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Nikon USA removed D600 and D5100 from their MAP list

Nikon-D600-bw-top
As of September 14th Nikon USA removed the D600 and D5100 cameras from their MAP (Minimum Advertised Price) list. This means that US dealers can now sell those two models at any price they wish and will not be punished for that. Nikon is trying to clean inventory for the upcoming D610 and D5300 cameras. The D5100 is already officially listed as discontinued. I expect the price of new D600 DSLRs to drop down in the next few days.

This entry was posted in Nikon D5300, Nikon D610 and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • robert

    How long do you think the d600 will stay in stock after the d610 will be announced? I may need a month to gather the paper.
    Possible they have more refurbs to offer?

    • Archie

      I’m think the same

      • robert

        I just want to see what the d610 offers. But at the moment im short on paper and need another ff camera. dx has no place for me with weddings. I can shoot at 6400iso with my current ff camera but not with any dx. Specific cameras for specific jobs.

        • Eric Duminil

          Fuji X100s does a great job for weddings at 6400iso.

          • Eric Calabos

            Good luck focusing with that in night party

            • Eric Duminil

              No need for luck, thanks.

              I said X100s, not X100.
              The manual focus with EVF, magnification and focus peaking works perfectly at *very* low light levels.

              From David Hobby himself:

              “And as good as the autofocus is, the manual focus
              is better. This is especially cool because MF in the old model was all
              but unusable—bad pitch and no good feedback. Using the electronic
              viewfinder and one of three chosen “manual assist” modes, you can
              accurately focus in light that is literally too dark to see in. It’s
              almost creepy.”

          • robert

            Would never buy a fuji camera.

      • Paul

        Those needing another FF should get the d600 at a cheap price when the d610 comes out. Awesome way to get another back-up FF at ~$1400! maybe less.

  • Vin

    I am guessing that the D610 & D5300 will be the last of the expeed 3 DSLR’s from Nikon. I think we will see the 2014 D4X & D400 with expeed 4, and 4k resolution at broadcast ability. Japan is moving to this as the new standard. I believe the 2014 camera’s in the pro prosumer range to be expensive.

    • Rock Kenwell

      The D3200 also has Expeed 3.

      • Vin

        I am wondering if they won’t update to D3300 in 2014, instead going to a new entry level smaller DSLR, then holding off on that update. I believe the D5300 needs just a few upgrades to make it more expensive, to make more pricing space.

        • Rock Kenwell

          I’m thinking the D3300 would be very similar to a D5200 so as to offer new features over the D3200 but not to overshadow the D5300. Hence, the D3300 probably would also have an Expeed 3.

  • Mike

    I see why the D600 could get an upgrade (bad press with the oil problem, upgrade to a better sensor etc) but why would Nikon want to replace the not so old D5200? They wont change the sensor (except maybe remove the lowpass filter) and they wont add new features because the D5300 can be better spec-wise than the quite new D7100.

    So what would Nikon want to change from the D5200 to the D5300?

    • nobody

      “upgrade to a better sensor” ???

      Huh? According to DxO the D600 and D800 sensors are the best there are. Nothing wrong with the D600 sensor! Well, if it’s clean, that is :-)

      • Sahaja

        Yes. The D600 sensor is best thing about the camera.

        Maybe he wants them to “upgrade” it to one with bands….

    • Vin

      Just a few new features, some new kit options for the holiday. Increase price. Make space for new entry level DSlRs and entry-level mirrorless.

    • Deep_Lurker

      Me too: A D610 makes a sort of sense, but a D5300 doesn’t. Unless… Maybe Nikon is planning to do something radical, like putting in an EVF to replace the pentamirror optical viewfinder.

      Or to get even more tin-foil-hatish, maybe the “D5300″ doesn’t exist. It’s a decoy, a code name, a misdirection to keep rumors of the about-to-be-announced D400 from leaking out.

      Or it could just be that Nikon is being stupid, with a pointless release of a D5300 that’s nothing more than a slightly slicked-up D5200.

    • stoooopid

      If they are replacing the D5200 so soon, it must be to make the D5300 something very different, maybe mirrorless. APS-c product cycles are faster than full frame (most of the time), but this is way too fast to replace the D5200 with something with just a refreshed AF system, or a few more MP sensor.

      • Josh

        Look what canon did with the new rebel. All they changed of any substance was giving it new 360 degree control dial and the ability to preview the effect filters in live view. I think Nikon is just taking a page from canon and having faster updates of the entry level cameras. No way the D5300 will be mirrorless. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the headline new feature of the D5300 be a touch screen though.

      • John C

        Don’t think we are going to see mirrorless any time soon. Thinking wi-fi and/or GPS. Touch screen also a possibility. It will not be very different.

        • V1J2

          Agree there will not be any Vx Jx models soon
          Even the V1 J1 are still plenty in stock
          Wonder how many units they made
          Or have they ever sell any XD

        • Sahaja

          GPS would cost almost nothing to add – the GPS module in smart phones apparently costs the manufacturers just $1.50. Wi-Fi chips are probably a similar amount.

          The perceived additional value for adding these would be good – especially since Nikon charge so much for their external units.

    • Andrew770

      We all have to get used to Nikon’s new thinking which was spelled out by a senior executive about a year ago. He said that Nikon will now be coming out with more frequent upgrades (basically copying Sony’s strategy). So no longer will you have to wait for 3 years for the next major product release.

      • Sports

        Yes, Sony certainly did this.
        But a short while ago, Sony sort of announced that they would do fewer upgrades in the future. They would begin to upgrade only when there were actually some real improvements.

        • Sahaja

          Sony seem to be releasing new cameras as frequently as ever – though they probably call some of them “new categories” instead of “updates”.

          • Andrew

            Actually, Sony does do a lot of engineering. Their engineers are on a real high. What Sony does come out with are REAL improvements. Those guys could innovate in their sleep, it’s part of their DNA! I should know I have too many of their products – both high-end and low-end.

      • Thom Hogan

        In a downward market, that’s not a good choice of strategy, IMHO. A more compelling choice is to do updates that a current owner can take advantage of, e.g. firmware updates.

        Most everything Nikon has been doing is taking value out of the product (more frequent releases of some products like Coolpix and low DSLRs, inventory buildup, overlapping products, lower quality control, lots of refurbished discounting, etc.). What you need to do in a downturning market is add value back in to make customers more confident about their purchase.

        • Andrew

          I have to agree in the case of the Nikon 1, the price drop shocked me, even though I must admit the product was overpriced from the start. But as for the D600, it is simply a big PR mess and they could not sit on all those returned cameras. And I guess most of those returns came from enthusiasts and not the professionals; but here I digress and speculate wildly.

  • robertkrasser

    Actually since one year I am quite disappointet with nikonrumors. Only informations, no rumors and no constructive future predictions. So what are the facts about D610?.

    • Stephen Ramirez

      No rumors? “Nikon is trying to clean inventory for the upcoming D610 and D5300 cameras.”

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      The fact that you just read a post on the D610 proved you wrong. What do you mean under “constructive future predictions”? Maybe something like this: http://nikonrumors.com/2013/09/09/nikon-rumors-what-to-expect-in-the-next-few-months.aspx/

      • Mike M

        I think the posters point was more aside from some new model numbers NR hasn’t provided the level of details we’ve come to expect. There’s been 3 D610 posts but aside from provide a model number, stir up a hornets nest and potentially devalue D600s already in the market there hasn’t been any actual details, is it a D600 with a new badge, a D600 with a new AF module and badge or ?

    • nobody

      NikonRumors posted the D610 rumor on August 29th. What are you missing?

    • lorenzo

      you are an idiot!

    • robert

      No cure for stupid.

    • Jon Ingram

      That’s Nikon’s fault, don’t shoot the messanger…

  • SteveHood

    The D600 must be the shorted run for an FX body.

    • Andrew

      You mean… The D600 is the “shortest” run for an FX body. Yes it is, and I am glad it is. I want Nikon to put their latest innovation in the D610… but here is wishing!

  • Joseph Li

    man imagine D600 discounted selling around $1100 (they are already selling refurbished $1300 after selling the lens)…and buyers would be pulling their hair out thinking should they get a d600 or a d7100……cameras have never been more affordable.
    Oh yeah thanks Nikon you just deprecated my d600 by 50% in 10 months

    • lorenzo

      I totally agree with you. The D600 (not to mention the D800) should have been recalled or returned to them for an exchange with the new fixed model… assuming they really fixed it..

      • Eric Calabos

        if Nikon was Toyota, we would have FJ cruiser equivalent in DX line

        • Groosome

          …so a camera that looks like a bad Lego set?

      • gr8fan

        100% right!

      • Andrew770

        Recall a camera that is not selling? OK, lets say they sold quite a few which is obviously the case, all you need to do is to get the sensor cleaned. If you are a professional photographer, then that is a little bit of inconvenience, but you do that anyway with your other cameras. If you are a prosumer, you have already heard about the issue and you have decided whether to buy one or not. My point is I do not see any reason for a recall. And besides, many photographers have benefited from the low price of the refurbished units. When you look back, you may kick yourself for not buying one. That second camera you so desperately need! Or that upgrade you have been longing for. And finally, the problem goes away for most users after about 2,000 shots (or actuation).

        • dclivejazz

          I have one and the constant splotches were a major pain. I haven’t learned how to clean the sensor yet (plan to) and paid to have it professionally cleaned. The splotches were back, especially bad at small apertures, within a couple hundred shots. By then I had almost 10K clicks. After seeing sample shots, Nikon asked me to send them the camera and they replaced the shutter. It’s been working much better since.

          I’m not sure whether Nikon should have made a recall because I don’t know how extensive the problem really is. They probably do, but are not very forth-coming. However, if you have the issue, it’s not quite as simple to deal with as you state.

          • Joven

            It’s a simple cleaning process. I found out that it was $100 to have it clean, went and bought the solution and swabs for about $50 (total).

            I cleaned it once, the spots came back (but not nearly as bad), cleaned it again, and haven’t had a problem since.

            • dclivejazz

              I just took more shots yesterday, wide angle at f/22, and the spots are showing up again in the upper left of skies. Not as badly as before, but there.

              I already had paid the $100 to have it cleaned, and it took Nikon a month to replace the shutter mechanism. Which cleaning system did you go with? Did you research any others, and if so, why did you choose what you use? Thanks.

            • Joven

              I went with the Eclipse Cleaning Solution and their Type 3 Sensor Swabs. The solution is about $12 on Amazon right now and the swabs are about $35 (for 12 swabs).

              I watched a few instructions videos sensor cleanings and the photographers mentioned it was the brand they using, plus I asked to a couple of photographers that I trust they recommended the brand. The cherry on top was the positive comments from reviews on Amazon. Most complaints were having to use more than one swab.

              I’ve cleaned my sensor twice, still have 7 swabs left (used 3 the first time and 2 the second), plenty of solution, and no scratches, so I’m happy. It only took a couple of minutes each time I’ve done it. I will also note that I had over 4k photos snapped at which point, and most reports say the issue will work itself out between 2k and 3k. So if you clean it after that, then you should be fine.

          • Andrew

            You are the exception. One professional studio tested six D600 cameras and after 2,000 clicks found five of the six cameras cleared up. So I guess you are unlucky. This issue does not deserve a recall.

            The oil is a lubricant, you just happen to have more than the normal camera has. About 3% of all manufactured products have known defects. If your camera has a defect, it is covered by warranty.

        • Joseph Li

          If all you need to do is get the sensor clean, Nikon wouldnt spent a week replacing my shutter mechanism for free. They know keep cleaning it wont help very much

          • Andrew

            [Andrew770 here...] It is because the technicians did not realize that all you needed to do was to take 2,000 shots for the problem to go away. If you have taken a lot more shots and the problem persists, then you may have other issues (I don’t know!). But remember, besides the oil drip problem, all manufactured products experience about a 3% defect rate. So your camera may have had other problems from manufacturing you were not aware of.

            But anyway, sorry to hear of your situation. It reminds me of a brand new printer I bought from HP that had real manufacturing defects and a new TV I bought from Toshiba that did not last! I may have just been unlucky with Toshiba since a laptop I bought from them was very reliable. But I have not been that lucky with HP’s consumer products (Computers and Laptops). Though a business server (computer) I bought from HP has been reliable.

          • Joven

            1) I thought reports were saying it was the mirror to blame, not the shutter.

            2) I’m glad you think it takes a week to replace a shutter (there’s a video of a D4 being diagnosed and put back together in 20 minutes).

            3) So you’re the only one being serviced?

            • Joseph Li

              1) that’s what my service receipt says, replaced shutter mechanism. Why dont they just clean the sensor for me? instead they had to replace something with new parts. All I did is dropped it off at the counter saying the sensor’s dirty.
              2) i dont get your point.
              3) No apparently there’s a long line, they ran out of parts that’s why it took a week. Nikon has been great in service recently, both D4s came back within 3 days, D800E with focus issue fixed within a week.
              Well sounds like you are happy there’s this design flaw so you can take advantage of cheap refurbished prices

          • Andrew

            If they replaced your shutter, then they must have found another problem with your camera. So good for you, you got additional service from Nikon – . that is what a quality company does. But no company is perfect and that is why you get 30 days to return your product if you are not satisfied. But I know sometimes we miss that deadline and that is when we hope we are dealing with a good company, one that will do everything in their power to fix our problem.

        • Celtic

          1. You have to send it in for cleaning every 200 to 300 shots, and you can’t do it yourself because it is OIL and requires solvent.
          2. If you bought early, you were blindsided.
          3. My problem never got better after Nikon cleaned it and I took at least a couple thousand shots (Photoshop cleaning all the way).

          • Andrew

            No, you do not have to send it in every 200 shots. A lab tested six D600 cameras and found out that if you take 2,000 shots, the problem goes away. Five out of the six cameras suddenly started behaving normal with no oil spots.

            • zbe

              I am 30,000 shots and 4 professional cleanings deep with my D600 and still covered in spots. I have been trying to get Nikon to do something to help with this problem for two months and still nothing. I was an early adopter of this camera and purchased it before the issue was well known. I think that the lack of an actual solution to this problem is ridiculous. And now with the release of this camera the loyal customer is hurt even more through the further destruction of any resale value. I am very disappointed with how this problem has been handled.

    • gr8fan

      Apple plays the same game! :-(

      • erkem

        no, with Apple you know that every year you will have an improvement (big or small) in the iPhone line. Nikon and canon are both impredecible

        • Spy Black

          Yeah really, with Apple you get a gold iPhone…

    • Anthony Woodruffe

      I bought mine in June… how do you think I feel

      • Rebel

        and I bought mine 20 days ago……….. :(((

        • Dpablo unfiltered

          Oh YEAH?
          Well I haven’t even BOUGHT mine yet!!!

          But if you really feel bad, I think the images look a bit better than those from the D3X,so…

          • metsatsu

            I don’t see how your comment makes Rebel feels better about his recent purchase

        • koenshaku

          You probably got it at a really good price. No reason to get your panties in a bunch before the specs are released, but I am glad that I didn’t buy it, it was so tempting with those refurbished prices. Actually if the D610 brings nothing new to the table then I may still snag a refurbished model I was saving for the D800, but at practically 1/3 of the price it isn’t something I can easily look pass. Either way I am excited! =)

        • Read the FAQ

          Cameras are tools and their real value is in their actual use value, not what they sell for or what their monetary resale value might be. The camera has a great sensor and is fully functional and capable of making excellent images (the rest is up to you.) Learn to wet clean the sensor and put the camera to work.

          And anyway, these days digital cameras are pretty much throw-away products and you get your money out of them by using them. I use a D600 as my ‘beater’ camera and that’s what I plan to do with it: beat it into the ground with hard use and then throw it away.

          • Mauro Schramm

            +1

        • Sahaja

          @Rebel
          If the camera you bought 20 days ago has no problems, you should be thankful that you din’t buy one 6 months ago that did.

      • Joseph Li

        Yea that’s crap, such ripoff. Again, they should just recall the d600 and fix its issues and leave it at that. Go to the lab for a year or so come up with something innovative then release something worth of a upgrade, rather than a d610 with no oil, add wifi or GPS or whatever crap and charge it at $2k plus and devalue the d600 to a $1000

        • owen heuston

          We really do not know what Nikon is doing, this all rumors at this point and this is why this site is call nikonrumors. It does look like a new model or two are coming out, but what the specs are for the camera or cameras is purely conjecture.

  • Morgan Glassco

    Kinda bummer that my D600 will be outdated so soon. But I got it for a great price. Although that will probably look like a lot after they start dropping now they are off MAP.

    At the end of the day my D600 still takes amazing images and I have only seen sensor dust a small handful of time as I shoot 5.6 or below most of the time.

    • Mauro Schramm

      You did not clean the sensor?

  • n11

    In my vision, what they improve on the 600 for the 610 would be no oil-sensor issues (it’s probably moot point at this point, but the damage has been done), a bigger AF area cause the current one is too small. Minor spec bump.

  • Vin

    The D610 should just be sight features update, some fix on shutter dust issues, price increase, but maybe then they will offer as a none kit option for sale too. Maybe we will get a more true idea of what the base price of a FF camera will be. Would be great if they do add the 51 point AF. Although the new Expeed 4 should dominate in processing speed and AF in 2014

    • lorenzo

      I bet the D610 (body only) will be over $2,399, for another piece of junk that will have new defects.

      • http://www.naturalvolo.it/ michele perillo

        How dumb you expect nikon to be in issuing another lemon with everybody on press and web, old nikon standfast supporter included, firing point blank broadsides against their QC? New body will have to be just blame free.

        • Thom Hogan

          One could have said that about “another camera” after the D800 QC issues, couldn’t they? Let’s see, the next camera was the D600. Oops.

          • Sahaja

            I think it is the two in a row that’s really harmed them – along with their sphinx like response to the problems.

            Three strikes in a row and they’ll be called out.

          • Andrew

            Nikon seems to have pushed too hard with too many products under development: Nikon 1, D4, D800, D5200, D3200, and D600. Then add to that the Japan Tsunami. Oh, not done yet… and finally the Thailand flood. Both of these catastrophic events occurred before the launch of the Nikon 1, D4, D800, and D600 – all of these products being released within the span of one year. So in retrospect, I am impressed with Nikon’s tenacity.

            • Celtic

              Somewhere there was a breakdown in QC because my D600 gunk problems start in the first few shots. Surely someone pulls an occasional sample off the line and runs it through its paces. When I saw the problem at the time, my first thought was “Oh, oh”… Apparently Nikon’s oh-oh guy dropped the ball.

            • Thom Hogan

              I believe a lot of Nikon’s problem is systemic, and that was revealed to all by the quake and floods. Simply put, Nikon doesn’t have high enough QA on incoming parts. As suppliers tried to come back on line after the two events, quality went down. Shutters, for example, were strongly impacted by the Thailand floods. Yet we don’t see other camera companies have the same QA problem with shutters from their suppliers (in some cases, the same supplier).

        • Andrew

          The D610 is not a lemon. Take 2,000 shots and the oil goes away. Lemons don’t fix themselves. Maybe they used too much oil for lubrication.

    • Sahaja

      If there is anything much more than an update to fix the oily/dusty shutter, I’d start to be concerned.

      In this short time frame, the camera would not have had time to be tested for very long before release – and the more substantial changes there are, the more potential for further problems slipping through, if they have not been thoroughly tested.

      The D7000 was in the hands of testers well over 6 months (maybe as long as a year for some) before announcement.

      Nikon would be sunk if they had another round of major QC issues

  • RxGus

    Nikon should be very happy they already have my money for the d600 and 4 lenses (jumped from a d5100)… because they wont get another cent from me.

    If the D610 has an upgraded autofocus I will be VERY upset…

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I doubt they will update the AF.

      • RxGus

        It places d600 users in a no-win situation. Our camera’s are <1 year old but have lost 50% of their value.

        If they replace it with one of the features that I "compromised" on originally there is no market to sell mine and upgrade. If it is the exact same camera, we still lose value because ours says 600 and not 610, even if Nikon has already replaced the shutterbox (twice).

        How is a consumer supposed to buy in on a 3-4 cycle tech product that is being updated/devalued 1 year in?

        • Eric Calabos

          as Thom Hogan said buying camera is not investment

          • RxGus

            Its not about the loss of money- but it is about putting your consumers in a sucky situation. A car is not an investment, but if Ford does something through marketing/quality that greatly devalues a car… it is still a bad situation for the consumer who bought one.

            Just because “it is not an investment” doesn’t mean you should be happy your camera lost 50% of its value in 8 months.

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              The loss you inevitably suffer is less than the cost of film and processing… which is essentially what you’re buying.

          • whisky

            i know of retired pro’s who said that long before Thom reconstituted that old truth. :)

          • Vin

            The old saying was, “the camera is not you investment, the lenses are the investment. ” that is if they don’t change the mount and the system.

            • Thom Hogan

              Right. Lenses are an investment in the sense that you don’t typically have to re-buy them with each generation of camera. Once you buy a great lens, it stays a great lens (until you drop or lose it ;~).

              Product disruptions have the potential for breaking or enhancing the lens investment for users. With the birth of DSLRs, Canon and Nikon users had a reasonably seamless transition, which meant the lens “investments” mostly paid off. Pentax and Minolta were already in the fray of becoming nonviable business entities in cameras when the digital disruption hit, and this hurt them in lots of ways, just making the Canon/Nikon choices all the more compelling. K and Alpha mount lens owners weren’t sure about what their future was and began discounting their lens investments.

              We’re near another product disruption point, where DSLRs become mirrorless, and possibly more disruption is possible (light field, post Bayer, etc.). There’s potential that lenses don’t make the transition, though I don’t expect that. Canon and Nikon know one of their primary assets is the installed lens base. But I can see a future were some lens sets disappear (e.g. 4/3 is looking that way over at Olympus, and DX has that potential at Nikon if full frame becomes mirrorless and CX persists and Nikon continues their knuckleheaded DX strategy).

          • Joseph Li

            They are all investments, if you are paid to shoot gigs. Think about the last lens that you bought new at retail and you actually sold more $$ for? almost never happened. A D600 depreciating like a coolpix in 10 months? That’s something of concern… (Imagine d800 at 1500 and d4 at 3000) if the replacement rate is so quick it ultimately lowers the value of all DSLRs, not just Nikon. Rather than giving us quality, innovative products, Nikon will turn into a company known for releasing lots of camera models to boost sales with confused marketing and little differences between models, manipulating buyers to buy new models over improvements that matters little in the field or worse yet, to correct a flaw in the previous model. Doing little to gain confidence in its customer base

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              You don’t have to upgrade at every increment. You should be able to see the difference between a minor update and a quantum leap. I know I can…

            • Joseph Li

              You are right I dont…especially the d600 has lost so much value in such short amount of time, gives me even less reason to pay them anything. No point upgrading to d610 for its minor updates, but nikon’s move is still pissing me off. It’s not like I dont have a camera to use…

            • Andrew770

              But the D600 is a quality camera. Take 2,000 shots and the oil issue disappears. You can clean the sensor yourself. So no big deal!

            • Andrew770

              Here is another tidbit, the minute you purchase a new product, you have taking a risk. This is not different from a company that designs and manufactures a new product, they are also taking a risk – that they got everything right. Nikon is still making great products. The D800 has held up its value. The D4 has held up its value.

              Prior to the release of the D600, NikonRumor speculated that the price will be $1599. When it was released for over $2,000+, I know I was not going to buy it. Now when the oil issue came out, a lot of people who were going to buy decided to wait. Now if consumers are not buying the D600 because of the bad press (though the issue is simple to fix with an easy wipe of the sensor), you should not be surprised by how much the price has dropped.

              Nikon is still making incredible products. They had a quality control issue at a time they were releasing many different models on the market (D800, D4, D600, D7100, D5200, D3200, and Nikon 1). These things happen and unfortunately, companies – just like you and I, are not perfect; they also make mistakes. I know that this is not too much of a consolation for you, but Nikon was also distracted by the earthquake in Japan and the flood in Thailand.

          • Thom Hogan

            True, but if RxGus is correct an a D600 loses half its value in a year, that represents a new low, and especially for a rather high end camera. For over a decade, the expected price drop was 25% over the life of the product. Nikon managed to do that within months of the D600 launch, and that would typically only be done if there was market weakness. What dropping prices like this suggest is just how weak the camera market is. Imagine how few cameras would have been sold in the first half of this year without aggressive discounting.

            As I note in another response, you don’t want to get into declining value wars when the overall market is shrinking. You have to figure out ways to increase perceived value. That’s where the QA issues of the D600 come up, where the whole notion of a D610 replacement after one year, and a host of other things start to come into play.

            To put it into a sports metaphor: Nikon is in a prevent defense and giving up big chunks of yardage because of that. All that will do is put more pressure on the offense to produce. Does anyone really expect a D610 to be a great offensive play?

            • Sahaja

              Sad. Nikon once had an enviable reputation for QC which they have now managed to demolish.

            • Andrew

              No, the D610 will not be a great offensive play if Nikon thinks that making it competitive will take away sales from the D800. The D610 can be a great camera if (1) Nikon gives it the D7100’s autofocus system to focus quickly in low light situations for great low light shots, (2) Nikon gives it the D800’s full video feature set, (3) and give us that 1/8000 sec shutter speed. A bonus will be 8 fps performance.

              The D800 is an awesome camera, the D4 is a flag ship camera, but what is the D600? Nikon has to realize that low budget professional photographers and prosummers may be their most profitable segment in the full frame category. They have deliberately limited the D7100 with a small buffer and anemic video performance to cause one to pause and think that Nikon lacks passion for the enthusiast. The Nikon D7000 was a stunning product with its magnesium alloy body at such an incredible price point. The D7100’s autofocus system is impressive, but why stop there? Keep pushing the boundaries! Show us some passion and never forget that photographers always want high ISO performance – that is, any further improvement to sensor technology should result in bigger photosites not more megapixel. WE DO NOT WANT TO GO BEYOND 24 MEGAPIXEL!!! It is perfectly acceptable to have a D620 Model A (with 24 MP) and a D620 Model B (with 36 MP). Car manufacturers give consumers choice in engine size, why can’t camera manufacturers do the same?

            • Sports

              Nikon Cars has just released the C600. It has 24 cylinders.
              I’m sure the C620 will get 36 cylinders next year.

        • guest

          Nikon’s job is to make & sell great cameras … not maintain value of sold cameras. Like many people have already said: the best camera is what you already own/use, not the one in the store and certainly not a rumored camera.

          • Celtic

            Or the worst, like the SX100 and D600. I once (in my long lost youth) owned a Petri that lasted three months; years later I took it apart, and found that the interior was a mass of brass–most of it in shreds (though the camera took marvelous photos while it worked)!

        • Spy Black

          Do you actually use your camera?

          • RxGus

            You caught me! I am just a troll who never touches my expensive “investment” but likes to complain on the internet.

            32k clicks in the past 8 months. Would love to do more, but a full time job makes that a little difficult sometimes.

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              Apparently.

        • Dpablo unfiltered

          Did you buy your * camera to shoot it or did you buy it to sell it? Does your camera work any less? How would you feel if you had just bought the D3x? Your camera will still take pictures. Right?

          I suppose they should not update the camera until you have at least 40,000 cycles on it. Also, think what happens to the value of your lenses if they don’t stay ahead of everyone….

        • Andrew770

          I bought the D80 and one year later they came out with the classic D90. Sure I felt bad, but I soon forgot about it. But I sure missed that video feature in the D90… THAT IS LIFE!

        • Sports

          What could Nikon do? It’s too expensive to recall and replace half a million D600 bodies … never mind the exact number….. It’s simply not possible if they want to stay an economically healthy company.
          What they COULD do was to offer something special for all D600 customers. Something like 20% or 200$ off your next lens. I know, it doesn’t compensate fully, but just something that both parties could live with.
          Anyway, go out and use those D600’s, while others wait and wait for the 610.

          • Quietly_Possible

            Good idea theoretically… however that would require that they admit the D600 is a problem. Not Nikon’s style.

      • S

        I think that if they don’t even update the AF the D610 will be the most pointless camera ever to be announced…
        Why would one buy it over a much cheaper D600?
        Just because of the oil issue?
        Ok, but who on earth buys such an expensive piece of equipment without making a little research, thus finding out that the oil issue was basically resolved in 2013?

        • lorenzo

          was it really fixed in 2013?
          Some say the same for the left AF on the D800/E and I still keep reading recent reviews of buyers that report that issue on new cameras.

          • S

            I can’t be sure since i did not buy one (yet).
            Since i’m in the process of doing so, i did a little research on the internet, and it does seem like the issue involved the first production batches, and when they realized there was a problem they changed something in the production line (though hardly admitting something was wrong).
            Still, if a seller had D600s from the first production, they might have sold them well into 2013.
            On major sellers such as B&H or Amazon, in the customers reviews from the last 6 months, there is actually very little complaining about the issue.

            • lorenzo

              I also have done an extensive research on internet for the D800E and saw many still complaining in July 2013.
              According to a salesman at B&H it might take up to four months from the factory to the sale (sounds a little too much to me) but even so, if now is fixed, it will bring back the problem at the factory still in March 2013, which is far after the first batch.
              I still wait, maybe I make the madness before Christmas and regret it in January.

        • Sahaja

          Nit it’s still 2013 – does that mean they have another three months left to fix it?

      • http://Flickr.com/inthemist InTheMist

        Seems to me the AF is the biggest potential for improvement (other than dust) isn’t it?

        It’s one of the things that put me off the D600.

        • Andrew770

          Yeah, if only its AF is as good as the D7100. But for me, add video also.

      • plan3s

        How about AA filter removal?

        • Andrew770

          Removing the AA filter might be more of a problem on the D600 than the D800 since its photosites are not that small.

  • Keith Liscinsky

    If the link is correct for the D5100 being discontinued, then it shows the D300S and D3100 as discontinued also.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      Yes, I reported about the D300s a while back. I think the D3100 was recently added to the list.

  • lorenzo

    This fact confirms that Nikon keeps throwing at us just junk, defective products… and we (me first) are so stupid to buy them

    I wonder if they will do the same for the D800E (any news admin about a D810E?) or if the LT AF, the loose 10-pin connector, the green LCD, the loose flash, etc. etc. are NOW fixed. Does anyone know that?

    I am still waiting to buy that camera. Meanwhile I got another piece of junk: Coolpix P330 (frequent freeze, GPS and GPS log not working, Continuous shooting not monitored) and it keeps going like this with the lowest quality I have ever seen from Nikon!

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I think there will be at least another year before we start talking about a new D810.

      • lorenzo

        it didn’t take two years for the D600

        • guest

          The D600 probably has a serious design flaw that we don’t know about.

          • jk

            yeah definitely other wise there is no LV issue of it.
            if it was just FW issue as DPR guessed , we already got it fixed.
            but in reality Nikon did not fix it yet.
            last week, I sent my last copy of D600 to Nikon (this was 6th time I sent it to Nikon for the very reason dust on the sensor issue), Nikon just replaced the shutter unit of my D600 and actually seemed also replaced the sensor.
            I guess Nikon has been doing this to many of us who keep complaining about it or have had the dust on the sensor issue more than 2 times.

          • Andrew

            Or it is possibly more simple than that. Maybe people simply want more features for their money!

        • Josh

          Well the D600 is the entry level FX camera and the D800 isn’t so you can’t really compare them. Entry level cameras are almost always updated more rapidly

          • Sahaja

            It’s only “entry level” for FX – not entry level like the D3200.
            It is really an “enthusiast level” camera like the D7000

        • Andrew770

          It sure did not take two years for the D600 because Nikon heard our complaints (no not the oil issue – that was a simple fix) that the D600 is simply an OK camera. Nikon needs to release an exciting camera for prosumers to be willing to pay $2,000+.

          • Sahaja

            D600 was exciting when it was released because it set a new low price for a full frame camera from one of the big two manufactures and the sensor is excellent.

            The many cameras that had the oil/dust issue killed perception of the camera.

            I expect it will become a classic case study of how to blow a product launch.

            • Andrew

              Well, my perception was different. I just did not like the fact that its shutter speed was only 1/4000 sec as opposed to 1/8000 sec. And then after the D7100 came out, I longed for its awesome autofocus system allowing the camera to focus quickly in low light situations. And finally, we were led to believe that the camera would be released at the $1,599 price point. Now if you add to all that the oil issue, the D600 soon became an unsatisfactory camera.

            • Sahaja

              Nikon never led anyone to believe the D600 would be released at $1,599. At the time that rumour never seemed realistic. Mind you that’s about what they’re having to sell them for now

        • umeshrw

          For consumer products the upgrade cycle is shorter.

          • Sahaja

            You’d normally expect a camera like the D600 to be updated only after two and a half to three years minimum.

            Like the gap between D90-D7000-D7100.

            • umeshrw

              Despite being an FF 600 is still more consumer grade than 7100 featurewise and builtwise. Although here the upgrade was mostly because of the QC problem imho.

      • Thom Hogan

        I’ll repeat what I wrote elsewhere: if you speed up the product updates, you essentially are shooting yourself in the foot. If D800 users think that it gets updated every two years, you’ll lose some of the updaters at each cycle. That’s the WRONG thing to do in a downturning market, and it’s a dangerous thing to do when market disruption is getting more likely.

        One of the problems of the “constant iteration” strategy the Japanese consumer electronics companies use is that it stops working once the market no longer is growing.

        US$3000 is not a price point at which someone wants to think they have to upgrade every year or even two years, anyway. You start to condition the person on the fence about such a product to just wait.

        • Sahaja

          Are you suggesting that Nikon is becoming (or has become) a consumer electronics company?

          • Thom Hogan

            It already has become one. Nearly 80% of their sales are from cameras now. How much of that do you think is FX cameras? ;~)

            Essentially, Nikon sells over 20m camera/lens units a year at the moment. This is very distinct from a company that only two decades ago derived two-thirds of their income from the sale of less than 100 units of steppers.

            Technology just keeps marching on. You have to figure out not just what you’re building today, but what you need to build tomorrow. There’s evidence already in place that it won’t be 20m units of something, which is a bit of a problem for a company that just made the transition that direction.

            • Sahaja

              If 80% of their sales are cameras – and yet CoolPix sales are going down the tubes, Nikon 1 apparently not selling well, and the D600 is having problems – a lot of that 80% must be disappearing fast.

            • Thom Hogan

              Not exactly. Sales aren’t yet disappearing, but you’re seeing Nikon using price to drive sales now and this will just get worse unless something changes. What is happening currently is that Nikon’s margins are disappearing in the camera business.

              One of the reasons why I’ve been so bearish on Nikon in the last two years is that they’re following a very common trajectory in high tech, one that has a predictable ending. We’re currently in the “lower price to keep sales up” phase. Once that lowers margins enough so that the company is losing money, we enter the next phase, and it won’t be pretty.

              The way out of such cycles is to disrupt yourself. Basically you have to be willing to risk your current business for your future business. You can’t be afraid to cannibalize your own sales. The problem in the camera industry, of course, is that no one seems to have a plan for how to do that and still grow the company. In other words, no one knows what the Next Big Thing is.

        • Andrew

          I think it depends on the product. In the case of the D800, it might already be an excellent product. If the consumer imagines it has every conceivable feature they may desire, then two years should be an acceptable cycle. For the the D800 at the size of the D600 is nearly the perfect camera. You buy it and regardless of updates, you will be pleased to keep it for 5 years or more. But, if they upgrade it with the D7100’s awesome autofocus system, then it might be time to sell it for the upgrade. But knowing me, I might just hold on to it.

          But the D7100 is a “very good” product and the D600 is a “good” product. If Nikon takes care of the obvious deficiencies or longings of their customers, then people will buy these cameras immediately. All Nikon needs to do is to look at the complaints concerning features that are lacking and address those issues in the next revision, and people will not wait around for the next camera release.

          My concern is that Nikon deliberately leaves desired features out thinking that they can artificially control the buyers behavior. Why didn’t they expand the buffer in the D7100? Why did they neglect the D7100’s video features? Why go through multiple camera iterations and still not address features their customers have been longing for? If you come out with great products, people will buy your product. And if Nikon’s customers skip a product cycle, they may still get new customers from their competitors. And remember, developing nations are adding millions of new potential customers who are entering the ranks of the middle class each year. Nikon should innovate aggressively and if the product is strong enough – like the D800, they will be unable to fulfill the demand for months!

          • Thom Hogan

            I’m pretty sure that Nikon does exactly what you are concerned about: deliberately choose features, keeping some back, and trying to micro manage buying tendencies via feature distribution. Moreover, I think that’s what a lot of folk fear about a D610 update: that it’s just an attempt to micro manage around the D600 shutter issue.

            The problem here is simple: customers don’t like feeling manipulated, so anything that reeks of that immediately changes the relationship from supportive to adversarial. You can already see that in some of the comments in forums like this one from people ANTICIPATING what the D610 is likely to be. Customer’s trust in Nikon has gone downhill for awhile now, and the D800 and D600 quality control problems and Nikon’s response to them has now made most people move to the cynical side. That can’t be good for sales.

    • Jon Ingram

      As for the D610, if all they do is fix the oil problem, it seems a bit underhanded. If they add some new features, AND fix the problem, then that is a little easier to swallow. But the fact that they are discontinuing the D600 leads me to believe it won’t be a significant upgrade at all (in terms of features).

      Every time I’m tempted to hate Nikon I remember how awesome the D800 and 14-24 are. Even though I’m really annoyed with Nikon recently, ultimately it doesn’t effect me that much. As long as they keep producing a few incredible products (that I can’t get anywhere else) every few years it is enough to keep me on board. But if they ever fall seriously behind on a product that I want, or if they screw up the FF market in the future I will probably switch though. I know many people are already in that boat, waiting for a “D700″ replacement or a “D400.” I’m not one of them, but I get it. I remember the days when I loved Nikon. Now I love/hate them.

    • jk

      why do they have to replace the D800E so soon?
      there is no known issue with that body.
      the D600 has a lot of issues , the most annoying issue of it is the fixed aperture in LV and video mode.
      so it should be replaced , the D600 was a flawed camera, while the D800/E was or has been an excellent camera for still and video.
      so basically, what you get what you pay for, I am glad I sold all my D600 before its price drops.

  • robert

    I think they might put out a D610E as well. Also i think the af might be tweaked a bit(a bit) and it might (might) get the 51 af points and a boost in fps when used with a grip. But these are t enough for me to add close to a grand to buy it over a refurbed d600.

    But its obviously a psychological game as well by putting out a new new tweaked model with new number so people wil say “ah its the d610 so no oil issue” although i think nikon has already fixed the issues for all of them coming out of the factory for some time now.

    But i stil think they will lose stock in the next quarter as well. Just my estimate.

    • jk

      no D610E for sure , if you want to get rid of the AA filter , you need at least 36 mp for FX and 18mp for DX to get any kind of real life advantage from it.
      the 24.3mp sensor is not pixel dense enough to go AA-less.

  • AM

    Just now from the specs, table of differences between the D600 and the D610:

    D600 D610

    Name D600 D610

  • jerkman

    move to Canon it’s that simple and it’s Made in Japan!

    • lorenzo

      yes, as they don’t have any problems, right?

    • Dpablo unfiltered

      Good way to make a name for yourself. The 6D can’t touch the D600. How will it do against an update?

      • jk

        in my opinion ,they are very identical in BQ and overall IQ.
        both do video very poorly, and I think basically what you get what you pay for.
        if you go all Nikon get the D800 or E or D4.
        if you go Canon just get the 5D3 or 1DX.
        but both theD600 and the 6D have very very poor video implementation, and I think that is why they are as cheap as they are now.

        • Spy Black

          If critical video work is your thing, I suppose, but for most work the video off both those bodies is more than sufficient, and probably better than what people have gotten off the 5D Mk II. The 6D has a cleaner sensor than the D600 and 5D Mk III to boot.

        • Dpablo unfiltered

          Oh, my. Video.

          Because DSLRs are for video.
          Mumbles curses that he will not print…
          Mumbles another derogatory statement…
          Curses some more…
          Remembers who he hates more than wedding photographers…

        • Aldo

          Seems like the d5200 does well with video… it may even be better than the d600 on that.

    • Mr. Mamiya

      Remember to always take Ken Rockwells humorous writings with a pinch of salt.

      • Neopulse

        The only reason I ever go to Ken Rockwell’s page is to see the charts that are possibly copy and pasted that offer comparisons. But other than that he is overly critical and is quite repetitive at times.

    • jk

      the real smart people like us use both Canon and Nikon , sometimes even Sony, Leica and Mircro43,I love them all for different reasons.
      but if I have to keep only one camera that would be the D800E or 5D3 cause they do almost all things well.
      the D600 is a loser and it is not selling well , just read what Thom says in his latest article.
      I think Thom got it all right this time.
      I love KR and I love his work , he seems a happy person and very positive in many ways.

  • jk

    thanks NR, I already sold my two D600 bodies without almost any significant loss(I lost a bit but I can accept that because if I rent the camera for just a week , I will lose more than I lost with my two D600 bodies).
    I guess I just wait to see what will really happen , if the D610 is any good , I will get that, but it must have better video mode than that of my D800E to make me buy it.
    that said , I ‘ll probably keep my D800E for serious work , my NEX6 and GX7 for everyday just walk around casual stuff.
    but if Nikon cannot get the video part right , sadly though, I must buy a 5D3 or an A99v very soon.
    but for if you shoot only still, then there is no reason to get anything else than the D800E(it ll stay in my camera bag for at least 2 more years, the D800E is a great camera).

  • learningcameras.com

    I returned my D600 because of oil problems and i’m really glad I did because of the value drop! I have no idea why Nikon would replace it already. The camera was amazing when the sensor was clean. The only thing that was really annoying which I pointed out in my review was that you can’t change the aperture when shooting video. Sure, i’d take a larger AF area, wifi, and audio control while recording. But Nikon should have just recalled the cameras, replaced the shutter mechanism, and been done with it. Designing a new camera this soon is bad for everyone. It lowers Nikon’s image, it kills our resale value, it doesn’t fix the issues with the D600, and it likely means that the D610 will be more of a ‘fix’ camera than a genuine improvement.

    • Andrew

      Why should technology slow down in order for your old camera to retain its retail value? Cameras are not antiques. If you are a professional, go and use your new camera and make all the profit you can. Then that new upgrade will not be that expensive. Would you be happy if Nikon releases a new camera every 3 or 4 years? This type of reasoning makes no sense. If you cannot afford a new camera, then wait a year and buy a refurbished or used camera. For me the D600 was a good camera but not a great product. I am glad Nikon is releasing the D610.

  • learningcameras.com

    I returned my D600 because of oil problems and i’m really glad I did because of the value drop! I have no idea why Nikon would replace it already. The camera was amazing when the sensor was clean. The only thing that was really annoying which I pointed out in my review was that you can’t change the aperture when shooting video. Sure, i’d take a larger AF area, wifi, and audio control while recording. But Nikon should have just recalled the cameras, replaced the shutter mechanism, and been done with it. Designing a new camera this soon is bad for everyone. It lowers Nikon’s image, it kills our resale value, it doesn’t fix the issues with the D600, and it likely means that the D610 will be more of a ‘fix’ camera than a genuine improvement.

  • Rob

    Nikon has their priorities backwards. They need to make a 5D MarkIII equivalent full frame camera (sensor wise) to fit in between the D800 and D700. They are leaving tons of money on the table.

    • decisivemoment

      Not until they have a CPU that can actually handle the data. With the chips they’ve got, 4fps on the D800 and 5.5 on the D600 is as fast as they can go; I think they have to do a bit of a kludge on the D4 to do what it can do, hence the 9 fps with AF and the 11 without. Nikon desperately needs a new Expeed CPU; once that happens, then they’ll have options. I agree, they probably should do a 16MP version of the D800 to tide them over, just as they should have also done a 16MP upgrade to the D300. But they seem dead set against it.

      • HD10

        Expeed 4 can handle 24Mbps at 12fps.

        Expect a D4s with 24mp shooting 12fps in a store near you next year.

        As to a D400 with 24mp and shooting 12fps, hell hasn’t frozen over so the wait continues.

      • Sahaja
      • Ola

        This has NOTHING to do with the CPU, it is the _sensor_ readout speed that is the limit.

  • Spy Black

    I think Nikon may be trying to get rid of AA filters along their line. It will not surprise me at all if the new bodies have no AA filters. I for one would like to see an articulating screen on the D610, I miss that on my D600 and it’s one of the best features of my D5100.

    The jump to D610 is probably mostly to nip the dust stigma in the bud. It’ll probably be the same camera sans AA filter, hopefully with stereo mics, and possibly Wi-Fi. It certainly would be great if they threw in more focus points and an articulating screen, but I think for the most part the above will be the new D610.

    • Sahaja

      Whether they think dropping the AA filter is a good idea – or not – seems to have a lot to do with pixel density. Pixel density of a 24mp FX sensor is much less that of the D7000 – let alone that of the 24mp DX cameras.

  • Spy Black

    It’ll be awesome if D600s start to drop below $1000.

    • Sahaja

      If D600s start to drop below $1000 any time soon, Nikon is in trouble.

      They already had to slash Nikon 1 prices in half to sell them – but rapid price drops and short product cycles on smaller sensor cameras are not so unusual.

      If the price of a full frame camera falls in half in just over a year that would be a different story. Who would want to pay $2,000+ when their next FX camera was released?

  • BangalorePhotographer

    At least I expect Nikon to give aperture control during Video recording. I don’t understand why Nikon is ignoring this aspect.

    • decisivemoment

      I think because of Nikon continuing to insist on mechanical aperture control in their lenses even ten years after they dropped the mechanical aperture ring, it kind of precludes any camera other than the D800 and D4 from having it simply because those are the only two with the space underneath the lens mount to house the mechanical gear needed to adjust the pin on the fly. I suppose they could at least implement it for the handful of lenses that have electronic aperture control. Unfortunately, so far, that means only the tilt-and-shift lenses and the 800/5.6.

  • Marco Carazzato

    D600 owners should have an option to upgrade to D610

    • AM

      There will be one, pay full price just like anybody else and you get to keep your D600.

    • AM

      There will be one, pay full price just like anybody else and you get to keep your D600.

  • David B

    Ironically, Olympus OM-D E-M1 that I pre-ordered will cost me more than Refurb D600 I got from Adorama recently (assuming I see the 24-85VR lens). I see today D600 refurbs are sold slightly used at $1250 at Fred Miranda forum. I think we will see the refurb price for D600 go to three digits within couple months. By the way, I find D600’s sensor to be superb. I know it when I shoot photos and I look at the picture I took and think it is ISO100 but then casually look at the EXIF info and it says ISO2000. and there is no difference and no noise. I used to own D800 and 5DM3 and I think for the price, D600 is a bargain. I also don’t shoot at F16 all the time so if there is a dust spot or two, it does not bother me. I have a feeling D600 will be my last DSLR. All mirrorless after that.

  • Celtic

    Beware the dirt. The oil and dirt on my D600 sensor finally got the best of me. I couldn’t finish shooting 200 pictures without such an accumulation that the camera was useless. Finally sold it for $700, and was glad to get rid of it. If you think you can get a great deal for one now, be prepared to get a camera that you can’t use. (I had it cleaned under warranty by Nikon, but I still couldn’t finish 200 shots without more grime and dirt, and because of the oiliness of deposits, I was afraid to clean it myself–though I have successfully cleaned the sensors of my other Nikons.) These cameras are no joke…

    • Sahaja

      If it was so bad, how come Nikon didn’t change the shutter for you like they have for so many others?

      • Celtic

        Probably because I sent it in only once. I just didn’t want to go through all the hassel of packing and running around to mail the thing. I should have just kept mailing it in, even though it would have ment doing so after each photo session (imagine taking 200 or 300 shots in a day, then having to return the camera to Nikon–you can see why I got discouraged). The first cleaning by Nikon didn’t change the amount of dust and oil splatter one iota. At that time the online commentators were being very discouraging, saying Nikon was going to continue ignoring the problem, while others were saying they didn’t see a problem (implying that any one who said they were experiencing the problem was exaggerating–at best), and I believed the first comments and felt hopeless because of the second. Now, after hearing that others got the full monty of glass replacement, I’m sorry I wasn’t more persistent. My bad and my loss. I should have raised h*ll.

  • Aurora1977

    My logical guess, would be that the D600 will definitely get at least an updated AF only for the reason that they have to keep it closer to the D7100 specs.

    My guess specs:

    D610
    – 51 AF points
    – Higher resolution LCD, like D7100
    – 1/8000s shutter
    – Killer feature

    They have to make a killer machine because they know they screwed up with the D600. I also think it will get a killer feature which will also go into the D800 successor.

    • BroncoBro

      Having a spot-free sensor would be killer enough for many people.

      • Andrew770

        This is an old issue, it is not worth mentioning.

        • Eaglenatchez

          Of course it’s worth mentioning. It’s the elephant in the room with this camera. If Nikon comes out with the D610 and it hasn’t address the “oil” issue. Bye bye Nikon.

        • BroncoBro

          It’s worth mentioning if you just paid $2,000 for a camera with that problem. Nikon needs to make the problem go away permanently or they can have all the “killer features” imaginable and it won’t do them any good.

    • http://Flickr.com/inthemist InTheMist

      I’d buy that.

    • Andrew770

      I agree with you on all of your feature list, plus they must give it the D800’s video features and performance. The D600 is a good camera, but it is not an exciting camera. And anything less than exciting will not get my attention. Nikon must make each camera as if it is the only camera they make. That is, give us all of the features they can pack at that price point and don’t worry about one model competing against another model in their lineup. Act as if each model is competing against a competitor’s model.

    • owen heuston

      The killer feature would be to increase the buffer when shooting raw.

  • decisivemoment

    Leaving aside all the dust and oil stuff (which I’m guessing would be due to a cheap shutter mechanism?), how durable is the D600 body compared to all-magnesium? I’m curious as to whether the plastic mirror box (and therefore the plastic behind the lens mount) makes the camera less or more prone to damage than something like a D300 or D800. I assume the plastic would be less likely to bend and deform in most impacts, but more likely to snap in a really major impact. Correct?

    • http://1000wordpics.blogspot.ca/ 1000wordpics

      Sort of. If you do a Google Image Search, you’ll find a few cases of D90’s with broken front plates, more so than D300’s… not scientific, but generally fits. Polycarbonate isn’t just ‘plastic’ in the regular sense of the word, it’s fairly strong (the stuff that Lexan is made of)… but… it can deform and bend without breaking. This would be quite durable if camera bodies were a singular monocoque of the stuff, but they have to be made of separate pieces joined together. You’re only as good as your weakest connection, so yes, the non-metal bodies aren’t as impact resistant as the metal bodies. The saving grace is that it takes quite a wallop to break a Nikon, and in a lot of cases, it’s because the camera fell with a largish-sized lens attached. The lens acts as a level and the force of impact ‘pry’s the lens mount away from the camera body. But again… extreme cases.

      • Cyrille Berger

        Not scientific at all, there were most likely more sales of D90 than D300, so it would be no surprised that in absolute values more of them break.

  • Dave Ingram

    Will be interesting to see the specs – given that Nikon is moving toward, how did it go, “products with higher profit margins” I wouldn’t expect the D610 to have much in the way of improvements/build quality … maybe just enough superficial changes to justify another couple of hundred.

    • Thom Hogan

      Not having to replace a lot of shutters should help Nikon’s profit margin ;~)

  • D800E_user

    if the D7100 has 51-point AF, I don’t see why the D610 wouldn’t.
    If the D7100 can do 7 fps in 1.3x crop (on a DX sensor) mode, I don’t see why D610 can’t do 7fps in 1.2x or 1.5x crop mode.

    It’s simple economics. The D610 body would likely be the FX version of the D7100 body, I do see why parts already used in D7100 not going into D610.

  • koltsov

    I think the change is associated with marriage d5200 matrix. That’s hot pixels when recording video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDrL8Yw3TG8

  • Rafa R

    if the D600 price drops considerably.. I´ll get one, if not I´ll wait and get the D610, this will be my personal travel camera, my working horses are D3x and D800.. so I don’t mind much the dust issue, I clean my sensors my self.. so.. awkward moment I´m going through, should I wait for the D610? man…

    • Andrew770

      I am thinking that the D600 presents a rare opportunity, especially for a one year old camera. And at these prices, its resale value should not drop much.

      Now as far as the D610 is concerned, my thinking is that it might be more than a minor upgrade. The reason is that a lot of their development effort which was distracted by the launch of the D4, D800, D600, and Nikon 1 were all concluded about a year ago and before. So image if in the past one year the development team that were focused on their professional full frame camera line turned their focus on the D610 to blow away the competition, then we are likely to get an amazing camera. But such a camera may likely sell for $2,000+. If they put a new sensor in the D610 with better low light performance and give it some better video performance equal to the D800, and add a few more bells and whistles, we may have an incredible camera. Ah, how great it is to speculate!

      • Sahaja

        Nothing wrong with the sensor in the D600

      • Rafa R

        hehe agree

  • Bjorn Erik

    Any chance the D610 will get a bump in its fps? To compete with Canon? If so… I’ll probably get one.

  • super101

    My pet peeve with the D600 is not so much with the controls. I can do away with that its the focus. For a camera that costs so much having the focus points bunched in the middle is really disappointing. I hope they improve on it.

    • Mike M

      Have you ever used any other FX camera? By the nature of the design of the sub mirror and the size of the mirror box, there’s a pretty significant limitation on how widely the AF points can be spaced on ANY FX camera. The D800 only has like 20% more “spread” to it’s AF points. Is it ideal, no, is it a major deal or significantly worse than other cameras in Nikon’s lineup, not really.

  • stoooopid

    Wonder if Nikon is going to announce a camera to compete against the new Canon SL1. Small body DSLR style. That would be interesting. My main body is a D7000, but I bought and returned a D5100 thinking that it would be “smaller enough” to make me carry it more often. No way. Lighter, yes. Smaller – maybe, but not enough to make a real difference. If Nikon comes with a DSLR body that is significantly smaller than my D7000, I could be tempted. I don’t see that happening with a D5300, but maybe we will get this body as a bonus.

  • droll

    I am surprised to know that D600 goes discontinued after just a year from its official release. It’s really unheard of for the price of this range. It means Nikon themselves recognizes D600 a failure, and I suspect that an urgent upgrade is demanded for from their marketing department to compete with the flawless 6D (except for the video AF capability of 70D). 70D was such a game changer and unless Nikon is able to catch up with the video AF capability of Canon, they will lose the game. The minor upgrade will not suffice in the long term, since all Canon DSLRs hereafter will be implemented with video AF functions better than that of a 70D, which is already far ahead of Nikon. As Ken Rockwell argues, Nikon is about 2 steps behind Canon.

  • Rock Kenwell

    D610 = D600 + Oil Sealer – Anti-Aliasing Filter + $200. Just call it somewhat D600E.

  • jurassicii

    IMO,not possible, releasing such improved D610 right now means nothing but total failure of Nikon’s R&D, QC and PR as well. any manufacturer would not do so to jeopardize its own image, not to mention such a huge company.

  • NotYourAvgJoe

    isn’t this called price fixing? and isn’t it illegal?

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