Nikon does not have a scheduled press conference for the 2018 CES show


So far Nikon has not scheduled any press conference during the media days of the 2018 CES show that will start on January 9th in Las Vegas. While other companies like Panasonic and Sony have already reserved their CES press events, I could not find any reference for Nikon:

In the past few years, the CES show has been the place where Nikon introduced their flagship cameras (D4D5, the D4s was announced at the CP+ show). As I already reported, I have not seen any reliable indications that there will be a new Nikon D5s DSLR camera announced in January but all this may still change in the next 3 weeks. Of course the big hope/surprise will be to see any reference to the new Nikon mirrorless solution.

Here is the 2018 CES floor plan with the Nikon booth location:

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  • CaMeRa QuEsT

    None of the other mayor Japanese camera makers have yet scheduled their press conferences at CES either, only the electronics behemoths Sony and Panasonic…

    • marymig

      Should know soon.

  • Eric Calabros

    D5 announced in CES, Development press release was in November.

    • Eric Calabros

      You had leaked images in December 14. Now its 19 and we have nothing. So there will be no announcement.

      • Yes, this is what I am thinking too unless something changes in the next few days. The D4s was announced during the CP + show which this year will take place in early March – so maybe we will see the D5s in March 2018.

        • mok

          I think we will not.
          D5s will be in January/February 2019 earliest (my opinion). Now we will have minimum three years between top models.

          • Davo

            Out of sync with the Olympics, especially the upcoming home Olympics for all the Japanese companies.

        • animalsbybarry

          Thom Hogan thinks Nikon will anounced thier New mirrorless system at the march show

          • I have no such info, we shall see.

          • Allen_Wentz

            IIRC Thom’s comment was along the lines of Nikon being even deeper in the soup if they fail to announce then.

            • Thom Hogan

              Nikon’s now in an interesting place. The longer they delay getting back into mirrorless, the better that effort has to be.

            • marymig

              I expect Nikon is well aware of that.

            • ZoetMB

              I wouldn’t count “awareness” as one of Nikon’s attributes these days.

            • marymig

              I think “awareness” is there, “reaction time” is the problem.

            • animalsbybarry

              You predicted in your blog March mirrorless announcement
              How likely do you thing that is ???

            • Thom Hogan

              Nikon is basically unpredictable at the moment, as management is not in clear consensus as to what to do when.

              Could they launch in March? Absolutely. Will they? Ask again later.

  • Nikon is going to have some serious explaining to do if they don’t update the D5 and D500. Except they will probably go silent which will have some wondering about the future of the F-mount.

    • marymig

      Where’s Canon? No real innovations in yrs.

      • Yes I agree and so do many of my Canon friends. I am still happy to tell Canon shooters to stick with their mount, however.

      • Well, I guess when they release a camera like the 5DmkII, they feel like they can rest on their laurels for a decade or so.

        But don’t worry, I’m sure Canon will be able to catch up to the D4 or D800 in a few years.

    • Wilson

      D5 yes, I’m sure we will see a replacement before the olympics but I highly doubt we will see a D500 replacement any time soon, it took 7 years to replace the D300S so I think it will be the DX flagship for a year or two more. That being said when they bring out their mirrorless lineup they could have a high end DX model

      • Well, the Olympics are in February, so Nikon better hurry up.

        • Wilson

          No kidding, I didn’t realize how soon they were happening. I wonder if Nikon would send any unbadged cameras to use there if they weren’t ready for the full release

          • Introducing, the “D0s”.

          • Thom Hogan

            Yes, they would. But it’d be better if they released a D5s before the Olympics, frankly.

            • Victor Collins

              Less than seven weeks to the Olympics and no credible rumor for a D5s, it’s getting way too close for the photographers covering the games to prepare with a new camera. The couple of US trials that I have attended there were a lot of D850’s being used. Shooting D5, D500 and D850 makes a pretty solid system and not sure what value the D5s would add. Delivery of a flawed D5s would hurt more than not delivering.
              I agree with you about informing consumers that Nikon is committed to updating their DSLR line.

            • Thom Hogan

              Given that I would expect a D5s to be pretty much exactly like a D5 except with some new bells (no new whistles), they could launch any time really. It’s not about selling more cameras before the Olympics. It’s about using the Olympics as promotional marketing. Thus, even just handing a few photographers D5s’s in February works fine if done right.

        • fanboy fagz

          if there were news of the D5s peter would have posted a long time ago.

          • That’s correct, if I get any info I usually post it right away. Of curse I try to post only reliable info.

            • Have you ever considered a monthly roundup of the silly, unrealistic, highly unreliable rumours?

            • No, I think it defeats the whole purpose of this site. There is so much fake news out there, I do not want to be part of it.

        • Ed Hassell

          I know it will never happen; however, Nikon SHOULD announce 1) a D5s for the winter Olympics to be available to the public mid-summer along with a matching D500s; 2) a mirrorless series M750 (FX) and M7500 (DX) pair to be available by 2018 fall/winter (to be followed in 2019 by M850 and M500 versions); and, 3) that mirrorless cameras will have their own basic lens sets as well as being able to use, fully functionally, all AF-S D, G, E and P lenses with the appropriate M-series adapter.

          Oh, and give me 4 DX primes, please: 10mm f/3.5E AF-S DX, 14mm f/2.8E AF-S DX, 18mm f/2.5E AF-S DX and 70mm f/1.4E AF-S DX (a 105/1.4E portrait lens equivalent – could be 60mm instead of 70, but I’d prefer 70).

          And while I’m asking, 400mm and 500mm “PF” telephotos would be nice.

          I could live with that … (I don’t want much, do I?)

      • Coffee

        I just got the D500. I still expect to see an update on the d500 in 2018, mostly due to the price drop/sale going on right now.

      • DFogle

        More pointedly what on earth needs improving on the D500, it’s easily the best APS-C on the market, and one of the best cameera in general. I mean I recently paired it with my Sigma Art 17-35 1.8 and the results were amazing. I gave my D810s the day off and didn’t miss a beat. Nikon’s kind of small in comparison to the rest of the mags, yet they have the three best cameras on the market, D5, D850 (recently held by the 810), and the D500. Its time we appreciate great products instead of this add level consumerism. Would you rather Sony “innovation” and bad products? I like to think Nikon shooters choose the latter.

        Of course I’ll be excited to try out Nikon’s mirrorless option, but at present, none of the current mirrorless cameras can do and hold up to Nikon’s DSLRs.

    • fanboy fagz

      “serious” explaining to who? to you? both models arent getting updated soon imo. d500, I dont think this year and D5, maybe this summer. the D5 took quite a leap forward (besides the sensor issues) and tech doesnt jump so quick at this level. D750 needs to updated and d610 as well, if at all.

      • Thom Hogan

        But this is one of Nikon’s big issues at the moment. Customers are wondering (and making decisions based upon available information). The whole movement away from Nikon DX started when there was no D400 on the expected schedule. You just don’t want to give users a reason to start doubting what you’re up to.

        DSLRs are more than still viable. They’re nearly essential for some types of shooting. Thus, you don’t want to be sending ANY messages that you might be reconsidering the top DSLR lineup and slowing down in your updates there. None. You want to be doing the opposite: assuring users that the DSLR progression continues for them.

        • For several years, Nikon sure gave it’s DX sports shooters reason to pause before introducing the D500. I diverted to a couple Sony A77 IIs during that period.

          • Thom Hogan

            Right, which proves my point. People make decisions upon what they don’t see as well as what they do see.

            • beach

              Wouldn’t that argue for Nikon to release camera and lens roadmaps? So that info is available on what’s coming when? Rather than risking losing customers who move on because of what they think might or might not be coming? Of course, putting cards on the table can seriously dampen demand for current models (somewhat lessened by the somewhat predictable time table of updates in the case of cameras).

            • ITN

              Releasing a roadmap is suicidal if you have an existing comparable product to sell. The Osborne effect.

            • PhilK

              Not only would releasing future product plans prematurely dampen sales of existing product, it’s a really bad strategic/competitive idea to clue in all your competitors about your future product plans until the products are nearly ready to go.

          • PhilK

            Except the timespan between the D300s and D500 was nearly 7 years, and the D500 is less than 2 years old at this point.

            (I would argue it’s even more stark than that: given the very very mild changes between the D300 and D300s, the timespan to update their last true DX flagship was more like 9 years)

            So it will take at least 4x the current post-D500 wait time to reach that kind of product-update gap today. 😉

        • ITN

          Canon make a killing in the market and they update their pro models more rarely than Nikon do. I think 4 years is a reasonable update interval for the single digit body.

          • Thom Hogan

            Perhaps. But again this isn’t a sales thing, it’s a perception thing. By updating regularly (and more often) it sends a signal about Nikon’s commitment to the high end body that Canon isn’t sending to its customers.

            • ITN

              Nonetheless Canon are doing a lot of the selling which means their products have got something right, and frequent updates by Nikon and Sony are not able to conquer the market from Canon. I think the signal sent by frequent updates may be that we got this wrong in the previous cycle so here is another camera for you to buy.

        • PhilK

          Whereas a very large and quickly growing (many might say the most dynamic) segment of the photo press and active ILC buyers today would probably see an announcement of many new Nikon DSLRs without a major MILC product announcement as a sign that the company is “living in the past and not adapting to the modern [mirrorless] world”.

          Perspective, perspective.

          • Thom Hogan

            As I’ve been writing for some time, Nikon has put themselves between a rock and hard place. The fact that their marketing department sucks and can’t manage perception doesn’t help at all.

            But that’s not a reason not to do the right thing. DSLRs HAVE to stay as healthy as possible for Nikon for as long as possible, otherwise they’ll plummet to third or fourth in market share. They can’t simply put mirrorless out and hope that solves all their problems. Even Canon isn’t doing that, you might note.

            Indeed, Canon has done pretty much exactly what I’m suggesting, and yes they’ve weathered the “those DSLRs look old and unremarkable” press, yet they’ve managed to hold their sales up.

            Nikon’s problem is that they have to do everything: they need to keep DSLRs thriving, they need a real mirrorless competitor, they need some true consumer entry points.

            • PhilK

              I never doubted that Nikon still needs to rely upon DSLR sales for now to stay viable, I just dispute the notion that adding superficially-changed DSLR models is automatically going to reflect well upon them in the marketplace. These days the public perception is increasingly: “DSLRs are legacy products, the future is all mirrorless”.

              Nikon may have perfectly good reasons to disagree with that (as do I), but they are selling consumer products and they have to deal with the fickle preferences of consumers. (If they’re real good they can try a “Steve Jobs” and basically tell people what they want to buy, but A) they have not a fraction of a clue about the shifting sentiments and habits of buyers that Jobs had and have little notion how to actually achieve such knowledge/wisdom, and B) they probably do not have the marketshare and mindshare these days to pull something like that off even if they did.)

              Re: Canon – it is common for a consumer-products company to gain a certain position in the market that allows them to “coast” on innovation for a while and still remain popular, but this is dangerous and the whole house of cards can come down really fast once the public figures out they are following a paper-tiger and getting ripped-off. Once you turn that corner of public perception it can be very very hard and timeconsuming to recover from.

              What saves Canon’s bacon at the moment is that they actually continue to innovate in a variety of ways, and consistently beat Nikon to the punch in a variety of areas such as lens innovations (eg diffractive optics, fluorite, USM AF, silent stepper AF, electromagnetic diaphragm, silent power diaphragm for video, compactness, maximum aperture, tilt/shift, etc etc), and they provide a variety of superior services to customers compared to Nikon.

              One thing I think that hurts Nikon in the Asian market especially is that AFAIK Canon still manufacturers most of their (at least higher-priced) models in Japan, and many of their lenses as well. Many Asian customers really look down their nose at high-end optical products that are manufactured in Asian countries other than Japan. (Or in Germany)

            • Thom Hogan

              You have to be careful for what you wish for, because it might happen. If Nikon doesn’t continue to point out and market that top DSLRs are driving great work by pros and Nikon is making better and better DSLRs than anyone else, then DSLRs will indeed go away. Simple as that.

              I’ve used pretty much everything that’s available, mirrorless and DSLR, both in and out of client production. The Sony A9 and Sony A7R3 are about the only cameras that I find capable of meeting the level of demand we pros put on products, but they have clear shortcomings. I’d tend to pick what I’ve been shooting with (D5, D850). Especially given Nikon’s recent lenses.

              Realistically, the end isn’t near for DSLRs, but only at the top end and only if the camera companies keep them “current.”

            • This is what I have been saying for a while: only the latest mirrorless cameras are worth considering, all models before were basically a work in progress that were sold with a big marketing push. Nikon decided to wait and get it right before announcing their mirrorless camera (maybe because they know their marketing sucks and they cannot do what Sony did lol). If they get their mirrorless right in 2018, they will be only a few months late.

            • PhilK

              I never wrote or implied that Nikon should not periodically update their cameras.

              What I wrote was that these lazy and trivial/cosmetic/minor updates do not impress, and Nikon has been repeatedly ridiculed by users when they do them.

              Most recently with the D7500, which actually removed features from the model it supposedly “replaced”.

              It’s also curious to me why you do not mention (eg) Canon’s flagship model(s) in that list of “the only cameras that [you] find capable of meeting the level of demand we pros put on products”. Was that supposed to be only a list of mirrorless cameras and you forgot to write that?

            • Thom Hogan

              The D7500 is clearly a marketing mistake by Nikon. They’re going to have a difficult time selling them at the price they’re asking. They’re basically only going to get the folk that didn’t do their homework and just bought the new model blindly. Not a good strategy long term.

              But the D7500 isn’t what I mean by the “s” type upgrades, all of which have offered additional features to an already existing well-defined product. That type of update is useful in extending the sales life of a product that has to be on the market for four years (e.g. D5, D500).

              My comment about the Sonys is missing something: I was talking about mirrorless cameras there. Canon, like Nikon, is in the same position of needing to defend DSLRs as long as possible while transitioning a number of their customers to mirrorless. There’s nothing wrong with the top Canon DSLRs, though the 7D Mark II is certainly showing its age.

            • PhilK

              “S” updates to flagship models like D3s and D4s were generally useful.

              Whereas the “S” update to the D300 was nearly pointless. I bought a D300 when they first came out. When Nikon announced the D300s I thought it completely uninteresting and the worst part was a few months later Canon introduced the 7D which eclipsed it in several important respects.

              The most compelling camera Nikon had at the time was the D700, which became an enduring classic. Not because it was a minor update to a prior model, but because it turned the whole system on its head and offered incomparable value by including several important features from their flagship model at a smaller size and price. It took Nikon 7 years to return to that formula (with the D500) and that model may end up being nearly as well-loved as the D700 was in its time.

            • Thom Hogan

              “Pointless to you” perhaps. The D300s added video to the D300, and that was something that prolonged the model, as by the time it came out video was a requirement.

              This is the problem evaluating whether an “s” model is useful or not (or a minor iteration, as has happened on the consumer DX models). It may make no difference to you, but it might make a difference to someone. And that’s my point: you have to keep cameras current, period. Selling a D300 for another two years without video would have been a “no sale” to a lot of people.

            • PhilK

              It seems that the only “S” models of DSLR that Nikon has ever released that were not flagship models were the D70s and D300s.* Given that they haven’t announced another one like that since 2009, I think it’s safe to say those 2 models were a short-lived anomaly.

              I suspect that pattern will continue: when they update the lower-end models they will just give them a complete new model number (like D800/D810/D850 etc) rather than a suffix. I think the short model update cycle these days makes them want to take credit for a “new model” each time, rather than a minor update. (Except with flagships where A: high-end/pro users expect tangible improvements, and B: the engineering cost of releasing such a new model is much higher)

              *(Excluding the weird 2/3″ format E-series mongrels developed with Fuji and based on Nikon film bodies)

            • Tony Beach

              To this day D300s cameras sell for noticeably more than D300 cameras.

            • PhilK

              Well for one thing they are, as a whole, newer and with less usage than the older models, and much rarer, so it’s not particularly surprising that they go for a bit more than the predecessor. Doesn’t really say much.

            • Tony Beach

              Not that much newer, not necessarily less used, and rare or not has nothing to do with the price as it’s not as if it’s a collector’s item. Things like the second card slot and video that the “S” upgrade brought are the obvious reasons the price is higher, your denial notwithstanding. The market speaks louder than opinions as people are putting their money on the line rather than their opinions.

              Speaking for myself, I took the discount and got a D300 a couple of years ago, so I’m not saying the “S” upgrades were worth it to me, but the market supports what Thom wrote about “S” upgrades being a good thing, especially if they actually do offer something tangible (unlike the D70s that didn’t seem to offer much at all, and the market reflects that too).

            • PhilK

              Never claimed it was a “collector’s item”. Everyone knows that newer models almost always sell for more money than older models in the used market, simple observation and logic.

              The fact that it was the only “semipro” DX Nikon for many years also contributes to that. For example, if someone wanted a used Nikon DX camera that had a 10-pin remote socket or accepted circular viewfinder accessories, then the D300s was the only model Nikon had made for many years that fit that bill, making its perceived value in the used market slightly higher as a result. (Until the D500 came along in 2016, 7 years later)

            • Tony Beach

              Simple observation and logic then is that an “S” model being newer would keep the price of the D500 up; whereas just continuing to sell them without updating them the price will drop.

              Here’s the facts about the market for the D300 and D300s. Today at KEH you can buy a D300 that is in EX+ condition for less than you can buy a D300s that is in “Bargain” condition (both with battery and charger); and an EX+ condition D300s costs 80% more than the same condition D300.

              To review, the D300s is not a collector’s item and a beat up D300s costs more than a like-new D300, so your arguments about the D300s being rarer and “newer” than the D300 being the explanation for the price difference doesn’t add up.

    • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

      What’s the future of the EF-Mount ? as well and will Canon update any of its semi pro – pro cameras. There don’t need to be big updates to excellent D5 and D500 – maybe just firmware tweaks and possibly a S Model. The real upgrades that are needed is to the D6xx / D75x family and possibly Nikon will bring out a mirrorless system to replace both the D3xxx and D5xxx series ?. 2018 will be a key year for Nikon and also for Canon – on how to keep punters happy and spending their $$/££

      • Allen_Wentz

        D6xx needs to die and D7xx is a conundrum that needs to fit into the upcoming Nikon mirrorless response. I call it “mirrorless response” because Nikon might think outside the box a bit.

    • Someone

      “serious explaining to do”
      Really?

      • Well not so much the D500. But their D5 has been updated on a predictable schedule for generations. With so much speculation going on about their business, if they miss this update at this particular time, it won’t look good.

        • ZoetMB

          Maybe, but how many D5’s do they really sell? There used to be a very reliable pro market for bodies of that level and a lot of them were purchased by corporations, especially media corporations. That’s not the case so much anymore. Newspapers have let most of their photographers go and they’re accepting smartphone images these days.

          • marymig

            Nikon’s projections could well be wrong…

            • ZoetMB

              You really are an optimist. Nikon has probably never exceeded its own projections except maybe back when the D70 was introduced and the 4th projection each year is just 42 days before the end of the fiscal and they usually still get it wrong.

              In fiscal 2017, in terms of DSLRs, they estimated 3.2 million on 5/14, 3.35 on 8/4, 3.25 on 11/7 and 3.1 on 2/13 and came in at 3.1 million, meeting that final estimate, but 125,000 units below their highest estimate.

              In fiscal 2016, they estimated 4.25 million units in the 1st and 2nd estimates, 4.2 million in the 3rd, 4.1 million in the 4th and came in 4.04 million.

              In fiscal 2015, they estimated 5.4 million, 5.05 million, 4.9 million and 4.65 million and came in at 4.61.

              In fiscal 2014, they originally estimated 7.1 million units and revised it to 6 million in July and they came in at 5.75 million.

              So at best, they come close, but they usually come in way under the first estimate and they’ve NEVER beat an estimate in recent years.

              If Nikon is projecting to sell a half-million fewer DSLRs this fiscal, even though they upped the projections by 100,000 units between the 2nd and 3rd estimate, I’ll take bets it will actually be even worse. But the question that can’t be answered is that if they were able to produce sufficient quantities of the D850, what would the numbers have looked like?

    • Spy Black

      What do you find lacking in the D5 and D500 that you feel requires an “update”? The only thing the D500 could use is two like storage medium slots, otherwise what else?

      I think people would be much happier if the D850 was readily available by CES time, without any more endless annoying waiting.

      If Nikon annouced at CES that the D850 is readily available with any further delays, that would be a BIGGER announcement than any D5s, D500s, or mirrorless announcement…

      • Thom Hogan

        That isn’t the point. It’s not that anything is “lacking” it’s that we want to know that Nikon is committed to continuing to upgrade these cameras. Remember what happened when the D400 didn’t appear when it should have. That was one of Nikon’s big fumbles, and they can’t just keep fumbling the ball and expecting to win.

        • Spy Black

          Yeah but that still doesn’t answer what you’re expecting. Nikon is having a hard enough time with the D850, are you really expecting them to start dealing with more new hardware stock?

          • Thom Hogan

            The D850 shortage is mostly sensor induced at this point. A D5s and D500s wouldn’t necessarily have new sensors.

            • Spy Black

              OK, but what exactly do you want to hear from Nikon, a DL-type announcement?

            • Thom Hogan

              Actually, what I want from Nikon is not a camera release, but a clear statement/salvo from them that shows that they UNDERSTAND the camera market, are catering to it, and are committed to things that are needed in the market.

              SnapBridge had all the right marketing points, but failed on execution. In both the consumer and professional camera realm, workflow is a huge user pain, and products are now so good that we aren’t going to update unless a pain is removed.

              We want our small cameras to work like our big cameras, and consumers should want to learn an entry camera that they can grow naturally out of into a bigger one if need be.

              Lenses are what distinguish ILC cameras ultimately, so we need to not only know what’s available, but what WILL BE available in order to choose a system wisely.

              Nikon just fails as a consumer-facing company. They don’t interact well with consumers worldwide, they aren’t understanding the consumers’ problems correctly, they aren’t offering the right solutions, they aren’t making the right marketing statements.

            • Spy Black

              Have you ever heard such statements from other manufacturers? I think that might be a bit of a stretch to expect such comments from Nikon, no?

            • PhilK

              Perhaps some day we’ll actually get some corroboration for this idea that sensor supply is the sole reason the D850 is slow-shipping. 😛

            • Thom Hogan

              Doubtful. But considering that the plant in which it is manufactured has a capacity of doing more than double the unit volume that is currently putting out, you’d need to explain why the D850 is trickling out. There is only one logical explanation: shortage of some part. There are only two parts that could come close to being the issue: shutter and sensor. Virtually all the other parts are shared or should be simple to source.

            • PhilK

              I can think of a whole variety of other “logical explanations”. Not sure why you cannot. 😛

        • ITN

          Or, someone wants to sell guidebooks to new cameras and depends on the income from them so Nikon must come up with new models to sell those books.

          Nothing to do with photographers’ needs really.

          • PhilK

            Heh.

          • Thom Hogan

            Funny. I’ve not marketed my books other than in static ads at the right on my Web site. If I wanted to sell more books, there are dozens of things I could do that I’m not currently doing. Thus, if you think that I depend upon the income from said books, you’d be wrong.

            • ITN

              My point is that we should not ask for a product update just for the sake of a product update; if there were some serious issues with the D500 or D5, then that kind of a request would be warranted, but these cameras work fine and there is no need for a new product until there is a major technological improvement available. The D300s was dissed largely by many people because the update was not seen as significant. An inignificant mid-term update may also cause a negative PR effect. It’s far better to have well-tested, carefully considered product updates more sparsely laid out than excessive number of new models that do not really solve anyone’s practical problems. I believe that intelligent, well-educated people should also be aware that unnecessary manufacturing of equipment that is not needed damages the environment. And thus, since I know you are educated and intelligent, I can’t but assume that you have personal agenda behind your constant pushing for new products and bashing of Nikon management for supposedly not updating products frequently enough. If you say it is not your books, is it perhaps clicking advertiser links on your site. Either way, we should push for people to use their existing products until they are beyond repair rather than buy new ones.

            • Ed Hassell

              My first cameras as a child were Kodak boxes given to me as presents. Then, in 1965,, as a freshman in HS, I bought a Yashica Lynx from a camera counter inside a drug store in Raleigh NC.

              Two years later, I was back at that same drug store camera shop looking at a Minolta when I met a man with a plan. He talked about a different brand that he claimed was the best engineered camera in the world. He said that when you bought a camera, you should be buying into a system that could serve you for the rest of your life, one that would grow with you and morph to meet your future needs. He talked about all the things a good system camera could incorporate and that the company behind it could take customers’ concepts and make them happen.

              I walked out of that shop having spent more than twice what I had intended with a Nikkormat FT body and two lenses: a 35mm f/2 and a 105mm f/2.5. That man was Joe Ehrenreich, owner of EPOI and the man responsible for Nikon’s reputation and popularity in the United States.

              He knew how to market; Nikon hasn’t a clue. Regardless, Nikon’s engineering is superlative, and I’ve been a loyal consumer for 50 years.

            • El Aura

              Not trying to comment on any of the earlier points, just curious why you don’t market those books in other ways? Overall not worth the effort or expense? Or simply too low a priority for you?

            • Thom Hogan

              I’m simply happy to be out of the “grow at any expense” game. I’m close enough to retirement that marginal gains aren’t worth the effort, and even big gains probably aren’t. I’m slowly becoming more like the custom violin maker who just builds a few a year and only tries to make their product better, not their sales.

            • Allan

              Do not retire!!!

              Or,

              Call it retirement, but continue doing what you’re doing. 🙂

              I continue to appreciate your contributions to photography.

              Merry Christmas, Thom.

        • EnPassant

          Although Nikon are very silent about the real reasons I think the D400 production plan was literally drenched in the 2011 flooding of their Thailand factory.
          By the time everything was fixed in spring 2012 it was too late to release a 16MP D400 when they just were going to announce a 24MP D5200 for which they needed the production capacity.
          Building a production line for a comparable small seller like a D400 would just not be economical.

          • Thom Hogan

            I’m sure that was part of it. But the story told to me by someone who should know has more to it: basically they decided the sensor wasn’t good enough.

      • beach

        All I want from Nikon is a firmware update to get the D9 AF area option from the D5 into the D500. Believe there is also some new group AF options. I don’t think a D500S is warranted at this point. Does Nikon really want to signal to its customers that it is “business as usual”? Shouldn’t Nikon put every and all effort into getting a DX and FX mirrorless system out to the customer instead of “showing commitment to an upgrade cycle that is no longer warranted? With the D500 they didn’t show “commitment” – they admitted they had taken the wrong path with a D300/D300S successor and the D7100 “DX flagship” and judging by being a bit rough around the edges, threw together a D500 in desperation to right that wrong before it was too late. When they release info on their mirrorless, then they can show commitment to the DSLR line by providing info when a D500 successor/upgrade will be released. And what the plans are with regard to the other DSLR that are due for an upgrade. I somehow doubt that in the long term Nikon has the capacity to maintain DX and FX mirrorless and DSLR lines.

        • ITN

          The D500 is far ahead of its competition in action AF. There is not much pressure on that front. However updates with dual pixel AF or quadruple pixel AF for video and live view might give a positive sign to those who want to know where Nikon is tech wise. Also full frame DX 4K instead of heavy crop.

          9-point dynamic is probably left out on purpose – they know it is valuable and don’t want to give it in this price class.

          • PhilK

            Personally I think Nikon would be better served by using a new MILC product line as the one to market to people desiring top video functionality. Because a DSLR is always going to contain various compromises for video performance/functionality compared to mirrorless, dual-pixel AF or not.

            Building seriously competitive video functionality into a new MILC line provides an answer to all the longstanding complaints about Nikon camera video capabilities, along with a nice differentiating element to reduce what we know Nikon has always been very wary of: cannibalization of one of their product lines by another.

        • Spy Black

          I dunno. They had a tsunami and earthquake to deal with too remember.

        • marymig

          D850 is very good…are they desperate?

    • geofflivingston

      The D750 fire sales this holiday season has me thinking they are clearing inventory. That would be with an intent to release the D760 next. I think the D850 is the new pro grade camera for the foreseeable future. Just a guess.

      • CaMeRa QuEsT

        Same fire sale happened last year, and it was not much different 2 years ago either, so this is the new “normal” for the D750. This time last year it was even just US$1K in Japan, it’s probably going to be the same situation this year or even cheaper. The D750 is effectively Nikon’s entry level FX, as the D610 is never pushed, they probably even stopped making them a long time ago but are still selling NOS.

      • ZoetMB

        Nikon (in the U.S.) is lousy at clearing inventory. Towards the end of life of a camera, they tend to raise its price again. Clearing inventory isn’t necessarily to make room for a new model – sometime it’s just to raise cash or to try and sell some lenses and other accessories.

        • geofflivingston

          That makes a ton of sense. The razor for the razor blades.

      • ITN

        Yeah, I also think there will be an update to the D750 soon.

    • PhilK

      The D500 only came out in 2016 and it’s still the best APS-C DSLR on the market. I think it’s a bit early to be running around predicting doom-and-gloom if they don’t update it again right now.

  • scott800

    i know its too soon, but id like to see a low light mirrorless announced to go with my d850

    • marymig

      reportedly the mirrorless will use the D850 sensor…

      • Yes, this was one of the rumors.

        • animalsbybarry

          The D850 sensor is a dslr sensor
          A differrent sensor desighn would be required for an effective mirrorless camera…..otherwise the best performance achievable would be no better than the D850 in live view
          Nikon does have a promising patent for a 2 layer all dual pixel 6 color sensor that would make an ideal mirrorless camera if someone like Tower Jazz were to build it for them.

      • Davo

        Makes sense to use the same sensor or a variation of it from a cost POV. But the D850 sensor has reported low yield and D850 supplies are sensor limited so I don’t know how there’ll be excess sensors for mirrorless. Unless the FX mirrorless is not scheduled til end of 2018 and their initial offering will be DX.

  • Why a need for a D5 or D500 replacement already? They have their places and I am guessing Nikon won’t sell as many of those two units combined versus an upgrade to the D750. Personally think a D750 upgrade and a full frame mirrorless is much more in need.

    • fanboy fagz

      d750 and the d610 should be next

      • They should merge those two lines. I see no need to keep both, just like the D3xxx and D5xxx. Simplify offering and reduce costs by maintaining multiple lines.

        • Semaphore

          They should have a D750v2 as the entry FX DSLR, and a DM610 as the FX mirrorless offering.

          • Allen_Wentz

            Yuck.

        • CaMeRa QuEsT

          No business sense in replacing the D750, not when the competition is still at parity (A7II), behind it (6DII) or way behind it and priced stupidly out of reach (M10). Why waste precious R&D and factory up-fitting money in a market segment that is currently very price sensitive? The only thing Nikon can add to a D750 replacement is 4K and faster CFS, that means a new, more expensive sensor (a version of A9/A7III’s?) that might run into yield issues at the fab like it did with the D850’s. Seems to me to be a lot of trouble for not much of a positive return. But a D5s/D5x duo, now that’s a very good business case there to be had, miking the last drop out of the F mount cow from before Nikon ramps up their mirrorless system.

          • ITN

            Nikon is losing market share and volume. They can revitalize the D750 class by introducing an update. They need to sell what they can. I think the D850 was a major update but its price put it out of reach from many (in US the price is low but in Europe it is high). D750 update would answer to the needs of those who need the new AF, full frame 4K, touch screen, radio flash control etc. in a lower price class.

        • Exactly. There’s little price and features differences on D5xxx and D3xxx series.

  • unimo36090

    and so they are busy with something?

    • Bart Ney

      Yeap, they are planning to take the best seats for spectators…

  • Piooof

    D5s should be ready for the winter Olympics. That leaves six months more compared to the D5 (Rio summer games). I would expect nothing more than a simple press release stating that D5s is in development.

    • You do realize the winter olympics start in 7 weeks…

      • Piooof

        No I didn’t (blush). This mixup probably reveals my interest in this kind of event!

        • Thom Hogan

          Thing is, this winter olympics is a near home event for the Japanese, followed by a home event with the next summer olympics. If they aren’t on top of this, they aren’t on top ;~).

          • Eric Calabros

            Its impossible to release and ship D5s in just six weeks.. maybe a new 200-400, but new body? IMPOSSIBLE.

    • This is a possibility and the may announce the D5s at the CP+ show in March just like they did with the D4s.

      • br0xibear

        I’m pretty sure that’s what it’ll be, a few “chosen” photographers will have a D5s at the Winter Olympics (like they did at previous games, look out on Instagram for hints)…then at CP+ or just after they’ll announce the D5s.
        Nikon don’t tend to play around with their flagship camera and release dates.
        It’ll be interesting to see what they actually change from the D5, will they drop the CF/XQD choice ? will they throw in a CFExpress slot ?, will it have the extra viewfinder magnification like the D850 ?…will I have enough cash to buy one ?, lol.

        • Thom Hogan

          And that would be problematic. Why? Because they need to announce other things at CP+, in particular something mirrorless. Nikon has long had this problem of not being able to handle multiple announcements at once well. Delaying the D5s to CP+ while announcing something else will have their beleaguered marketing folks sending mixed messages.

          • br0xibear

            “Nikon has long had this problem of not being able to handle multiple announcements at once well.”
            It’s a Nikon tradition, maybe they’ll stick with it, lol.

          • The D4s was also announced at CP+ if I am not mistaken.

            • br0xibear

              Shown in a glass box at CP+ then announced a few weeks later I think.

            • Or maybe just an announcement on paper.

            • br0xibear

              Yeah, announce it, but the available to buy date is weeks later…seems to be a trend.

            • Didn’t they sort of do that earlier this year?

            • Thom Hogan

              Yes, it was. By itself (with a bunch of Coolpix releases that were mostly quietly made). The D3300 was announced a month earlier, the V3 a month later.

              That’s my point. Nikon is terrible at multiple camera announcements unless they’re twins of some sort (D300/D3, D4/D800, D5/D500). They can’t market two ideas at once, it seems.

              So a D5s at CP+ would preclude them doing a mirrorless announce at CP+, I’d guess. And they REALLY need to do a mirrorless announce at CP+. Badly.

            • It seems to me that the mirrorless will be more like a Photokina event.

            • Thom Hogan

              Nikon is ready to go with bodies long before that. Lenses, not so much. I don’t think they have until Photokina to drop a mirrorless strategy.

            • I would think that for a company like Nikon the lenses will be the easy part.

            • PhilK

              Of those “twins” you mention, I can think of little that makes the D4/D800 some kind of philosophical pairing. What are the commonalities other than stuff that just reflect the point-in-time that they were released?

              Because:

              Resolution/sensor – nope
              Speed – nope
              AF – nope (MultiCam 3500FX – identical to what was in their better DSLRs since the D3/D300)
              Storage media – nope
              Connectivity – nope

            • Thom Hogan

              Well, I wrote “of some sort.” Nikon marketing tried to promote them as the upgrades to the D3s and D3x. Quite obviously, the D800 was NOT a D4x, though. Still, the promotion was “here are our two top pro cameras, and they’re better than ever.”

            • PhilK

              Certainly the D4 was not an upgrade to the D3x’s sensor resolution, either. The D3x remains the highest-resolution “true pro” DSLR that Nikon has ever made.

        • yes most likely, but people are very careful now, you hardly get a leak… unless you are in the deserts of Africa 🙂

          • Thom Hogan

            Well, I sure wouldn’t be leaking if Nikon gave me a shooting contract. Not a lot of those to go around anymore, so you absolutely don’t jeopardize them.

            • Correct, 5 years ago pretty much any new camera will get spotted while they are doing their promo videos. Not anymore. Nikon also fixed their website that was “leaking” new products for years. Soon I will be out of business 🙂

            • PhilK

              Haha, dang.. well the heck with them then… lol

          • br0xibear

            “unless you are in the deserts of Africa”…
            You mean like Ami Vitale, Nikon Ambassador, who tagged a few of her recent images in Africa on Instagram with the hashtag #nikond5s lol…

            https://www.instagram.com/p/Bcm5axCBzU6/?tagged=nikond5s

            • seriously? wow…. so maybe there will be D5s after all….

            • but this is somebody else IG account, her pics are tagged with #nikond5:
              https://www.instagram.com/p/Bc40stnnUh-/?hl=en&taken-by=amivitale
              So is it a mistake or they covered it up?

            • br0xibear

              There are images on Ami Vitale’s Instagram also tagged with #nikond5s
              Has she made a typo ?, yeah she might have, but she comes across as a very careful hashtag user, she tags D5, D500, D4, D4s in different images, not all on the same image as generic blanket tags.
              I think it’s a reasonable assumption to make that there’s going to be a D5s, and Ami Vitale might have one for testing.
              it’s still a rumour site isn’t it ? Lol.

            • There are multiple images tagged with #nikond5s and the 5 and s are not really close on the keyboard.

            • also, the pictures are from June… still debating if I should post this online…

            • br0xibear

              That’s all the information I have, you could post it with a caveat…with the headline “This could be a simple typo, Nikon Ambassador tags images with #nikond5s” ?

  • Hector Gonzalez

    It’s disappointing, that Nikon does not share any info of what is coming if it is. Peter any news about nikon new FF mirrorless?

    • Neutron

      This is the best time to dump stock and let people be happy. Therefore, terrible timing to confuse them with potential new stuff.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Exactly. Holiday buying season is no time for discussing next year’s products.

  • Graham Blaikie

    What could Nikon’s next update model be? Some are talking D5S and D500S as it is already two years since they were announced. But what needs updating on those? In my opinion the only real area that needs attention is the Live View video AF which seems woeful compared to Canon and Sony. What Nikon should consider is a sliding AF in video mode instead of a sudden jump/overshoot/correction, where the AF will slide the focus from one area to another area selected by a tap on the rear screen. This might work with AF-P lenses with a firmware update.

    But, I would rather see an update to the D750 as that is more overdue. This is a fine camera and something of a bargain, a true good-value all-rounder. But it lacks 4K video. I don’t really think it needs wholesale upgrades to a new model number but a D750S would be sufficient with a tweaked sensor, Expeed 5 and maybe AF Fine Tune.

    Then there is the Missing In Action update to the Df of which plenty has been said. As we have heard from one Nikon official we should buy the Df before they come out with an update. But how about a Df successor that is based on the D7500 sensor and AF?

    • Focus stacking is one feature. Full frame 4k video is another. Improved video in almost every aspect of usability another. For other refinements, we won’t know what needs updating until they update it.

    • Thom Hogan

      Again, you miss the point (and let’s hope Nikon doesn’t). Updating key cameras is a message to customers: these cameras have legs and we’re going to make sure that they do. Remember the D400? Oops.

      Nikon has a believable problem. In spades. Every time one of those believable problems gets promoted, some customers run to competitors. Nikon 1? Not getting updated, not getting fixed. Line is dead. D300s? Not getting upgraded, high-end APS-C might be better in mirrorless. DLs? Nikon is out of compact cameras. KeyMission? Nikon is aiming at dead market and still missing. No DX lenses? DX is dead, long live mirrorless.

      What’s believable with Nikon is D500, D5, D850. Fail to update those cameras on time and the speculation starts with customers, and you lose a few more percentage points of market share. Simple as that.

      Has nothing to do with what features/fixes/performance is changed. Has everything to do with the perception of keeping the cameras “current.”

      • BVS

        While I agree, I wonder though if there are cheaper ways of ‘keeping the camera current’ that don’t involve putting new inventory on the shelf, such as:

        1. Nikon showing it’s committed to the cameras through regular firmware updates that aren’t just bug fixes. It doesn’t have to be major changes, but something like the recent D5 update that added new AF features (iirc), or maybe something like adding full touchscreen menu support to the D500. Things that would at least keep people talking about the cameras.

        2. Promoting stories/interviews/reviews about the cameras, again, to keep people talking. Something like the recent story about NASA buying dozens of D5s for the ISS, or reports from pros in the field, or some Steve Perry reviews or something. Of course, NR keeps us pretty up to date on this stuff, but I think Nikon themselves should promote/market the products more.

        3. Put out some ‘leaks’ every now and then. Again, it doesn’t have to be major. Even something as simple as “Nikon rumored to be working on a D500s” would probably generate hundreds of comments and discussion. Costs them next to nothing and keeps the myth alive.

        That’s just off the top of my head. I’m sure more creative people could come up with other/better ideas as well.

        • Thom Hogan

          1. Yes. Exactly.
          2. Again, yes.
          3. Not in agreement here. Nikon could very well use some Road Maps, which I guess is a form of leak. But true leaks have a potential for backfiring on you. Media coverage runs in sine wave cycles of hot/cold. You can get hot on rumors and cold on launch. That’s happened to a few companies along the way.

        • PhilK

          Re: feature additions in free firmware updates: much as this would be a nice thing, I suspect Nikon is worried that people will start feeling entitled to such things if they start doing it and then end up angry at the company if they never appear.

      • marymig

        Wouldn’t say Canon is keeping its cameras “current”

        • Thom Hogan

          Not exactly sure what you mean by that. Canon seems to be iterating their lines. They aren’t on the same schedule as Nikon, for sure. They seem to be a little slower on cycles, but they also have more ILC products, too.

          I suspect that by “current” you’re trying to snub the Canon sensor/features (e.g. dynamic range comparison and 4K not on a lot of models). But from their sales, it’s not clear that they need those things.

          • marymig

            Canon is far better at marketing than Nikon…it’s perception over reality.

            • marymig

              “Canon, however, has been on the decline since 2007. Its sales dropped by one-quarter over the past 10 years, and operating profit and net profit plunged to 30 percent of what they were a decade ago.”

            • PhilK

              Is that Canon as a whole, or just the camera portion? Because Canon is a very diversified company that does a lot more than just build cameras.

              For example, Canon has a huge office-equipment division, and office-equipment sales have been crashing lately, I hear.

            • Sony has the best marketing hands down, nobody else comes even close.

            • marymig

              Yeah, but they outright lie sometimes.

            • Moretimes than sometimes 🙂

        • ITN

          As always.

      • ITN

        People need to move away from the idea that new models are constantly needed. It would be better for the world that people shopped less and focused on the content they are producing.

        • PhilK

          These kinds of comments are always entertaining on a blog devoted to those who are so obsessed with the equipment that they can’t wait for an official announcement of new stuff, they have to read all the rumors constantly. LOL

          • ITN

            There are useful discussions from time to time also on this forum, it’s not just about obsession. But I think the rapid rate of introductions is not good for the photographers – it might be good for the camera manufacturers and bloggers for sure, but from it is a distraction from the pursuit of photography itself and probably a more sparse interval of introducing new bodies would be better for the photographers. Some bloggers make it sound like Nikon (or another manufacturer) MUST introduce rapid updates but I don’t think is the case. 4-year intervals with better testing of the products before launch would be better, I believe. Canon manage to hold about 50% of the ILC market yet they release new professional bodies more sparsely than Nikon.

            • PhilK

              I doubt Nikon likes a rapid refresh cycle either. But regardless what Canon is doing the real up-and-comer is Sony these days, and they release updated models at a ridiculous rate and Nikon has to respond to that to some extent.

              For example the A7RIII almost completely fixed several of the most criticized areas of the previous model, making the new one a much bigger threat to Nikon than its predecessor was.

              If a company like Nikon ignores such things, it does so at its own peril.

            • ITN

              I don’t think Nikon is ignoring the A7R III; when Tetsuro Goto was interviewed regarding the Df design some years ago, he specifically noted what a formidable competitor the A7R is. In a later interview this year he said that if Nikon go mirrorless, it must be full frame. But he may not be making the decisions so it’s not certain what Nikon will do when it comes to final products. Personally I think the A7RIII is still too small for optimal comfort in shooting; I would prefer a larger body but Sony thinks their customers choose their products because of their small size, and so there is a set of compromises involved regarding the design of controls and miniaturization. In particular if the body is small, and there is need for high end video controls, there is a scarcity of space for optimal positioning of video and still controls, as the microphones, speakers etc. also take some space. As for Sony being a threat, IMO the native E mount lenses are sufficiently expensive that it is likely to limit their market share (and adapters produce suboptimal ergonomics in many cases and there may be performance issues). Their primary professional telephoto (70-200/2.8) has gotten criticism in reviews (not up to the optical standard set by Nikon’s FL version, see e.g., lensrentals and diglloyd for criticial evaluations). I think Sony is likely to do well among photographers who prioritise video and small size, but Canon and Nikon have more experience and expertise in long lenses, for example, and while the Sony 100-400 got excellent reviews it’s still an f/5.6 telephoto which is not going to be the primary tool of those who want to make images which set themselves apart in sports and wildlife photography. And how the upcoming 400/2.8 will perform remains to be seen. Sony / Minolta have tried before with 300/2.8 and 500/4 but not with much success in the past.

            • PhilK

              The comment Mr Goto made about mirrorless FF was a debated translation, many are not convinced he actually meant “it must be FF”, I think the comment was more along the line of “Nikon must consider FF”. Big difference there. And since he’s no longer a decision-maker for Nikon product strategy one must also take his comments these days with the proverbial grain of salt.

              Also, I never suggested Nikon is actually ignoring the A7RIII, that would be highly unlikely. What I wrote is that Nikon should not ignore such matters such as A) fast release cycles from their top competitors (eg Sony), and B) the fact that some competitors like Sony are consistently improving their product and eliminating many of the top issues complained about by the public and the press on the earlier versions.

              In short, Nikon may not “like” short release cycles, but they risk falling even further behind the public’s favor if they do not respond to competitors who are updating their models very frequently – and not just making superficial changes, really addressing the top weaknesses and making them very competitive indeed.

              Re: Sony lenses in particular, I personally suspect Nikon did not predict how fast Sony would improve and expand their lens line. As they keep adding high-end models – many of which are quite good, I hear – one of the longtime smug retorts from the Nikon fanbase (that Sony isn’t a ‘real’ competitor because they don’t have ‘professional grade’ lens models) is going to ring rather empty sooner than people think.

        • Thom Hogan

          You’re mixing up what people should do with what businesses should do ;~).

          I’ve long advocated that people shouldn’t update their cameras on every release. For over a decade I’ve been writing that it rarely makes sense to do more than an every-other model upgrade. E.g. D90 to D7100. There have been exceptions both directions (no real reason to go D7100 to D7500, big reason to go D7100 from D7000).

          But companies have to build and iterate product. Period. Not doing so makes them irrelevant in today’s markets. Indeed, Nikon is getting whacked by not having a mirrorless (or high-end compact) solution when the other companies have them and are iterating them. They’ve lost a third of their ILC market share in just a couple of years.

          So I’ll continue to write that Nikon needs to preserve the higher end DSLRs as best as they can, and they need mirrorless products ASAP. Both. Not one.

          • Thanks for all your lucid writing. I think it’s still possible to build a new, stand out mirrorless camera line by incorporating some innovative customer-centric features akin [in spirit] to Maitani’s OM-X study, like

            – exchangeable [tailored] top plates
            – fully personalized grips
            – open software
            – FE mount? [gulp]

            Would also offer the chance for added revenue. Interested in your thoughts on the subject.

            • Thom Hogan

              Features are tricky. The questions you have to always ask are: (1) what is the biggest user pain point/problem? and (2) does adding this remove a user pain point/problem?

              You have to solve unsolved user problems. To understand what those are, you have to talk to users ;~).

              So, in your list, I’d say that most of those aren’t dealing with the top user problems still not solved (though open software may allow someone else to solve the user problems ;~).

              The real reason why mirrorless has done well is that it accidentally solved some user problems. IBIS solves the “can’t hold the camera steady” problem. Face detection solves the “don’t know how to control focus” problem. And so on.

              Note that pros might not have the user problems that the consumers have. I run into this all the time in workshops, where it becomes clear that most don’t understand how Nikon’s AF system actually works. Master that and you’re happy with your DSLR ;~). Don’t master it, and you’re not.

            • Adam Brown

              Even pros who understand focus can benefit from face detect/eye-detect — As it can still make their job easier. Since moving to the A7riii, I no longer “focus and recompose.” That makes it even easier for me to concentrate on composition. It speeds up my workflow. It makes it easier for me to interact with my portrait subjects, as I can spend less time focusing on focus.

              Even those who understand good camera-holding technique benefit from good stabilization — I can shoot handheld landscapes at 1/2 of a second. Without stabilization or a tripod, there is no way I’d be able to do that no matter how good my technique may be.

              That’s become the great defense of traditional dSLR — The, “I don’t need those things” argument. I always use the viewfinder, why should I care about good live view? (Because good live view makes it even easier to photograph from different perspectives without climbing on ladders or lying down in the grass). I don’t shoot video, so why do I need a camera with good video? (Maybe you don’t… but lots of other people do like the option). Pros use manual focus for video anyway so who needs good video autofocus? (Chicken or egg…. pros used manual focus in video because the autofocus was so bad. As autofocus improves, more pros will use it). I always shoot at fast shutter speeds or use a tripod, so why would I need stabilization? (Because maybe you don’t always want to lug around your tripod). I only use center point focus and re-compose, why would I need wide AF coverage, face detect, etc? (Because it can speed up your workflow, make your job even easier).

              Really… we don’t “need” any of the features of modern cameras. We don’t need 40+ mp. We don’t need AF systems with tons of cross points. We don’t need touch screens, or focus stacking or pixel shift. We could all make due with a Nikon D1 — And it would still be capable of getting us most of the shots we need.

            • I’m glad we agree that open software might be a useful tool – and proprietary routines/algorithms could still be hidden [but callable, with a documented interface]. Would even make adding an instagram-button easy.

              Not sure why 3D-printed, custom grips shouldn’t catch on. The reason I’ve not upgraded from my A7 [used mainly with vintage lenses] comes down to size, weight, and – the grip.

              Another problem to solve is obvious – affordable, nicely sized digital ink based [ie. passive] picture frames would go some way towards bringing photography back from the personal micro-screens everyone fixates on.

              Happy New Year!

      • PhilK

        Nikon 1 was atypical as it was a product line that I suspect Nikon’s finance side seems to be unable to rationalize (it’s not selling or supporting itself) but the product/management side is unwilling to kill for face-saving reasons. The fact that they are not updating it is not very surprising, management will probably only acquiesce when they have already announced a new DX/FX MILC line to “replace” it.

        It’s like those AI-S lenses they still make. I can’t imagine they sell more than a handful of them, but it’s almost like Nikon just can’t let go of these last remnants of a time when they had a more dominant position in the market or something.

        • Thom Hogan

          The story of the Nikon 1 is an interesting one and reveals a lot about Nikon as a company. Without going into details, it was key members of the D3 team that built the Nikon 1, and it was designed as a “next thing” in many, many ways. Both the J1 and V1 had less than 300 parts total, unheard of at the time for an ILC.

          The problem is that they made an inexpensive one-seat Ferrari. Management didn’t want that. They wanted an ADDITIONAL consumer line to the ones they already had, and not to displace ANY DSLR sales. There were a ton of compromises that were pushed upon the Nikon 1 designers that many of them didn’t really want. And management wanted to make back the entire R&D and marketing budget immediately, thus the pricing.

          I suspect we’re going to see Nikon start dropping a lot of those hang-on bits. They simply can’t justify them any more under current management rules. But some are a problem: they have inventory that never sold, so they would either have to write that off and scrap them, or continue to sell them until they’re gone. The non-global structure of their subsidiaries makes the latter more likely than the former.

    • PhilK

      I think the place Nikon should put their efforts to get competitive with video will be a new DX/FX MILC line. No matter what you do with a DSLR it will never be able to compete head-to-head with mirrorless for video, and Nikon needs the product-line differentiation to reduce cannibalization anyway.

      Re: the Df, I’ve always thought that model was doomed. There just aren’t enough wealthy hipsters and film reminiscers around to make such a model earn its keep. (Especially since it was not doing anything particularly great – particularly at that price point – anyway. Sensor was nice but AF was lousy and price was too high. Ain’t nobody got time [money] for that.)

  • So maybe they finally realized there’s no point spending R&I money on marginal updates to relatively niche cameras which are still the best in their own tier. Nikon better concentrate on releasing their mirrorless cameras and lenses. D6 and D600 (or whatever it’s called) can wait till 2020.

    • drororomon

      There’s already a D600 btw, but yes, they should focus on getting the mirrorless out so pros and tourists can bring a version two of it to Tokyo 2020.
      Best case scenario, they come out with something to best the A7riii and take pole position. But that camera is incredibly hard to beat and any high-end full frame mirrorless camera in that >$3k price bracket may be dead on arrival unless it’s got some neat trick to beat it.
      I really hope they can first pull a Canon and drop a M5/M6 in the <$1000-$1500 range first and work towards something to match the A7ii/iii. Then maybe the high-end mirrorless camera will be ready by Qatar 2022.

      • Sure, I know there’s a D600 already but if they want to keep the current naming scheme they’ll have to reuse the D600 name or maybe reuse D60 (probably already forgotten by most) or call it D6000 (which won’t be optimal as it’ll suggest it’s bellow the D7x00 in capabilities).
        I don’t see their first FX mirrorless at a A7RIII level cause such a camera will be a D850 competitor and we know how careful Nikon is not cannibalizing their existing cameras. They’ll probably replace the D610 with a mirrorless camera.

        • Thom Hogan

          Nikon will use new names for mirrorless. That’s a gamble (witness Nikon 1, DL, KeyMission ;~). But they don’t want to mess up what remains of their DSLR legacy.

          • BVS

            Canon has the 5D.
            Nikon has the D5.

            Canon has the M5.
            Therefore the Nikon mirrorless should be called the 5M.

            They’ve got the Big Mac.
            We’ve got the Big Mic.
            🙂

    • Thom Hogan

      If that’s what they realized, then Nikon is dead. These are Nikon’s best products. Sending any message that their best products won’t be updated is death. Pure and simple.

      • Allen_Wentz

        True, and a D5s/x upgrade should occur with similar timing to the past. However the D500
        A) has no previous reference regular upgrade cycle,
        B) remains unchallenged as best DX DSLR and
        C) has only been out for a year and a half.

        D500 should just get routine new-product firmware upgrades and wait a year for an upgrade synched to fit with all the great Nikon mirrorless coming out during 2018 :~).

        Nikon’s mirrorless response combined with shrinking market must by definition shake up the camera products mix, including DSLR. The precipitous drop in number of new Nikon bodies you note on your site must reverse in 2018 or indeed Nikon will die.

        • marymig

          Nikon’s biggest problem has been the rise of smartphone cameras. That produced a collapse in one of their consumer areas.

        • Thom Hogan

          Sure it does: the D300s was a two-year update. The D200, D300 were two-year updates to previous models. The D400 didn’t happen, nor did the D400s ;~). Are you saying that Nikon should screw up the D500 now that they’ve gotten back in form?

          There’s nothing that “syncs” DSLRs to mirrorless. I don’t think you want to try that strategy, anyway, even if it were possible. Message to customers: Enthusiast/Pro DSLRs iterate as normal. Mirrorless is our new line, starts by targeting consumers.

          • Allen_Wentz

            I absolutely think that Nikon should try to synch compact, DSLR and mirrorless. The entire camera product line road map (ideally) needs to be in a sort of synch, especially at the low and mid ends. E.g. if Nikon has a $400 Dxxx with 18-55mm kit lens, they probably should not introduce a $400 Mxxx with 18-55mm kit lens at the same time.

            I see Nikon releasing multiple cameras in 2018 and beyond, and from a management standpoint placing them to cover the full market space (synch in my verbiage) as they move forward is a good goal. Obviously A) full synchronization is impossible, B) customers will to some extent do the unexpected, distorting the planned map and C) competition will change everything. However that does not mean Nikon should not have an initial synch plan.

            • Thom Hogan

              That certainly would be my approach. It appears to be where Canon is going as the GX line gets APS-C it shares with the mirrorless and low DSLRs, and the features/controls do a slow merge.

          • PhilK

            The D300s was a 2-year update that did virtually nothing to improve the performance of the D300. So I don’t really think of that as much of an update at all.

            • Thom Hogan

              Again, people are missing the point. Appearances are everything, especially considering how much the Nikon faithful has lost faith in the company.

              A 2-year minor update, as has been done with a lot of s models over the years is not a lot different than a new model year car where they don’t make fundamental changes but do something like upgrade the stereo or change the standard feature list.

              There are plenty of simple things that Nikon should be able to do on a D500s that actually rise above that: add D9, HL, VL to the focus system, add more touch features, etc. These would extend the life of the camera, and get new press on a two-year old model. Indeed, it would sell a lot more D500’s when the D500 price drops below the D500s price.

              There’s not really any downside to Nikon doing a two-year update. There IS a downside to not doing it.

            • PhilK

              The funny thing about “appearances are everything” and specifically, frequent releases of superficially updated models, is that Nikon has already been publicly criticized for this kind of thing on numerous occasions. (See: D7500, D610, D300s, etc.) I sincerely doubt it’s some kind of magic pill for their public image, it may actually be the opposite.

          • PhilK

            I do agree about the idea of trying to ‘synchronize’ a MILC line to their DSLR line. One of the greatest opportunities for Nikon wrt releasing a new MILC line, it seems to me, is that it allows them to go in an entirely different direction and thus appeal to a type of customer that they haven’t typically been attracting to their DSLRs lately.

            Of course using the existing lens line as a stepping-stone to a full set of MILC-optimized lenses is a given, and there’s nothing wrong with that, it gives them a leg-up on companies like Fuji, Olympus and Pentax. Perhaps even some other compatibility, like remote control interfaces, etc.

            But to me Nikon has a major opportunity to re-fashion themselves and broaden their appeal by designing a completely new system that has strengths where their DSLRs traditionally were weak, and appeal to people who want something compact, elegant, quiet.. and perhaps who also don’t mind framing pics via an external or internal LCD. (The latter bit being one of the key reasons I personally have little interest in mirrorless at this particular point in time)

      • Sure they’re their best products. But considering they’re still the best in their respective category is it really needed to update them or simply focus on new products such as mirrorless, D750 successor and D6 and the D6 mini? Canon’s 1Dx isn’t updated every two years and neither is the 7D.

        • ITN

          That’s the thing – it is not necessary and buyers aren’t able to keep up anyway as people shoot sports games for the price of a movie ticket. There isn’t money in sports or wildlife photography any more as it used to be. So the camera sales should reflect that and fewer updates are sufficient.

  • Günter Hofstädter

    i´m happy with the D5 and the D850 ! Don´t care about the hype about mirrorless!

    • Graham Blaikie

      I’m with you on that. If they did mirrorless it would have to be done well, with an excellent EVF and perhaps in the style of the Df.

      • Günter Hofstädter

        A DF style would slow me down to much but probably I’d take a mirror less as a third body if it looks the same like the classic bodys.

        • Graham Blaikie

          I was thinking along those lines.

        • Allen_Wentz

          You hit my sentiments almost exactly, except that I do not much care how it looks but rather how it _feels_.

    • Claude Mayonnaise

      And the hype will continue. If they release one and pass it off to their ambassadors to market, the hype will move forward each year until it’s no longer hype but a real choice. Just depends on whether Nikon wants to create such hype for their company. I’m guessing they will. There’s no way they allow Canon to move forward with this and sit on their hands.

    • thundrrd

      I think you and every manager at Nikon feels the same way.

  • Pilgrim2112

    Nikon can’t make enough D850s to fill demand. We can expect nothing new until they have the capacity once again to handle a new product.

    • Graham Blaikie

      That sure is an interesting thought, you may be right about that.

    • That is a problem for their Thai factory and new sensor. The D5 uses a two year old sensor and is made in Japan. This should not be an issue.

      • Pilgrim2112

        I expect Nikon is moving away from Sony sensors because of Sony’s new policy of “Sony First” and for competitive reasons. They should replace refreshed models with TowerJazz sensors as the D850 is using. But I don’t think sensors have much to do with their industrial capacity. DSLRs require a lot of hand work from a skilled workforce, and I’m sure they have their backs to the wall at this time.

        • Thom Hogan

          1. Sony Semiconductor makes sensors for virtually everyone, including Canon (some 1″). There is no “Sony Imaging First.” Indeed, Sony Imaging is finding that the fact that the Sony Semiconductor fabs are at capacity that Sony Imaging is having to reschedule camera drops.
          2. The D850 doesn’t use a TowerJazz sensor. It uses some form of new IMX produced at the Toshiba fab now owned by Sony.

          • Allan

            As Sony owns the “Toshiba fab”, why not just refer to it as a Sony facility?

            • Thom Hogan

              Because it’s tricky. Sony also bought the Renasas fab. But clearly sensors on those two fabs prior to the sales were sourced differently. Given how long sensors take to bake properly (from prototype), I’m keeping the distinction in fab because it also suggests that there might not be straight Sony IMX technology involved.

          • Pilgrim2112

            I have read in many places the D850 Sensor was made by TowerJazz. Do you know otherwise?

            • Thom Hogan

              All these “places” lead back to The Angry Photographer. They’re attempts to justify various arguments made about sensors these days.

              I’ve yet to tear a D850 completely apart to see what the back markings say, but the front pin connections are clearly the same as Toshiba fab has been using. It is highly improbable that TowerJazz would duplicate that. Indeed, it’s one of the clear fab tells, as the equipment that does that is not standardized.

            • Actually the Angry guy took that info from a comment here on NR and made a big deal out of it pretending that “he is in the know” – pretty much like all of his other videos.

            • Pilgrim2112

              Maybe you can get your hands on that D850 which was shooting a time laps and the tide got it.

            • Thom Hogan

              I try to do that when I can. If anyone has a “destroyed” camera they want to send me to examine, send me a message.

      • ITN

        But to improve sales Nikon need to provide better video AF and that means a new sensor.

  • FX
    D5 – I doubt it’ll get a successor this 2018, it’s still reliable.
    D850 – Just came out, check after 4-5 years.
    D750 – I guess looking for a true D700 replacement is over after seeing what the D850 offers. It can be improved, but I guess Nikon will merge the D6XX lineup with the D75X to create a new line of entry level FX body.
    D610 – See above.

    DX
    D500 – There’s no fierce competition in this market (APS-C DSLR) and Nikon (IMHO) is still reigning. Give it a year or two for a new model.
    D7XXX, D5XXX, D3XXX – Time for Nikon to abolish the D3XXX and have a basic lineup of entry level cameras

    • BVS

      Different permutations of D3XXX cameras are currently #1, #5, #6, #7, and #9 (among the top 10) on Amazon’s top seller list under DSLRs. Most of the other top 10 is Canon’s entry level camera (T6). Why would they want to get rid of a line that still seemingly sells well? It’s not like they spend much resources on the line anyway, since the camera has barely changed since the D3200.

      • Well it still costs a lot to produce the D5XXX and the D3XXX models. It would be better if it would be merged together. There’s only minimal price difference for a few set of features.

        • marymig

          Yes, not clear why those are separate. I wonder what the marginal costs are?

        • BVS

          I still think they need different models at different price points to satisfy different levels of consumers. If they merged the D3XXX and D5XXX into a single camera (let’s call it the D4XXX), then they’ve only got a single camera to cover everything from $400 up to $1,200. How do you price it correctly?

          If they price it higher than the current D3XXX then the price conscious buyers will just purchase Canon’s cheaper entry level camera instead and Nikon loses market share.

          If they price it the same as the current D3XXX then Nikon is leaving money on the table from customers that would have paid a higher price for the current D5XXX camera.

          Also, it’s not just a minimal price difference between the two. The D3400 w. kit lens is currently $400 (with holiday sale), and the D5600 w. kit lens is currently $750, nearly double the cost. While in the overall camera world scheme of things $350 is basically nothing, to the people buying these level of cameras $350 is probably quite a lot.

    • PhilK

      Re: “true D700 replacement”, the D850 is it, and an outstanding new flag-bearer it is.

      There is little to no market today for a FF DSLR in a “D700 successor” price range with a 20MP sensor. I doubt it would sell.

      (Sony still has a 12MP FF mirrorless but it has very good video capabilities, making it much more viable in the market than a low-MP DSLR with lousy video performance.)

  • unimo36090

    nikon looks dead to me. we’ll wait 2-3 more years.

    • Luboš

      it doesn’t look that way. just fulfilling the D850 orders, and CP+ is going to show the move Nikon and Canon will have against Sony’s mirror less development. I think it is going to be remarkable year.

    • Thom Hogan

      Wrong analogy. Nikon looks like an Olympic athlete that’s trying to compete in yet another games after winning lots of medals in previous ones. They’re feeling “old.” But that doesn’t mean they’re “out.”

    • ITN

      They make three of the best cameras out there (D850, D5 and D500) in their respective categories and many of the best lenses too. Hardly dead.

  • Luboš

    CP+ is going to be the main event for photography.

    • Thom Hogan

      It’s going to be interesting to see what happens when Photokina goes yearly and moves their date forward after this coming year.

      • Nakayamahanzaemon

        Even now Photokina doesn’t matter for most makers. Why would they have to shift away from CP+ to Photokina? There is no sense at all. After all, they are all Japanese companies.

        • Thom Hogan

          You have such a narrow view of the world. More and more I think you work for one of those Japanese companies.

          Simple answer: most cameras aren’t sold in Japan. CP+ will give Japanese companies positive feedback only, no matter what the product is, because to do otherwise wouldn’t be culturally correct.

          Funny thing is, your auto companies figured this out eventually, but your tech companies still battle with this “we know what we’re doing we don’t need to really integrate with the rest of the world” attitude that hurts them.

          • Nakayamahanzaemon

            Calm down, Mr. Hogan. You’re pathetic. You haven’t answered the core question: Why do camera makers have to focus more on Photokina once it becomes yearly?

            Asia is booming, and more and more people are coming to Japan. Southeast Asia is one of the few regions where mirrorless camera is selling more than DSLR. Do camera makers need to shift focus away to Europe, far away from Asia? Well, we’ll see.

            I’m not saying that camera makers will ignore Photokina all together. Some new products may be released for Photokina. But there is no reason for now to believe that camera makers focus more on Photokina. Of course, that’s my idea.

            By the way, I haven’t said that I’m Japanese.

            • Thom Hogan

              Your reading ability is poor. “Simple answer: most cameras aren’t sold in Japan.” Right now, about half of cameras are sold in Asia/Japan, half outside of that (Europe/NA/Other). You’re not going to get many of those folk to CP+ in Japan. I’m not sure that CP+ actually attracts a large number of the rest of Asia, either. That certainly wasn’t apparent the last time I attended CP+.

              Moreover, I don’t think that a mostly Japanese audience is actually going to give the Japanese camera makers anything other than positive feedback. They need to hear the user problems of the world if they’re going to sell to the world. And Photokina is currently the best place to hear that.

  • akkual

    Nikon needs to address the fullframe mirrorless soon. Sony A7r3 is finally a fullframe mirrorless camera that can be said to be as good as DSLR in those areas where DSLR previously shined. Fuji X-series is as good as D500 except for battery lifetime. Fuji GFX boasts far better image quality as a system than anything under 10k does (body + 50/85mm), where only Zeiss Otus is capable to match the quality on FF.

    I personally have hard times to stick with my current Nikon gear, as my lightweight X series Fuji set is up to ISO1600 as good and not significantly worse at higher ISOs either. Only reasoning I can come up about updating to D850 instead of the competing mirrorless is that I have existing lenses (from which I only really like my 85/1.8 AF-S – that lens is pinnacle of Nikon, TBH) for it and that I still fear that I cannot live without OVF, but I am not so sure about the necessity of one either. The benefits of mirrorless start to outweight benefits of DSLR. And that is saying a lot.

    If Nikon would announce an F-mount compatible FF mirrorless, I would definitely stick with Nikon.

    • thundrrd

      Yep, the DSLR is dead. NIKON is dead. Death and misery ,,,

    • marymig

      What type of photography do you principally do?

    • decentrist

      D500 kills Fuji in low light

  • Thom Hogan

    I obviously question the validity of that article. It’s actually a heresay article (Dave Etchells wrote…). And I believe Dave not only misunderstood what he was told, but he was talking to Sony Imaging folk at the time, not Sony Semiconductor folk. There’s a conflict of interest there; Sony Imaging WANTS people to think Sony Semiconductor is favoring them. But my understanding is that the A7r/A9 sensors were the result of Sony IMAGING doing work. Moreover, I have it on good authority that Sony Semiconductor offered Nikon the A7r sensor for the D850.

    So I’ll stick by what I wrote.

    • PhilK

      If Sony Imaging truly wants the world to think Sony Semiconductor favors them (hellooo, antitrust enforcement) then they are a lot stupider than I thought.

      • Thom Hogan

        Antitrust works differently in Japan than elsewhere. And coopetition is a well established practice.

        • PhilK

          It matters little what antitrust laws are in Japan, companies like Nikon sell most of their products elsewhere and are subject to the same regulations in those places as any other seller. (Including the gigantic Chinese market, where government officials often seem to use such excuses to promote a nationalistic favoritism when it comes to foreign products. Nikon has been somewhat lucky so far since there is not really a competitive Chinese camera maker – yet. But they are most certainly becoming a competitor in add-on lenses and I suspect they will start moving up-market in cameras pretty soon, too.)

          Re: sensors, Sony’s marketshare in sensors has gotten to where they’d better mind their loose talk about favoring their in-house camera division lest they want to start attracting billion-dollar trade actions against them for monopolizing the sensor business and using that monopoly to gain an unfair advantage in the camera business as well.

  • marymig

    Nikon presumably designed the D850 sensor.

    • Thom Hogan

      This is arguable. There are people who say no, not exactly. And given the Nikon sensor guys that have gone to other firms lately, that gives further credence to the no, not exactly idea.

      That said, I’m 100% sure that Nikon dictated the design of the D850 sensor. They made choices from what was available to them, chose a number of bits and pieces (like from where the video reads in the photosite array and how fast), and maybe contributed something in the design. It very well could be the Toshiba photosite design moved another generation forward.

      • marymig

        We don’t know when most of the sensor was designed. Could have been before the Nikon sensor guys left, no?

        • Thom Hogan

          Yes, true.

    • Pilgrim2112

      I would think so: The D850 sensor has no onboard PDAF, so its purely a DSLR sensor, something for which Sony would have no use.

  • José Soriano

    For me if there is nothing by March about mirrorless I’m done with Nikon. I really want it to work but this is ridiculous. Panasonic and Sony are way further on the 3rd or 4th generation of great cameras and Nikon only point and shoot style mirrorless. Bahhh so disappointed

    • Just the latest mirrorless cameras announced this year are worth considering in my opinion (improved battery life, better EVF, dual memory cards, etc). When you say 3-4 generations, you have to understand that Nikon will not compete with the first Sony mirrorless camera but with the latest model. In that case the delay is only a few months, maybe a year in the worst case.

      • José Soriano

        So you say that the a7rII and a7sII are not competition? They were out way long time ago and Nikon still with the same technology. Numbers talk by themselves, for some reason Sony is growing fast. Btw I’m not a Sony fan boy, I have been a Nikon shooter since I started 10 years ago but the wait is coming to an end soon if Nikon doesn’t act in the next few months. It’s very annoying that Nikon has been anouncing rumors about a FF mirrorless since 4 months ago or even more and we don’t even know if they will anounce something soon.

        • Yes, I don’t think the previous Sony cameras were worth considering. Just my opinion. Sony basically decided to sell their work in progress and market the hell out of it. Nikon decided to wait until they get it right. The a9 and the a7r3 are a different story, and they were just recently announced. Crappy EVF, unacceptable battery life, no lenses, one memory card slot, overheating, horrible ergonomics etc. etc. etc. – would you have bought any of the old Sony a7 cameras?

        • Wade Marks

          Sony has benefited from really being the only FF MILC in town for a while now. I don’t count Leica since that’s a whole other market niche.

          Sony cameras have been lacking; poor controls and ergonomics, lack of lenses, poor battery life, etc. They are making improvements, but IMHO still lag far behind in overall usability and experience. Every time they come out with a new mirrorless FF people proclaim that this is finally it for Sony, they have arrived. That never quite happens, and then when the next model hits, people then admit the many flaws of the previous model. We are seeing that with the release of the A7Riii, where all of a sudden people are saying that the A7Rii wasn’t the holy grail, even though many proclaimed it to be.

          When Nikon and Canon enter the FF MILC game, then we will see what Sony is made of. My guess is that they will be chopped down to size. Esp. Canon will eat their lunch.

  • lordbaldric

    I’m surprised Nikon’s booth isn’t in the broom closet.

  • Claude Mayonnaise

    Good grief Nikon, can you make a few more prime lenses for your crop system.
    It’s like Pizza Hut selling pizza without cheese for a decade.

  • Connor

    I’d like to see a Nikon mirrorless but only if it’s done right so I’m willing to wait. For now I’ll stick with my D850 couldn’t go back to Sony anytime soon after the way I was treated getting a body and lens repaired. And they still don’t have anything like the 200-500 or the 150-600 offerings from Tamron or sigma.

    Tried out the 100-400 Sony in store on my A7RII wasn’t all that impressed with it especially for the £2500 asking price in the UK even grey imported it’s still expensive for what it offers.

    To be honest I’d be happy with a D850 body without the mirror.

    But guess we will just have to wait and see 🙂

    • PhilK

      Unfortunately over the last few years Nikon has really cost-cut their service resources and to make matters worse announced a new policy not to sell parts to 3rd-party repair shops, so I doubt that your Nikon service experience these days is likely to be any better than Sony, I’m afraid.

      Once upon a time Nikon had a dedicated service facility (that also supported NPS pro photographers with loaner equipment) in my city, but they closed it down years ago. Now I have to send cameras hundreds of miles away to get them serviced.

  • SkyMeow

    Big firmware update for D5 is a lot better than releasing D5s, just like what Canon had done with 1DX in response to D4s. D5 will do great for another 2 years until D6 is released.

    I actually want Nikon to spend company resources on its upcoming mirrorless rather than on D5s.

  • Wade Marks

    Interesting thread. There are 2 schools of thought on a possible D5s and even D500s update and both have validity.

    Thom argues that these are needed primarily for marketing and perception reasons…people expect them, and without them they might wonder about Nikon’s future.

    Others argue that an incremental update to the D5/D500 is not needed from a practical standpoint: they already are class leading cameras, and why confusion the market with more choices? For these people, Nikon needs to focus on a successful launch of their new mirrorless system, meeting D850 demand, and updating the D750. That’s plenty on their plate, and as Steve Jobs noted, a company should only focus on getting a few things right every year.

    IMHO I don’t think Nikon needs a D500s even for perception: most people don’t remember or care about the precedent set by the D300s…too long ago and no one cared at that time anyway.

    A D5s would be more in keeping with past tradition…as others have noted, I don’t think it is needed from a practical standpoint of features. As for perception, I think with this pro model Nikon has more leeway than with consumer models. The type of people who buy the D5 series don’t care about market perception; it’s a tool and this tool doesn’t need updating. And I think virtually everyone in this market will be fine with a longer upgrade cycle, like the Canon 1DX series. As it is many pro’s don’t upgrade every cycle anyway. I know pro’s still using the D3 and D3s.

    If Nikon does update then fine. But I tend to agree that Nikon needs to focus on their new mirrorless. If Nikon does that and gets D850 to supply/demand equilibrium, and a replacement for the D750, that will be a lot accomplished.

    • Tieu Ngao

      Agreed, especially about the mirrorless. I’ve been waiting for a Nikon mirrorless camera that’s more compact than my D750 for casual outings (something similar as Fuji X-T20 or X-E3).

    • unimo36090

      you sound like a serious photographer, but from a perspective of an enthusiast like me who uses nikon. i think their taking their time developing a mirrorless body.

  • unimo36090

    mirrorless medium frame development is going up. it will only become mass marketable.

  • saywhatuwill

    They have nothing to say.

  • Eric Calabros

    Nikon was absent at NAB 2017, right? But at NAB 2018, they will return.. here is their booth https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6196f80c9a89d362dce0d90e98b654d128a2d3a43a4d4be7108b10824ed13b91.jpg

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