New for the D850: Nikon ES-2 film digitizing adapter set – scan film at 45.7MP


You probably already noticed in my post from earlier today that Nikon has also announced some new and interesting accessories for the D850 camera - now you can scan your film at 45.7MP:


Nikon ES-2 film digitalizing adapter set


Nikon FH-4 strip film holder


Nikon FH-5 slide mount holder

In order to use the kit, you will need a macro lens - see Nikon's product description (the Nikon ES-2 film digitizing adapter is compatible only with the D850, for other cameras you can use the existing Nikon ES-1 Slide Copying Adapter):

The ES-2 is a Film Digitizing Adapter that lets you easily convert your film images to digital. Taking advantage of the high-pixel count of the D850's 45.7 MP, the Film Digitizing Adapter lets you convert both 35mm slides and negatives to digital files. Using a lens such as the AF-S Micro NIKKOR 60mm f/2.8G ED attached to the D850, the camera's digitizing function automatically reverses the colors and stores them as JPEG images. This once time-consuming process involving a film scanner can be done much more quickly. For negative strips, use the FH-4 Strip Film Holder with the ES-2 and for slides, use the FH-5 Slide Mount Holder with the ES-2.

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  • Lladnar

    This…

    • Spy Black

      I’m old school I guess. A PB-4 and slide copy adapter for me. This certainly cheaper. I doubt it’s for D850 only. You can probably use this in pretty much any camera from any manufacturer.

      You’ll also need to image stack to compensate for film curvature on mounted slides. No dust and scratch removal either. Now if Nikon would only release a modern Coolscan 9000…

      • David Gottlieb

        I agree.. See my post in this thread with the scanned image from a Plustek Scanner using Silverfast software. Plustek is nearly as good as a $20,000 Hasselblad scanner. and its under $500. Get the version with Silverfast if you are interested. Without Silverfast software which really works synergistically with the plustek….

        • Spy Black

          The problem with modern film scanners is that they’re pre-focused, they don’t have the ability to focus on the film plane. They compensate for focus inaccuracies by applying sharpening in software.

          The Coolscan 9000 could not only focus, it was also one of the few scanners that had a glass carrier option, ensuring you image area would be focused from edge to edge.

          • Reflecta rps 10m has autofocus. Filmscanner.info classifies this scanner as good as the Coolscan 9000 (if I’m reading the test correctly).

            • Jan

              The RPS10M is in fact the best filmscanner for its price. 550€ on amazon. It is also the most comfortable to scan with. I would never spend my money on a hasselblad just because of its mechanical failure and the effort it needs to scan with it. I used an Imacon 545 at my university. Dont get me wrong. The image quality is astonishing but you have to cut your negs to single or two pictures which are a hell load of work to put back into their sleaves. In addition to that you have to send the scanner evey year to the hasselblad which cost so much money. So you re not only paying a hell load of money, you really have a lot of cash flowing every year into repairs. Every flextight holder for any film format cost like 200-300€ and break every now and then.
              This scanner only pays of if you re scanning 4×5 inch sometimes and selling these prints for a lot of money.

              Regarding this Nikon adapter: I first thought this is a lens which i mount to a camera. This would have been a really great product. But: Letting me buying a decent macro lens for it, puts the price tag up to the same level as a decent film scanner without the advantages from it.
              This makes it a non-buyable product for me.

            • raphaelzydek.de

              The RPS10M is in fact the best filmscanner for its price. 550€ on amazon. It is also the most comfortable to scan with. I would never spend my money on a hasselblad just because of its mechanical failure and the effort it needs to scan with it. I used an Imacon 545 at my university. Dont get me wrong. The image quality is astonishing but you have to cut your negs to single or two pictures which are a hell load of work to put back into their sleaves. In addition to that you have to send the scanner evey year to the hasselblad which cost so much money. So you re not only paying a hell load of money, you really have a lot of cash flowing every year into repairs. Every flextight holder for any film format cost like 200-300€ and break every now and then.

              This scanner only pays of if you re scanning 4×5 inch sometimes and selling these prints for a lot of money.

              Regarding this Nikon adapter: I first thought this is a lens which i mount to a camera. This would have been a really great product. But: Letting me buying a decent macro lens for it, puts the price tag up to the same level as a decent film scanner without the advantages from it.

              This makes it a non-buyable product for me.

          • David Gottlieb

            I’ve never had any problem scanning 35 mm. If you want to scan 120 film or 4×5, then that focusing could be a problem. But with 35mm, the scan is dead on. Now I know some people don’t like the silverfast software, but once you get through the steep learning curve, it is quite sophisticated. There is an ebook which is quite technical but once you get the basics down the complexities of the software is solved. And the going is smooth. (The ebook should be free with the scanner as it is essential but unfortunately it must be purchased separately.)

            • Matthew George Martin

              The reflecta rps 10m won’t hold colour film flat (all colour film dries curved) I have one and have become very frustrated with its inability to scan colour negs. The only solution is days stored under a heavy book to flatten the negs.

  • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

    Hope Nikon enhances their software, e.g, Nikon Capture NX-D to include some adjustment filters, like removing old scratches from the image, blemishes, etc – although we may need to convert this images to a third party app to do this.

    • Eric Calabros

      NX-D is already heavy.. don’t ask them to bloat it with features third party apps would do much better.

      • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

        thanks guy’s some great replies here – be interesting to see what quality you can get from this adaptor

    • RIT

      It reverts and converts to JPEG, wish it saved to RAW.

      • Lladnar

        RAW would be utterly useless as the image has already been captured to film, eliminating the possibility of capturing extended data like the sensor can do with light. Lossless bitmap options like TIFF should definitely be made possible though.

        • Eric Calabros

          They probably thought our films don’t have much DR and tonality to begin with, so we gonna ruin the image with raw editing options we have for digital images, so it’s better Nikon engineers do all the necessary processings with their own color taste 🙂

        • RIT

          Untrue in practice. The built-in algorithms that process the RAW into JPEG don’t handle the loss in DR, off white balance or sometimes the noise in dark regions. CA on the negative/positives can also be better handled in RAW. When I used a D200 I’d bracket expose transparencies by 4 stops either side in RAW

        • Film can have a huge dynamic range (up to 22 stops I read somewhere) so RAW would make sense if you had a strong enough back light.

          • Thom Hogan

            Well, yes and no. Negative film has a very high exposure latitude, which to some looks like DR. But it’s not a linear DR. There’s reciprocity failure in there.

            • Well it’s analog so you can define a transfer function and make it as linear as you like.

    • Ralf

      The good film scanners do an extra infrared scan for scratch removal. Which the D850 can’t do.

      • Abiatha Swelter

        Which will leave artifacts that still need to be cleaned up manually anyway.

    • Capture nx-D, sigh…..
      Wishing nikon could make a comeback also for that software…

    • Oguz

      good idea, also if adjustment could be done picture-by-picture to obtain best results. But if then, the D850 should be coupled via usb to a pc, then remotely controled by software like a scanner, this would be ok. I say, with preview and final scan.

  • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

    A silly Q – what is the rrp of this kit across the regions ?

  • RIT

    Well, that stacks up nicely in the D850’s favour! I’ve got piles of 35mm film to be scanned!

    • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

      be good to see the image quality from this adapter.

      • It’s just an adapter. No glass. So all the quality comes from the camera.

        • tomskyphoto

          …and the lens.

  • Jarrett Hunt

    Why not store them as a RAW format?

  • Why is this only for the D850? Does a similar device exist for non-D850 cameras?

    • br0xibear
      • I forgot about that one 🙂

      • MB

        I am using ES-1 with 55 micro and I was wondering what is the difference for sometimes now .., is there some special settings for ES-2 or what …

        • Fiatlux

          Main difference seems to be a 62mm filter thread (to mate with the AF-S Micro Nikkor 60mm 2.8) as opposed to ES-1’s 52mm thread. It should work with any camera.

        • br0xibear

          No idea…maybe this one replaces the ES-1 ?

    • tomskyphoto

      Looks like a slightly upgraded ES-1 to me; mainly with better film/slide handling options. Don’t get the compatibility limitation either, it’s just a tube with light diffuser for a macro lens that could be used with any camera. Wouldn’t even have to be a Nikon.

    • Molesworth

      This mounts on the lens like the ES-1. I think the compatibility statement refers to the in-camera reversal process which only the D-850 features.

      • I wonder how the software accounts for the different films’ base colour difference. There is nothing that could read the brand or type of negative. Unless we can select from a database built into the camera.

        • TheInfinityPoint

          I hear you can set the white balance to the area on the film that wasn’t exposed, e.g. the area around the sprocket holes of the film. Then it’s just a matter of inverting the film (for negatives). Or maybe it was invert first then adjust WB, can’t remember lol.

        • Sebako

          You would definitely have to select something manually, but unfortunately I find it highly unlikely that the camera has a built-in film type database like good film scanning software does (for example VueScan or SilverFast, to throw some names out there). Would be funny, though, if a Nikon camera came with profiles for the various Fuji films 😀

      • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

        shame it can’t be added to other cameras ( may not be possible) by firmware

      • ZoetMB

        Why couldn’t you reverse it in Photoshop after the fact? You’d probably have to do post-processing on every image anyway. And the minimum focus distance on the 60mm macro AF-S is .6 feet (7.2″), so how does this work?

        • Victor Collins

          The answer is you can. I have been doing this with my large (4×5) and medium format film negatives since the D800 came out. I place the negatives between two pieces of non glare glass on a light box and take a raw image. The 4×5 format pairs up really well. The 120 medium format film negatives took some time to get the right lenses and distance from the negative to get a image that I do not have to drop. 35mm works well, I converted all of my old slides and negatives several years ago.

    • ZoetMB

      Yeah, but I still don’t understand why it would only work with the D850. Since it has to be used with a macro lens (and I’ve read both “only the 60mm” and “like the 60mm”), I assume either the adapter somehow attaches to the lens or doesn’t attach to anything and you just line it up and shoot it. What am I missing?

      • Maybe the D850’s new ability with focus stacking comes into play. Or perhaps some other software enhancement to the image. Just guessing here.

  • Kiboko

    I want one!

  • RIT

    Negative to positive processing implies some sort of film pack,or is that going to be rough and ready and not much use?! Can it auto-detect from unexposed film outside the frame?

    • Abiatha Swelter

      My guess is that this is for fast bulk processing, not for optimal reproduction. So if you want to do emulsion-specific color profiling and such, you’ll still need to do that as a separate step. But who knows–Nikon used to make good film scanners, maybe they will surprise us.

  • MB

    I am certain you could use it with any camera as long the macro lens has 62mm filter thread … the question is which lens will give you full frame … I presume only 60mm … the main difficulty is focusing where D850 focus stacking will come in handy 😉

    • Max

      What’s the point of shooting your slides in raw?

      • Antonio

        At first glance I’d say at least WB flexibility in post and added highlight headroom.

        • MB

          Also you would want to use ETTR and adjust in post production … film has much great DR than JPEG can reproduce …

          • Antonio

            Yes, and it’s there that the RAW’s highlight headroom plays a useful role because what we see on the LCD is the associated Jpeg representation that as you say may show a blown end when the actual file may still allow the highlights to be recovered.

  • Oguz

    I have a Nikon Coolscan V for scanning old film negatives. It scans all 5-6 pictures per strip automatic, shows previews, which can be adjusted by software before final scanning. Also you can choose jpg or tiff as format. Ok, this scanner has only 5MP against the 45 MP of the new D850, but it does everything automatic, and gives best results. As i do not know, how the negatives come out, when captured by this kit and the D850, i can not compare to the Coolscan V results.

    • Sebako

      The Coolscan scanners are definitely very good and offer lots of goodies in regard to automation, but also infrared scratch detection, etc., that the ES-2 doesn’t have. And their resolution is as good as it needs to be. But unfortunately Nikon stopped making them years ago, and even second-hand, they’re still pretty expensive. Not D850 territory, mind you. But then they don’t take pictures either.

      • Spy Black

        The Coolscan 9000 is well past D850 territory.

  • Abiatha Swelter

    I think I will stick with my plan of light box and copy stand. Those holders aren’t going to be adequate for multiple formats.

  • Adnan

    Very interesting!

  • eric

    Ironically film negatives will probably last much longer than the jpeg format will. But if you’re into sharing film photos on social media I could see this being appealing. A good film scanner is around $500.

  • Photoman

    Is the 60MM Micro the only lens it’ll work with?

    • MB

      It seems that the set comes with couple of adapters so it should be possible to use it with different lenses …

  • David Gottlieb

    I use a plustek scanner with great results and silverfast software. d

  • David Gottlieb

    I’m not sure I am interested in the portable slide and film copying device. A scanner works better combined with the correct software. I might try it out. Here is an example of a neg scanned on a dedicated scanner.
    The following photo was taken on September 12, 2001 – the day after the 9-11 attack. May those who died rest in peace. May those who suffered find peace in this lifetime. May we never forget.
    Photographed on either a Nikon F2 or F3 – with either a 24mm f/2 Ais or a 35mm f/1/4 Ais lens. Tri-x developed in D76 1;1
    Scanned on a Plustek 7200 scanner with silverfast software.
    Click the photo twice to see the quality of this low res image. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4da8767dc8db30917780a14134a45e0be7716a16054b8352f080219c7a945700.jpg

    • Abiatha Swelter

      People have been using DSLRs as scanners and getting good results, at least compared to desktop scanners (drum scanners are still the best, but not always a practical addition to the home). I have an Epson V750, and I’ve been able to get some decent scans from it, but I would expect that this camera and a good macro lens could do better. But I agree than this film holder is probably not the thing to do it with.

      • David Gottlieb

        The plustek optical scanner eliminates the glass…. I find it works well. The old Nikon scanner was the best for the money, but is now quite ancient and hasn’t been made for years…

    • Allan

      That is a very powerful photograph.

      • David Gottlieb

        Thank you Alan… It was a horrid day!!!

    • Raymond Payne

      Excellent! Thanks.

      • David Gottlieb

        You are welcome, Raymond.

  • Chaitanya

    Is it proprietary solution or it will work with any cameras?

    • Fiatlux

      The ES-2 will physically mount on any lens with a 62mm filter thread.
      However, it is designed to allow 1:1 copy of film with Nikon’s 60mm Micro-Nikkor. Other lenses may not focus close enough and/or frame the same area.

      • Chaitanya

        So quite proprietary solution compared to Pentax or other film duplicators.

  • Kiboko

    I have an old “dia duplicator” … what is the difference? (except maybe quality)

    Is there any electronics or connection with this new one?

  • David Gottlieb

    And will it work with the 105 mm f/2.8 macro… I don’t see why not. It focuses down to 1:1…

  • Daniel D

    Can be used with D810, as well ?

    • akkual

      As it is lens attachable, you can use it on any camera that has F-mount. Apparently (if I understood correctly) D850 has some built in software to convert negatives to photos directly, so you will lack that on others and need to use 3rd part sw.

  • Nikon’s Bitch

    Do you guys think this would work with this Micro Nikkor 200mm f/4? That plus the D850 would equal ultimate sharpness, lack of distortion and sex appeal.

  • Nikon’s Bitch

    Also, no 120 film???

  • This product is overpriced. You can find many similar DIY solutions on the web you can assemble for the fraction of ES-2’s cost.

  • Mahatma

    Can one scan 120 film with it?

    • NJD

      Same questions, from what I have seen the adapters are all 35mm. Hope I am wrong.

    • MB

      Nope, the adapters support only 35mm slides and negatives and the tube is too smal and made for 1:1 magnification on FX, so …
      You could make one using Cokin or Lee filter holder, diffusing filter and a tube …

    • Abiatha Swelter

      No, but if you look on photo forums you will see discussions on how to set up a dslr for film scanning.

  • Roy Amatore

    What light source is used for this?

  • Photoman

    I’m curious how the scan would compare to that of the Plustek. Are there any samples somewhere?

  • Goran Kindwall

    ES-2 works just like the ES-1. The difference is the holders (FH-4 for filmstrips, FH-5 for slides). The ES-1 has 2 steel springs that hold a mounted slide OK, but will easily scratch a film strip. The ES-2 comes with 52 and 62 mm adapters. For FX use a 60 mm Micro-Nikkor, for DX use a 40 mm Micro-Nikkor. Or use it with any camera/lens that focuses to the plane of the ES-2 holders. It is a simple, no glass, tube. A diffusor, film-holder, two sliding tubes (to adjust angle and framing) and the adaptors to attach to the filter threads of the lens.

    Use a continuous light source (lightbox or LCD/LED panel) for framing, focusing and exposure. Save to whatever quality you deem necessary. For slides without color cast, the file is ready. Old slides that are faded or with color cast and negatives use VueScan and the feature “Scan from file”. You can then use all the features of VueScan to reverse negatives and adjust color etc.

    For a smooth workflow it is very smart to use Nikon Camera Control Pro 2. You run “the show” from your PC, verify the exposure and focusing, name the files and save them directly to you harddrive. Any Nikon DSLR can be used. Put the camera on a tripod or repro stand. You will probably need a light table. To sort your slides/filmstrips and use as a good light source. Happy digitizing!

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