All Lexar XQD memory cards already discontinued at B&H


All Lexar XQD memory cards are already listed as discontinued at B&H. Some models can still be found at Adorama and Amazon.

Nikon is currently the only camera manufacturer that uses XQD memory cards (some high-end camcorders are using XQD as well).

Sony is currently the only manufacturer of XQD memory cards (most models are finally in stock).


In June Micron killed their Lexar memory cards retail business. In September the Chinese flash storage maker Longsys acquired the Lexar brand.

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  • spamdie

    Out of stock = Discontinued when there is no more supply.

    • ZoetMB

      No, it’s the other way around. Discontinued = Out of stock when there is no more supply.

  • Delmar Mineard Jr

    I don’t get this…why would they discontinue unless demand was really low. So what does a user do if they have a Nikon DSLR that uses the XQD?

    • fanboy fagz

      bend over and smile and buy sony.

    • PhilK

      Lexar and Sony were the 2 makers of XQD cards.

      Lexar was a brand name of Micron the memory manufacturer, and Micron decided to get out of the retail flash memory business. (Sold the Lexar brand name to a Chinese company which may or may not decide to market flash memory under the “Lexar” brand, but it won’t be the same product as before)

      Sony still makes XQD cards and you can find them at all the usual retailers.

    • PhilK

      Lexar/Micron exited the entire retail flash memory business, they were not “targeting” XQD.

      That means:

      USB flash drives

      CompactFlash
      SD
      MicroSD
      Cfast
      Etc, etc.

      My personal opinion is that the industry has become very commoditized, margins were low, and Micron could not justify staying in a business where the majority of its competitors were low-price sellers selling cheap junk that most people couldn’t tell apart from the good quality products like Lexar/Micron. (And wouldn’t pay more for anything better)

  • Michal Lepore

    Amazon 64gb +128gb out of stock.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Only 128 GB and temporarily. My guess is the (old) Lexar news may be causing a run on XQD cards.

      • I think the D850 caused a run on XQD cards from Lexar, at least it did for me.

  • mannequindisplay

    Just as long as Sony keeps making them as I have the D5 and planing to get the D850 which both uses the XQD Cards … Now that Sony is the only company that makes them they can charge what they want for them. I always bought Lexar cards but not everyone out there need high speed cards so they will buy the cheapest card they can afford.

    • ZoetMB

      And since mid-August, the price of the Sony G-E series cards at B&H has gone up between 17%-27% and the price of the M-series cards has gone up 10.2-12.3% except for the 32GB, which remains at $50. The 256GB G-series card is now $400. It was $340 in mid-August.

      • And even with “competition” XQD was absurdly expensive. It’s memorystick iii.

        • ZoetMB

          Not really. A SanDisk 128GB Extreme pro SD card (300MB/s read, 260MB/s write) is $250 – that’s $1.95 per gig. A 128GB XQD even at the new higher price is $190, which is $1.48 per gig and it’s a faster card. An M-series 128GB XD card is $1.09 per gig and it’s still faster than the SD card.

          • Of course it’s faster than SD or no-one would buy it for anything. Compare the prices to M.2 (6Gb/s) where the $150 easily gets you 512GB.

      • Well, keep in mind that on the D850, a 128GB XQD card can store 1.2k worth of lossless compressed raw photos. Not sure what workflow needs a 256GB card unless you’re shooting lots of 4k video to the internal card.

  • fanboy fagz

    I believe I read that some chinese mfr , who makes memory cards, is in talks to buy the lexar name

    • MB
    • PhilK

      The Lexar flash memory products were very high quality, as they were basically just the marketing arm of Micron the US memory manufacturer.

      I do not expect the new Chinese brand owner to market anything remotely on the same quality level as the original Lexar products.

      • fanboy fagz

        who knows. you have info about the companies intentions?
        they already make flash cards, no? and some mfr dont even make their own but just slap their label on it, and theyre good quality.

        • PhilK

          Well, let’s just say that having spent several decades in the tech industry, and being a student of corporate behaviour and strategy and so on, I have seen enough of these sorts of deals to know the general pattern.

          Micron/Lexar was a very unusual example of an actual flash memory manufacturer marketing their products under their own banner. The only other flash memory companies I know of that do this is Sandisk (Now owned by Western Digital), and perhaps Samsung in some cases.

          Personally I thought Lexar’s flash memory products were significantly better than average, and marketed honestly with a minimum of BS hype – rare in the tech business. I have no illusions that the “new Lexar” will be anything remotely comparable to the old Lexar. These deals almost never work that way.

          If Micron really and truly wanted to ensure the reputation of the Lexar brand name, they would have sold to a well-known and reputable company like Sandisk (Western Digital) or even a well-regarded OEM’er like Kingston or PNY. More than likely they did what happens in 95% of cases: they decided to abandon the market so just sold the brand name to the highest bidder, regardless who that happened to be.

          Just like Kyocera did when they sold off the Yashica name to some unknown Chinese company, that is now producing generic junk labeled “Yashica”. Happens all the time.

          • Brubabs

            My understanding is that Micron did make the rounds and pitched Lexar to several companies but found no takers. The Chinese company, whatever their name, came in later and made an acceptable offer. Anybody know whether I have that right?

            • PhilK

              I don’t know the specifics of that deal in this case, but that is the usual story for deals like this.

              In the end, all the shareholders care about for the most part is “maximizing share value”, which means selling to the highest bidder, whoever that may be.

      • CERO

        Hu, who did manufacture Lexar cards? if they are built using chinese factories,they sure as hell can maintain the quality if they just copy everything bis per bis.

        After all, most counterfeit memory products are actually produced in the same factories that make the legit ones.

        • PhilK

          Lexar was simply a marketing name for the sole US-based memory (including flash memory) manufacturer, Micron.

          Micron decided to get completely out of the entire retail flash memory business.* In no way did they “target” XQD for any reason.

          * That means Micron (marketing products under the Lexar brand) stopped producing all the following memory card products:

          CompactFlash
          CFast
          XQD
          USB thumb drives
          SD/MicroSD cards
          Etc.

          This market change has nothing to do with Micron (Lexar) deciding “XQD is no good”.

          • CERO

            Yes, I read the news about that.

            The interesting part is not ALL memory products.
            They just set all the eggs in the pro market, right?

            • PhilK

              Micron – the actual company behind the “Lexar” branded flash memory products – abandoned the entire retail flash memory business. Then sold the “Lexar branding” to a Chinese memory product assembler. (Longsys)

              That means Micron will no longer sell their flash memory products (which they actually manufacture the chips for themselves) with their own retail brand. But they still produce the flash chips themselves, which other companies use to build flash memory products. (Like Kingston, PNY, Transcend, etc etc)

            • CERO

              I read they will be still selling corporate SSD and memory solutions for high end computing.
              Just not as you said it “retail” for “consumer”.

              I think it was anandtech who mentioned this.

              Speaking of micron.. just how reliable is Micron chips vs Samsung or Sony ones?

            • PhilK

              I am quite sure they will remain in the SSD business, but I don’t consider such products “flash memory” products per-se, even though they do contain flash memory chips. (Like many other electronic products) Micron still sells SSDs under both the Micron (commercial/industrial) and Crucial (consumer) brands. Lexar was the brand they abandoned and sold off.

              Sony to my knowledge is not a memory chip manufacturer. Samsung is the largest memory chip maker in the world. Micron is probably #3 or #4. (And the only US-headquartered memory chip maker)

              Both Samsung and Micron produce good products. I think Samsung tends to more aggressively pursue new tech, Micron is a bit more conservative and perhaps less inclined to inflate the claimed performance of their products than Samsung is.

        • PhilK

          Re: counterfeit memory products, if we are talking about major branded memory products made by actual chipmakers (eg Sandisk or Lexar), then I assure you that counterfeits do not come from the same production lines as the originals.

          That might be true for some counterfeit clothing items, or for copies of memory products made by 2nd or 3rd-tier “module assemblers”, but that doesn’t describe either of the 2 original XQD producers.

          • Scott M.

            My sister in law gave a counterfeit Lexar CF card for xmas one year. Guess she shopped by price. Be careful out there. (She also got me a fake EN-El 15

          • CERO

            I remember reading that Sandisk and Kingston actually had these factory issues.

            Not sure about Lexar/Micron.

            Also good point on the QXD

            • PhilK

              Since Kingston is just an assembler, that would be more plausible.

              Sandisk making counterfeit Sandisk in their own factories is a very far-fetched notion.

      • fanboy fagz

        nice!

  • MB

    XQD was kind of cool at the time… but Nikon should have waited till CFexpress is standardized …

    • PhilK

      You mean like Canon did with their pet project – Cfast – which they put into their flagship DSLRs, and is now a truly dead format, unlike XQD?? 😉

      • MB

        No … I mean like Nikon depending on Sony now dead XQD standard …

        • PhilK

          XQD is NOT dead.

          Cfast – which Canon chose for their 1DX cameras – IS dead.

          • JoeJohnBear

            It’s in the Arri, Black Magic, and Canon Cinema cameras, so please think before speaking.

            • PhilK

              It is dead from the standards-body perspective, see my other posts here.

              That particular faction of the industry made the same stupid mistake that CompactFlash did: based it on a disk-drive interface tech that did not have the ability to evolve, and which reached a developmental dead-end. (IDE/ATA in the case of CompactFlash, SATA in the case of Cfast)

              Now the same group of industry boneheads are proposing ANOTHER format – CFexpress – that they want everyone to move to instead.

              Sound familiar?

              Whereas XQD is not only designed to evolve over time to increase performance (we are currently on v2.0), the “new” CFexpress format just did a modest update on existing XQD tech. (Including copying the physical card housing and using the current version of the electrical interface standard XQD was based on several years ago. LOL.)

              It’s kinda hilarious that the doomsday scenario everyone was predicting when Nikon chose XQD for the D4 A) never happened, and B) happened to Canon instead. (Canon chose Cfast for their EOS 1DX and 1DX Mark II cameras)

              Neither will the tiny sales numbers of a few high-end cine cameras have any impact on the long-term viability of the Cfast format. Memory card makers do not care about a few hundred people using Arris when they have to decide whether to make a decision to spend a half billion dollars on a memory production line.

            • JoeJohnBear

              Oh, that’s right, I forgot until you mentioned it. Industry boneheads indeed. Welp, guess external recorders are the way to go for now.

            • PhilK

              Now why did you have to remove that part of your post where you were ridiculing my point. That made it more fun to read. 😀

            • JoeJohnBear

              I aporogize, thank you for the good manners.

            • CERO

              Does this means the new canon’s flagship models could use XQD too in the next revisions?

            • PhilK

              It’s certainly possible, but Canon seems determined to foment factionalism in the industry and split the market rather than adopt the same storage standard that Nikon uses. (And pioneered: The Nikon D4 had XQD in 2012, whereas Canon’s flagship DSLR was using ancient-tech CompactFlash until they released the Mark II model 4 years later which added Cfast to that.)

              So if Canon is going to switch to something else for future products, I suspect they will switch to CFexpress before they come anywhere near XQD.

              This is pretty much Beta vs VHS, revisited. Pathetic, really.

            • CERO

              RE BETA vs VHS: Worse if you add Sony into the mix now as well in the memory issue.

        • Sony is still manufacturing the cards. Also it is storage medium to a few of their video cams. Few but still there.

          • br0xibear

            A few as in three, three of their older broadcast cameras. Did you notice the three new video cameras Sony announced in September ?…none of them use XQD.

            https://photorumors.com/2017/09/14/sony-to-announce-three-new-4k-camcorders/

            • Good point… I blame Sony for everything 🙂

              Their latest camera form a few days ago also doesn’t have XQD….
              https://blog.sony.com/press/sony-expands-hxc-series-with-new-entry-level-full-hd-camera-system-supporting-up-scaled-4k-and-hd-hdr-for-studio-and-live-applications/

            • br0xibear

              Here are the Sony video cameras that use XQD, as you can see there are really only two cameras with slight variations to make six models, the PXW and FS7.

              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/111319cb7bb2727516441cd2ed03eec8ef2a5aef1d5cd241329dfb7b88895f9e.jpg

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              %%^^%^ Sony bringing in a new format, where they could possibly use and enrich the XQD format – with more uptake of this media, same with the A9 series was expecting to see the XQD and SDXC formats to be used / utilised. Don’t think any DSLR or mirrorless cameras could use the SxS format due to what looks like quite a long memory card ?

            • Ben Turley

              As a lighting cameraman, the FS7 is one of the most widely used cameras in the broadcast market at the moment (at least in the UK). Many production companies own one, as well as facilities and owner-operators.

              In addition to those cameras, several others – notably the PMW-F5 and PMW-F55 – can also use XQD cards with an SxS adapter. I do that myself, as a considerably cheaper alternative to SxS Pro+ cards. Earlier cameras could use SD cards in an adapter, but the data rate demands and bus of the F5 and F55 necessitate XQD.

              A video shoot will be pretty heavy on media, particularly if shooting a high-end codec or 4k, and most of the people and companies I know (myself included) have tended to go for Sony cards with their Sony cameras, and enough cards to get through at least a day without needing to DIT.

              I would be surprised if the video market for XQD has not been stronger than the stills (Nikon) market, and I have a feeling that Sony has shifted a fair few XQD cards to FS7 users.

              What that means for the future availability, I don’t know long term, but I would be staggered if Sony consider stopping manufacture in the near to mid term.

            • br0xibear

              As an FS7 user, do you use cards in the studio too, or do you send to external storage ?

              “I would be staggered if Sony consider stopping manufacture in the near to mid term.”…I don’t see Sony stopping, but if they did, I wouldn’t be surprised…they’ll just say hard luck, use SxS, lol.

            • Ben Turley

              Except for a couple of occasions where a client has specifically requested going direct to ProRes, I’ve never personally recorded externally with an FS7 or F5/F55. The bulk of the time I work with F5s nd F55s, where there is a strong case for RAW recording with those (compared to the FS7). That is an add-on recorder with another media type called AXS which is just Sony. In my own case, its pretty much all 10-bit XAVC to SxS or XQD.

              I don’t see Sony ditching XQD in the mid term, particularly now that it is ‘theirs’ alone; captive market, with the bonus of Nikon high-end cameras. Obviously not good from a competitive price point of view, but then on the video side the competition is from other camera manufacturers.

              The market that the FS7 is in would be given pause to look elsewhere if pushed to (current) high end media like SxS Pro+ or AXS prices. Sony broadcast stuff has never been known for low prices, but the FS7’s success came from being not only a significantly better camera than the Canon C300, but (at launch) half the price.

              Sony’s latest broadcast video camera announcement is the VENICE, a competitor to the Amira or ALEXA (certainly price-wise), with no mention of FS7 or F5 replacements, so to me I see them trying to flog as many FS7 mark IIs and XQD cards for them as possible for as long as possible.

            • That a reason to worry indeed.

            • br0xibear

              I think the concern is this…
              The D4 came out in Jan 2012, since then no other manufacturer has made XQD, with Lexar gone it leaves one manufacturer Sony. Sony only use XQD slots in one high end video camera, and their own flagship camera A9, marketed for it’s speed compared to DSLRs, doesn’t use XQD.
              I think it’s a legitimate concern and reasonable for people to ask questions.
              Again, like the recent lightroom announcement, companies are giving photographers problems instead of helping them.

            • Thom Hogan

              Let’s get the history correct.

              Up until just before the D4 announcement, the XQD standard was driven by Sony, Nikon, and SanDisk.

              When the D4 was announced there was only one source of XQD cards: Sony. Lexar eventually decided to join in, particularly when SanDisk clearly decided to get out and emphasize CFast instead.

              Since the D4, we’ve gotten only a few cameras from Nikon and Sony that use XQD. This is a tricky problem. Nikon has clearly used XQD on cameras that benefit from it (D500, D850, D4, D5). Sony hasn’t.

              One would have expected that Sony use XQD in the A9. They didn’t, and probably because of space considerations (they’d have lost the extra slot; frankly, a mismatched pair of SD slots is not a benefit in my book).

              Personally, I’m scratching my head trying to figure out Sony’s use of media. It’s all over the board, and not particularly well thought out, IMHO.

              But for XQD to continue on much longer, it’s going to need another vendor to choose it. This reminds me of Apple’s early decision to go to Thunderbolt.

            • br0xibear

              You’re the one with the blog/website that has articles on various photo related topics…maybe you can write one covering XQD and CFexpress ?
              I don’t get paid for the information I post here, lol.

            • PhilK

              I’d bet that the reasons Sony picked SD in the A9 was almost entirely a size/weight thing, combined with the fact that most of their other digital cameras also use SD. (Or MemoryStick – now if we wanna talk about dead/proprietary formats… 🙂 )

  • Spy Black

    Waiting for the XQD to SD adapter to happen. That will be the death knell for XQD.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Why would anyone want to put a slower, more expensive SD card in the fast XQD slot, compromising camera performance?

      • Johnny in Philly

        expensive SD card? XQD is 2 to 3 times more expensive than SD.

        • PhilK

          I seem to recall a post either here or on photorumors that the higher-capacity/speed XQD cards are now cheaper than the highest-capacity/speed SD cards. (Which are slower than XQD, and have other disadvantages as well)

        • I checked B&H and the Sony 128GB XQD card was cheaper than a Lexar 128GB 2000X SD card. The XQD card is also faster. When they first started the XQD cards were a lot more expensive in comparison, however that is no longer true. I agree that slower (and therefore cheaper) 128GB SD cards are out there, so it can depend on the speed you need and/or require as to what you should buy.

          • TurtleCat

            You did cherry pick your comparison a bit. 64GB cards are much more comparable in price and top performance.

            • I did not look at other sizes. I tend to use large cards myself, so that is what I looked at. However, if the 64GBs are more comparable in price, it still makes the point that XQD cards are no longer premium priced when compared to SD cards. Pick the card that works best for you without having a price penalty.

        • UHS 1 is slow and cheap. UHS 2 is fast and equivalently priced to XQD.

    • D700s

      Nope.

    • PhilK

      Not likely. The electrical interfaces are completely different and work in a completely different way.

      • Spy Black

        Nothing an interface can’t handle. If XQD becomes harder to get it’ll happen. I hope it does to killit once and for all.

        • PhilK

          I think you need to learn more about data bus technology and its application in embedded applications like cameras.

          Show me the CompactFlash to SD adapters and Cfast to SD adapters. That work in embedded devices. (Not computers which can have special drivers written and installed by users to get the data off the hardware)

          • Spy Black

            Don’t think it can’t happen. It can easily happen. It’s not a technology issue. It’s a demand issue. It all depends on what happens with supply and demand of XQD. It may never come to pass. But it can.

            I’ll tell you tho, it seems to me that Sony especially, but other manufacturers as well, don’t think outside of the box on XQD. It’s a really versatile and useful tech not being used for anything but writing to a camera or video device, and I think you can count all of them with your fingers. For one thing, I could easily see XQD being used in laptops. I think that could help a lot in making XQD more mainstream and affordable.

            Think about it, the format’s been around for 5 years, almost 6, and nobody is making use of it. Unless Sony wants some heavy tariff for it’s use, I’m amazed this format never took off.

            • Thom Hogan

              It’s a lowest common denominator issue. Basically, consumer volume tends towards convenience and price. SD is the proper media choice for such products. Professional gear often requires very carefully performance tuning. XQD is the best current media choice for huge data pipes from fast cameras, high-end video cameras, and high megapixel cameras.

              The fact that not all the high-end has adopted XQD is worrisome. If you’re in a brand that went CFast, get ready for another change in media when the next bandwidth blast happens.

            • Spy Black

              Yeah, it’s too bad about XQD, because it has such great potential. It just looks like it’s following in the footsteps of CFast.

              Sony should really try to expand it’s usage beyond video and Nikon. Laptops seem like such a natural for XQD, but Sony seems to have tunnel vision on it.

              Reminds me of how they handled MiniDisks back in the 90s. It had great potential to be a mass storage medium like the ZIPs of the era, but they just kept it as a locked-up music medium. In the end they finally did release it as a storage medium, but the cavalry came over the hill too late for that, and time and technology marched on.

              I suspect XQD is the new MiniDisk.

            • PhilK

              You realize that Lexar in no way “targeted” XQD for any reason, Micron (the company that produced/marketed Lexar flash memory products) simply decided to get out of the retail flash memory business altogether.

              That means:

              CompactFlash
              CFast
              XQD
              USB thumb drives
              SD/MicroSD cards
              Etc.

              This market change has nothing to do with Micron (Lexar) deciding “XQD is no good”.

            • Spy Black

              I didn’t say anything about Lexar targeting XQD, I’m talking about the fact that nobody has adopted the tech.

            • PhilK

              Why would laptops be a market for flash memory cards?

              It’s already gotten to the point where customers look down their nose at SSDs that “only” have a 600 MBps SATA3 interface, and want something faster than that. Simple flash memory cards like CF, Cfast or XQD can’t touch SSD speeds, especially for random writes and erases. (SSDs are basically supercharged flash memory with high-performance controllers, RAM cache and spare flash memory used to enhance reliability)

            • TurtleCat

              It might be good for ChromeBooks and similar.

            • Spy Black

              Yes but they could make for a good secondary storage. Most laptops can’t fit a second SSD. Granted SDs do that now to a degree, although I’m not aware of any laptops with UHS-II storage. Running apps like Photoshop, After Effects, Davinci Resolve, et al on a lap can greatly benefit from a fast secondary storage scratch disk.

            • PhilK

              Re: secondary storage, that’s what USB flash drives are used for. And that’s a very very popular tech, compatible with virtually any laptop (since virtually all laptops include USB ports), meaning the prices are driven down continuously and represent a very good value.

              If your argument is that USB drives aren’t fast enough, then A) you’re using the wrong products/interfaces (USB 3.1 rev B is quite capable of speed, with the right device connected, and B) XQD (or any general-purpose flash memory device today) will never compete with high-performance storage like SSD (or even HDD) anyway, when it comes to speed. (For anything other than sequential read/writes of large files. Trying to store any sort of data on such media that requires a lot of random writes/erases is glacial on pretty much any standard, non-SSD flash media.

            • Spy Black

              If a “proper” USB 3.x stick can be equal to, or better than, an XQD card, then that says a lot more about XQD than it does about a USB 3.x stick, doesn’t it? 🙂

              I’m not comparing it to an SSD, I’m citing it as a high speed secondary port for laptops.

              And yes, I suppose I’m clutching for straws, but I’m merely thinking in other ways to make use of, and further expose, XQD, because things don’t look good for the format, and any further exposure and use it can get could only be a good thing, right?

            • PhilK

              All I know is that I don’t see a lot of people clamoring for a special memory card slot on laptops for high-performance secondary storage purposes.*

              The usual strategy for people who need a very high performance portable computer with large high performance storage these days (eg for imaging workflows) is to install either a giant SSD (2TB SSD’s can be obtained for as low as ~$550 USD these days), or put a smaller SSD in eg a M.2 slot, and install a large HDD in the SATA drive bay. (2TB 2.5″ drives are less than $100 now)

              Those options either blow away an XQD/Cfast card performance-wise for not a huge price premium (and a much higher storage capacity than can be obtained with an XQD/Cfast card), or destroy it on price with the HDD option.

              *Some laptops come with SD card readers, but I think that’s mostly a convenience for people using basic digicams.

            • Spy Black

              Well, as I said, it’s clutching for straws, but I think XQD should find some wider uses if it’s ever going to try and stick.

            • PhilK

              Sure, one could say that about any product that sells in modest quantities.

              Cfast has seem some traction in industrial markets, apparently.

              That would have been nice for XQD, but personally I think there was some kind of backroom payola going on at the CompactFlash Association that got Sandisk to abandon XQD (after actually signing on as a founding member of the XQD development group) and throw their lot in with Cfast instead. (The whole nonsense with the CFA allowing their members to bifurcate and develop two directly-competing storage card standards was the other half of that ridiculousness.)

              That move by Sandisk probably was the single biggest negative hit for XQD, as Sandisk has a lot of influence in this kind of market, and they probably drove companies over to Cfast that likely would have considered XQD instead.

            • Thom Hogan

              Whether you like XQD or CFast or something else, the problem remains: as storage needs expand, we need something that can grow to very large file sizes and at very high speed. The fact that there’s not a clear path to that at the moment is worrisome.

              But it strikes me that our two biggest players in this, SanDisk and Lexar, were both acquired. Their priorities no longer align with the Japanese camera companies. Moreover, we have Sony, which has a long history with introducing media formats that it wants to own, and as @disqus_zyXTbxqZrY:disqus notes elsewhere, is sometimes successful at that, sometimes fails at it.

              The fact that the camera companies, even the video ones, are now somewhat behind the times in terms of imaging for consumers means that they’re not likely to be driving the future with storage formats other than for professional gear.

            • Spy Black

              “…we need something that can grow to very large file sizes and at very high speed. The fact that there’s not a clear path to that at the moment is worrisome.”

              The best candidate for that is actually, well, SD. Just because XQD and CFast have superior capabilities means jack if nobody adopts them, and lo and behold, that’s exactly what’s happening.

              Even UHS-II is having a hard time being adopted, but if XQD and CFast die tomorrow (and you never know), you’d see a high gear shift to adopt UHS-II, and a push to get UHS-III out the door.

            • Thom Hogan

              UHS-III is max 650MBps

              XQD (current) is 1000MBps

            • Spy Black

              That’s not gonna do anything for you if it’s a dead medium.

            • Thom Hogan

              And SD UHS-III isn’t going to handle 8K video without severe compression, so again, we need something that can grow to large file sizes at very high speed. XQD and CExpress are really the only two currently defined standards that get us there.

            • Spy Black

              What Nikon camera shoots 8k? 8k doesn’t matter now, and anyone shooting it now is writing to SSDs.

              XQD either has to get further out into the wild, or it’s dead, and it’s not looking too good right now.

            • PhilK

              It’s more about politics than anything else. See my previous comments about the stupid factionalism that the CompactFlash Association created – rather than do what standards associations are supposed to do – get everyone on the same page and work to increase technology standards so customers aren’t constantly forced to pick vendor sides for something which should be a standard commodity. (Data storage devices and interfaces)

            • TurtleCat

              You also described how most standards bodies work: bigger players are more influential, back door shenanigans, politics, etc.

            • PhilK

              That’s true, with one important exception: this situation would be similar to a standards-body already dedicated to a particular standard setting up internal factions within itself to compete within the marketplace.

              Eg “USB Sony” vs “USB Panasonic” – developed around the same time, but using completely different connectors and incompatible with each other. Or “SATA Green” vs “SATA Red”, also using completely different, incompatible connectors, competing for the same uses/devices. Etc.

            • TurtleCat

              Reminds me of the HL7 healthcare standards. In practice it’s more of a suggestion 😉

  • AnotherView

    Whew! Glad I got my Sony 128GB XQD G card for my D850 when I did. That, plus my backup XQD 64GB card will likely outlast the camera (i.e. until the next model is announced). Remember folks, we are dealing with computers here…where obsolescence is built in. If you can’t play the game, you can alway go back to film. Err…maybe not! ;~)

    • Same here. Except I got lexar XQD. And 2 days later, they are either unavailable or double the price I bought for. Same with lexar XQD readers.

    • PhilK

      Sony should be making XQD cards for years. It was Lexar (Micron) who exited the retail flash memory market.

  • nobody knows (I mentioned that in my post already)

    • Pablo And-Jennifer Gabetta

      Imagine if Nikon bought the license and technology? I mean, since Nikon uses xqd and Lexar are supposed to be the fastest…

  • WoodyM

    just got a couple cards from Adorama. Thanks Nikon Rumors for the heads up.

  • ZoetMB

    Yeah, I think Nikon made a strategic mistake here. They should have insured there would be an adequate supply of memory cards before they decided to put XQD into the D850. Sony could certainly hurt Nikon by deciding to discontinue their XQD cards. If that were to happen, I think Nikon would have to set up a program to retrofit their XQD cameras with either SD or going back to CF. Or Nikon should have bought Lexar. Or did a deal with Sandisk to make XQD cards. Or something.

    • WoodyM

      Without Lexar, Sony can price there XQD cards as high as they want. Well at least there is a SD card slot in the D850

      • Allen_Wentz

        Not likely. Sony would have to price gouge its own high end buyers. Why would they?

        The SD slot just compromises performance of an expensive high-performance body.

        • CERO

          Its all about competition, no competition? you can try to charge as much the market is willing to pay.

      • HD10

        If you compare the price of a Sony 128GB XQD G Series at $190 vs the SanDisk 128GB Extreme PRO UHS-II SDXC at $250, you will see that this is not happening. Moreover, the XQD at 400mbps max. write speed is considerably faster than the UHS-II SDXC at 260mbps max. write speed.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Nonsense. XQD cards are not going anywhere.

      A) The market is big enough to justify making them.

      B) Sony themselves have products that use them.

      • PhilK

        Yeah, discontinuing XQD would be kinda dumb unless they wanted to instantly obsolete the various HDcams they make that use them. 😀

        • br0xibear

          The Sony cameras would not become obsolete. The XQD cards on those cameras only work with an adapator that fits into the SxS slot…SxS is the native storage they use.

          • Thom Hogan

            As I noted before, Sony’s media choices are inconsistent and weird. I fully expect the Memory Stick to make a comeback ;~).

    • Yasfaloth

      Pro Sony video like the PXW F7 II use XQD cards, Sony have to supply those needs, and I suppose that the high end Nikon Camera business is important to maintain volume sales and (relatively) low costs, so I foresee no risks of shortage !

      • br0xibear

        The XQD cards on Sony’s video cameras only work with an adapator that fits into the SxS slot, they also have an SD card adaptor that fits in the SxS slot. SxS is their native storage.

    • You are talking about memory cards manufactured by third party. Look at the state of their self manufactured D850. LOL.

    • PhilK

      It’s a difficult problem because the industry is beset with stupid factionalism and politics.

      Even more outrageous because there is an organization that serves as the “standards body” for all of the memory card formats being discussed here, and even within that “standards body” they allow companies to create separate factions that try to kill each other in the marketplace. [boggle]

      That would be the “CompactFlash Association”, created in 1995 and named after the original format they were formed to develop and maintain standards and compatibility for, supported by a large coalition of manufacturers.

      But they later allowed 2 internal factions to create sub-groups, one was originally proposed and supported by SanDisk/Sony/Nikon – this became XQD. The other was proposed and supported by Sandisk (which had, very mysteriously, abandoned XQD) and Canon and one other company I can’t remember. (Lexar/Micron?) This became “Cfast”.

      But the Cfast group made the same stupid technical mistake the original CompactFlash group did: based the format on a disk drive interface (IDE/ATA in the case of CompactFlash, SATA in the case of Cfast) which became obsolete, no longer developed and had to be abandoned. Which is why Cfast is also being abandoned in favor of “CFexpress”, which essentially took a bunch of XQD ideas – including the physical card format and basic electrical interface family – and updated it slightly.

      Whereas XQD is designed to be able to evolve into newer generations to keep up with the need for ever-faster and bigger storage. (We are on version 2.0 now)

      So as a camera maker it’s not good enough to settle on a storage format that has good technical merits, you also have to have a crystal-ball to try to predict which political faction within the CompactFlash Association is going to gain the upper hand with better lobbying/payoffs/whatever.

    • yes, this whole thing doesn’t look good

    • Nikon could also long-term purchase of a large number of XQD cards from Sony to insure continued manufacturing and then re-brand them Nikon. “Made to Nikon’s standards” or however it goes. With Nikon’s purchase of Sony sensors, Nikon has a lot of clout with Sony.

    • Tooki

      I would definitely welcome a second version of the D850 with dual SD slots.

      • Allen_Wentz

        You must be kidding. Cripple the D850 on purpose? That is nuts!

        • Tooki

          What do I need ultra fast cards for when I’m shooting landscape and macro? The only thing the XQD card slot adds for me is the necessity to use two different card types–one of which is 3-4x more expensive than the other. I’d much rather have dual SD slots.

    • Thom Hogan

      I have problems with your assessment. When Nikon choose XQD for the D4, there was only one card supplier, Sony. So nothing is new here. An additional card supplier eventually appeared, now has (at least temporarily) disappeared.

      • ZoetMB

        And yet you wrote above, “But for XQD to continue on much longer, it’s going to need another vendor to choose it. ” I agree with that.

        Time will tell in any case. If Sony continues making XQD cards and doesn’t raise prices, then no harm done. If the company taking over Lexar makes them, fine. With Lexar out, maybe SanDisk will relent. But if that’s not the case, it’s going to be a problem for Nikon in the long run. While everyone who buys a D850 (or any of the other models that use XQD) will have at least one card, I’d feel pretty nervous working with just one card. We’ll know more when Nikon releases their next high-end camera.

  • Allen_Wentz

    XQD cards are FAR superior in every regard to the slower SD cards some folks seem to like.

    We all knew Lexar was leaving the business. Maybe prices will rise, but at D850 sizes of 128 GB XQD remains not only much faster but also CHEAPER than lame SD cards.

    • br0xibear

      I don’t think anyone is arguing SD or Compact Flash cards are faster than XQD. The concerns are about availabilty and price, considering only Sony manufactures them.
      When people say “but Sony uses XQD cards in their video cameras”, yes that’s true, but look a bit deeper and you’ll see that there are only three of those cameras, and they are very high end broadcast cameras…which means they’re likely using external storage not cards.
      Then when you find out Sony’s latest three high end broadcast cameras, which came out in September, no longer use XQD alarm bells start to sound.

      • Allen_Wentz

        What do they use instead of XQD? We know XQD will be replaced at some point by a newer/faster spec, but it will ot be lame SD. Why anyone wants the slower more expensive SD cards makes no sense to me. Camera cards are not consumables; one buys the amount needed and they last the life of the body.

        • br0xibear

          “What do they use instead of XQD?”
          What do Sony use ?…only the FS7 model (there are three versions see image in above post) have conventional XQD slots. The others use SxS cards in SxS slots. XQD and SD cards can be used in those SxS slots using an adaptor.
          The other Sony video cameras use Memory Stick Pro Duo and SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.

          “Why anyone wants the slower more expensive SD cards makes no sense to me.”…SD cards are not more expensive and are far more available than any other type of card. As far as speed goes, it depends on what type of photography you do, and how you take pictures…not everyone needs lightning speed, when taking or transfering files.
          Let me say again, I’ve got nothing against XQD or any other card, what we’re discussing in this thread is the fact that only Sony makes them, they’re difficult to get, they are expensive and implications that might arise from only having one manufacturer.

          • TurtleCat

            Yes, the discussion and comparisons are a lot like laser discs back in the 80s and early 90s.

            • br0xibear

              I’m tired of it now…I don’t care what cards people want to use, or if it’s 3 milliseconds quicker than some other card, lol.

            • TurtleCat

              Yep, as we used to say: majoring in minors. For some it makes a small difference but for the rest of us we don’t care. 😉

          • Thom Hogan

            Right. And one of the problems with Sony is that they aren’t really supporting raw video recording in camera. Sony is all about huge gains at the sensor and in BIONZ, but what you get is compression many of us don’t like out the other end of the pooper scooper on a lot of their products.

            Raw, ProRes, Avid DnX, there are formats that could really make XQD shine. Sony is still too vested in Blue-Ray and the convoluted media mess it creates.

            • PhilK

              Luckily Blu-Ray has now become something like what happened to the PDF document format. (The de-facto standard, after HD-DVD failed in the market) So the industry as a whole can promote and advance it, instead of just being Sony’s pet project.

              But yes, Sony has a history of creating new media formats that it dreams of having control over. Sometimes it succeeds (CompactDisk – with Philips, 1.44 inch floppy diskette, BluRay), other times it fails. (MiniDisk, MemoryStick, SACD, DASH)

      • Thom Hogan

        I don’t get the “only two” and “high end” arguments regarding Sony and XQD. Let’s see, for Nikon it’s “only three” and “high end.”

        It’s “high end” because only the high end is currently in a place where the extra bandwidth of XQD really shows up. It’s “only two or three” because not every product really is high enough end yet to need what XQD delivers.

        As I noted before, Sony is a mess when it comes to media. I’m in the market for new pro video gear for a project I’m working on, and frankly, I’ve knocked Sony down a couple of pegs in my evaluations because of their strange and not-very-coordinated approach to data.

        • br0xibear

          “I don’t get the “only two” and “high end” arguments regarding Sony and XQD.”
          it’s not an arguement, I’m simply saying that the Sony cameras that use XQD (the images of which I posted above) are high end in the sense that they are very expensive, broadcast cameras…not everyday video cameras.
          And many of the Sony broadcast cameras Memory Stick Pro Duo and SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.

  • T.I.M

    I guess XQD memory cards are now just a souvenir…

  • br0xibear

    What happened to the CFexpress XQD compatibility article?

    • I cannot find your email….

      • br0xibear
        • akkual

          Typical customer service reply. The only major difference is the PCIe express version they are using. The newer one that CFe will use is not backwards compatible directly. However, the world is full of PCIe equipment that can talk many of the variants, and as a SW engineer, it is not that hard to implement both on a same chip as long as the physical form factor is the same (same amount of I/O pins and usage voltage and gnd come to same pins). But I would expect them start making both XQD and CFe on same production line, because it is at most only changing the controller chip and accompanied PCB. Small change on production line.

          • PhilK

            I haven’t looked at the standards documents (which most likely require a King’s Ransom to purchase in order to read, anyway), but if history is any guide, a headline of “based upon PCIexpress” is probably an oversimplification and has little to do with actual interoperability via the card interface pins.

            It is of course part of the PCI/PCIexpress standard that cards should be interoperable between generations, but I wouldn’t assume that XQD or CFexpress are just raw interface bus implementations. I would think there has to be all sorts of storage-related logic in there that is not part of the bus itself, for example. (Since the card has to manage things like block-remapping, wear-leveling, etc etc)

          • br0xibear

            It’s not a “Typical customer service reply.”, If you go to the Delkin website there’s a dedicated page for their CFexpress cards with an ask us about this product part…which is what I did.
            I can only go by what they said to me, you can ask them any questions you have.

  • D700s

    The sky is falling. Loose sleep at night. Oh No!!! Please gentlemen.

  • funny – I actually emailed longsys 2-3 weeks ago (using their online form on the website) asking what’s up with lexar xqd availability and got a response that they’re working to resume the supply as soon as possible (without any ETAs)… and to check with B&H. gah.

    • PhilK

      Ask them who they are sourcing the chips and other technology from, where they would be physically manufactured and what the technical difference is between the old Lexar XQD and the alleged “new” Lexar XQD.

      There is a small possibility that they could actually OEM the parts and designs or even manufacturing from Micron (since Micron’s announcement was that they were not abandoning the flash memory business entirely, just the retail part of the flash memory business), but it wouldn’t make much sense to me for Longsys to spend a bunch of money just be another memory vendor that uses Micron chips.

      • I doubt they’ll provide any answer to those questions. :/ I have a 128GB card on backorder with adorama for a month now.

        • PhilK

          Yep. The usual way these deals work is that they spend a bunch of money to be able to parlay the goodwill associated with a well-regarded vendor’s branding, to sell a generic/cheap product.

          • Yeah – hopefully the quality doesn’t tumble. Otherwise I may need to pay for a Sony product (which is probably also made in China).

            • PhilK

              When it comes to product quality, I don’t personally have a problem with manufacturing things in China, per-se, it depends on the product and the vendor and their standards.

              Re: Longsys, they appear to be just a module assembler (eg like PNY, Adata, SuperTalent, etc), not an actual chipmaker.

              http://www.longsys.com/longsys/

            • another big question is if future cfexpress cards will be backwards compatible with existing xqd cameras. It is pcie after all and some articles seem to indicate that it should be compatible- but nothing for sure yet. It’s the same form factor and connector after all.

            • PhilK

              Not only PCIe but also uses the XQD card form factor.

              But I need to read up on this. Haven’t cared much because I’m not going to be owning a device that uses CFexpress any time soon, so… motivation is lacking. 😉

            • jagigen

              CFExpress 1.0 uses the PCIe 3.0 standard while the XQD 2.0 does PCIe 2.0.

              The CFExpress do specs both 4 and 8 lanes of PCIe 3.0.

              It might be as simple as firmware patch for Nikon to support the newer cards although they might not be able to push the limit of the specs.

            • I’m not worried about them not running at full speed – more about the future supply of compatible products. It would be good if more vendors jumped in – having currently only one producers sort of limits options and competition. 🙂

            • br0xibear

              “It might be as simple as firmware patch for Nikon to support the newer cards”
              From what I’ve read, and from what Delkin said, it’s not a software issue it’s hardware…the cameras would have to be sent back to Nikon to be adapted.
              I don’t see that happening.

            • MB

              CFA did not specified backward compatibility for CFexpress cards and they will certainly not be able to work on anything else but PCIe 3 and no firmware will help with that …
              On the other hand it may be possible to make future cameras CFexpress and XQD compatible, there are already devices that can do that …
              https://www.atechflash.com/blackjet-vx1cxq

              Also current Sony XQD card prices are still lower than high performance SD cards so no problem there for now … it is just that now when PCexpress is released (and will be used in future cameras by Canon and others) Nikon will remain the only company that actually uses XQD and Sony the only producer … so at some point in future we could expect some problems …

            • PhilK

              Thanks for the Atech link… already found several little useful gadgets in their product line that I’ve been looking for and having little luck finding. 😉

    • Spy Black

      If they try to uncut the market in price it may save XQD yet, as it will force Sony to do the same.

  • bobgrant

    So the hottest pro DSLR on the market uses a “nearly” dead memory card? I have two D850’s on order and this is troubling. I have plenty of SD cards, but why did Nikon use XQD when it’s barely available?

    • PhilK

      See my other comments here. Lots of stupid politics and industry factionalism nonsense.

      I don’t personally think XQD is dead or nearly dead. In fact, I’d wager that we will see some new XQD vendors on the market before long.

      (The company taking over the Lexar brand claims they will start marketing Lexar-branded XQD cards again soon. Though I doubt they will be the same products as before.

      But even if they are not: that would mean they would be the first XQD cards on the market from a non-flash-memory-chip manufacturer. Which would seemingly open the floodgates to all sorts of XQD products being marketed from all the usual brands of flash memory sellers. (Eg, Kingston, PNY, Patriot, Centon, Transcend, Corsair, etc etc)

      • br0xibear

        “I’d wager that we will see some new XQD vendors on the market before long.”
        Really ? the D4 was announced in Jan 2012, and since then no other manufacturer decided to make XQD…and of course Lexar went bye bye.

        • bobgrant

          The D850 is a CRAZY hot product. Backordered for weeks and months (I have two on order). There’s no money to be made by not selling memory cards for what is currently being called the best DSLR ever. Sony is also using the format, so they can’t just drop it. No issue for buyers at all. And XQD is fast as all heck. I’m a bit annoyed at spending hundreds on more cards, but the good life isn’t cheap. On top of that we can also use our SD cards unless we need that utmost. I think people are more annoyed about the cost of getting a D850 to the 9 FPS mark. You need the grip, battery and charger…yikes.

          • TurtleCat

            The D850 is in demand but let’s not get crazy. Big demand may mean a total production run of 100,000 to 200,000 units over multiple years. If Nikon and Canon both used it in most of their cameras then the volume would attract new vendors.

            • Thom Hogan

              You’re both forgetting the D500 ;~).

            • TurtleCat

              Well, I have one. 🙂 but the volume is still pretty small.

            • CERO

              For every D850.. how many memories you usually would buy? Id say at least 3 for backups and reliability.

              so they have the potential to sell.. Sony just needs to put these on more camera designs.

            • Ed Hassell

              Maybe this is a question for other professionals or for Thom. I bought 12x 64gb 2933x XQD for each of my two D500 bodies and an additional 12x 128gb for my future D850 body. I do not have an D5; nor am I likely to buy one. Regardless, that’s 36 XQD cards for me — 7 to 10 days worth for each camera. However, I’m gathering that — at least, among posters here — my purchases are considered excessive.

              Back in film days, I often traveled with two dozen bricks of film.

            • CERO

              I only have a single XQD card for my D500,

              You sure went for futureproof.

            • TurtleCat

              It really depends upon the person. I could see 2 for most. But there is that guy here who claimed 30+.

            • CERO

              Well, considering how Sony jacked up the prices.. Definitively a good thing to do lol.

            • PhilK

              I will tell you this: that is already several orders of magnitude higher volume than any of that professional video stuff that sells by the handful. 😉

          • br0xibear

            “Sony is also using the format, so they can’t just drop it.”
            Have you actually looked at which Sony products use XQD ?…look at my previous posts, it’s one model, the FS7 (there are three variants of that model). It’s the only one that has XQD slots, a few other models can use XQD with an adaptor, they can also use SD with an adaptor…neither of which is their native storage, which is SxS cards… https://www.sony.co.uk/pro/products/broadcast-products-professional-media-sxs

            • bobgrant

              And…so? Sony’s line of 4K cameras are pro level systems and they are in production. Sony won’t abandon support for a current system. Expensive? Compared to the SD cards? I spent 7500 on two D850’s, so who cares about a few extra hundred on the XQD cards? The D850 is a top selling camera at the moment and Nikon isn’t actually a small player. Buy a few XQD cards and call it a day. You are getting what you pay for. My initial reaction to Lexar pulling out was mild annoyance. But it’s really not a factor at all. This the high end of DSLR shooting. You have to pay to play.

        • PhilK

          Up until now, the only companies that were making XQD were companies that were actually in the silicon chip business. (Sony and Lexar. Lexar was just a marketing brand of Micron, the US memory manufacturer. Sony is a chip maker but not, to my knowledge, a flash memory manufacturer. But they have deep expertise in chipmaking and have a special interest in XQD.)

          Whereas Longsys – the company that purchased the Lexar brand name – from what I can tell has never been any kind of chipmaker. They are like the majority of companies that market memory or flash memory modules – they are simply a module assembler.

          Given that Longsys (according to another poster here who contacted them – lukemeup) is planning to start marketing XQD cards under the Lexar brand “soon”, this suggests to me a paradigm-shift: the first XQD product produced by an “assembler”, not an actual chip-maker or company deeply involved in the XQD standard. If that is true, then that would indeed suggest that there is not any insurmountable barrier to any other of the dozens of “memory module assemblers” in the industry also starting to produce XQD cards.

          There’s one other possibility: that Longsys will just OEM the previous Lexar XQD SKUs from Micron. But I’d give that a very very low likelihood of being the case.

  • Hans J

    X
    Quit
    Dead

  • triggered

    Wondering if the future D860/D900 will have an XQD slot

    • CERO

      Lets think about the D760 and D620 first 😉

  • bobgrant

    Well…after doing some real research, I must retract my earlier panicky comment. Doesn’t look like XQD is going anywhere, at least not soon enough to effect us.

    • jstevez

      Exactly, people are just reacting to Lexar shutting down. Remember these forums 6 months ago? Nikon was totally dead and going out of business’ today? good luck finding a D850 in stock. I read these forums for pure entertainment.

      • bobgrant

        LOL….Yep….and now Nikon is at the top of the heap. And calling it a best all-arounder is silly as well because it’s superb at so many things. We still hear the whacky “mirrorless will rule the world stories”, but a pair of D850’s will be fantastic tools for the next 5 years.

        • ZoetMB

          The D850 camera might be a fantastic camera, but that doesn’t necessarily put Nikon “on top of the heap” in terms of overall sales and profits. Although few D850’s were sold in Nikon’s 2nd quarter, we’ll see the results of that quarter on Nov 7th. We won’t see the results of the 3rd quarter until Feb. If Nikon gains some market share back in that quarter and the one that follows, then I would agree that Nikon is in much better shape than it’s been recently.

          But just because the D850 is backordered doesn’t mean there is truly high demand because we don’t know how many Nikon has actually shipped to retail. If those numbers are low, the perception of high demand might not actually be real. And let’s not forget that even though people expected it to be priced even higher, it’s still a $3300 body (in the U.S. and priced higher elsewhere) and therefore has limited sales capability as a luxury item. Time will tell.

          Back in the day, Pioneer made the best flat panel TV’s one could buy: the Kuro line. The image on those sets would take one’s breath away. But they still went out of business and Pioneer electronics (except for automobile products) was sold to Onkyo.

          And whether the D850 will be a fantastic tool is independent of whether “mirrorless will rule” and even whether mirrorless should rule. The fact is that while DSLR’s still sell about 1.8x as well as mirrorless, mirrorless units are up 51% YTD and DSLRs are down 3% compared to last year.

          • KnightPhoto

            It’s interesting to hear some of the D850 sales anecdotes “most pre-ordered Nikon Pro camera ever” – if that is true then Q3 profit and market share should be much(?) improved.

            If the sensor and other parts volume is available, Thailand plant should be prioritizing them to the max. Looks like a great cam.

            The final nail in the plan will be whether Nikon can achieve good interoperability of lenses from the DSLR line with the upcoming mirrorless line (e.g. for staples like the 105E, 70-200E, etc.). Hope Nikon can do that! If so market share ought to improve decently. I’d gladly take a ML that was a little deeper at the mount if it meant my DSLR lens stable can achieve decent to very good AF. Sure the DX ML can be slim, with some slim lenses, but on the FX mirrorless I’d really like to interoperate with Nikon DSLRs and their lenses.

            • Robert

              I think that you will have to accept an adapter to use the Fx lenses on Fx ML, otherwise Nikon will waste the advantage to not have to reserve space for the mirror in the Fx ML. Hopefully Nikon will at least provide a good adapter so that we can use our exiating lenses (G and E at least).

          • bobgrant

            I’m a working professional in the field. I can report to you that much of the pro community is excited about what the D850 is bringing to our kits. And if you’re reading every forum, then you already know that artists and hobbyists are even more excited. Virtually every reviewer is calling this the best DSLR ever made. DXO gave the sensor a perfect score, and the first ever of 100 points. I ordered two D850’s and I’ve been told that the backorders exceed the original D800 release, which is amazing for a camera of this price. “Top of the heap” means the D850 essentially bests all other DSLRs in overall spectrum of performance. And it does this without compromise in most respects. By the time mirrorless really catches up, the D850 will be ancient tech anyway. For now this is the top dog.

      • Nikon advised that the D7500 is also selling very well.

        • PhilK

          I don’t think Nikon advised that. That was some Japanese investment group or market analytics company. Nikon’s response was to tamp down people taking such reports at face-value.

  • Ed Hassell

    I’m glad I had the foresight to stock a decent supply ahead of my camera purchases. I had already purchased a dozen 64gb 2933x cards for my 1st D500. I purchased a dozen more when I ordered my 2nd D500. On hearing that Micron was about to abandon the Lexar retail brand, I ordered a dozen of the 128gb 2933x cards for my future D850. So, I’m covered.

    • Allen_Wentz

      I’ll say you are covered. That is a lot of cards!

    • HD10

      That’s quite a lot of XQD cards … now all you need is the corresponding D850s and Nikon’s upcoming mirrorless FX camera to use these!

      • Ed Hassell

        I plan to replace my D810 with the D850 in April. It would be nice if the upcoming MILC bodies use XQD — it’s as fast as greased lightning — however, regardless, I’ll need more cards when/if I get it.

        I figure that a dozen cards represents about a week’s worth of work per camera if I am unable to both backup and transfer the images to my permanent storage. I don’t like to reuse cards until all the images are safely backed up in duplicate.

        • Allen_Wentz

          IMO mandatory: “I don’t like to reuse cards until all the images are safely backed up in duplicate.”

    • saywhatuwill

      Pssst, it’s known that you can upload all your photos and videos that you have on the XDA cards and put them on an external disk, then you can reuse it again and again. (LOL, this is a joke…I know you know that).

    • ZoetMB

      36 cards? You could probably sell a bunch a pay for at least one of those cameras although if you bought 36 cards and you’re buying a third body, I guess affordability isn’t a problem for you.

      • Ed Hassell

        It’s not a matter of affordability; it’s a matter of personal and professional integrity. If I offer my services as a photographer and expect remuneration, I need to make every possible effort to deliver. Having insufficient storage media to cover a multi-day assignment in the field without access to my usual backup systems is inexcusable.

  • Chaitanya

    I think Longsys hasn’t killed off any of the current lexar products, as the SD cards still seem to coming in at usual levels maybe its just XQD has been killed off. I just hope going forward Longsys adds to current lexar product stack and that quality remains at the same level as before.

  • Mehdi R

    Why SanDisk doesn’t manufacture XQD, After being acquired by WesternDigital they started to make lots of memory stuff..

    • Max

      I wonder myself..

    • Thom Hogan

      Back in 2011 SanDisk bailed on XQD and went with CFast instead.

      • PhilK

        And I would bet you that the reason SanDisk bailed on XQD had a lot to do with back-room industry horse-trading. (Including perhaps some money thrown at them by the other “camp”.)

        Since SanDisk was not just signed up to produce cards, they were actually one of the founders of the XQD standard in the first place – just like Sony and Nikon.

    • saywhatuwill

      Probably need to pay a royalty to Sony and SanDisk (WD) didn’t want to do that. Just as Microsoft didn’t want to pay Sony a royalty if they put Blu-Ray in their Xbox 360 years ago.

      • IronHeadSlim

        Wow, they had Xbox in 1657? : )

  • Rick Jansen

    Remember everyone wanted a dual QXD D850 version? This could be why Nikon didn’t do that I guess..

    • br0xibear

      I’m pretty sure what peole wanted was dual slots, not necessarily dual XQD…they didn’t want two different types of cards for one camera.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Some just wanted dual slots with similar cards. Others, like me, did not under any circumstances want the very substantial performance degradation that SD brings to a body like D500 or D850. Intentionally limiting modern camera performance with outdated card tech is absurd.

        Although personally I would prefer dual-XQD like the D5, I actually think Nikon served its overall market best by putting in XQD and SD. Folks enamored with their bagful of old slow SD cards and that will never use high frame rates or batch captures can still use them. Other folks like me can when necessary just pull the lame SD from the camera to get the full performance Nikon built for us.

        • PhilK

          It’s both hilarious and pathetic that after Nikon was incessantly criticized for releasing the D4 with dual XQD/CF support, Canon came out 4 years later with the 1DX-2 including…..

          [drum roll please]……

          …dual Cfast/CF support. ROFL.

          And then Nikon did this amazing thing (that will probably never ever be done by any camera manufacturer, ever again), and came out with the storage-format-customizable D5. (Presumably to placate all those former whiners)

    • Proto

      Sony likely gave XQD free to Nikon so Sony can sell cards….

  • TouchmymonkeyUK

    I bought a Lexar 2933x 64GB card for about £95 when i got my D500 and also bought a 2933x 128GB which cost me £128. The 128GB are now well over 160.

    I’m sure XQD will not die as i really can’t imagine Nikon releasing a D850 thinking they might.

    As for a 2000x 128GB SDXC card, those cost close on 200 quid.

    • PhilK

      Are you comparing the same series of Sony XQD card? They’ve made several, with widely varying prices depending on performance. (Several series are discontinued now)

      • TouchmymonkeyUK

        I didn’t actually compare anything to anything.

  • SkyMeow

    So from now on, Sony can make us kiss their backside to buy XQD cards.

  • Robert

    According to Jaron Schneider at ResourceMagOnline XQD and consequently CFexpress has already won the battle with CFast. Looks like Nikon chose the right format. A pity IMO that D850 and D500 are limited by the slower SD card slot though.

    If you are interested in why XQD/CFexpress will likely remain, read the article I am linking to in my own answer to this post (or google it until Peter has approved the link). It is a comprehensive article well worth reading IMO.

    • Chaitanya

      You know it’s not just camera makers that use CF/CFast formats, it’s also used heavily in industrial/embedded computers and that market is much larger than camera market. Just do some research on that as well. So the whole success of a format is also dependent on that market.

      • Robert

        Could be that industrial computers still use old formats, they seem to me to always be a bit behind the latest available top performance. Laptops have used SD cards in recent years, maybe because they are smaller and cheaper.

        I guess what will decide which format will be a success in the computer market is which format is fast enough and can provide enough storage at a good price point. The fact that CFexpress is a free format and XQD a Sony proprietary format may impact as well. CFexpress/XQD is sturdy as CF/CFast as opposed to SD, which should give CFexpress a good chance also in the computer market if the performance is needed (assuming that fast cards come at a price).

        • Allen_Wentz

          Plus SD is MORE EXPENSIVE at the kinds of high capacities photogs need for pro camera bodies.

          Users here who whine about wanting SD for something like a D850 so they can run to the corner convenience store for cards fail to consider that to obtain large sizes and other than the slowest (even for lame SD) speeds one needs to order on line, pay more than for much faster XQD and get less.

          • Robert

            Agreed. SD is currently slower AND more expensive for the fastest cards needed to get the maximum performance from a D850.

            • TurtleCat

              However quite a few people who will use these cameras will not even stress the capabilities of a UHS II SD card regardless of the specs.

    • Max

      Nice! It’d be interesting to see how those primes resolve the 46mpx stopped down to f/5.6 or so. The “soft” 58 especially (My favourite Nikkor). You should post some samples.

      • Michiel953

        It’s not soft. A common misunderstandig, not necessarily on your part.

        • Max

          Hence the quotation marks. I used it to indicate irony.

    • fanboy fagz

      at least you made 66% great lens purchases

      • Proto

        Which ones are the great?

        • fanboy fagz

          35/85

          • Neopulse

            58mm is great to use

            • fanboy fagz

              so great you sold it..
              shet lens.,,for the price..

            • Michiel953

              There you go again.

              Take your meds, it might help.

            • fanboy fagz

              piss off michelle

            • Neopulse

              Yeah sold it because was switching to Sony dumbass. Don’t need to be encumbered by more than one system when traveling.

            • fanboy fagz

              blah blah blah dumbass. shet lens, bought by a dumbass, who was more of a dumbass that moved to sony. right dumb ass? dumbass

            • Neopulse

              Wow man, you definitely are off your meds. Look, just because you can’t own a lens nor utilize it the way other have doesn’t mean you have to bash them.

              You apparently have a real internal conflict with the 58mm f/1.4G lens.
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/cb32b77f7b3f4169420dbd847a28bf92260fb2b46115e6281931ee683107db6a.jpg

            • fanboy fagz

              I would say you need meds to with your off the chart replies.
              Amd bitch dont speak to your superior unless youre told to

              Respect my muthafukin autoritay! Bitch.

              You do realize i love trolling clowns like you. Get you all fired up. You have to make a meme of a lens. Dumbass

            • Neopulse

              You’re a dumbass man. You spewing a cartoon from 15+ years ago really shows are immature you are mentally.

              So you pretend to say that you are trolling when in fact you are one overly sensitive little cunt. If memes offend you, then your snowflake dumbass deserves to look stupid.

            • fanboy fagz

              I love how up the chuff girlies like you huff and puff.
              dumb asz sony girly. faggy sig picture, hahaha

            • Neopulse

              Hey kid, grow up and learn how to spell also. You can’t be this butthurt over a piece of plastic and glass.

          • Proto

            yup. Those two are the prime work horses.

      • I actually like the 58mm.

    • KnightPhoto

      Nice set! I have the 58 and it is a great lens, whenever I put it on it’s hard to get it back off my cam… would like to get the other to 1.4G’s!

      • T.I.M

        You could use some (just a little) clear silicon grease.
        I put it on my cameras and lenses mount, it make the on/off process much easier and also protect from rust.

        • Ed Hassell

          LOL. I don’t think KnightPhoto was referencing a physical difficulty in removing the 58/1.4 — it’s a superb lens.

          • TurtleCat

            It is another of TIM’s jokes. This one, at least, got me to chuckle.

            • T.I.M

              And the 58mm is a great lens, replacing my AF-S f/1.8 (now on my F6 as standard lens)
              The 8mm “extra reach” does make a difference.

        • KnightPhoto

          LOL
          (and I didn’t know about Silicon Grease, will look for it 🙂

          Glad to hear you got yourself a 58G!

          And finally, how many of us think T.I.M should get himself a D30x30-50 😉 You can do it T.I.M!

          • T.I.M

            Thanks but I’m fine with my D800 (and my pro CF cards $$$$)
            The D30x30 will come, and I am a very patient guy.

        • Allen_Wentz

          Using grease is bad advice IMO. See my post above.

          • T.I.M

            It does need some attention (like never place the lens on a surface with the mount side down, same for the rear cap).
            But if you are careful, it make things much easier, and keep tour camera & lens mount like new !
            :o)

      • Neopulse

        Loved the 58mm, too bad had to sell it 🙁

      • Michiel953

        The 24/1.4G ain’t half bad either!

    • manattan

      now all you need is a new tablecloth 😉

  • Vince Vinnyp

    On a related note, Has Peter/Anyone heard of any manufacturer planning a 512GB UHS II SD card?

    • Allen_Wentz

      Not yet as far as I know. I would think that the comparatively slow speeds need to be improved before large capacities will become a viable product. SO far at least, SD card costs skyrocket at larger sizes.

      SD UHS-III was just announced this year, maxes out at 624 MB/s, and it usually takes many years for vendors to step up to max standard rates, if ever.

      The other issue is bus speeds. As long as users like Sony and Nikon choose UHS-I (Sony A9) or cripple the SD buses in-camera (Nikon D500) anyway there is no reason for card manufacturers to push the SD throughput envelope from their end.

  • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

    Wished that Sony added XQD more to their products including their superb A9 series to boost up more uptake of this media and that CfA associated had standardise their next media just to one format – rather than having CFast and XQD. Hopefully Nikon will continue adding XQD to their cameras including mirrorless and at the lower end.

    More uptake of this format means more vendors like Sandisk making cards and for prices to be as low as possible and for the current media to be standard.

    • Allen_Wentz

      My guess is that whatever is next with better bandwidth will replace XQD at some point like XQD superseded CF. In the meantime XQD works very well on Nikon’s top bodies.

      • Robert

        CFexpress will likely be the backwards compatible successor to XQD. Read the article I linked to below for more technical background about the possible increased bandwidth.

        • br0xibear

          “CFexpress will likely be the backwards compatible successor to XQD.”
          Nope… CFexpress cards will not work in any current camera with a XQD slot. See my post above with an email screenshot from Delkin.

          • Robert

            That is actually up to Nikon et al who use the XQD cards. The card controller needs updated firmware, and if that is provided the CFexpress cards can be used in an XQD card slot.

            • Allen_Wentz

              Agreed. However my expectation is that the likes of Nikon will not make effort to upgrade bodies like D850/D500, because they do not need to. The speeds and buffers of those cameras (once the lame SD card is removed from the camera) are already quite spectacular and class-leading at the respective price points.

              My guess is that Nikon will wait for some faster bodies (D5s and/or perhaps mirrorless) to bring us CFexpress. Older bodies will live with the very good XQD cards that they have now.

            • Robert

              The scenario you describe is what I would also guess is likely to happen. The XQD cards seem to be fast enough for the D850. I would like Nikon to dump SD for the next iteration of D850 though so that we can have only XQD/CFexpress.

            • Allen_Wentz

              Heck yes! Dual CFexpress would suit me. Camera cards are not consumables.

              I just want the absolute best available tech with each new body. I then buy fastest-available cards that live with that body forever, including when it gets sold or otherwise passed on.

            • Robert

              Same thinking here. I do not want to limit my cameras by using slower than the fastest available cards. As a bonus that also gives the fastest transfer to a computer available at the time.

            • br0xibear

              It’s not firmware, it’s hardware…the cameras would have to be changed.
              As Delkin said the connector is the same, but the technology is different.

            • Robert

              In the Swedish article from Fotosidan you linked to Delkin confirms what I wrote. It is up to Nikon et al to update the card slot controllers. If that can be done by an FW update is more than I know, and knowing Nikon, even if it can be done it probably won’t happen because Nikon wants us to buy new cameras.

            • br0xibear

              I think if it were a simple firmware update, Nikon would have shouted about it in the D850 launchand marketing.

            • Robert

              Could be. If it is a simple FW update I would of course appreciate if Nikon would choose to update the D5, D850 and D500.

        • Allen_Wentz

          Thanks for that Robert. Good article.

          • Robert

            You are welcome Allen. I always appreciate when people link to articles that provide relevant facts, so when I find one I am happy to do so myself.

    • Allen_Wentz

      I would argue against standardizing media in any area where tech is evolving. If we had standardized on a format we would now be stuck with the significant limitations of something like CF or SD.

      Lame available storage format would then also limit camera designers’ efforts. Why build a 10 fps 200-frame-buffer D500 if all that was available was lame SD that does not allow such good performance?

      • PhilK

        Standards are good, unless you want to pay 3x as much money for everything, or more.

        There’s a reason Apple abandoned SCSI drives back in the day. It had gotten to the point that an identical model HDD with a SCSI interface was wholesaling for 30% more than the equivalent IDE model, with little practical benefit for the Apple application. That’s mostly because IDE was a popular “standard” of the day, more competitively priced in the marketplace, more effort expended to keep driving down the prices, greatly facilitated by the production efficiencies driven by high-volume production.

        Neither does that preclude any other vendor(s) from offering alternatives, but if they are vying for a place in the mass-market, they’d better find a way to get their product out there in significant numbers unless they want to remain a niche player with a poor value proposition.

        • Allen_Wentz

          IIRC Apple did not abandon SCSI so much as simply move on to more modern better bandwidth Apple-developed Firewire, then Thunderbolt. Now USB-C with support for Thunderbolt 3.1, which is 4x faster than USB 3.

          Sure relatively lame IDE-standard drives have been available in Apple boxes for lower end usages, but (unlike most PC boxes) far better i/o has also always been available on Apple devices; sometimes _only_ on Apple devices.

          My point is that we are talking about camera tech high end, not about finding the cheapest slow product for some corp like Chevron to save a few bucks in 10,000 workstations. We need the Sonys and the Apples of the world to be innovating new methodologies for top end cameras rather than being force-fit into some cheaper “standard.”

          • PhilK

            Re: Firewire, Thunderbolt and USB-C, Apple didn’t invent any of those things, though they contributed to the development of some of them. (Substantially so in the case of IEEE-1394 – the official name for “Firewire” – but Apple was not the exclusive developer.)

            They do have a habit of re-naming interface buses to make their users think Apple “invented” them, though. 😉

  • akkual

    XQD is in uncomfortable position. Other camera manufacturers do not want to adopt it, because it is still expensive – and other memory card manufacturers do not want to start making them, because the demand is too low. It is a bit sad, as SD is technology wise outdated as frack and cannot match the future of these high megapixel cameras and high FPS 4K and 8K video. PCIe is the only way to go for future. XQD is already capable to do those, but CFexpress will probably get popularized before 8K video will be mainstream. However, XQD has the same physical form (superior to SD and old CF) with CFe, so it will be just swap of controller chip and one can produce both on the same manufacturing line. So I would expect XQD cards start to emerge, once the CFe gets closer to be realized.

    • Robert

      That it is currently only Sony who designs and produces XQD cards may be because it is a Sony proprietary format, which CFexpress is not. Good that Sony woke up and agreed to use the XQD concept for CFexpress.

  • T.I.M

    Peter, I totally agree and understand when you delete a stupid comment I made on NR, but the one I posted about the silicon grease (with the link) can be useful to many NR readers.

    • Robert

      I can see it and agree it is a relevant comment. Maybe you need to refresh your browser?

    • I did not delete your comment, it was flagged for moderation. I just approved it.

    • Allen_Wentz

      Sorry T.I.M, but I strongly disagree. I recommend _against_ adding grease to make Nikon lenses
      mount/unmount to Nikon bodies more easily. There is no value add, and
      even the tiniest amount of grease is a magnet for dust and dirt.

      I have used Nikon bodies with Nikon lenses hard, and in the worst possible conditions since the 1970s. Not once has rust/corrosion impeded proper lens/camera mounting. If anything I find the mount/unmount process too easy, multiple times having needed to catch a lens jumping off the body due to operator error.

      The only time I have used silicone grease is O-rings for Nikonos and underwater housings. And in those usages the trick is to wipe the grease on and then try to wipe it all off using one’s fingers. Even then, when u/w leaks do occur it is most often at a spot where grease on an O-ring attracted a bit of sand or other detritus.

      • Thank you, Allen, for calling it what it is…siliconE. It’s NOT SILICON. Silicone contains some silicon atoms, but that doesn’t make it proper to call it silicon.

    • CERO

      I think the moderation system thinks you’re way too kinky with your lube Mr. Tim.

      • yes 🙂 plus this was a weird link

  • Suhail Alam

    There are quite a lot in circulation on eBay. Isuspect there will be for some time. Anyone know whether the fail rate for xqd is different than for SD?

    • Allen_Wentz

      Even if SD is as durable (which I doubt), there is something about the smallsize that makes me less comfortable with them in my workflow.

      Since Nikon gave us XQD+SD in the D500/D850, I do use both cards in my workflow. But I mostly never touch the SD card. I just put the least slow 128 GB SD UHS-II card I can find into slot 2 and use it as backup, pulling the SD if I need max buffer for any reason.

      The tiny SD as backup suits certain occasions, like having a full images backup to send offsite at a wedding. Or to quickly conceal somewhere when the police come looking to conceal the truth, as they are wont to do all around the world, including the USA.

  • Pablo And-Jennifer Gabetta

    If only Nikon could buy the technology…

    “Nikon 512GB XQD 5933X”

    • PhilK

      Don’t forget the 100th Anniversay edition, with a gold border on the label and a paltry 30% price premium. 😀

      • Pablo And-Jennifer Gabetta

        Excellent, Nikon should hire us for their new memory card department! Haha.

  • akkual

    Like in all of these kinda “non-proprietary standards”, the manufacturer wanting to adopt it typically still needs to pay licensce fee of using the standard to some party.

    • Robert

      Unless they are already participating in/contributing to the organisation developing the standard and thus financing the development of the standard that is indeed common.

      Still I think that there is a significant difference between one company having the control of the concept and an organisation sponsored by multiple companies having the control over the standard, since it means lower risk for surprises (i.e. unexpected costs) for the companies using the concept/standard.

  • PhilK

    That article contains some blatant misinformation and in places he seems to be making things up.

    It characterizes XQD as being a sole Sony/Nikon project when in fact it not only was sanctioned by the very same CompactFlash Association that Cfast is, but it PRECEDED Cfast historically within that standards organization.

    See my other posts here on the subject.

    Personally I’m inclined to think that Cfast was created mostly as an attempt by sore losers like Canon to split the CFA into factions in order to carve out “their own little corner” of the storage card world so Canon wouldn’t have to join in a storage standard that arch-enemy Nikon was the first-mover in.

    • Robert

      I checked on Wikipedia and from there I can see that CFast was announced by CFA 2008-04-14 (CFast – Evolution of the CompactFlash Interface) and XQD was announced by CFA 2011-12-07 (CompactFlash Association Announces XQD Card Format).

      I do not want to come across as rude, but from the information available to me it seems that the article is correct in this aspect and what you are stating is not correct.

      You may be right in that Canon did not want to join for some stupid pride related reason. It happens in politics every now and then that it is considered more important who said something than which solution to a problem that actually works best. I would appreciate it a lot if all people would adopt a pragmatic way of thinking where a good solution is more important than who came up with it.

      • PhilK

        Re: those dates, that’s very strange to me because I distinctly recall Cfast as having started development afterwards. I will double check when I have more time.

        FWIW, it’s not unheard-of for organizations like that to ‘edit history’ to match their political objectives if the dates in question don’t fit their current PR story.

  • And Sandisk hasn’t produce a single XQD yet

  • Scott M.

    The 64gb xqd by Lexar (440/2933) doubled in price since I bought one in June. Now 32gb is old price of 64gb on Amazon-$89. Bought 2

  • Rod P

    Surprise surprise. An excellent decision by Nikon to support this format.

  • Market needs competitions.

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