Nikon announces the closing of sales operations in Brazil


Nikon Brazil issued a press release announcing that they will no longer sale Nikon equipment in Brazil. Currently Nikon sales only through their e-commerce site in Brazil. With e-commerce closing, they will also close all sales in that country. Nikon will continue to fix broken equipment under warranty. Nikon does not have any real distribution network in this country. Brazilian camera stores sell only gray market Nikon gear without a factory warranty. Here is the full press release:

Nikon do Brasil Ltda. announces the closure of e-commerce in Brazil

Nikon Corporation is optimizing R & D, Sales and Manufacturing structures in a global scale restructuring.

As part of this process, Nikon do Brasil Ltda. - from December 31, 2017 will close the sale of cameras, lenses and photographic accessories for the Brazilian market, currently marketed exclusively through its e-commerce, the Nikon Store. The company's other business segments, including customer service and technical assistance, will continue to operate normally in Brazil.

Products under warranty, including those marketed by Nikon Brazil's e-commerce through December 31, 2017, will continue to honor the warranty periods. For out-of-warranty products, where possible, technical assistance will be provided based on costs approved by the owners.

São Paulo, November 6, 2017.

Auster Nascimento
President - Nikon do Brasil


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  • That’s a shame. Weren’t they aiming to gain market share in emerging markets?

    • MB

      Yup, but those markets emerged much smarter than Nikon and are buying gear at much lower prices than Nikon would like…

      • Jon Godfrey

        No it has nothing to do with being smart and everything to do with the tax system in Brazil. If you’ve ever tried to do business there you would be shocked.

        • Originaru

          Canon prices are competitive.

          • Albert

            Competitive with what? Canon Brasil sellt the Rebel T6s for US$2000. Body alone. A 70D (not 80D) with a kit 18-135 is well over US$3000.

        • Mr B

          Spot on Jon – not all markets create level playing field for imported goods.

        • It once looked like Brazil would make the leap from Lesser Developed Country (LDC) to a Developed country. They’ve actually been going backwards for the last couple years.

    • Roger S

      Apparently one great success has been India. I seem to recall that Nikon foresees India becoming an important market for them in the future.

      • So much success that they have priced D850 more than in US. But on the other hand they also have given us (in india) a decent supply of D850.

        • br0xibear

          The prices in India are the same as here in the UK, I thought they might be cheaper but no.

          • r2d2

            I got it for ~3400USD here in India on launch day. Its not as high as in UK

            I was expecting it to be lower then US prices. But cameras are now categorized at a much higher 28% tax bracket. I guess that was the reason. (lenses are taxed at 18%)

            • br0xibear

              I was there about a year ago, I looked at buying a D5 but at that time the prices were identical to the UK prices.

            • ZoetMB

              If that $3400 includes the 28% tax, which I presume is a VAT, then the base price of the camera is only $2656.25, much less expensive than the U.S.

            • r2d2

              yes, its inclusive of taxes

        • Daniel Shortt

          The D850 is 1100USD more in Australia, than the US. I think the US gets cheaper prices than any other country.

          • Leonardo Baraldi

            In Brasil, minimum 200% over oficial USA price! The warranty in Brasil is a bad joke… No NPS program…

          • This happened in India only for D850. Everything else till now was cheaper than US.

          • Piotr Kosewski

            Official US prices exclude VAT, as it varies depending where you live.

            Also, you have to remember that warranty standards in many countries are much higher than in US and that’s a significant part of the price in complicated electronics.
            E.g. minimum warranty length in EU is 2 years (for any product purchased by a consumer). In US you usually have to buy an additional insurance plan.

        • RKS

          You’ll get it for a dealer discounted price (Around Rs.2,10,000 for body)

          • I already got it on launch day for similar price. But the point is, Official MRP is a lot more than US. And this has happened for the first time that the discounted price is equivalent to that in USA

            • RKS

              Hmm. That’s true. I guess it will come down with GST being revised to 18% instead of the earlier 28%

      • RKS

        Nikon dominates the Indian market for DSLRs with more than 50% market share

    • Marcelo Gimenes

      Moro aqui no Brasil, os preços que a Nikon Brasil vende são altos, tem muitas pessoas que compram no Paraguai para revender aqui no Brasil mais barato do que a loja da Nikon, pois conseguem trazer os equipamentos escondidos e não pagam impostos. Aqui o governo cobra 50% de impostos.

  • Maurício Costa

    Sad…

  • Giorgia

    negative peak?

  • Eric Calabros

    Next: Kill Nikon USA for good

    • Jacob Smith

      Another Sony troll…

      • Eric Calabros

        If I’m Sony troll, Justin Trudeau is Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo.

        • Jebagi Erol Paker

          Eric is a wild Nikon fan with agood sence of humor

      • Delmar Mineard Jr

        +1

    • Wildness

      Jacob… Yep, the Cult of Sony is strong with this one.

      • Integral Moments

        Why assumed he is a sony troll, he might be a Canon or Fuji or other brand troll!!!

        • Integral Moments

          I think he is being sarcastic and not a troll folks

          • Ian Lindo

            I’ve read enough articles on NR to know he’s not a troll – he’s probably a Nikon fan like the rest of us, if anything.

        • Wildness

          I’ve never read a Fuji Troll and Canon Trolls seem to be few and far between these days. The Cult of Sony on the other hand is very active – they seem to hate everything that isn’t Sony… I’m surprised they haven’t revolted against Sony putting an AF-ON button on the new A7rIII… sacrilege to do something that cameras have had for decades. Just sayin’.

    • Allan

      LOL

    • Yoong KP

      if you have nothing good to say…..just shut up

      • Allan

        His comment was funny. Your comment was rude and unacceptable.

        • Roger S

          Yes, particularly if you are familiar with even a small set of the large number of useful comments that Eric Calabros makes on Nikon Rumors. A word to the wise: avoid making rude comments about other site members until you are more familiar with the site itself. Lurk for a while first, until you get the sense of the place and the people who use it.

  • Igor Barra

    I do not know how to last this long. Here at the online store of Nikon Brazil, a D750 body is only today costing $ 2757.

    Because of the high taxes on imported products, 99% of the market is dominated by paraguay cameras (where the tax is minimal) that are resold without payment of taxes

  • Igor Barra

    I do not know how to last this long. Here at the online store of Nikon Brazil, a D750 body today is on sale at U$ 2757.00

    Because of the high taxes on imported products, 99% of the market is dominated by paraguay cameras (where the tax is minimal) that are resold trought the web without payment of taxes

    • SteveWithAnS

      I remember being in the Sao Paulo airport a few years ago and seeing a D7200 being sold for 2x the price it was selling for in the USA at the same time…

      • Lukasz

        The same in Poland, expect there is no grey market here to compensate but used camera market dominates…

  • Wildness

    If the camera stores will only cary gray market, then the best business decision is to pull out and only support known direct customers.

    • Abhinav

      Taxation can be a main issue .

    • Thom Hogan

      Uh, what? You mean continue the don’t-repair-gray tactics Nikon uses worldwide? (At least where legal to do so)

      Exactly the wrong answer to Nikon’s woes.

  • neonspark

    So much for BRIC economies. More like IC now.

  • Abhinav

    Not a good news -_-

    • I talked to a reader from Brazil – my understanding is that Nikon never had a real distribution there and sold only from their website. They are basically shutting down their online store. Photo stores in Brazil never sold Nikon gear with warranty – only gray market as I mentioned in my post. So while it sounds really bad, it is not that big of deal. There are many countries out there without a “real” Nikon distribution. Many people buy from the US because we almost always have the lowest prices.

      • Abhinav

        Maybe Nikon missed the trick by not killing gray market like they did here in India .Gray market is almost negligible for nikon goods.

      • Originaru

        Not true at all…
        I don’t recall having an Nikon exclusive store, if it’s what he meant but yes there were stores that sold Nikon officially with warranty, he is probably missinformed.

      • CaMeRa QuEsT

        I remember a time when the only reasonable priced SLR in Brazil were Yashicas because they were assembled locally in the Manaus free trade zone if I’m correct, and they were more like re-branded Contax bodies and lenses than the lowly Yashicas found in the rest of the world.

      • CNMorais

        The problem here is a ghoulish tax policy. At first, the objective was demotivates imports, and help entrepeneteurs to build industrial plants in Brazil. To keep tradiiton, every new Government changed the policy, an now we have a Frankenstein… Imports costs the double plus 25%. It works this way for official importers, like Nikon. A truly shame.

      • Thom Hogan

        I think people are missing the forest for the trees. Or tree in this case.

        So, effectively Nikon has decided that gray market into Brazil is the answer. This is at the root of one of Nikon’s key problems. They use gray to effectively micromanage sales rates. Sales down a bit? Dump some more into gray.

        Nikon can’t move inventory between regions. They’ve effectively set up a system whereby all their methods and measurements require subsidiary protection, and the net impact of that is actually corporate protection (a lot of warranties and subsidized repairs denied, among other things).

        The Brazil story is just a piece of a bigger decision that Nikon management recently made. The short version: business as usual.

        • Originaru

          THIS!

      • ZoetMB

        Except that the costs of running a website (and presumably also a warehouse to fulfill the orders) is so relatively small, one wonders why they wouldn’t keep it going. There are 208 million people in Brazil, although many are poor and wouldn’t buy the products, but that’s true in India and other countries as well. How does a company simply walk away from that?

        And if Nikon didn’t want to own distribution there, they could have permitted another company to distribute for them.

        Unless they figured that cameras were selling anyway, but they were grey market. Grey market makes no difference to Nikon corporate – it only makes a difference to the local units.

  • Randolf Sack

    Can someone explain to me where gray cameras come from? They must originate form Nikon, do Nikon sell somewhere real cheap or how does it happen?

    • Marek Hild

      Most grey market electronics come out of Hong Kong.

    • Thom Hogan

      Yes, they come from Nikon. Nikon dumps some inventory into (mostly) SE Asia, particularly Hong Kong. For decades this was a functional tool for them to stabilize their sales numbers without having to hold back things on their books such as warranty reserves.

      And the money in HK was easily available to even smaller distributors via on-demand loans. A couple of years ago the loans started to get tougher to obtain, because as overall camera market volume declined the value of the collateral (the gray cameras/lenses) became risky. There are still many players left, but the days of “anyone can play” seem to be gone.

  • animalsbybarry

    Closing markets
    Closing plants
    Increased profits

    Is Nikon doing well or poorly ????

    • Integral Moments

      Reconstruction and new strategy. They sent a letter explaining this matter, don’t worry bro

      • he is just trying to troll

        • Allan

          I don’t interpret Barry’s comment as trolling.

        • animalsbybarry

          Peter
          I do not consider my comments as trolling
          I try to present a balance of comments. Some are good and some are bad….I take a middle of the road position
          If I said only good things about Nikon then Nikon fans would be very happy with me and Sony fans would not be

          But I get Sony fans just as upset with me

          This comment has presented 3 recent news events and asked the simple question for debate… is this good or bad ?

          With all due respect I truly do not believe this is trolling

          • My point is that I am not sure what kind of answer do you expect on a question line that? Cutting cost and maximizing profits is something every company does. If you read the other comments and my post, you will understand that this whole closing does sound bad, but in reality it doesn’t mean anything. It’s very simple – Nikon had much more expenses than revenue in Brazil and they shut down the place. Nobody was buying from them anyway. Remember, we are taking only about an online store here. Nikon never had a distribution in Brazil.

            • Thom Hogan

              See my post above about forest and tree(s). The Brazil thing is one visible aspect of a decision Nikon management made that is more wide-reaching.

    • Allan

      Today, on paper, they’re ok. But, as Thom and many others have pointed out, they did to increase market share to stay compettive.

      • I don’t think this is the answer he was looking for because we have discuss this over and over for a long time.

      • ZoetMB

        What makes you think Nikon is “okay”? 2nd quarter results announced today. For the overall company (not just the imaging group), revenue is down 4.5% from last fiscal and down 0.8% from the last estimate. Operating profit is down 15% from last fiscal but up 35% from the last estimate. Op profit before taxes is down 27% from last fiscal, but up 19% from the last forecast.

        For the Imaging Group, they’ve actually decreased share to approximately (as compared to CIPA shipments in the same 6-month period) 21.6% in DLSRs, 20.2% in compacts and 20.3% in lenses. Hopefully they’ll gain back a few points once the D850 ships in quantity. Nikon themselves are predicting for the full year a 23.6% removable lens camera share, a 22.8% compact share and a 21.7% lens share. Which means that even with the D850, Nikon is still predicting share losses. Last fiscal (full-year), it was 26.4% cameras, 25.4% compacts, 24.1% lenses.

        Their new full year estimate, although an increase over the previous estimate, has them at 19.35% below the previous fiscal for DSLRs, 27.9% below for compacts and 19.91% below for lenses. So by Nikon’s own predictions, they’re still declining at substantial rates. CIPA has DSLR sales down just 2.9% for April-September, representing the first two quarters of Nikon’s fiscal.

        The estimate ups DSLR sales by 100,000 units, so that’s obviously the impact of better sales than expected for the D850, but that’s not really that big a number, which seems to indicate that they don’t think they can get a lot of units onto dealers shelves before March or that they don’t actually have all the sales that the current shortages imply. They’ve upped the estimate for compacts by 300,000 units!!! (How can that be?). They’ve upped lens sale estimates by 200,000 units. Those numbers also seem to indicate that there will be no mirrorless this fiscal year.

        Overall, I’d still say that performance sucks. Any American company would have long ago cleaned house. Nikon’s presentation materials still have the same generic meaningless phrases: “Strengthen profit model”, “Strengthen business structure”, “Efficiency and integration leading to improve productivity”, etc.

        • Allan

          Thanks for the numbers and analysis. I agree with your overall assessment of performance.

          As Thom has pointed out recently, they have had three (? am I remembering the number correctly) previous downturns and have been able to turn it around each of these times.

          A cat has nine lives. Hopefully, Nikon has a fourth life and can again turn it around.

    • EarlFargis

      Barry, the issue best I can figure isn’t the fact Nikon gear isn’t selling in Brasil. The issue is excessive taxation which has driven sales into the underground (grey market) economy to avoid taxation. Nikon is a legitimate business which has to follow the rules and can’t directly compete against the grey market in Brazil.

      Heck, if you go onto eBay you’ll see tons of grey market Nikon items for sale and in the case here in US the is savings is only a couple hundred bucks. In the case of Brazil it seems savings could much more than that.

      While not the way Nikon would like it (or the customer who loses warranty protection), ultimately a sale is a sale even if it’s at Hong Kong prices.

    • HD10

      There are many countries where Nikon does not have a presence but in which Nikon’s products are profitably sold through official distributors and gray market importers. The closure of the Nikon Office in Brazil likely indicates that it is not profitable to maintain an office there but not whether selling Nikon products is profitable to all those involved in the selling.

      • Yes, this is exactly what I said in my previous comments. People are making a big deal out of nothing. “Closing markets”…

        • David Peterson

          It isn’t unexpected at all that people would respond like this (not realising the situation that almost everything is “grey market” anyway).

          I kinda feel this post on NR is doing more harm than good, due to being (very unintentionally) misleading to the average reader :-/

      • Thom Hogan

        And yet we don’t see a similar announcement from Canon ;~). There’s more to the Brazil announcement than Brazil.

        • HD10

          Easy enough to explain. Canon sells many products other than cameras. That is not the case with Nikon. There are many countries in the world where Canon has a sales office but where Nikon does not sell directly but through distributors and gray market channels.

    • Thom Hogan

      Depends upon whose future you believe. Nikon management seems to think everything is under control. And historically, this is the same game plan they’ve used before when consumer product sales failed for them.

      But some of us think that there’s a more fundamental change happening in the market, and that Nikon’s old game plan will probably result in them continuing to contract.

      • br0xibear

        “Nikon’s old game plan will probably result in them continuing to contract.”…I thought that was the plan ?
        There’s less people buying cameras, make fewer models, make them more expensive, stretch model lifespans and become more of a niche business like Leica.
        Or throw in the towel and sell to a bigger company.

        • Thom Hogan

          Well, it seems to be Nikon’s plan. But Canon doesn’t seem to be projecting the kind of volume loss Nikon is. Fujifilm is growing. Sony is growing. Olympus is holding steady.

          So continued contraction by Nikon means only one thing: lower market share. Lower market share is a big problem. It affects your parts and marketing costs, among other things.

          • br0xibear

            Yeah, I think Canon too will feel the pain like Nikon has, but being a far bigger company and with different income streams they can cope better.
            Fuji found their particular niche very quickly and made the most of it, I don’t think they and Olympus will grow much more if at all.
            Sony is the big one, big as in they’ll dominate, they have enogh money to make mistake after mistake and still come out on top, eventually they’ll get it right. And one big thing some people don’t understand is that this is Sony…the same Sony as in Playstation…and it’s the Playstation generation that are buying these Sony cameras.
            Canon and nikon don’t have that type of brand loyalty outside the very small pro/enthusiast bubble.
            In the end it comes down to the same thing, most people don’t need, don’t buy and will never buy a camera that’s not inside their mobile phone…the one’s that do will have to pay a far higher price it.

            • Allan

              Many good points.

            • “some people don’t understand is that this is Sony…the same Sony as in Playstation…and it’s the Playstation generation that are buying these Sony cameras.”
              Actually this makes sense and explains a lot…

            • ZoetMB

              I’ve said numerous times now that younger photographers (although somewhat limited to those with money) are attracted to Sony. Canikon is perceived as “my father’s camera”. Younger photographers are the future. Nikon has to design a camera that appeals to them or they won’t have much of a future. They can’t live off baby boomers as they’re disappearing.

              I don’t think it’s because Sony is the same company as the Playstation. It’s because the overall design appeals to younger people. And remember, most of the younger people aren’t going to buy the big, expensive lenses, so for them, the bulk actually is reduced substantially.

              Nikon needs to be as adventurous was they were when they launched digital cameras and especially when they launched the D70. They didn’t hold back because they were afraid of cannibalization or erosion of film camera sales.

            • Originaru

              There is much more to it as well, but yes you can say that the first consumers of sony cameras were the ones who related to their products, and mainly Consoles, TVs, and Audio in general, nowadays i can’t say for sure that their focus still is the gamers, they are transistioning to the photographers first/ geekies second.
              You can see this in the menu scheme.
              I can consider myself the ex gamer-photographer, who had little problems with the sony menus, and had not a clue about the importance of color science. A very thought path to learn so much info about what makes a photo really sing…

        • ZoetMB

          Selling fewer units at higher prices is fine as long as you maintain market share. But Nikon is continuing to lose market share across the board. See my long post above re: Nikon 2nd quarter financials released today.

          • br0xibear

            They can’t maintain market share, because that market now includes a new powerful player called Sony, and the market itself is shrinking due to mobile phones.
            Using a Playstation phrase…Game Over.

  • Allan

    Per Investopedia,

    Brazil is the 8th largest economy in the world.
    India is the 6th.

    Sad for Nikon.
    Sad for the Brazilians.

    • Kriss_De_Valnor

      8th largest economy in the world and still a shithole.

      • br0xibear

        That comment is out of order….go somewhere else to post comments like that.

        • Allan

          Agree.

    • Roger S

      More may be involved than the size of the total economy, however. In this century India has expanded, and should continue to expand, its share of total global middle class consumption quite dramatically, while a less equal distribution of wealth (among other things) has held back Brazil and many other countries in this regard. Markets for consumer goods should be very healthy in India for some time to come.

      Still, Nikon’s move is sad news, although Brazilians have apparently figured out ways to cope.

  • Phanter

    Happy 100th birthday Nikon!!!

  • St Ooges

    I live in Brazil and I can tell you that NOBODY here buys this kind of stuff from official sources, taxes are too high and grey market stores can sell products even with invoices by almost half the price. So this store closing doesn’t really mean anything

    • yes, this is why I said that this is not that big of a deal in reality

    • Allan

      Do you have trouble getting competent repairs?

      • Leonardo Baraldi

        The parts are very expensive, have no parts in stock, are imported on demand and skilled labor is scarce. Independent repairers do not have equipment to calibrate the cameras or lenses, after changing parts …

        This is the reality in Brazil.

    • Spy Black

      Soooo…does that apply to all brands?

      • FSA

        Not really. As a said Canon Online Store in Brazil sometimes has really good prices.

      • Originaru

        Nope, Canon have decent prices, at least much better if you compare the USA vs BRASIL prices.
        And better overall support here.

      • Semaphore

        As far as I can tell it seems most Canon cameras aren’t even available on the official store… it’s mostly only Rebels. The T6I with kit lens is 3900 BRL, or $1200 USD.

        Curiously the 1DX (not mark II) is available, but for 23,500 BRL which is $7200 USD. If Canon only bothers to sell the most entry level or outdated models, I can see why the other posters say they have “good prices” relative to the US.

    • VanHoff

      I Live in Colombia and I think that what you describe is the same situation all over south-america, we face very high taxes that make almost impossible to buy from official retailers or brand houses, I buy from amazon.com but lately the customs in Colombia are retaining the gear until we pay up to 30% taxes over the value of the gear in usd, not even the local currency.

      • Eric Calabros

        What’s wrong with your governments?

        • VanHoff

          Well… think about this: If one wants to buy gear from here without leaving such absurd amount of money paying taxes (up to 30% per item base value), the “easiest” way is to visit the U.S in person and buy the gear personally at a store, then you bring the articles back to your country and pay no taxes (they pass as personal goods) if you don’t carry a suspicious amount (don’t remember if the limit is something like 10.000 usd or a little less)…

          So… the trade treaties between the U.S and Colombia force the people here to do one of two (three) things:

          1. Buy to domestic “official” traders and get ripped off by huge taxes on technology.

          2. (And this is where the trade treaties go against the pocket of the citizen of 3rd world countries) Travel to the U.S (if the embassy allows you), “invest” money in the trip and get the illusion of buying cheap directly to a store like B&H (but be careful, you are not allowed to surpass 10.000 usd or you will be get ripped off back to Colombia at the customs section in the Airport) and convince yourself that you are a smart guy and have saved some money.

          The trick here is that all the money stays in the U.S just like the treaty was intended for.

          (3. Bonus) Go domestic black market, if you are lucky you’ll get some goods like if it was gray market, without any warranty, but you “save” good money… At the big risk of being cheated by black market dealers and end up losing more money… And to people like me who make a living out of providing photography for different clients, it will be a death sentence to end up with broken or non functional gear.

          So, customers in countries like the U.S have plenty of options for honest trade, everybody in the chain wins and nobody is forced to try illegal things in order to get the tools (for a decent price) to make a living from what you have learned at college, in order to be a professional in your field.

          So, what’s wrong with my country?, that little thing I just explained, and that’s only the beginning, but this is a photography discussion and I’ll leave it that size. 😉

      • Chris

        This is the same all over Europe. If I buy something at B&H I have to pay 21% VAT (Dutch). Together with Customs fee, handling fee, shipping costs the extra is well over 30%. The VAT is charged on the item price + shipping costs.
        A real-life example from B&H:
        SanDisk 64GB Extreme PRO UHS-II SDXC ($119.95) and Sony 64GB XQD G Series ($116.50) total $236.45 = €204,00
        My CC will be charged for $363.91 = € 315,00 (cheapest shipping costs). If I forget the CC-costs and poor exchange rate this is over 50% extra
        If I buy it in Holland it’s € 258,00 “just” 25% more expensive (I guess VAT + Customs).

      • Athanasius Kirchner

        Not us in Chile, no 😀 Perú also has a lot of imports at decent prices.
        Here, Sony sells at basically US prices + VAT (19%) although at certain times they’re priced significantly lower than in the US, which is incredible. They’ve been trying to sell an A-mount 500mm f/4 SSM for a year now at half price (9,000 USD), still no takers…
        Canon is more expensive, and Nikon is stupid overpriced.

        • Neopulse

          Not even VAT should exist (IVA in Argentina) it’s essentially highway robbery.

    • Proto

      And …. Brazil and Rio’s beaches need big medium format sensors to catch all the bouncing glory! : )

      • Allan

        I need to plan a trip to Brazil.

        Are Brazilians as pastry crazy as the Portuguese? This would be another reason to go.

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          Nope, that’s Argentina you’re thinking about. They’re really, really good at making pastries and desserts. My experiences in Brazil have been underwhelming in that regard.

          • Neopulse

            Although Argentina has its dulce de leche stuff, Brazil has brigadeiro, and that shit is awesome.

            • Originaru

              Never call it shit, althought it has the same color.

            • Allan

              “Shit”, as in this case, is frequently used in slang in a positive way. 🙂

        • Proto
  • Jacob Smith

    In end like any large company you have to streamline and get rid of any assets that are not performing up to par. In the end if this makes Nikon stronger all the more better.

  • FSA

    I am Brazilian.
    It’s true that Nikon’s prices are high and our tax system is absurd, but the online store canon here sometimes has really good prices. Taxes do not explain everything. Excuse me for my bad English.

    • Allan

      Your English is excellent.

      • FSA

        Thanks!

    • David Gottlieb

      Nothing wrong with your English!

      • FSA

        Thank you!

    • Roger S

      Your English is far superior to my Portuguese, which I learned mainly by listening to subtitled copies of Zé do Caixão movies.

      • FSA

        Portuguese ia a crazy language to learn!

        • Roger S

          And to pronounce! — especially if you are used to the other Romance languages. But its a fascinating language to hear being spoken. (I should also clarify my earlier post by admitting that my actual knowledge of Portuguese is pretty limited.)

          • FSA

            It is not so easy to find a foreigner that knows something in portuguese. Thanks for think that our language is fascinating!

      • Originaru

        Hahahahaha! That was a funny way to learn a language!

      • CG462

        A Coffin Joe fan. Nice.

  • Originaru

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
    Nikon is ridiculous! They should have shame of theirselfs their prices here in Brasil are astronomical and they are outrageous compared to anywhere i have been before, and Canon prices are nowhere near, they though Brasilians were idiots.
    Thank god they are leaving.
    Never made any difference here.

    • Originaru

      BTW, before anyone call me a troll or fanboy, all my gear is Nikon!

    • Neopulse

      It’s not Nikon’s fault their prices. Why do you think Nikon is much cheaper in Hong Kong or the US? Because taxes are far less than that of Brazil. Blame the socialist government, not the private company. They are the ones that make businesses difficult to exist and flourish.

      • Originaru

        Why Canon can provide much better prices than Nikon?

        • Neopulse

          Maybe they get tax exemptions in comparison to other companies trying to compete. Canon most likely gets because they produce other goods than Nikon does which is strictly camera tech. So more likely that is the reason.

          You also have to remember that despite being a socialist country, there is still crony capitalism to a degree which includes corporate welfare.

          • Originaru

            I don’t think this is the real reason.
            The price differences should not be that big, still i agree with you reasoning that Canon may have an extra tax exemption because of the other goods they produce. Nikon made the wrong strategy here, thinking people would go for 2 to almost 3 times the price for a warranty which will rarely be fullfilled, here we lack places to go reliably when anything happens to our Nikon gear. Not really an official repair store…
            Nikon should never entered after so much time of omission on our country, selling cameras at car prices almost. They should tried to compete with Canon.

  • Pedro Henrique Matsuo

    The 105mm 1.4E is on sale at nikon Brazil for about US$2300.00 after taxes. Great deal! Just got one. My first and last purchase there. All my other gear I bought in the US.

    • Originaru

      Eles estão fazendo alguma queima de estoque por um acaso?

      • Pedro Henrique Matsuo

        No big sale actually. Just this lens. 58mm and 85mm 1.4 are at the same price, but they cost a lot less in the US. I’ll keep looking for deals until the end of the year.

        PS: preferi manter a discussão em inglês

    • Roger S

      It looks like there’s quite a lot on sale now at Nikon Brazil.

    • Matsuo

      I’ve received the invoice today. Look how crazy it is here in Brazil: I paid a total of R$ 7,583.00. This includes federal taxes of R$ 2,078.00 and estate tax of R$ 1,182.00. Total taxes are R$ 3,261.00!! Nikon receives R$ 4,322.00 (about US$ 1,321.00). I know the lens is on sale, but it is only 10% off…

  • Nakayamahanzaemon

    Nikon got out of camera sales directly through its own retail shop in Indonesia this year, and has integrated its channels through a distributor, according to today’s Nikkei.

    • Thom Hogan

      Yep. What I said. Brazil is just one of the trees. Look at the forest folks.

      • Michiel953

        Brazil and Indonesia really aren’t the best examples for trees and forests.

  • Claude Mayonnaise

    Whew…for a second there I though they were getting rid of the Brazilian Wax.

    • The sheer thought of that curdles my mayonnaise.

  • Rogério Peccioli

    Também moro no Brasil. Infelizmente o sistema tributário no Brasil e canibalesco para as empresas e para seu consumidores. Uma pena pela Nikon sair do país!!

  • Lukasz

    The same in Poland, i.e. cameras priced 2x more than in USA, expect there is no grey market here to compensate but used camera market dominates…

  • jonebize

    Brasil really wanted that Digital FM, it looks like. =( #MeToo

  • Shark

    oh boy.. whatever you say that is never a good sign.

    and i guess there are other markets in trouble too then.

  • Carlos Eduardo Sampaio

    Sad but unfortunately they prices strategy was crazy here in Brazil, the D810 price is about USD 7K here. I know that out taxes are stupid, but it didn’t reach 200%.

    • Neopulse

      If cheap cars go for crazy expensive in Brazil, then you can imagine any other imported goods.

  • Katie Middleton

    I live in brazil … D750 is $3000 ONLY BODY in official store !!!! D500
    is $3500 !!! Brazilians is a rich people !!!

  • CNMorais

    ANOTHER bad news… We’re sinking fast here…

  • Gaonkar

    Yes very true. Some Governments don’t have the basic sense and still view Cameras as an equipment of ” LUXURY”. Thus levying very high Sales Taxes. India is no different. They suddenly jacked up the taxes from 12% to 28%. Now we hear news that people are trying to get smuggled grey market goods into the country.

    Greed for making money exhibited by Governments is pushing Photography Industry & Camera users into deep trouble.

  • Amir

    So that simply means Nikon left Brazil market in favor of Sony & Canon?

    • Neopulse

      Nah, just too expensive to keep operating there

  • Claude Mayonnaise

    In this day and age I think Nikon and the majority of camera makers marketing is ineffective or nearly nonexistent in the USA. You go to NYC and there are stores dedicated to swatch watch. Apple has stores that are packed from wall to wall selling there products.
    In the States, consumers walk into Costco and see a wall of Canon 80D for $1300 and say to themselves “who cares, where are the food samples”
    I think Canon is better than Nikon in this regard. They are doing something right. Nikon needed some forward thinking years ago but it never seems to have arrived. When you think of Canon you think Nat Geo photographer or Wildlife. When you think of Fuji you think modern/Street. What do we think of when we think of Nikon?
    Nikon makes some of the best equipment on the planet and because of that fact they should not have allowed any reasons to exist that results in closing anything down or restricting their products from being available anywhere in the world.

    • Allan

      “What do we think of when we think of Nikon?”

      Yokan.

    • Roger S

      “What do we think of when we think of Nikon?”

      Off the top of my head: CSI tv show :-), photojournalists, NASA, my wish list

      • ZoetMB

        That’s not good enough. CSI is mainly watched by older demographics. Photojournalists are in decline and many are now sent out with smartphone cameras and even if that wasn’t the case, it’s rare that anyone ever sees one. It’s great that NASA has used Nikons, but few people realize that or care.

        Nikon has to sell cameras based on how an average person or camera enthusiast would relate to using one. Aside from trade shows and a few generic ads, Nikon does very little marketing and the marketing they do accomplish seems ineffective. Now one can claim that I’m incorrect about that or can’t prove that statement, but the proof is that Nikon makes some great equipment, but is consistently losing market share.

        • Roger S

          “That’s not good enough.” I agree completely, and almost added something to that effect to my post. The things that I listed were meant to show that my response to the question is a personal (and, yes, older demographic) one, and I to suggest that such personal responses are insufficient to bring Nikon to the level of success that it enjoyed, say, in the 1970s when I first took up photography as a serious pastime.

          I also agree that inadequate and ineffective marketing has been part of Nikon’s problem, along with the stronger competition that it faces and a host of other things. How Nikon has lost such a significant portion of its market share while its products have continued to improve in significant ways remains a mystery to me. As you say, though, addressing the ways in which average consumers and camera enthusiasts think of Nikon must be part of the answer to the company’s problems.

          • Allan

            There appears to be a frequent theme in many of the posts: disappointment.

            We are disappointed that Nikon, that makes excellent products, is losing market share, and can’t sell products to young people.

            • Allan

              And for some, the disappointment is accompanied by disgust.

    • MiK Images

      Now, when I think about Nikon, my first think is “dying”.
      Closed factory
      Nikon 1 is dead
      etc.
      Rest In Peace Nikon

      • When I first look at this comment, my first thought is “trolling”… Did Nikon closed all of their factories? I must have missed that. I was also not aware that they sell only Nikon 1.

        • MiK Images

          Peter, it’s my opinion 🙂 I rather see the Nikon’s future in dark colours. Inconsitent or unclear product lines and their future, no roadmap, changes of decision.
          Personally I like Nikon cameras, and Nikon shows us that is able to develop great product (eg. D850) . But I don’t like unclear vision where Nikon is going to go.

      • Claude Mayonnaise

        I think Nikon certainly deserves some negative comments such as this but they also have come out with excellent products such as the D500, D850. This is serious equipment probably being used by plenty of folks to feed their families. When they get it right they get it right. The problem is they seem to make bad decisions in other areas. I think they should have already been humming along with a fourth version of a Coolpix A. I think they should have released those one inch compacts. I think they should have probably kept the one inch system and priced it far below what they asked. It’s decisions from within the company that cause some of the disappointments. The equipment has always been pretty dang good.

  • T.I.M

    Nikon would have more success in Brazil if the they make a DSLR shaped like a soccer ball.
    :o)

    • Allan

      lol

  • Renata Xavier

    This is so sad… I’m a Brazilian photographer based in Rio de Janeiro. I saw everything very near. Between 2013 and 2016, Nikon invested in a great sales and tech team, good people that help a lot the professional shooters from Brazil and all over the world that arrived for the World Cup, Olympic Games, F1, and all sport and big events. They had a NPS program here, a office in São Paulo, presence in the biggest Photo Expos where we could test cameras and lenses, they contracted photographers to speech, made great workshops, had a Art Gallery, realized contests… I was a Nikon speaker in Brazil and I saw a great team working hard to increase the presence of the company in our market and help photographers from Brazil and around the world. Unfortunately, just after the Olympic Games, they fired almost all Nikon Brazilian workers, finished the NPS program, leaving only the tech support and e-commerce. The reasons of Nikon leaving are: 1) Crazy tax system in Brazil (we pay 2 or 3 times more to the same camera, so is cheaper pay a air ticket to NY, and buy a camera in the BH store). 2) Bureaucracy (if you broke your camera or lenses and need to import parts to repair… you will face big taxes, at least 180 days to import because of bureaucracy in customs, a lot of papers, crazy laws and sometimes strikes… Imagine 6 months to have your repair ready?). 3) Nikon bad financial results worldwide (growth of cellphones and mirrorless cameras made the company re-think the business). 4) Economic and Political crisis in Brazil ( between 2014-2017 we face the worse crisis in own country history: the justice and the federal police found a lot of corruption cases in the government and big companies. We face the impeachment of the president just after she was reelected, and the new one is awful too… Only this year he almost had the impeachment two times, but he made everything to stay with the power. Frank Underwood is a beginner near him…). 5) Violence (with the crisis a lot of people lost your jobs, the poor increases, the police had less investments… so the crime is bigger now, especially in the favelas/slums). Finally, I would like to say, that after the storm, comes the sun. The economy is in a recovery moment, slowly things are coming back thanks to the people that work harder and need to be creative to overcome the difficulties. Next year we have new president elections and we are a country of good people with a lot of hope and will. We are a big market with 200 millions of citizen, thousands and thousands of photographers hungry to buy things with a fair price. Just need companies that can push the government to change that evil tax system. The computer companies made it, and why not the Nikon, Canon, Sony, Fuji can’t? Will be a hard but rewarding battle! Here we have a lot of things to be made and space to every company grow. Let’s hold our hands! The wind are changing… (Sorry for my bad English…)

    • Allan

      Very interesting explanation. Thank you for sharing.

      Are taxes on imported computers less than on imported cameras?

      (Your English is excellent.)

      • Renata Xavier

        Hi Allan! Here the computers, televisions, cell phones and domestic appliances are more expensive than US too, but not 2 or 3 times! Some of them are manufactured in Brazil, others has laws to tax less. Everything depends of doing politics… The automotive companies, for exemple, are strong with the politicians and receive a lot of benefits.

        • Allan

          I’m not a historian, but I would think/hope that constructive changes come from within a country and not from foreign companies.

          Good luck with improving your tax system on photographic equipment. Also, don’t worry: the United States and Argentina will survive without the business from Brazilian photographers. 🙂

          • Renata Xavier

            Allan, here in Brazil unfortunately we need more than people will to things happen… People will, economic power, media… to things happen, everything must be together… Here the president has 95% of rejection and people hate him. With a lot of proofs of his corruption, even a audio record with his voice, he stills in power because the others politicians are guilty too so they saves each other and now everybody knows it! I hope that in the next election the old politics goes away renewing the government and the minds. The Brazilian photographers business will survive and will be stronger after all that storm.

            • Roger S

              The best of luck to Brazil (and Brazilian photographers, of course) in weathering this storm. And echoing Allan above, thanks for sharing your account of what has been happening — and for your optimistic conclusions.

            • Neopulse

              Fucking Temer. Anywho the socialism and corruption run deep there and with the previous Argentinean Kirchneristas, they were buddies with Lula and Dilma.

          • Neopulse

            Argentina I can say won’t especially with high taxes on any imported electronic goods from cameras to computers. People prefer spending millions of dollars in Chile to bring the merchandise across the border to resell it in Argentina.

  • Albert

    The government imposes a 70% import tariff on all electronics, so people who sell a camera here in Brazil without paying that tax have effectively smuggled the camera into the country. Even purchasing abroad, and bringing it with you without paying would be illegal since the government also limits purchases to its nationals to $500.

    That said, it is the only solution. Consider that between the items costing double, and the average income at best half the average of US or Europe, and you have electronics costing at least quadruple relative to what they earn. Think the D850 is expensive at $3300? Imagine if it cost Americans $13 thousand…

    The current ‘official’ price for the D750 body at Nikon Brasil is ~US$2800.

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