Third shipment of Nikon D850 cameras hitting US retailers


I received several tips from readers that a third Nikon D850 shipment is now reaching US retailers (see this and this blog comment and several reports from the Nikon D850 Facebook group that now has almost 10,000 members).

The first D850 shipment was in the first week of September, the second shipment in the US was around September 18th. It seems that Nikon USA is shipping the D850 camera to retailers every two weeks. The next (fourth) shipment is expected around October 10-15th.

Update: we now have also the first report of a Nikon MB-D18 battery grip being shipped in Singapore (picture credit Kevin L.):


Amazon has the Nikon MB-D18 battery grip listed to start shipping in 2-4 weeks.


Check D850 availability: B&H | Adorama | Amazon | BuyDig | BestBuy | Cameta Camera | Focus Camera | eBay | WEX | Jessops

Follow D850 on Facebook: Nikon D850 Page | Nikon D850 Group

This entry was posted in Nikon D850. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Jeffrey G. Bank

    Now if we could just get the grip!

  • vipmediastar

    Great news for the pre orders

    • Ali Moradi

      I’ve literally had no luck anywhere. I was stupid enough to sel my D810 early and now I’ve got no camera. Serves me right, I suppose.

      • vipmediastar

        Same here. Shooting a fashion editorial with the Df 🙂

      • my 810 & 750 were stolen, so kinda same boat on weddings & such this month & next with a d610 & d4s. i can wait it out until it arrives! excited!

        • David Lewis

          D810 AND D750 stolen??? That makes me physically ill. I pray you had insurance!

      • Robert Daniel Krause

        I sold my D810 early expecting a higher price before the crush came. And I got a great price for it (although it was hard to sell a great camera). Then my camera store came though and I got the D850. What a camera! Contact your local camera stores and buy what you can in the future form them. Then when something like this happens, they really try to help you.They appreciate the business, whereas the big NY/NJ stores don’t care. Helping small business is just the best thing you can do. You did the right thing, hang in there. If you really need an 810 for something important, just rent one. Your local store may be able to help you with this. I think you are doing the right thing, even though it seems frustrating too you now. Good luck.

      • Alan Rosenberg

        Why would you sell your D810 it was the perfect back up camera

        • Ali Moradi

          Because some of us can’t afford two $3000 cameras.

    • Proto

      Comparison news — D850 ebay scalping down to $3.8K from $4.3K (during second shipment)

  • Ed
    • Ricky Mackie

      grats!

      • Ed

        Thanks!

    • Chris

      And … so what do you think of it?

      • Ed

        I’m lovin it! I’m saddened that I had to sell my D810, but glad to have the D850. It’s a well-rounded camera that is a great tool for any type of photography..IMO.

  • caffeinedrink

    Any one receive their battery grip yet?

  • eric

    The best part is watching the unboxing videos on YouTube.

  • Renaldo J

    Good news! Beach Camera informed me I they would be sending mine out at the end of the month(September). Hoping this in fact the case. Fingers crossed!!

    • thanks, so another confirmation that a new shipment arrived in the US, good luck!

    • Rob R

      When and how did you order?

      I ordered with them on amazon in the beginning of September and still have pending.

      • Renaldo J

        I ordered through their site earlier this month as well. About mid September I went through their chat support just curious on what their estimate was and they said end of September, which lines up with what we’re seeing in this potential 3rd shipment.

  • Ed

    I believe preordering this camera on shops like Adorama and B&H will take time as they are very popular shops. The queue gets longer as they accept more preorders. Give the other camera shops a try. They might get them earlier like I did. Preordered mine at 9/21 and it arrived today…to my surprise!!

  • iNtervengo

    Going out like hotcakes!

  • Chris

    Glad to hear that shipment of the D850 is happening, only wish we had a few more here in the UK!
    I’m looking forward to seeing how it performs compared to the D810. I’m not expecting huge improvements in terms of resolution but if all that has been reported so far is accurate I think it should be the best option for commercial photography out there. 🙂

    • Tony

      Has there even been a second UK shipment yet?

    • Ed

      I had a D810 and had used that camera alot! But I’ll be honest though. The D850’s shutter slap is rather hard for my taste as I could feel the slap. The D810’s shutter slap is well dampened and quieter IMO. But despite that, overall the D850 is a great camera for any type of photography. Resolution is very detailed. The grip is much more improved as far as comfort goes. And surprisingly, it’s a bit lighter than the D810. The Snap Bridge is well improved than on my D500.

      • Thom Hogan

        Well, more likely you’re feeling mirror slap, and the question is when the slap occurs to when the shutter is open. Slap before shutter opening is bad, slap after is not generally bad.

        • EcoR1

          Even if the slap had no effect to image quality, the camera designers should try to minimize it. It’s all about the emotional feeling that the product transmits to the user.

      • 24×36

        According to the specs it’s actually a little heavier. Go figure.

  • Michael

    Got a we are sorry message from Adorama that Item(s) from your order are still on backorder. Order placed on 8/24/2017

    • Ed

      Try pre-ordering from smaller, less popular camera shops like Focus Camera, 17th Street Photo, or your local store. Adorama and B&H preorder queues gets longer as more customers puts in their orders so they have a big quota to fulfill as oppose to the lesser famous shops. You get a better chance. I placed my order through 3 shops. Adorama, 17th street photo, and Focus Camera. Whoever fulfills my order first gets my money. Focus Camera fulfilled it and now I got it. So I cancelled my Adorama and 17th street photo preorder.

      • D900

        Ordering from 17th Street Photo? Are you kidding me? That’s the most infamous “bate and switch” store in the world!

        • Ed

          Hmmmm. That’s strange. I had good experience from them. That’s where I picked up my D810 back in 2014 and had bought a couple of other equipment. No issue whatsoever.

    • bonem

      Yup. That’s the message I got too. Ordered 8-24 @9am PST.

      • bonem

        I also have an order in at a small local store and I’m #2 on their list. Not sure how much they get in each batch though.

  • I know this is not related to current discussion but still…
    In D850 all auto white balance modes no longer has fine tune (amber-blue) option. Instead it cycles through the 3 auto modes. One can set the fine tune only through menu WB settings.

  • Amir

    No matter how many shipment dispatched,I will still wait for D850 to celebrate its first year of birth.So far,we know focus accuracy and tracking is not good as it was claimed,based on recent Math Granger’s video.

    • I’m doing the same ( you can read my comment below )

      • Andrew

        If you plan to use your camera to take action shots in low light environments and have the subject move as erratically from the background to the foreground towards you performing all sorts of jittery motions, then sure, the D850 is not for any of us as it is a high MP camera that is designed to be used on civilized subjects 😉

        Now if the D5 can focus track perfectly on such an unrealistic test at ISO 12,800, does not matter if the D850 can only do it at ISO 6,400? I think we are now living in a world were people make decisions based upon questionable data and understanding of their use case.

        I think though Matt that these types of tests do not prove anything in terms of a buying decision as it is similar to testing a lens at the outer limits of its specifications, something that it was never designed to do. Would be base your buying decision of the D850 on its ISO Hi 2 setting of 108,400?

    • Andrew

      Not true. You set a camera’s ISO to enhance its light sensitivity. Comparing the D850 with the D5 in a low light environment and keeping both cameras at the same ISO setting makes no sense. That will give the D5 an unfair advantage over the D850 as the D850 has a smaller pixel pitch than the D5.

      • Spy Black

        “Conclusion: Let us be realistic…”

        Most entertaining comment coming from you…

      • Joey Bordelon

        The people here discussing the autofocus of the 850 vs the D5 are missing one crucial piece of info. The D5 had a professor dedicated solely to the autofocus system. Ofcourse it performs better. None of the other nonsense means anything, that is the reason for the D5’s incredible autofocus performance and it being better than the 850. It’s very simple if you knew the two cameras.

        • KnightPhoto

          All THREE cameras have the dedicated AF processor: D5, D500, and now D850.

  • Pells

    The one thing I will say is that after using a quiet D810 the standard shutter is back to the D800e in terms of how loud it is. Takes a bit of getting used to.

    • Ed

      I agree. The shutter slap is loud and you can feel the slap once it goes off. The D810 is quieter and the shutter is well dampened.

      • bonem

        I’m sad about this. I have a d800 and hate how loud it is. Almost got a d810 only because it was quieter. Not sure why this want rolled into the d850 design.

        • Don’t worry about the sound. Shake is vastly reduced compared to D800 models. I am getting about 1 1/2 stops equivalent of VR effect on 850 compared to my D800e.

          • bonem

            That is fantastic news to hear. The vibration reduction means more to me than the sound.

          • Pells

            True story: I was shooting Meerkats in Africa with a D800e with 80-400 and a D810 with 500mm. We waited for them to get comfortable with our presence and I began shooting with the D810. As soon as I switched over to the D800e the first shutter click freaked out the family and they disappeared into their holes. Had to wait another 10 minutes for them to come back out. That’s the day I started appreciating the D810 sound. I could care less about shutter shake if it means the subject is going to bolt. I would think it would make a difference at weddings as well.

            • ITN

              Use quiet continuous to reduce the peak intensity of the sound for those situations. Note it is important to choose Qc and not Q as the latter makes each shot two clicks.

            • Pells

              cool thanks…will try

            • ITN

              I just realized the D800E doesn’t have Qc. Ups – sorry. D810 has Qc but is already quite quiet in S mode.

              The D5 is loud in S mode but I use and like Qc on that camera. I think it may be also useful on the D850.

            • For your purposes I would agree wholeheartedly. For many others, reduced shake would be more important than sound.

        • 24×36

          Because almost twice the frame rate I suspect.

    • ITN

      The D850 has a counterbalanced shutter which generates less vibration than that in the D810.

      However, the D850 is capable of 9fps and thus the mirror has to move faster (at least when grip and EN-EL18b is installed) and this creates by a bit more crisp sound.

      According to dpreview the shutter/mirror induced vibration issues with telephoto lenses and the D810 are absent in the D850.

      Sound? Yes. Sharpness-reducing vibration? Less than in previous cameras.

    • how loud is it compared to like the d4s or 750? i can deal with loud in certain environments if i do not want to use the Q mode. the d4s scared the flower girl & thought it was a machine gun! 🙂 loved the 810 sound 🙁

  • I cancelled my order. I want to see how this focus issue unravels…

    • Ed

      I can feel your sentiments about the auto focus issue on the D850 that Matt Granger have discovered. But IMO, the D5 is a dedicated sports camera. So of course it’ll be good at tracking because that how they designed it to be. The D850 is an all around camera that is for everything not just sports. So with that said The D850 is fine tuned not as a dedicated sports/action camera, but for everything else. Sure they claim it has the same system as the D5 but it will not perform the same so don’t expect it to be. Matt just contradicted himself because he already explained in the beginning the analogy of the Nissan vehicle. Nissan uses the same engine and transmission throughout their other models and yet they perform differently. And yet he is somewhat not happy with the AF tracking performance of the D850. Well…duh! you just said so yourself when you mentioned the analogy. Plus granting that let’s say Nikon placed everything on the D850 and it’s REALLY a great camera. Better than all of their other products including their flagship D5. So if that’s the case, marketing wise the D5 will not sell well anymore as consumers would prefer getting the D850 as oppose to the D5. Who would want to pay $6000 for a camera when you can pay half and get the same performance? So with that said, Nikon will of course put a handicap on certain models to keep the market leveled for them and still able to sell their D5.

      • I understand that, great points. I currently have a D800E, and, recently picked up a Sony A7RII. I had hoped for the D850 to perform much better with regards to AF. More so with nailing focus ( a models eye with an 85mm f/1.4 ). I’m going to give Sony a try and see how it does. I shoot landscapes as well, and the D800E has been spectacular. I don’t see the D850 being a revolutionary step with regards to that. Lastly, a light mirrorless system sounds wonderful. I’ve been hauling 30-40lb packs on all my travels for too long. I’ve got a three week trip in Hawaii I’m going to try the A7RII with a f/4 zoom setup. It’s half the weight. I’ll see if I can tolerate the “handling”. Meanwhile, I’ll be eagerly awaiting to see what the reviews say of the D850, what Nikon does with mirrorless-mirrorless lenses, and what Sony brings with the forthcoming A9R/A7RIII.

        • Ed

          Mirrorless will be the future regardless of any new features or technological changes to DSLR. They are light and easy to carry around. I guess the Achilles heel for the D850 and all other DSLR are its massive size. Like you, when I do travel, I wouldn’t like to haul that camera along with various lenses. If I have another chance to get another body and lens I would like to get the Olympus OMD -EM10 Mk III (new one). That would be my travel camera. The Sony A7 series and the A9 is a revolutionary feat that has brought photography into a new level. It’s great that you picked up a Sony A7R II. It’s an awesome camera. I just hope the upcoming Nikon mirrorless will also be good and can compete with the other mirrorless. I guess we just have to wait and see. Nikon…please don’t disappoint us…lol….

          • I also picked up a Kipon G to E mount adapter (Jim Kasson recommended as the best – correct flange distance ), so I can use all my Nikon Pro glass on the Sony as well. I think Nikon will do well with a mirrorless body IMO, it’s the lenses ( or lack of ) that I feel will be the achilles heel.

        • Compared to D800e this camera is definitely quite better. I cam vouch for that. I have both. Even on D type lenses, one can feel the difference. I cannot say anything about difference between D810 and D850 though as I have handled D810 very less and some time ago.

          • I’ve been curious about a bump with D glass. I sold my D750 for the D850, largely to feed more pixels to my Voigtlander 125; I also have hopes it might give my 28/1.4 D and 28-70/2.8 D a little love, too. No worries if it doesn’t, of course.

        • Vince Vinnyp

          When I first got my D850 I said that the AF when tracking in continuous shooting was not quite as good as the D5. at 7 or 9FPS but it’s still very good and much better than the D810. I am assuming that it is as a result of longer mirror blackout, the D500 also has significantly longer blackout.

          • Thom Hogan

            That would be a good assumption. Also the main integrating CPU may not be quite the same speed. That would tend to mean that there would be some slight difference in performance in some modes.

        • Thom Hogan

          Okay, but my comment above still applies. The A7rII does decently at face/eye recognition, the A9 does better. This is no different than the D5/D850 problem you’re trying to evaluate.

          Moreover, you’re evaluating the wrong thing the wrong way. You’re worried about whether the D850 is as good as the D5, but the fact that you wouldn’t consider an A9 means you also wouldn’t consider a D5.

          Your real evaluation needs to be whether a D850 does better than a D800E (or now A7rII). It’s also not likely you’d be using 3D tracking for models, and if you were, you wouldn’t be replicating what Granger did in his test anyway. So I’d gauge that you’re making snap judgments on non-useful information.

          • Matt Grangers test got me thinking about the future of DSLR’s. Also, this whole discussion here is really helping me evolve my thinking about what I need and what the ideal “tools” would be for me in the future. Something I have trouble with; slowing down, and wrapping my head around “What would be the ideal camera for my personal needs now and in two years”. I no longer use or need heavy, robust, medium format cameras with all the studio gear, stands, booms, lighting, etc.

            As I check off the wants and needs on paper, I now see, the current Nikon offering no longer aligns with me. I will continue to shoot both brands, but I’ve got a wonderin’ eye…

            • Thom Hogan

              I’ve been thinking about the future of DSLRs for some time. They have an advantage with phase detect that mirrorless doesn’t due to data discrimination. Mirrorless uses brute force speed to try to compensate.

              Right now, the differences are very much still apparent, with one exception. The mirrorless cameras just lose tracking easier because even at the A9 level they don’t have enough horsepower to brute force extreme tracking perfectly. I’ll have more to say about this in about two weeks when I complete my two month testing cycle with the A9.

              The exception is that mirrorless cameras have better information to make face detect and eye detect work well on static or near static subjects. For some photographic uses, that’s a big benefit.

              So it really depends upon what you’re shooting to some degree, and what you’ll shoot in the future.

              That said, I’d be perfectly fine with almost any of the teched out cameras these days. They each have different strengths and weaknesses as it applies to AF, and you just have to learn those and learn how to maximize the results. Knowledge trumps technology in actual practice.

            • Proto

              Will you publish your D850 review when the camera is available without a waiting line?

          • D700s

            I would say Matt is trying to justify to himself he’s making the right decision. Otherwise this discussion would have been over long ago. By the camera you want and don’t try to convince everyone you made the right choice.

      • Allan

        ” … still able to sell their D5.”

        I wonder if there has been a trend downwards in sales of D5 compared to sales of D4 compared to sales of D3.

        • D700s

          I checked Adorama and the D5 is on backorder. Seems strange. Both the XQD and CF version.

      • Thom Hogan

        Matt’s test appears to be solely a test of 3D. 3D is magic when it works, less so when it doesn’t. It is temperamental to a number of things, including starting information and camera handling during the sequence. Those are really hard to control in any test situation.

        As far as I can tell, the only difference in the focus system seems to be the integrating (main) CPU. So it’s possible that a D5 may be faster at dealing with the fire hose of information that 3D is monitoring. But I’m certainly not going to call that until I can come up with a repeatable test that allows me to verify that.

        • bonem

          Think it has to do with file size as well? Same hose, bigger files.

          • Thom Hogan

            Well, if he’s judging them at pixel levels, then he’s not comparing correctly. I’d have to look at the video again to see what he did.

            • ITN

              I think bonem is referring to the fact that at a given fps rate, the D850 has to process a lot more image data due to the high resolution files. This could cause problems in timely handling of AF information.

            • Thom Hogan

              If so, that would be an incorrect assumption. Look, the image data pixels are created AFTER the focus and are not involved in it. The three primary things that are are the AF sensor assembly, the metering sensor in the viewfinder, and the autofocus CPU, which is the same across the D500, D850, and D5. What’s different is the viewfinder blackout time on the D5. The D5 is getting more of a data stream to analyze than the D500/D850. The longer you track with the AF focus sensors, the more accurate you are.

              But frankly, I’m getting tired of all this angst. The proper comparison is the D850 against the D810. The D850 wins hands down on focus performance. No questions asked.

              I would think that if you double the price (D5), you might see some benefits from paying that extra money. Surprisingly, we don’t see many.

              And remember, Granger tested 3D only as far as I can tell, which has some fuzzy logic in it, thus makes for difficulty in coming up with a repeatable test.

            • ITN

              The processing of image data in the middle of a burst may continue while focusing for the next shot. I doubt the AF processor solely controls the AF, there may be communication between the two processors which could be stuttering in the middle of a burst because of the greater load. I was told that the processor speeds are also affected by the battery. I guess a lot of ideas are thrown in why, but it is a problem when Nikon claims one thing (same AF in D500, D850 and D5) when it is clear it is not (the AF area modes are different but performance is also apparently not the same).

              For me it doesn’t matter; I know that most reviewers consider the AF close to equal and without doubt in another class from the D810.

            • KnightPhoto

              Hang on ladies and gents. I doubt Nikon claimed “the exact same AF performance” as the D5. They generally always claim “same AF sensor” etc.

              Nikon is generally careful about this NOT to claim performance is exactly the same in different cameras that share the same AF modules.

              It’s always been the case, D3 compared to D300/D700, D4 to D800/D800E, D4S to D810, and now D5 to D850/D500. The big body has always had a Je ne sais quois difference. We forum dwellers have generally observed it may indeed be mirror blackout time and this go around due to lack of grip on Matt’s test a power difference.

              I know my D4 always seemed to have some kind of an edge over my other cameras and it was always a pleasure to shoot it and experience uncanny AF performance.

            • Thom Hogan

              Starting with the D5, the D5, D500, and D850 all have a dedicated AF CPU that does nothing but AF calculations. The “processing of image data” you cite is done by the EXPEED chip, and is not part of the focus inputs.

              Yes, it is clear that there is something going on with the way Nikon handles power management now. They absolutely changed many internal load characteristics that I can measure. But until I get my vertical grip I can’t test the battery theory. I suspect that it will prove incorrect. Almost certainly it is more data coming to the CPU due to less blackout time on the D5 being the significant factor.

            • Davo

              Which begs the question. What can this AF unit do with a pellicle mirror and ‘see’ the action 100% of the time and would that be worth the 1/2-2/3 trade off in ISO performance and current EVF viewing experience.

    • Tuna

      Matt Grangers discussion of autofocus of d850 is identical to his description of d500 autofocus compared to D5. Very close but not quite same as D5. That matches my observations, too. D850 will nail slow moving subjects 100% of the time. The very slight difference only applies to fast, erratically moving subjects, but it will still nail them better than any other camera other than d5. Look at Tom Hogan’s d850 blog on using D850 for football, he seems to think it has a great autofocus system. I don’t think any mirrorless camera autofocus quite matches an SLR yet, but that day will come.

      • And there is the question of whose opinion to trust more. Thom’s or matt’s?

        • my vote is for Thom

          • Thom Hogan

            Let’s not make this a popularity contest.

            Focus testing is probably the most difficult thing to do on cameras. Nikon for years (and may still do) used fuzzy logic in the AF system, which made it difficult to get absolutely repeatable tests.

            Generally, what I find is this: initial focus acquisition plays a huge part in whether focus is followed or not. Secondarily, background disinformation starts to impinge on focus performance when viewfinder blackout goes up or camera handling doesn’t track the subject well. When I teach workshops, those are things I tend to concentrate making sure users get right.

            Sony has different issues than Nikon. For instance, I hadn’t noticed it until I started shooting with the A7, but the Sonys tend to lose focus on zoom, particularly if the subject is moving towards you and you’re zooming out (as you would likely do).

            Far better than trying to “pick a winner” is understanding how what you picked actually works.

          • Exactly.

        • Personally… I know ultimately I want a modern mirrorless full frame professional camera. I’ve grown impatient with Nikon. I do however, have very high hopes they (Nikon) will knock it outta the park with a robust body, and every bit as important, a decent offering of lenses. I use to think Nikon must have a savvy adapter for legacy, non-mirrorless lenses. But, as important as that is, I want native optimized glass like the Batis/Loxia/Touit/EF line. I feel that’s too tall of an order for Nikon to produce in the short term ( short term being the first year or two of a mirrorless release ). Especially with their limited vision and capital.

          • Thom Hogan

            I think it unlikely that Canon or Nikon will match the high-end Sony mirrorless offerings any time soon. It’s not just the camera body issues, it’s lenses, as well.

            It is far more likely that Canon/Nikon would start exactly the way Sony started, with a basic beater.

            • Eamon Hickey

              I’m not as sure about this as you are, Thom. I’m not making any predictions, but it won’t surprise me all that much if either company brings a high-end full-frame mirrorless camera soon (next 6 to 12 months, say).

            • I agree, I also think Nikon will go full frame mirrorless or maybe even introduce two cameras.

            • Assuming they do, with what lenses ?
              They’re going to need a minimum of 5-6 lenses optimized for both cameras upon release. That’s a monumental task IMO. Also, I LOVE how Fuji has always had a published roadmap of where they are going with lenses. It lets their base see what and when. You would never see such a visual roadmap from Nikon. Don’t get me wrong, I sure as sh!t wish (Nikon) would with all their camera lines.

            • Thom Hogan

              Yes, and I’ve been clear that I believe that lenses are what are actually going to dictate launch date.

              And yes, Nikon doesn’t get it when it comes to “customer information.” Road maps are useful for us in order to plan. The Nikon 1 users got random lenses at random times and then nothing. Gee, do you think you’ve encouraged those users to keep upgrading bodies? Nope. Not even close.

              Nikon is consistently making more mistakes than any other camera brand at the moment. They’ve done nothing to show me that they’ve learned from those mistakes, other than perhaps they’ve upped their QC a bit.

            • one possible explanation is that Fuji did not have a single lens when they startled and they had to show a roadmap. Nikon currently has over 70 DSLR lenses… now I do agree with you that If Nikon introduces a new mount, they have to be very clear and specific on what is coming and when, otherwise people will not buy into the new system.

            • Not to be so cynical, but I would guess Nikons marketing push would-will be how well their mirrorless adapter works on non-mirrorless non-optimized legacy lenses. 😉

            • ITN

              Roadmaps are only published by companies with no existing products. Once Fuji starts to make their Mk II versions you can be sure there won’t be any whisper of a roadmap as they have to sell the old stock first. Osborne effect.

            • I agree. Does Sony has a roadmap? Or Canon? Fuji and Pentax are the only companies that still do roadmaps, but I could be missing something.

            • Davo

              Didn’t the Nikon 1 line have a pseudo road map? Road maps only makes sense for a line that is being fleshed out. It’s a promise we’ll do something in the future so hang in there.
              When you’ve already got a complete lens line up, road maps just kills sales of the lenses to be updated.

            • yes, they kind of displayed mockups of the Nikon 1 lenses without any details:
              https://nikonrumors.com/2011/10/31/pdn-photoplus-show-recap.aspx/

            • Davo

              Oh yah. That’s what I was thinking of. Not really a roadmap. More of a tease.

            • yes, exactly

            • Thom Hogan

              I believe I’ve been clear. Last semi-reliable word I had out of Tokyo is that both DX and FX are proceeding, and that what finishes first will be launched first, and that was likely DX.

              But “going full frame” is not equivalent to “high end” in my book. Nikon could very well target D610 replacement with an FX mirrorless. Would that be “high end”?

            • Allan

              One hopes that a mirrorless D610 replacement will not be high price.

            • MjR

              Actually, for my needs, a D610 performance set in mirrorless would get my money. If it brought along enough of the mirrorless advantages, of course. Hardly think I am alone in that.

            • Allen_Wentz

              D6xx is low end though. I think that is the point. Not bad and not a bad intro choice, but not high end.

            • BG

              That and a 12-24/4 with the weight of the Sony and I’ll buy both immediately…

            • To me high end means something to compete with the a7 models.

            • Allen_Wentz

              Would that (D6xx) be “high end”? Hell no!

            • Tom Taubert

              Do some photographers prefer OVFs or will they be just a relic from a past age?

              I wonder if users of EVFs do a bit a reverse chimping?

              just wondering…

            • Thom Hogan

              “High end” can mean a lot of things. So we need some definitions. “High price” is not the “high end” I’m referring to.

              Sony has set the technology bar very, very high now. Indeed, so high that it’s making some of their own still-in-store options look bad.

              Realistically, you need PD on sensor, high dynamic range, and blinding sensor speed backed with lots of on-chip memory to begin to be “high end” in the technology side.

              But note my comments about one-horse, above. It would be marketing suicide for Nikon to come out with an A7rIII/A9 competitor. It would kill the D850 (assuming there was a lens solution; otherwise it would be a wasted missile).

              What neither Canon nor Nikon want to do is lose more of their established sales and just replace that with something else. That’s R&D spending for no gain. What they want is to supplement their current positions and shore them up for future transition. Canon’s doing a decent job of this with M bodies, terrible at lenses (buzz, buzz). Nikon’s currently doing nothing.

            • ZoetMB

              Which is why I think Nikon’s entry will be somewhat lower end (and probably should be). Because how many D850 purchasers would pay another $3300 to get pretty much the same camera in a mirrorless? IMO, Nikon’s entry needs to be the second camera in the bag and the travel camera for people who own a DSLR and the entry high end camera for those migrating up from low end DSLRs or consumer 4/3rds cameras or Nikon 1’s, etc.

              It needs to be differentiated from the D850 and other DSLRs by more than the fact that it doesn’t have a mirror.

            • I still think they will go full frame with a direct head-to-head competition with the Sony A7/A9. Announcing two cameras (one low and one high end) is still a possibility.

          • Eamon Hickey

            Nikon may indeed have a limited vision, but they don’t have limited capital in camera development terms. They have plenty of money to invest in cameras and, in fact, in many new optical businesses. They don’t have enough money to start, say, an automobile production line.

            That said, a truly limited vision is a much bigger problem.

            • Thom Hogan

              Perfectly correct, Eamon. This is why I describe Nikon’s back-sliding as indicative of management problems. There’s nothing wrong with Nikon’s technical prowess, their manufacturing facilities, their parts supply pipeline, their optical designs and glass making, or their money supply for useful product R&D.

              Thus, if the right products are not coming out, it’s management decisions that are the problem. They are not seeing the customer space correctly.

          • Thom Hogan

            The problem for Nikon is what I outlined in a recent article: they’ve turned a lot into a one-horse vendor. The D850 is a tour de force, and it basically makes you stop considering other Nikon bodies unless you have a really specific need that the D850 doesn’t satisfy well enough.

            So, for Nikon to put out a mirrorless camera at the level you think you need, they’d basically be just switching horses. That’s not going to help them, short term or long term.

            I’ve written it before and probably will again: Nikon needs someone with strong product line management judgment making better decisions from low-end to high. They’re still using the old Japanese CES product strategies, yet Nikon isn’t really a C (consumer) company and doesn’t have the marketing to make that work right. Moreover, I think it’s been pretty well established that those old strategies didn’t fare well into the 21st century in the first place.

            And you’re correct, Nikon’s biggest problem now is lenses. They’re knocking it out of the park for lenses that work well on a D850—again the one horse thing—but they’ve basically messed everything else up and they’re not going to be fast to deliver a full, new lens system.

            • Mike Gregory

              Is moving customers up to an 850 such a bad thing. Which is better for Nikon sell a D500 or a D850. They still have the lower models to get people into the system and for the more limited budget but the D850 sits there as something to aspire to.
              For sure they need a mirrorless to meet the demand and a croppy or a low end FF is probably the most important to bring people back to the fold.

        • Tuna

          I trust Thom’s views above all others. I’ve always found his advice to be sound and when I follow his instructions, get the same results he describes. Having said that, for whatever reason, in my hands the D5 autofocus is slightly, and I mean very slightly, better than the d500. I’m not sure if its a firmware difference, or a difference in blackout time between the two cameras affecting the calculations. Having said that, I consider the d500 autofocus stellar. It’s splitting hairs. The d850 sounds like it is in the same autofocus class as the d500, which is great.

          • Very true about everything. The difference of focussing was true also about earlier models, i. e. D4 and D800 which were supposed to have the same AF unit.

          • ZoetMB

            Considering that the D5 is a $6500 body and the D500 is a $1900 body, I sure as hell hope that the D5 gives better performance. Otherwise, $3500 is a big price to pay for perhaps a bit better weather sealing and a more robust shutter (and of course a larger sensor).

      • Robert

        Unfortunately it looks to me in Matt Grangers video as if he tested without the MB-D18b, which means we cannot be sure about if that makes a difference or not. It could since it makes the D850 faster.

        Maybe you can give us a clue? Do you shoot the D500 with an MB-D18 battery or without the optional grip?

        • 24×36

          x100. If this “comparison” wasn’t done with the EN-EL18b battery, it’s like comparing two cars with the same engine, but putting regular in one while the other is running premium fuel.

          • Robert

            Exactly. To make the comparison fair the EN-EL18b battery needs to be used.

            • Vince Vinnyp

              I noticed this and mentioned it when I was using the 850 with the grip at 9FPS. Its only a minor difference likely caused by the longer mirror blackout time.

            • Robert

              Sounds plausible with the mirror blackout disturbing somewhat. I guess it could be processing power contributing a little as well in case that is one of the reasons for the 7 instead of 9 fps.

        • Tuna

          I use a grip with the EN-EL18 battery, I want the longer battery life and the vertical controls. I’m not sure why D5 is better, but I think that there are many factors. First, I agree with umeshrw that the D4 autofocus has a better hit rate than the D800. I’ll be honest, I’m still not sure if the D4/D5 autofocus capture rates compared to their companion cameras are a function of the autofocus, or the fact that you need a higher shutter speed to compensate for motion smear with a high pixel density camera, or both. I know with my D810, my tack sharp hit rate for birds in flight goes way, way up when I increase the shutter speed to ~1/3000 or higher to compensate for motion blur issues with high pixel density cameras. I suspect that one needs to increase the shutter speed for the D500/D850 compared to the D5, too. I also know for certain that both Nikon and Zeis know about motion blur issues with high pixel density cameras. Thus, in Matt Granger’s test where the cameras were set up exactly the same, it is possible that the blurry results in some pictures with the D850 were simply because the D850 shutter speed was way too low when the model was in shadows. I believe Thom Hogan’s autofocus test was at high shutter speeds, which I think you need with a camera like the D500/D850, and thus is a better test of the autofocus system. Next, one of the early firmware updates for the D5 was to improve the 3D-tracking watch area (a5). Does that contribute to some of the autofocus difference between the cameras? Next, as Them Hogan points out, there are differences between the blackout times between the 3 cameras. Without knowing the algorithms, it is entirely possible if the algorithms were optimized for the D5, it could lead to subtle tracking differences during certain extreme conditions. Also, as Thom points out, better technique can certainly improve things, and I’m sure he’s much better than me. As far as tack sharp autofocus on static or slowly moving subjects or landscapes, I guarantee you any poor results with the D500 (and I assume D850 from what I’ve seen in published pictures), is almost certainly user error. Finally, I find the D500 autofocus to be superb, the D5 is just slightly better for fast, erratically moving subjects for whatever reason (some of which is certainly my skill level).

          • Robert

            Thank you for explaining your use case. For my use (no sports photography or similar) I will not see the D5/D850 AF difference if any, and even if I would (BIF), in Matt Granger’s test the keeper rate was 9/10 (D5) vs 7/10 or so (D850) so I could easily live with that.

            I also find it interesting from a technical standpoint to understand the D850 AF performance.

            • Tuna

              I agree any tiny autofocus difference between cameras with the D5 autofocus module does not materially affect use. I probably use the D500 more than the D5 for BIF because I sometimes find the increased reach more important than occasionally getting 1 or 2 more in focus images in a burst. I rarely miss an image I want when using the D500 because one is out of focus. Most of the time with the D500 I end up keeping 1 or 2 images from a burst, and delete multiple perfectly good pics. I use the D5 in lower light or if I know I’ll be closer to the bird/animal.

    • Ric of The LBC

      What % off is the fast focusing from a D5?

      Is this really an issue?

      • My question, and it may be unrealistic, is how fast and accurate is the D850 focus compared to the D5, the A9 and the yet to be released A9R/A7RIII? Because if Sony uses the A9 focus system in the future models, which I’m sure they will, how will Nikon stack up against those models? I also feel the D850 might be the last late great traditional DSLR. Every technology has a lifecycle, and IMHO they’re past the maturity, and deep/steep on the curve of decline.

        As I wrote below about (“ultimately I want a modern mirrorless full frame professional camera”), I’m looking down the road 2 years from know, and I’m making my current buying decisions about my current and future shooting needs given the best info I have right now.

        • Ric of The LBC

          What limitations of the D850 would cause you to miss shots? You have not stated what you are shooting.

          Small birds and baseball, IMO, are the two types of photography that need maximum auto focus and FPS.

          Yes, in 2 years there will be a better camera.

          • bonem

            I’m also curious about this. You talk like the AF if horrid yet you use a camera with much lower AF performance. From the reviews I’ve seen the AF on the d850 is amazing especially when coming from d800 and d810.
            Also, waiting 2 years doesn’t guarantee anything other than not using the great technology available now for 2 years.
            The grass is always greener with this one…

        • Ric of The LBC

          Looking at you site, the AF performance of a D700 would be good.

          • bonem

            Agreed. Matt, you take great photos, but I see no need in landscape photography to have better than D5 AF performance.

            • See my other comment, my website is only landscapes.

            • Dinosaur

              How can we view your other work?

          • You only see landscapes at my listed site. You don’t see models, sports, etc… And that’s my side photography LLC business. I also have a day job with a completely different beast of photography needs.

            • Ric of The LBC

              Thanks for clarifying.

            • Thom Hogan

              Of course that raises the problem I fight all the time. For some of my work, Camera X is the right choice, for other work, Camera Y is the right choice. What you’re trying to do is slide into the “jack of all trades” product.

              I’ve written it before, the D810 is the best all-around camera (not the A7rII, though it is very close). The D850 is better than the D810 in enough ways that I expect I’ll be writing the same thing about it very soon.

              I can find faults with just about any product when I try to use it for unintended use. There aren’t a lot of “all around” cameras, in my view. And some of them—I’m looking at you 5D—are starting to fall behind the rest.

            • I should have been more clear, but I foresee 2 bodies in my bag again. Whether it’s the same brand, it remains to be seen. Every Nikon landscape shooter really outta hold the A7RII – Loxia 21 combo just once ( or the 16-35f4). Yes, a very pinpointed combo, but it makes your wheels turn, and your back / arms smile.

            • Thom Hogan

              I’ve been pretty clear about liking the A7rII and specifically the Loxia. It’s a very nice combination, sure. But then we’ve got the D850 with focus stacking and plenty of great small 20mm optics (try the Voigtlander if you like the Loxia; not the same all the way out to the corners, but a really good, compact lens).

              I think you give yourself a lot of grief trying to split hairs. That said, the D850 really does seem to be better in IQ than the D810, which I already thought slightly bettered the A7rII. Not a small accomplishment Nikon made here.

            • You just had to say that, days after I sold my Voigtlander 20/3.5. 🙁 Looking for a Zeiss 21/2.8 to take its place, but feeling the loss, nonetheless.

        • Raymond Garcia

          Matt, based on your pass comments it seems to me that you already have made your mind, but I want you to answer these points:
          1-)Ergonomics: D850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          2-)Price: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          3-)Heating issues: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9(btw hardware issues can not be solved with software fixes)
          4-)Fps on electronic shutter: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          5-)Fps on mechanical shutter: d850 up to 9fps, vs a7r-ii like 5fps vs a9 just 5fps
          6-)Banding: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          7-)Resolution: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          8-)Reading/capture(memory card): d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          9-)Build quality: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          10-)Weather performance over 95 degrees: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          11-)Weather performance under 30 degrees: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          12-)Battery life: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          13-)Plain Weight: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
          14-)Fast lenses Weight: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9(here the weight advantage is over)
          15-)Battery need it to last you one day: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9(here again the weight advantage is gone)
          Now, out of those 15 points above, I can tell you without any doubt that the d850 will beat the a7r-ii 13 out of 15. And it will beat the a9 14 out of 15. Why did it beat the a9 14 vs a7r-ii 13, easy PRICE.
          Now the choice is yours.

          • Raymond, I’ll be trying both systems in the coming months, and making assessments.

          • Ric of The LBC

            My final question. Why not the right body for the right job instead of an all in one?

            There are multiple types of hammers. Yes, that can all pound nails but if I was framing I would not use a common household hammer, I’d get a framing hammer.

            • Ric, I’m not a one brand guy. There’s been periods where I’m shooting Hasselblad and Canon in the studio, Nikon for travel and local commercial gigs ( portraits, fashion, interiors ), and a little Olympus for candids. ( although the iPhone replaced the Olympus 😉 )

            • Dinosaur

              Studio? Everything on your website is landscape, how do you fit whole oceans and forests in a studio?
              I would Like to see your Hassleblad studio work seriously though.
              Curious how he didn’t compare single or group area AF abilities.

            • Allen_Wentz

              Answer: because it is mostly fairly hard and expensive to build and carry full kit for multiple different brands. FX+DX both Nikon is easy, but Sony + Nikon or Canon + Nikon would be a nightmare.

            • Ric of The LBC

              I agree, but apparently Matt does.
              Hassy
              Canon
              Nikon
              Olympus

            • Dinosaur

              “apparently” is the best word to use for sure, considering he doesn’t answer my requests to see his other portfolio as his Matt Anderson photography website is only landscape and one folder of weightlifters

          • Thom Hogan

            All very good questions. Let me try to answer them from my viewpoint. We’re going to leave the A9 out of it, because it clearly doesn’t serve all of Matt’s needs.

            1. Nikon over Sony. I’ve been clear about this.
            2. It will leapfrog with model introduction dates. Both companies will try to restore price points at launch, lower them to goose sales over time.
            3. Not an issue.
            4. Not really a win for either because of all the footnotes.
            5. The D850’s win here would be expensive. You’re really looking at 7 fps versus 5 fps.
            6. Not an issue.
            7. Not specifically an issue, though I’ve written that I like the D810’s files better than the A7rII’s when all is said and done, and that’s going to be true of the D850 I think, too.
            8. Advantage D850 if you stick with XQD.
            9. Advantage D850 I think.
            10. Not been an issue other than small buttons (ergonomics) on the A7rII, which when your fingers get sweaty (or you use gloves) become an issue.
            11. See #10.
            12. Not nearly as bad an issue as it looks for the A7rII. You carry more batteries, but they’re smaller. You will need a multi-battery charger, though.
            13. Don’t see this as an issue unless you’re going to try to build a lightweight travel kit, and then you’re going to compromise on the lenses and pick the Sony.
            14. Not an issue. I’d judge optical quality to be far more important than this issue.
            15. See #12.

            It’s much close than most people realize until you get to the personal factors (like ergonomics). Then, small things start to stand out.

            • Raymond Garcia

              Hi Thom, but I can understand your responds, but I guess I was not very clear on a couple of points, here are they:

              9-)Build quality: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9
              10-)Weather performance over 95 degrees: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9. I believe that in a weather that is over 95 degrees, the Sony solution will have issues, like over-heating, just imagine yourself on a Sahara desert trying to shot that gazelle and wola!! the a7r-ii shot down because over-heating issues
              11-)Weather performance under 30 degrees: d850 vs a7r-ii vs a9, here is the same of point 10, but here the batteries of the a7r-ii will be spent so fast that you will need to carry like 4 for each battery of the d850, so when you add all those weights 4 batteries and two charges your work-load will be almost the same without stopping to change and charge your batteries and losing shooting time, I have been there is not funny

            • #11, I would be able to operate the Sony from my iphone in a warm car remotely via one of the Play Memories app’s, the camera can run. 😉

            • Raymond Garcia

              Matt, it seen like you did not understand my point #11: here is an example you are shooting NFL game in “The Frozen Tundra” here both cameras are going to be outside under very cold conditions and the batteries in the a7r-ii will run out of juice like crazy you will need to use 3 to 4 batteries for each d850 the Weight advantage of the a7r-ii is gone, also when changing batteries you might lose some moments. Another one you are shooting the Northern lights or astro-photography and again you have the same issues……….here the Sony a7r-ii have no place to hide it has to perform and I doubt very much that it will perform at the same level of d850

          • Adam Brown

            No offense… but the list is silly. Mostly predetermined to get the result you want, especially when you pick battery life twice! (Btw… according to real world testing, the a9 battery outlasts the D810). Let’s try this list:
            1- body weight
            2- focus point coverage over the frame
            3- viewfinder size
            4- video autofocus
            5- live view autofocus
            6- availability of eye-AF
            7- availability of in body stabilization on all lenses
            8- expected shutter life
            9- body depth
            10- adaptability with off brand lenses
            11- ability to shoot silently (in live view and viewfinder)
            12- total number of focus points
            13- availability of focus peaking in VF
            I could go on and on. But based on this “objective” list… the Sony camera would win every category.

          • Adam Brown

            But even using your factors—
            1– ergonomics. Subjective. Some prefer smaller size, some larger layout. So it’s purely subjective.
            2– price. For now, a7rii winner, D850 gets second.
            3–heating issues. Non-issue in real use.
            4–FPS— electronic shutter. Easy win for the a9, 20 fps at 24mp and continuous AF. The D850 does 30 fps— but only with locked focus and only 8mp. With those limits, the a9 is the clear winner.
            5– fps with mechanical shutter.. slight win for the D850.
            6–Banding..
            6a— banding with mechanical shutter — tie. Non issue.
            6b— banding with electronic shutter. Quite poor on the D850. Almost non-issue on the a9. Win for the a9 overall.
            7– resolution. D850 for now, but a7rii will likely leapfrog over it.
            8– memory card— D850 wins.
            9–build quality. Maybe a narrow win for the D850.
            10&11– weather performance. Non-issue/tie.
            12–battery life. Reports of the a9 getting thousands of shots on 1 charge. Win for the a9.
            13–body weight. A7rii win.
            14–lens weight— tie, slight advantage to Sony with ultrawide lenses, but a tie for everything else.
            15–battery— same as 12. See the reports of the amazing a9 battery life.

            So… wins using your list— 4 for the D850. 4 wins for the a9. 2 wins for the a7rii. Rest were ties or total non-issues.

        • Thom Hogan

          The problem is multiple:
          1. What are you focusing on?
          2. How well are you obtaining initial acquisition?
          3. How well are you tracking the subject?
          4. Have you optimized the focus settings for the above?

          As I noted above, the one place where technology has actually produced something different is in face detect/eye detect. PD is PD. It has limits, which mirrorless tries to supplement with CD and brute force speed. But the DSLRs are doing the same thing the other way (supplementing with color info and brute force speed).

          Everyone seems to want the automagic autofocus system. It doesn’t exist, and if it did, it would be end-game: everyone would have to have that system or their products would go away.

          • Proto

            What is the “brute force” aspect in CD and DSLR? And what is the impact from this? Can you please explain. Thanks!

            • Thom Hogan

              CD doesn’t give you distance to move or direction to move information like PD does. Thus, when you run CD, you run it as fast as you possibly can, because you may have gone the wrong direction and have to backtrack to get to the proper focus position. There are different approaches to this. Some do this with a subset video stream (the Live View feed), some do it with the full sensor, which is better. Either way, you’re collecting at least XVGA data at 60 fps that you have to analyze and then reposition from.

        • Tuna

          Given your autofocus and photography needs, it seems that your D800E is all you need. If you want the best general purpose camera (landscapes, wildlife, studio), I doubt anything would beat a D850. All tech is snagle-toothed in 2 years. I’m going to go out on a limb, at next Olympics the next great thing will be a hybrid SLR/mirrorless camera. Unless, someone solves geometry issues with on sensor Phase detection focus with mirrorless cameras that Thom Hogan brings up. Someone will.

          • Allan

            snaggletoothed – new one for me.

    • Thom Hogan

      What are you going to do when I review the A9 next week? ;~)

    • Luca Motz

      I just tested the D850 against the D750 by running at a flower in very low light shooting wide open with my 105 f1.4
      Forget 3D tracking it‘s bad. Now area af: HOLY SMOKES.
      I knew the D850 was good as I have already shot a game with it. But damn the D750 is a JOKE against it. And when I tested the D750 vs the A7Rmk2 in store using the same method (I was frustrated with the focus performance of the D750. I tend to abuse the AF system quite a bit because I sometimes have to move myself while shooting moving targets) the D750 won easily. So yes Matt found out you shouldn’t use 3D tracking. You can see he never shoots moving subjects 😛

    • MB

      Who is Matt Granger?

      • I would not cancel my order because of him, no matter who he is.

      • Nikkor300f4VR

        That Nikon Guy.. 🙂

  • animalsbybarry

    Not yet ready for the 3rd shipment of D850
    But just finished my 3rd Peacock Painting

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/cb583562c720c89f6326784c4b2d4e0dd7d211838e327426b6ebf6ce9e15fd4d.jpg
    “Proud Peacock” acrylic on canvas 48″x24″

    • Allan

      “But just finished my 3rd Peacock Painting”.

      Good one. I like your painting. I love peacocks.

      For what it’s worth, I don’t like adding contrast and saturation to a photo to the point that it doesn’t look natural. This holds for me whether the processed photo is supposed to represent reality at the time of capture, or an “artful” representation.

      On my monitor, (new Eizo), your painting is saturated and “contrasty” ; maybe it’s the sRGB rendering.

      I’m curious to know how many people on this site like saturated, high contrast photos.

      Barry, thanks for posting your paintings.

      • animalsbybarry

        Real peacock feathers are highly metallic

        The peacock will actually shimmy these feathers while displaying resulting in a flashing display of multiple changing colors

        Naturally these colors do not photograph , so an Peacock photos you see, no matter how enhanced the colors are do not come close to the color intensity of the real bird

        My paintings are NOT painted to look like photos

        They are Hyperealistic and look much more like real animals than photos

        For the peacock paintings I am currently working on I am utilizing metallic colors to capture the look of real peacocks in a way that conventional colors simply cannot

        Since only a few metallic colors are available thes cannot sufficiently capture the colors in real peacocks

        I have formulated my own palette of custom metallic colors , many of which you may never have seen before

        Every time you look at a real peacock the colors will appear different, so each painting will have a slightly differrent palette of colors

        Please compare my paintings to real birds, rather than photos that are far from adequate

        • Allen_Wentz

          I used to (poorly) shoot a fair amount of art, and the quality of your digital file blew me away. Your large format scans are sweet.

    • T.I.M

      I’m glad I don’t have to do that to impress the girls (I just tell them that I’m a NR reader…)
      :o)

      • Allan

        Yeah, but can he take out the garbage?

        • T.I.M

          Right, more I have females at my house (5 so far) and more I have work to do.
          Not good to be a man in this century.

        • Ric of The LBC

          and kill spiders

          • 24×36

            Or capture them alive and relocate them to the great outdoors.

    • Wow, how long does it take you to paint this? I think you need a D850 to capture all those details 🙂

    • Ric of The LBC

      Thank you for sharing.

    • bonem

      Nice work! Thanks for the share.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Nice! Great skill required to detail those feathers.

    • Aldo

      Excellent skill no doubt. I have a little difficulty looking at it full screen…. maybe I’m getting old but it hurts my eyes a little.

    • fanboy fagz

      bob ross’s cousin!

    • Claude Mayonnaise

      Great work.

    • Max

      Wow! You have patience.

  • chromedome

    Hope this shipment includes grips!

  • TwoStrayCats

    Any firmware issues so far with the ones that have been delivered?

    • not that I know of

      • Thom Hogan

        There are a couple of very small ones that I’m trying to replicate. Don’t really impact the type of use most people would have, though.

    • just one report of a lock-up caused by SnapBridge

  • D900

    Anybody ordered from B&H getting shipping notification yet?

    • fotos y video el paraiso

      no i pre ordered w/B&H on sept 5

  • Ad B

    Hi,
    Tell Nikon in Europe are also many waiting for shipment…
    In the Netherlands I’m waiting for the second (!!!!) batch shipment.
    Damn…
    I want to enjoy that D850.
    Nikon even doesn’t tell the dealers, wenn they are goig to send that second batch.
    Nikon doesn’t communicate.

    • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

      True on that and could be a dangerous step and people having less confidence in Nikon delivering or not if they announce a mirrorless system and not a) introduce a roadmap of mirrorless lenses b) what is happening to Nikon 1, DSLR system and any plans to replace / Nikon Coolpix / Nikon A / DL, etc, etc.

      • ITN

        Introducing a roadmap of future products when you have an existing product line would be suicide.

  • John Alexander

    yee haa

  • Man, so many complaints. Just be happy that Nikon has created such a popular camera that this is even an issue! It means Nikon still has a strong DSLR user base, and that they’ve still “got it” when it comes to general camera design, ergonomics and interface, features, and performance. Because the other two big players in the full-frame have dropped the ball on at least one of those factors. Sony still has a generation or two to go before they truly rival Canon or Nikon with an effortless user interface, and Canon has a generation or two to go before they could even dream of being the same “landscape beast” of amazing image quality that the D850 (and D810) are. BE HAPPY!

    • Ad B

      I only will be happy with Nikon when my D850 is in my hands.
      Till that time, no…

      • So, no happiness whatsoever that Nikon DIDN’T produce a LEMON, and lose you as a customer to Sony? 😛

        • Allen_Wentz

          Not much chance of losing me as a customer to Sony…

    • JXVo

      I’m happy as a DSLR stills shooter but if Nikon is going to produce a high end FX mirrorless body, it’s going to have to be able to compete with this or it will flop….probably lower MP would be acceptable but same or better HMI and then obviously OSPDAF and decent video and capitalise on innovative features for the inevitable EVF….will be some camera!

  • Christer Gabrielsen

    Is it only the US that has had several shipments? What about other areas?

    • I have no info on other locations.

      • Thom Hogan

        Been fewer complaints elsewhere, but UK was also initial shipment constrained, I believe.

        • Max

          Surprisingly the price in South Africa is the same as in US.

    • just saw that on the D850 Facebook group:

      “Just had email from Wex ……850 arriving tomorrow Woo Hoo”

      https://www.facebook.com/groups/NikonD850Camera/permalink/1810442365914031/

    • JXVo

      In South Africa we haven’t even seen the first shipment yet. It was due end Sep but local online stores are now saying mid Oct.

      • Max

        yes Orms: Pre-Order: ETA Mid October 2017
        I’m surprised that it’s “only” R54,000 (4,000USD). The D5 was 9,300USD when it became available out here.

  • Nikkor300f4VR

    Disclaimer: dear readers, please brace yourselves: so called “pro” photographers self-justifying “first world problem”-like comments are coming..

    • Allan

      I don’t understand.

      • MB

        You know … oily shutter, reflections at some insane angles, some peripheral AF dot does not work as some people want, light leeks when you open rubber cover and point flash light … usual nonsense…

        • Allan

          Thanks.

          Hmm.

    • Matt Comerford

      feel better?

    • Ric of The LBC

      a minuscule portion of the AF is not exactly as fast as the D5 as Nycon allegedly has claimed

      That’s it, I’m switching. How can you expect me to take photos with this?!!!! 🙂

      • Nikkor300f4VR

        LoL, you got it, Ric! Thanks!

      • ZoetMB

        You’d think we never got any good sports or action photos when we had manual focus cameras. I remember laughing when Canon released their AF cameras – I couldn’t imagine why anyone would need AF (although I wasn’t shooting birds or much sports). I didn’t use an AF camera until 2002 when I bought a new Nikon film body to go to Hawaii.

  • Thom Hogan

    I would point out, Barry, if you need more “resolution” than you currently can get, you actually need it in three dimensions, not two. Even small focus differences on a subject like this will take away the gains you got from pixels.

  • @ peter. As an aside, I just read on FB that LR update is out. Please check if true.

    • hmm, I don’t think so – the latest LR update is from September 6th:

      https://blogs.adobe.com/lightroomjournal/
      Do you have a link?

      • Let me search. It is difficult to find anything on FB.

        • Ok, thanks – maybe it was just a new beta? I searched but did not find any new LR releases.

          • John Turner

            Peter I agree, nothing new on LR yet and i’ve just checked.

            • ok, thanks

            • Mr B

              Do you think they are waiting for the rumoured October full revision of Lightroom before supporting the 850?

            • I hope they will release an update before. I don’t know.

          • That post is hopelessly lost. Maybe the fellow was vaguely talking about ACR/converter.

            • No problem, thanks.

      • Dinosaur

        Peter, here are some photos from a friend who was one of the few people that were lucky enough to get one of the few D850 shipments last night from B&H. Another 2 people I know jut received emails from B&H alerting them of outbound UPS packages(D850’s) waiting for pickup today. And both of the camera shops I told you about received the amount of D850’s I told you about https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/05ed7145ab932aa4e3433947f3d6d1a8ce8f30c590a3a42476da8a77ff65b2d4.jpg

        • Thanks for the update.

          • Dinosaur

            no problem, my original post got too many idiots claiming I was wrong because the offices had the holiday off and couldn’t believe that possibly the shipping center could operate on a different schedule that the offices. but just trying to update you. since my last post 1 other person received a UPS confirmation for shipping today for delivery tomorrow

      • Dinosaur
  • Allen_Wentz

    What Thom said. Maybe you can get a bird to hold still while you focus stack a D850.

  • nice, good to know that my report was correct – in the future you can contact me directly here:
    https://nikonrumors.com/tips/

    thanks!

  • bgbs

    Why did Nikon not release a 12mp, 24mp, 36mp D850 cameras? They could have wiped the floor with all its competition.

    • Davo

      An alternative D850 with a 24mp would do very well imo (same or tweaked sensor as the D750) priced lower of course.
      They could share most components plus the 24mp sensor costs a lot less. The combined larger volume will have cost advantages.

      • Mike

        Buy a D850 and you get a free D750 and D500 built in. That’s good value. 😉

        • Davo

          No doubt. But I think a D850 could indeed be too much of a good thing for a lot of people. Just saying a few tweaks and a lower price would extend some of that goodness to a wider audience whilst minimizing development costs to Nikon.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Does the 24 MP sensor really cost Nikon a _lot_ less? Or are you just guessing? It would seem all FX sensors are pricey.

        • Davo

          Guess. But based on:
          1) economies of scale (it is a higher volume sensor used in multiple models).
          2) no/little additional development costs
          3) no additional complexity e.g. BSI, stacking etc. so yield should be better and hence cheaper to produce.

    • BVS

      I believe this is what they were trying to do with the new mRAW and sRAW – one camera that can do it all instead of having to make three different cameras.

      It appears that the new mRAW and sRAW implementations in D850 are a significant improvement over the D810 sRAW. They’re now actually true RAW files (albeit only 12-bit), and the image quality is close to what you’d get from a true lower res sensor.

      Check out the D850 review on the Photography Life website. It has a bunch of mRAW/sRAW samples and comparisons.

      • Davo

        Good strategy for the advanced photographer. But even at its surprisingly reasonable price, it’s not a high volume seller relatively speaking.
        I think sharing the body with a lower specced model at a lower price would be very cost efficient to Nikon. Compared to a lower-build body in a D750 update that still needs development from the ground up and probably needs to be priced even lower again.
        Entry level FF replaced with mirrorless.

  • rex360hype

    I really wish this batch comes with the grip because I want to see how good it feels ergonomically in my hands and compare with the D5, which just feels like I’m one with the camera… If that makes sense.

    • Mr B

      The grip is great and combined with the EN 18 battery gives fantastic shooting capability.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Makes total sense.

      • rex360hype

        And after seeing the pic of the D850 with grip, i knew I just had to compare to my D810 with grip (pic below). Still waiting for my mb-d18. I just worry the lower edge of the body is going to be sticking out. I love the grip of the D850, definitely feels more deep than its predecessor. My D5 does not feel as deep but feels beefier in my hand, which I actually prefer. So I feel like I’m not letting go of my D5 anytime soon. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/682de31b4b9f5ccb803316932636784229e6c767892d9f3d1f1e9ecd22e75406.jpg

    • IronHeadSlim

      I sold my D700 (with grip) and kept my D3 because it fit my hand like a glove, in both positions. I have a grip for the D500 only because Nikon gave it away for free. : )

  • Frank Yuwono

    The MB-D18 is already in stock in Australia

    • Slowtrekker

      But not the camera.. hahaha

      • Frank Yuwono

        Yes they are. We have one sitting in the display cabinet, unopened 🙂

        • Davo

          Wrong kit lens I reckon. I think they missed an opportunity to introduce a new 24-120 AF-P lens with such a ‘hot’ product.

          • Frank Yuwono

            I agree

  • Sandeep Bhandari

    me too

  • nikonagain

    This seemingly perfect/wonderful camera has been on the market for weeks, and still noone has got anything negative to say about it!?
    I almost can’t believe it!
    No bugs or dust/oil flaws at all?
    Has Nikon finally got their Q&A right?

    • Max

      Live view.

      • Dinosaur

        There is some small bug not allowing flash to be fired when using touch focus/shutter but that’s all I’ve heard of, is that what you are referring to? If not what?

        • Max

          No I’m referring to a prehistoric problem with live view across all Nikon’s cameras. It’s sluggish ito responsiveness and AF.
          I don’t really mind it because I use an ovf all the time, and when using live view it’s for things where I don’t need speed.

          But I still don’t think it’s a good idea of Nikon to procrastinate on this.

          • Dinosaur

            So you have a D850? I don’t find it that way at all on my mine.

            • Max

              I don’t have one.

              I wish I had one.

              I think it’s perfect.

              I’m nitpicking in response to your op.

              From the reviews I’ve seen I’m convinced that it’s still behind the competition ito live view speed.

            • Dinosaur

              Ok so based on “reviews” you are making a decision. I was sure you were making a stupid comment thanks for clarifying it

            • Max

              No, I have not made that decision based on “reviews”, but on reviews. Without the inverted commas.

            • Dinosaur

              Those are quotes laser brain. No matter, thanks for the laughs. I’ve never met you in person but my “review” of you tells me you are ignorant. Good day.

            • Max

              My quick scan over your Disqus comments history, and your reaction to my comments, tells me that you are a troll at heart.

            • Dinosaur

              yes I am a troll because you make a stupid comment and I ask you if you even have the 850 in hand and you say your comment is based off “reviews”
              stupid is as stupid does, learn from Forrest Gump.
              I find the screen very responsive, fast and accurate. what videos are you watching cause the Northrups/Jared Polin/Angry Photographer and many others find the touch screen to be awesome

            • Max

              Hey no I wasn’t talking about the touch screen, but Live View mode, as I’ve said. And Tony actually agrees with what I said. Maybe watch it again a bit more carefully.

    • Dinosaur

      Well considering 2 years between the D800 and 810, and the 3 years between D810 and 850 and the noticeable slow roll-out of the D850 that many speculate(including myself) is primarily due to quality control to attempt to avoid problems like the D600/750/810(oily spots/shutter issue/bright spots) plus being their 100th Anniversary “Hercules” Nikon executives understand a lot is on the line here.
      I would think an item for $3300(much more in all other countries) people would want quality control for best chance of long term success but first world problems and people revert to 5 year old whining. I’m happy Nikon is taking a more serious attention to detail,

    • PSI

      My XQD slot stopped working after one week. Going back to Nikon for inspection.

    • PSI

      XQD slot failed after one week.
      Back to Nikon for inspection.

      • nikonagain

        Let us know how it goes!

        • PSI

          Will do. Its going in on 13th October when I get back from a trip. Definitely a camera issue, as it won’t read cards that are OK in my D500. First time I’ve had an issue with a new Nikon in 40 years!

  • Kob12

    This is interesting since B&H offices are closed this Friday due to the Yom Kippur holiday.
    I doubt that they will operate the warehouse on Friday, even if run by non-observant people.

    • Dinosaur

      The warehouse does not follow the office schedule, I personally know people at B&H

  • Claude Mayonnaise

    Being a painter myself, I also find it difficult to find a camera that is perfect for painting reference purposes. Color profiles, dynamic range, and other variables never seem to reach what you are seeing in the real world and by the time you get back to your studio it all gets lost in the shuffle. there is a dimension in reality that can never be replicated by a camera. Awesome work man.

    • animalsbybarry

      My primary obsession is for resolution
      I generally shoot at F9 and high shutter speeds
      My ISO is auto and it is generally high ISO
      I can live with the noise and I am not too concerned with color fidelity because I fix all that when I paint
      I do not sell or show my photos so I am not concerned with how good the photo looks…I am concerned only with what I can see in the photo
      And I shoot many photos so hopefully what I cannot see in one photo I can see in another

  • ZoetMB

    B&H closed at 7pm EDT on Thursday 9/28 for the Yom Kippur holiday and will not open again until Sunday Oct 1, which means no shipping until Monday, Oct. 2. That includes their offices as they don’t even accept website orders during the Sabbath.

    Edit: I see Kob12 below also posted this.

    • Dinosaur

      Considering I was at the at the warehouse visiting a friend on Monday i may know just a bit more about the inner workings of the shipping dept and how religious holidays affect the offices compared to the warehouse.

      • ZoetMB

        And you’re saying without a doubt that the shipping department was either open Thursday after 7pm and/or Friday? Because I would find that very hard to believe.

        • Dinosaur

          Hey man believe what you want, seriously I try to give you people some info and assholes got to come out of the fucking woodwork, asshole know-it-all jackasses. Armchair quarter backs in some fly over state. FYI, many companies diving their warehouses into either a legally separate entity or umbrella it under a parent company so certain rules/holidays can be separated for maybe like everyone in the factory is black/Hispanic/white non-Jewish. All the shipping labels were printed yesterday for a pickup scheduled for today, last night and today the units are being packaged in B&H boxes and prepped for shipment. Go fuck yourself. Nobody cares what you find hard to believe. Again, go fuck yourself.

  • Nolan P

    I preordered one from prophoto supply in portland or usa, and thier giving a free 64gig xqd card with it in case anyone wants to know, and ya im stll waiting for mine to.

  • I need my grip. I’m so used to the D3S and D4S it’s just weird not to have that portrait grip.

    • Allen_Wentz

      I agree it is weird without the grip but an add-on grip does not make a D850 feel like a D5. The single-digit Nikons have a special feel, but my take is a body like the D500 does not become a D5 by adding a grip. I prefer the D500 without a grip but still prefer the feel of my D3.

  • Photoman

    I like the grip but I hear shooting landscapes are better without it. Does anyone agree?

    • Allen_Wentz

      Why would it matter?

      • Photoman

        It’s extra weight and less stable on tripod with the grip.

        • rex360hype

          If the tripod has a low load capacity then yes, depending on your total weight (lens + body + grip) this might be a problem… but this is more of a problem with the tripod, not the body + grip combo. Otherwise, I don’t think it causes the setup to be less stable. I’ve shot with the D810 with grip mounted on a tripod on numerous occasions and never had an issue because of the weight or it being less stable on a tripod.

          • Photoman

            Great, the reason I ask is because I’m debating whether to get the L-Bracket for the body or body+grip. Not sure I want to travel with the grip for weight savings.

  • Merijn van Dyck

    I preordered one from prophoto supply in portland or usa, and thier giving a free 64gig xqd card with it in case anyone wants to know, and ya im stll waiting for mine to.

  • Don Sullivan

    It seem like despite there being a report of shipments received last week there are very few reports from folks actually receiving their cameras from that shipment. Did this turn into a false report?

    • I have no reason to believe it was a false report – B&H and Adorama were closed, maybe this was the reason why they did not ship yet.

      • Laurie Faille

        I was told I was next on the list by my retailer. That would have been for the third shipment. I checked with the store when I didn’t get a call and they said they haven’t received anything.

  • Fernando Costa

    Peter, is it known any type of problems in d850?
    I need to upgrade from my d800, and I’m afraid since my d800 was with AF problems.
    I didn’t find any reports till now of any kind!
    Is Nikon D850 that perfect. 🙂

    • Nothing major so far – I’ve seen some reports about Snapbridge and the occasional lockup that was present also with the D800.

  • Photoman

    How many months will it take to see the end of preorder status from the major retailers?

  • Matt Comerford

    Any updates on this? Still nothing from my early Aug 24th B&H order…

  • Back to top