The Nikon D7500 will start shipping on June 9th


  
  
Nikon Japan announced the official shipping date for the new Nikon D7500 DSLR camera:  June 9th.

      
The new Nikon EN-EL15a battery and Nikon DK-28 eyepiece will also ship on June 9th. The Nikon EH-5c AC adapter is delayed due to production issues (you can still use the old EH-5b model).


Nikon D7500 pre-order links:

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  • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

    Not bad time between announcement and possible deliver, hope Nikon has a good year and ships other new items on time, without much QC issues and without any cancellations.

    Still a hard sell thou on the D7500 compared against the excellent models of D7100 and D7200

    • This is the problem now, once when manufaturers had one or two models there was a good choice, am/proam/pro now the models are soooo close in spec why spend the more, in fcat my spare 3rd body to my 810/d4s is a D80

      • ambient_exposure

        haha sold my d80 & beloved d7000 as a package with a few junk lenses that i acquired over the years. i then sold my d200 for not too far under the combo price of the other 2. at one time before film, the d80 & my d200 at the time, were my breadwinners & they did quite the job for the time!

      • Andrew

        The specs on the D7500 is mostly that of the flagship D500. The D7200 is an excellent camera but is not in the same class as the D7200. It lacks a Tilting-LCD touchscreen for Menu selection and the ergonomic body of the D500 which was first introduced in the D750. In fact I would not even consider the D7500 an upgrade but a new class of camera. See my reasons below.

        The D7500 has the new EXPEED 5 image processor which is 30% faster. The D7500 has a 180,000-pixel RGB 3D Color Matrix Metering III with Advanced Scene Recognition System. The D7200 3D Color Matrix Meter II has a 1,005-pixel RGB sensor.

        If your lens is not focusing well, the D7500 now includes an Auto AF fine tune feature. There is also new Auto Picture Control not available on the D7200 which enables the new camera to automatically set the correct tone curve settings which would be a boon for portrait and wedding photographers or basically anyone as it would set the exposure for a more accurate skin tone.

        And what about the fact that the D7500 has the new D500 image sensor which produces very nice images at ISO 51,200, up from the D7200 ISO of 26,600. In addition the D7500 has an electronic image stabilization for 1080p High Definition videos which the D7200 lacks. Plus the D7500 now supports 4K video which is missing in the D7200. And if all of these things are not enough, the D7500 has a more tighter and comprehensive weather-sealing of its body for the elements. Would you care to take your D7200 on a damp trip to the Amazon?

        The fact of the matter is that many people make general statements about these models being close to each other when in fact the new Nikon D7500 camera is the closest thing we have seen of an enthusiast camera having the DNA of a professional flag-ship camera model. The D7500 is essentially worlds apart from the lower Nikon camera models including the D7200. I would not have expected a camera with these features and capability to be priced as low as $1,250.

        • CERO

          The D500 has been hovering around 1500 USD with discounts.
          Id rather get a D500 (which I have already) than getting a gimped version.

          • Spy Black
          • Andrew

            The D500 is an impressive camera. But it is 35% bigger than the D7500. Here are the specs: (a) D500: 860g. 147 x 115 x 81 mm and (b) D7500: 640g. 136 x 104 x 73 mm.

            For someone who prefers a smaller, lighter, and more enthusiast friendly camera without sacrificing much in the way of its professional aspirations, the D7500 strikes the right balance between functionality, performance, and portability.

            The fact that the D7500 gets most of the innards of the D500 makes it a formidable camera. The D500 is priced at $2,000 and Nikon’s promotion takes off only $200. So at $1,250, the D7500 is an amazing deal.

            • So what about weight, some of us a real men, with mens hands, OMG wow 220 grams, DUH, still for the women users it may be better 😉

            • CERO

              but most of the weight will be on the lenses.
              As for innards, the D7500 is still gimped in many areas. I wouldn’t want to lose the second memory slot for example.

          • +1

          • irandroid

            Yes and no, the D7500 is way smaller, that’s the one reason I sold my D500, I loved the camera and features but wasn’t willing to take it to places due to the size many times

            • CERO

              is the D7500 really that smaller compared to the older D7XXX series? I know someone else mentioned weight.
              But coming from a D610 I didnt feel much change weight or size wise.
              Most of the weight will be on the lenses anyway, unless you only use primes.

            • dabug91

              Nope, not really. The D610, D7100, D7200, D750, D7500, and D500 are all pretty similar in size.

            • CERO

              so the weight and maybe the features is the only change.

        • Pippo

          D500 is action camera, so far, not used tilting LCD. Flip-out and twist LCD as my year 2000 PSh G2 will be more usable.
          Trying to use AF Fine tune. Without special printed target it is painfull. I do it manually.
          Still drain battery twice more than CIPA targets.
          But, D500 is nice camera, D7500 will be too.

          • CERO

            I never had issues with the battery drain. Perhaps its related to the wireless? I have everything disabled wireless wise.

            • Pippo

              I have read many discussions, changed settings, no result. I dont know, my battery is Li-ion 20, because manufacturer are Sony (wuxi), but with Nikon holograms. I’m ready to buy spare OEM battery, than look, what happens. Only JPG use less power, RAW+JPG more.

            • CERO

              have you tried raw+raw ?
              It also does not cut down the buffer that way too.

        • Oh gosh a tilting screen wow big deal, at least Canon has a PROPER articulated screen up down left right

        • Dave

          It’s far from worlds apart to the D7200. You get the jump to 8 fps from 6fps, Bluetooth, screen, slightly better AF and 4k video. There’s very little difference in quality of stills. For anyone upgrading from a d7000 or previous it’s a no brainer, for a D7200 owner who doesn’t use video, there’s nothing here that would make me upgrade.

    • Shutterbug

      It’s not aimed at D7200 users, but rather D90, D7000, D7100 etc. users or those wanting to upgrade from D5XXX and D3XXX, to which it is a huge upgrade including some D5/D500 tech at a reasonable price.

      • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

        True but they could always upgrade to the excellent and still current / in the line up D7200 and saw bit of dosh to put towards lenses, accessories, etc.

        • Shutterbug

          Sure if speed is not their priority, otherwise the D7500 offers a lot of value. There’s lots of choice, that’s a good thing.

      • Mike

        Indeed. The D70, 80 & 90 were always a few horsepower, so to speak, less than the D200 and D300. The D7500 is no different. Want/need dual slots, higher frame rate and a grip? Pony up to the D500. The D610 is actually priced inbetween the D500 & D7500. There are lots of options. The D7500 is incredible value for the specs/price.

        • ambient_exposure

          don’t get me wrong, the 7500 is pretty nice spec’d all around, i think the killer is the dual card problem. i think some folks feel they havent had it since the double digit days & dont know how to cope. i personally use both on 610 & 750 but only the cf with d4s & 810. never an issue since i use an sd-cf1 adaptor. i can see the concern since some folks were upset with the df one slot
          1

          • Personally i think the card slot thing was over blown a bit. It made sense when they didn’t have a pro dx to add a second cars slot to the 7000 line, now that they do its less important. If you shoot very important shoots where you have to have back ups, get a d500. Everyone else can live with one card slot. I literally only use the second slot when i do weddings, or important shoots like a safari. People like to complain i think the 7500 is a great camera and will sell well.

            • Jim Huang

              Totally. Not many people use dual card slots, AI/AIS lenses, battery grip…etc, but still a bit of a d*ck move by Nikon for removing those features. If they reduce the overall price of the camera for removing those features, then ok, fair enough, but D7500 costs about the same as D7200 when they both first launched.

            • Andrew

              The D7500 has features that should easily price it at $1,750 while the D500 could easily have been justified at $2,500. So pricing the D7500 at $1,250 is an absolute steal!

              If you want a second card slot, then get the D500. If you want two card slots, consider getting the D7200 for only $997. That is a savings of $250 off the price of the D7500. The D7200 is an excellent camera and is used by many professional photographers.

            • Jim Huang

              My point isn’t on which camera to get or whether the D7200 is a good camera or not. I also agreed everything you said, apart from the price tag.

              I think we can naturally assume that the tech from higher tier cameras will get down to lower tier bodies without much (if any) of a price increase. It also doesn’t make sense to have too many different production lines. We can see plenty of examples just on AF sensor alone 200>D300, D7000>D7100, D5100>D5200…etc
              While I think D7500 is quite a big upgrade from D7200, but I don’t think the price tag is justified. D90 to D7000 had about $200~300 price increase when you compared the launch price. It may due to D7000 weather sealing, 2nd card slots, AI/AIS lens support….etc, which makes the price increase more justified.
              From D7000 to D7200, there is no (or little) price difference at launch between three of them as Nikon hasn’t really added anything.
              Now since Nikon has removed those features that caused the price to be increased in the first place, shouldn’t it makes sense to drop the price down?

  • Brent Rawlings

    If it had an optional grip this would be a simple choice for me. But it doesn’t.

    • MB

      The missing grip is unfortunate, but with the current Nikon pricing we could expect something around 400$ and I doubt too many people would actually buy it for a 1200$ D7500 …

      • Brent Rawlings

        Perhaps the price point is incorrect? I need a grip due to my large hands. The D80…D7200 all have grips. The lack of a grip is a fundamental shift, imho. Nikon hopes that those with gripes about grips will grope for a D500.

        • Spy Black

          That’s the plan, are you in?

          • Brent Rawlings

            I could get a used 7200 with 1,106 shutter actuations today for $900 Canadian. New it sells for $1150 Canadian. Here’s what I need that my D7100 lacks: larger buffer for RAW 12 bit; a much cleaner ISO 1600. I typically buy and keep a camera for up to four years before replacing it.

            Does the D7200 fit the bill?

            • MB

              D7200 buffer is 3 times larger than D7100 … as for much cleaner ISO 1600 … depends on what you expect … it is not noiseless but IMHO, and I know this could cause some flame, it looks better than D500 to me and therefore should be better than D7500 … I dont know Canadian prices but if you ask me D7200 could better camera overall than D7500 if you dont need articulated screen … so if the price is right I would say go for it …especially if you have some good lenses for it …

            • Brent Rawlings

              Here’s my kit:
              Nikkor 200-500 f/5.6 VR FX for wildlife, birding including BIF.
              Tokina 12-24 f/4 DX for ultrawide landscapes.
              Nikkor 35 f/1.8G DX and Nikkor 85 f/1.8G FX for portraits.
              Nikkor 18-70 f/3.5-4.5 DX and 70-300 f/4-5.6 VR G for walkabout.
              Sigma 105 f/2.8 EX for macro.

            • Brent Rawlings

              I purchased a D500. What a great camera.

            • MB

              Great, the only right decision:)

            • Spy Black

              Depends on how much larger a buffer you need, but probably yes.

        • SteveWithAnS

          The D500 with a battery grip is amazing, except for the fact that by the end of the day I feel like I have arthritis in the middle finger of my right hand due to the added weight (I’m not old). Your camera will never look this sexy on a tripod if you buy a D7500 minus battery grip technology…Just get the D500…a year ago…you deserve it.

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/31c1cd2c9288f78ee681a55ef9e5ef8105a03d7ce4b8fa8e27c1730625b6aa3a.jpg

          • Spy Black

            “Your camera will never look this sexy on a tripod if you buy a D7500 minus battery grip technology…”

            But you won’t get arthritis either…

            • SteveWithAnS

              I don’t use my battery grip all that much anymore. I suppose sometimes it helps for shooting in portrait orientation, but that’s about it. I have large hands as well and the D500 grip is plenty big enough without the battery grip. However, I’ve never held the D7200 or D7500, so I don’t know if the camera is too small without the battery grip. I do know that I had the D5200 which was tiny and though it was small I never complained about not being able to manipulate the controls.

            • SteveWithAnS

              I suppose another way the battery grip is helpful is when I use my manfrotto 502 fluid video head tripod mount. Without the additional height from the battery grip, my lenses rub against the top of the tripod head and that could scuff them or burn out the focus motors due to resistance.

            • CERO

              Time to get to the Gym!

    • ALL cameras get a battery grip, just because Nikon do not make one does not mean GOOD suppliers such as Neewer or Meike won’t supply and before the crap about “not as good as Nikon” starts, NIKON do NOT manufacture battery grips they sub contract

      I have used BOTH makes in the past on 7000, 7100, 7200 etc and only my 810 has a Nikon because it was a special offer, and I have NEVER had any problems ever.

      • Bob Thane

        The trouble is, if it’s not designed to accept a Nikon grip it’ll need to have an external cord running up to one of the input ports on the side. Maybe not a big deal, but it is annoying.

        • The only one I know of was the D3100 like that, I had one of those also

          • Bob Thane

            The D5x00 series is like that too. It’s because Nikon doesn’t make contacts on the bottom of the camera for a grip – so if they aren’t making a grip for the D7500, they probably won’t put contacts on it either.

        • Brent Rawlings

          A wire doesn’t work for me.

    • Shutterbug

      It’s very likely that third party grips will work with it, similar to the way they do with the D5XXX series.

      • 100%

      • Brent Rawlings

        That would be great!

  • Eric Calabros

    Can’t wait to see how this Auto Picture Control works

    • Eric Duminil

      What’s that?

      • Michiel953

        It’s voice-controlled.

      • BVS

        It’s supposed to auto-adjust the tone curve based on the scene.

  • For me the main issue between the D500 and D7500 MIGHT be the focus system. The D500 seems to have a better one over that offered on the D7500. As far as buffer, a 50 shot buffer is plenty. I have shot sports with a D3X, D7000, D7100, D600, D700, D3S and a D810, so a 50 shot buffer is not an issue.
    While the grip issue may be important to some people, I have never had a problem with battery life. Turn off image review, don’t waste time or battery life on checking shots (and in sports shooting I seldom have time for that anyway), etc. Carry a spare battery in your pocket, and change, if necessary, during a break between innings, at half time, or any other such break in the action. It does not take long.
    Compared to the D7100 or D7200, the buffer on the D7500 is a great leap forward.
    My 2 cents into the discussion.

    • Jim Huang

      I think the AF system is fine. I dont think many people actually expect it to have the same system as the D500. However, removing features such as AI tab, 2nd SD card slot and battery grip are really annoying.

      • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

        Agree and with the excellent cameras of D7100, D7200 it is a hard decision on upgrading these smashers to the latest for a marginal improvement and extra £500 / $600

        • Aldo

          In a market where dslr sales are in constant decline one should at least ‘keep’ features if not adding.

          • Andrew

            I think Nikon is sending a message that these enthusiast cameras are getting so feature rich and powerful that soon no one would need to buy a professional camera.

            Soon the next upgraded version of the D7500 will get the 153 point AF system and the professionals will be picking it up in droves and putting that $750 savings towards a new lens… this, Nikon clearly sees. So that $25 extra card slot is turning out to be a great bargaining chip and is turning out to be a master marketing stroke.

      • Don’t forget the older lesser resolution back screen.

      • Andrew

        The AF system in the D7500 integrates the same 180,000-pixel RGB 3D Color Matrix Metering III with Advanced Scene Recognition System found in the D500. So the performance would be identical. The only difference is that the D500 AF system will have a wider coverage area because of its 153 focus points as opposed to the 51-point AF system in the D7500.

        So the performance of the D7500 is going to closely mirror that of the D500 such that if Nikon gave us that extra card slot they would lose massive amounts of D500 sales to the pros. Nikon is a business and is making a purely business decision. Nikon once released a $3,000 camera (D700) about a year after the D3 and lost lots of sales from their $5,000 flag-ship D3 camera.

    • BVS

      Don’t forget about the new 180K metering sensor as well. This should improve AF in some modes and generally be a substantial improvement over the 2K meter in D7100/7200.

      • Allan

        How does an improved metering sensor improve autofocus in some modes?
        Thanks.

        • Shutterbug

          3D tracking uses the RGB meter to identify color and lock onto colors/objects. The higher resolution the RGB sensor, the more accurately it can track. It’s also used for viewfinder face detection in all relevant modes. It’s the same meter in the D5, very impressive they added it to the D7500.

          • Allan

            Thanks.

    • Coastalconn

      My issue with the lack of battery grip is this camera would be too small to balance with my 500 F4 and even 300 F2.8.

  • pyktures

    20mp has a larger pixel pitch than 24mp, Nikon’s smart of upgrading the d7200 by increasing the native gain of the sensor 🙂

    • decentrist

      and sacrificing low iso DR

      • Ric of The LBC

        that only pixel peepers would notice or care

        • decentrist

          when you blow out your highlights, that isn’t pixel peeping. The exact same thing will be served up with the D820. Better high iso, scarifice the low DR. The Kinks had a song called “Give the people what they want”. So you end up with a body that can image your shoes in a dark closet, meanwhile most of your imaging needs will be quite the opposite. It’s BS, total shell gane, because sensor tech has plateaued.

          • RC Jenkins

            You blow highlights over like half a stop (at base ISO)? What kind of scenes are you shooting?

            Half a stop is usually less than the difference between the center of the lens and the edges of the lens

            • decentrist

              google D500 blown highlights, same dynamic will be coming with d820

            • RC Jenkins

              I did Google it. The results are more related to metering and JPEG rendition, not limited sensor DR.

              This is what things like “exposure compensation” and “metering modes” and “picture controls” and “raw” are for.

              Most of the results I saw are people who don’t seem to understand the causes of the issues they’re encountering.

              Do you have any links specifically for ‘limited DR causing blown highlights’?

            • decentrist

              You’re not getting the idea. the D7200 is better at low iso DR than the D500, just as the D810 will be better when the D820 is released. It’s marketing. It’s give the gearheads a reason to buy. If all you do is high iso, you’ll be happier. If not, you have to weigh the value proposition versus lower low iso performance

            • RC Jenkins

              I’m not getting the idea…that you’re just making up? Let’s not divert the subject here.

              “Better” implies scale, and you claimed that the D500’s inferior DR causes it to blow highlights–that it’s a significant difference. It’s not. Y

              You’re just now bringing marketing into this, since you previously said: “When you blow out your highlights, that isn’t pixel peeping.”

              Sensor tech today is phenomenal, but there are improvements that can (and are) made: Things like:
              -BSI (for DR & increased photosensitive area), and
              -Variable gain (so that you don’t have to make as stiff of a choice between low & high ISO).

            • decentrist

              You get the same difference D5 vs D4 bodies. Much better on the high end a bit worse on the low end.

            • RC Jenkins

              I know the differences between the D5 and other sensors. That’s not what you’re claiming.

              So again: Links for the “limited DR causing blown highlights on the D500 vs D7200?”

            • decentrist

              I already gave you the heads by googling the issue. Why don’t you go forward thinking the sensors are all iso invariant, and be happy

            • RC Jenkins

              lol, I don’t think they’re all ISO invariant across all ranges. You’re avoiding the subject, retracting your claim, and attributing false ideas to me (which I never even came close to claiming).

              Here’s the first google result for what you suggested:
              https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/57716177

              It completely contradicts your claim and supports mine.

              And from the responses in that thread, it’s clear that the poster just didn’t know how to optimize exposure and metering to avoid blown highlights.

              Sounds like you’re in that same boat too.

            • decentrist

              I shoot with a D750/D810. The issue I speak of is well known. It’s very well known on the D5 vs. the D4, and will be on the new D820(whatever it’s called).You are going to be given, again, better high iso performance, and will lose incremental low iso DR. .

            • Ric of The LBC

              the A9 will be a big steaming pile then.

            • RC Jenkins

              Can you explain what does any of this have to do with blowing highlights on the D500?

              The D750 has a larger pixel pitch than the D810. The D5 also has a larger pixel pitch than either. How do these compare for DR?
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f970c6e526ef033a283bcf2f7858e0fe843d9446a1b8104352f6bd8c01088d4e.png

              Ohh. Huh…fancy that. So…Nikon can actually tune these sensors…wowww

              Well what about the D7200 & D500…?
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f219703204925689e69e3885e0168d597918e8b1b44d1f8198c70bc7efcf4fe5.png

              Yeah, you’re right. That D500 will blow highlights like crazy compared to the D7200!

              As a note, if you were to just cut the D500 sensor as FF, you should (in theory) end up getting over 1 stop advantage over the D500. That alone would put the new sensor at a DR higher than the D810 at low ISOs. Of course, heat, electronics, practicality, etc. play its part too.

            • CERO

              So, the D500 pulls above the D7200 once you get to Iso 600+ ?

            • RC Jenkins

              Yes, you’re correct (but more like ISO 400).

              So if you typically shoot ISO 400 or more, the D500 will provide you with (ever so slightly) superior DR.

              A great example is in the FX cameras I listed. Take a look at the D750 vs. D5. The D750 has vastly superior DR and image quality at ISO 100:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/9deaa543353af429c41c9eacd47dd8ac453504f35d57abe4a9dcd609351c08b2.png

              (https://www.dpreview.com/news/9402203921/nikon-d5-shows-drop-in-dynamic-range)

              But the D5 has slightly better DR & image quality than the D750 at high ISOs:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/ec8384a74e65b9dfc19e32a6bcce5b4875add4f9ecac2a10a278597786ca3229.png

              So it really depends on where you shoot and what the cameras were designed for.

              The D5 & D500 are primarily aimed at action shooters who use tiny shutter speeds–and consequently high ISOs. In the D500’s case, it didn’t sacrifice much low ISO DR to do this–the DR is almost identical to the D7200 across the board.

              Let’s compare the D7200 & D500 at the same extremes:

              Low ISO:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1e2963fa71cf1bb29d223231ea6b9be6cd287972da9fee2ab54956c62a5b2ef5.png

              High ISO:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/374e222a4c692f2c27258c67bc521f564b5f819b741663dacf28657a7cad23ea.png

            • CERO

              Holy shit, the color shifting of the D7200 is so easy to notice.

          • Ric of The LBC

            “when you blow out your highlights,”

            You and Your. How is that the fault of the tool?

  • Great upgrade for the D5600. Mow Nikon just needs to get their act together and provide us with a decent upgrade for the D7200.

    • Spy Black

      They call it the D500…

      • I am sure landscape / travel photographers will appreciate the deeper buffer, the higher frame rate and the added size / weight of the D500… Never miss the perfect shot of a sunset because the buffer ran out…

        The D7200 was a great general purpose camera. The D7500 adds very little for this audience, while it takes away useful features and feels more like a D5600 replacement.

        I like my D7200 / D610, but I will certainly not buy the D7500. Nor will I buy any of the new overpriced lenses. I don’t care how good 2700 Euro 70-200/2.8 is.

        • Fly Moon

          I use my D500 for Landscape all time.

          Do you think the sunset will refuse to be photographed because the camera has lots of buffer or a fast AF?

          • RC Jenkins

            No, but the shadows will! 🙂

            j/k both are pretty similar for landscapes.

            Ending up with a
            6000 x 4000
            vs.
            5568 x 3712
            image is a negligible difference.

            So is losing a approx. 1/3 stop of DR at base ISO–for landscapes.

            • A. F.O.

              16% less area sensor…and DxOMark says 24Mp sensor of D7200 is far better for landscape than the 21 Mp from D500.
              Sure D500 is far better camera, but not for landscape. That’s my opinion.

            • RC Jenkins

              Where are you getting your 16% less sensor area figure from? It’s completely false. Their sensors are pretty much identically sized.

              Do you know how to read and interpret the DxOMark data or are you just spitting out the numbers they have? DxOMark has its own issues, but I’ll humor you here.

              Here’s DxOMark’s dynamic range measurements for the two cameras:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3042a5cfecd4cb3a492e0728a4e517cd696e6e34a3376036d5072cb6cc021bb0.png

              If you hover over them, you’ll see that that’s about half a stop difference at base ISO. That’s also the “Landscape” number they give you.

              Half a stop difference is less than the difference between the center of a lens vs. the outside:

              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/efeddc06e4ccbd47d3b7bd9c1dde0be9b013b14adef761dac7bcc0d2685baa96.png

              Alternate measurements sites (like photonstophotos.com) show even closer dynamic range performance between the two:
              https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/f219703204925689e69e3885e0168d597918e8b1b44d1f8198c70bc7efcf4fe5.png

              So no, it’s not “far better for landscapes.” They’re actually very close.

            • A. F.O.

              keep calm please 🙂
              I meant the number of pixels (16% more for D7200 (and D7500) than the D500. Sure I know those graphics…and have some idea how those rankings are made … and sure D500 is better camera…but not for landscape, that’s my opinion.

          • Obviously one can photograph landscapes with a D500. But buying a D500 to photograph landscapes is a waste of money because there is no need for high frame rates or deep buffers and the AF of the D7200 is pretty good, definitely good enough for occasional wildlife / sports / events.

            In my personal opinion this whole push the customers to buy more expensive / high end equipment will backfire. Most people will not spend 2000 Euros for a camera / lens. They will just buy something else.

            • Fly Moon

              I prefer to have it the other way around. I mean, have a more responsive camera like the D500 than the D7200. If one can afford it of course.

            • RC Jenkins

              What additional features did you want to see for landscape shooters? And what features did the D7500 take away from landscape shooters?

              The D7200 IQ is just about as good as it’s going to get in an APS-C sized sensor. It’s not designed specifically for landscape shooters. It’s an all-rounder. And the D7500 may be a better all rounder than the D7200.

              If you want a better landscape camera for well below €2000, look to something like a D610.

            • I always shoot using two cards. The D7200 had two cards, the D7500 has only one. Why?

              In what regard is the D7500 a better all-arounder than the D7200? Nikon removed useful features from the D7200 (second card slot, grip option) and added features that I would not consider important for all-around shooting: 8 fps and a deeper buffer. I do shoot wildlife with the D7200. 6 fps is fine and the buffer of the D7200 is ok. If I would shoot mainly wildlife, I would buy the D500 anyway.

              I also have the D610 and I like it a lot. But carrying full frame lenses on mountain hikes / when traveling not very convenient.

            • RC Jenkins

              If you’re truly concerned for landscapes, you can often just swap cards and take a second shot. In what way is that specific to landscape shooters?

              I didn’t say the D7200 “is” a better all-rounder–I said it “may be.” As in, for some people.

              But you skipped a question: What improvements for landscape shooting did you want to see over the D7200? In other words, why did the D7200 need a replacement for landscape improvements? Why not just buy a D7200 instead of a D7500?

            • Built-in GPS would be nice. Smaller and lighter body would be nice as well. Live view could also be improved.

              Some DX primes would also be nice.

            • RC Jenkins

              The lenses are not attached to the camera. They don’t count.

              GPS is easy: link to your phone using View NX–and it will attach GPS to all of your photos.

              Smaller / lighter is tougher. How would they accomplish that with all the stuff in the camera?

              So you would buy a “D7300” to replace your D7200 that added only GPS and had a smaller & lighter body + nonspecific improvements to live view?

            • I already have an external GPS for my Nikon D7200. But external GPS is not convenient and I almost never use it.

              For me, a mirrorless successor of the D7200 would have been the best option because I photograph a lot when hiking / traveling where size / weight really counts.

              I now mainly use my Olympus em5 or my Nikon Coolpix A when hiking.

              I will not buy the D7500, I am certainly not taking a shot, swap cards and take another shoot. If my D7200 breaks, I will look for another used D7200 or I will completely go mirrorless.

            • Captain Megaton

              Everyone was totally cool with one card slot until cameras started offering two. It’s a comfort feature, I admit, but indispensable on a mid-range DX dSLR? No.

              Also, I don’t think owning both D7x00/D6x0 is justifiable on size alone, they are too similar. Better to pool the money and get a D750 IMO.

            • The D7200 + Sigma 17-70 is quite a bit smaller / lighter than the D610 + 24-120.

              I also use the D7200 for zoo / wildlife.

              I don’t think the D750 is a good upgrade for the D610 + D7200 for my use case.

            • Allen_Wentz

              One does not build DX+FX kit for size reasons. One builds it for added flexibility (in my case D3+D500+ beater D5100).

              Minimum two bodies is a necessity, so why not dramatically increase flexibility by having DX+FX?

            • Captain Megaton

              Yes, that’s what I was getting at. A D610 is a D7200 scaled up 10%. If the 24-120 is too big, there’s the 24-85. The net difference of that over the D7200 and Siggi 17-70 alone wouldn’t justify the investment in a second body to my mind. But, whatever works for people I guess.

            • Allen_Wentz

              IMO the reason why is because Nikon is evolving to new product lineup.

            • Allen_Wentz

              Suggesting that fps/buffer is where the D500 value add comes from is wrong. I bought the D500 specifically for the _body_, not for high frame rate or deep buffer (although they do rock).

              There is a reason I never bought any D7xxx; the bodies.

        • Spy Black

          I don’t disagree, I’m just highlighting what Nikon wants you to do. By the way the D7200 IS a great general purpose camera, not was. 😉

          • Yes, the D7200 is an excellent camera. And the D7500 would have been a nice update to me if Nikon kept the second card slot. Sure, it’s only a convenience, but a convenience I want to have. Without the second card slot, the D7500 is a step backwards for me. If my D7200 breaks, I will just buy another (used) D7200.

            • Antonio

              As you consider it an excellent camera and Nikon keeps it in their product list why don’t you buy another D7200?

            • I’ll do that if my current one breaks. Or I just jump ship and go completely mirrorless.

              But I still wonder what happened to Nikon. A few years ago I would not have spent a single thought on buying anything else than another Nikon camera. And I think I am not the only one 🙁

            • BVS

              I don’t think anything happened to Nikon, it’s just that their competitors have stepped up their game. Sigma and Tamron are producing much better lenses, mirrorless has improved technologically to the point where it can complete with DSLRs, etc.

            • Hans J

              Nikon forgets they don’t only compete with themselves they compete with other camera companies. That’s why they keep failing.
              Lately they just make junk. Sad to see such a great company inflicting so much damage to themselves.

            • Antonio

              “Lately they just make junk” – if you have one of their last pieces of junk you hate and want to get rid of I’m open to receive either the D5 or the D500.
              And if you can add something like the 105mm F:4 it would be great. 🙂 🙂

            • Hans J

              I’ve been selling it all off actually. Moving to Fuji

            • Antonio

              However you continue to come and intervening here…feeling homesick, besides the politically correct for people that made that move is to claim that they are as happy as one can imagine and there is no way back?

            • Hans J

              I’ve used Nikon for the past 11 years. Its hard to just go cold turkey. Its sad to see a great company fail. I’m here trying to help them stay on top. I work for large studios, we buy 100k worth of eq every year so my opinion does have some weight.

            • Antonio

              I see but saying things like “Lately they just make junk” doesn’t seem to be a big help and with all the issues and questionable decisions they may have made it seems a bit exaggerated because not all they introduced lately to the market can be considered as junk, no matter the frustrated expectations of some people and the amplification of “noise” across the net.

              Concerning this camera, I will not buy it not due to the indicated cons but because if I was after a DX body it would be the D500 namely for its body’s layout and AF. However I see that most people that criticizes the model focus on the “cuts” and forget about the “improvements” when compared to the D7200, as if what they really wanted was a camera with all the functionalities and specs of the D500 at the D7200’s price.

            • Hans J

              Maybe my words were to harsh… my bad

            • Chris

              “Lately they just make junk…” That’s one of the most stupid reactions I’ve read the last year or so. D5/D500, 19TSE, 105/1.4E, 24-70E, 70-200E, 200-500E and more. One can argue about the price, but junk!?

            • Hans J

              D5 lower DR at base ISO, 19TSE?? why not 17mm like it needs to be. 105mm over priced and nasty Boken. 24-70E not as sharp as older 24-70m 70-200E great performer but at $2700 I can buy 2 Tamarons at $1300 and still have money left over for a burger and lots of beers.

            • Chris

              Rest my case. 🙂

            • Hans J

              You made my case for me.

            • Shutterbug

              Nice that Discus has an ignore list now, it sure cleans up these comment sections up nicely leaving the people who want to discuss things rationally and objectively. Just got a little longer 🙂

            • Yes, it works pretty well, I wish I can use it – I need to moderate all comments 🙂

            • Hans J

              haha, glad you took the time to reply before ignoring me 🙂 thanks for that.

            • Spy Black

              The second slot is not a “convenience”, it’s a safety backup when shooting time critical events. That has always been it’s primary purpose. The other dual cards functions are more convenience.

        • tomherren

          According to online reviews, the new Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 G2 is (almost) as good as the new Nikkor but half the price.

    • Shutterbug

      Nice that Discus has an ignore list now. It sure cleans up these comment sections for those willing to discuss things rationally and objectively.

  • Nikon King

    Soccer Moms rejoice!

  • Ric of The LBC

    This camera will that the fantastic photos you tell it to.

  • Michael Steinbach

    You should start a new poll… How many bugs will we have to put up with? :/)

  • Bob Thane

    Very true, and yet as far as I know none of the grips for the D5x00 or D3x00 series offer that. So I’d be very happy with a wireless D7500 grip, but it’s not something I’m expecting.

  • jmb2560

    Where’s the beef?

  • Michiel953

    So… what exactly is wrong with this camera? Just run it by me slowly, and I’ll try to understand.

    • Jeffry De Meyer

      Nothing it is the perfect successor to the nikon d5600

      • jmb2560

        Nothing is wrong and I hope Nikon will sell millions of those so they can invest in future (and more groundbreaking) products.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Like I posted elsewhere, talk of successors is wrong. Nikon MUST be rearranging their product lineups to cope with harsh market forces and Nikon’s own pending response to mirrorless.

        • Jeffry De Meyer

          If it wasn’t supposed to be treated like a successor they shouldn’t have used the existing naming scheme and come with something new.

          • BVS

            D750 wasn’t a ‘true’ D700 successor either, but people got over it (mostly) and it turned out to be a great camera.

            Wouldn’t calling it something else like “D6500” been even more confusing, since they’d then have five DX lines instead of four, and especially if D7200 was the end of the D7XXX line?

    • Shutterbug

      It’s not a D500 for half the price. That sums up nearly every complaint I have read about it since it’s release both here and on forums.

      It is a huge upgrade for D80, D90, D300/s, D7000, D7100, and some D7200 users (those wanting more speed). It is an even bigger upgrade for D3XXX and D5XXX users looking to move up a notch. D7200 users are certainly not the primary target market. It will appeal to enough people I think it will sell very well, and is not intended to appeal to everyone. The loss of a card slot and some AI support is unfortunate but I think the average person picking this up at BestBuy or Costco making up the majority of Nikon’s sales is unaffected by either of those things. For some enthusiasts those omissions are a bummer, but certainly not a deal breaker for everyone. I also see a lot of people ignoring the positives like 8 FPS, huge buffer, and D5 metering – I’d much rather have that than legacy lens support or a second card slot, and if you do need those things above all else, the D7200 is there waiting for you. I think people just complain for the sake of complaining and are overly focused on some minor negatives. Also there is nothing the competition has that even comes close for the price. Don’t like it don’t buy it, but I think it will sell well.

    • Captain Megaton

      I don’t think there is anything wrong with it … but there are certain features which have been removed in going from D7200->D7500 and that is never going to sit well with people.

      Dual card slots, AI lens coupling ring, grip attachment – it’s not a long list and honestly not important to the majority of people who use that class of camera, but anyone who *did* use those things is not going to appreciate having them taken away.

      • Allen_Wentz

        IMO it is wrong to think too much in terms of
        “…certain features which have been removed in going from D7200->D7500.”

        Nikon’s product lineup is, very much by market necessity, rearranging. Which is why it is D7500 and not D7000–>D7100–>D7200–>D7300. Very different.

        Just my 0.02, feel free to disagree.

    • Ric of The LBC

      Nothing. It will take the pictures you tell it to.

  • Senor Magnifico

    No grip, no 2nd SD card slot, total fail. Nikon can start shipping on June 2020

  • DaveyJ

    I am getting to the point of needing another backup camera. I looked at the D3400……low cost, but couldn’t justify the detuned nature, I use the D7200 mostly, rough field stuff with D3200, really critical fast stuff with D500, so,the extra body I need is…. as Nikon would plan, is probably a D7500? I already have my tried and true D7200 and my Precious, the D500, why not the D7500 if the reviews are excellent? But I do also need a Super tele photo 150-600. Probably that lens will NOT be the Nikon 200-500. So for this reader, the D7500 looks very attractive!

    • Allen_Wentz

      Davey, once you have a D500, a beater D3200 and a D7200 for backup I see no reason to put more DX bodies in your life.

      Put your money into lenses, and consider adding FX to your kit via a D750 or the new D8xx (except be aware that going D8xx also leads down expensive lens and computer hardware upgrading paths).

      • DaveyJ

        I have a D500, my son uses it mostly, leaving me with the D7200, etc., I live in a tribe where the collective good drives everything. I see the 500 as spectacular but the D7200 is my daily user. We have owned three Chevy Corvettes, all new, but the daily driver is still a Chevy 2500 HD, or a little Hyundai Tucson AWD.

        Appearently I agree with Allen Wentz in that my next priority is either the Nikkor 200-500 or the Tamron G2 150-600, I only own a few non Nikkor lens but the extra 100 mm and the fact that where I photograph ( our farm, or Yellowstone or Grand Teton National Park) your subject may well be 700 ft. Away to over half a mile……also the farms also burn up most of my money paying taxes……so $10,000 lens are now out.

  • BVS

    I’m actually starting to seriously consider getting this to replace my D7100. The pros seem to well outweigh the cons:

    Cons:
    Lower resolution – sad, but not a major difference
    No grip – never used it, not an issue
    No second card slot – never used it, not an issue
    No AI tab – don’t have any old lenses, not an issue

    Pros:
    10x the buffer
    60% faster fps @ 14bit RAW
    Much better metering sensor
    Improved AF
    Better low light performance around 3200-6400 ISO, if it’s like D500
    Through the viewfinder face detection (maybe, still waiting to see manual)
    4K video
    1080p@60fps uses full sensor area
    Power aperture
    Auto AF fine tune
    Highlight weighted metering
    Group Area AF
    Set AF point by orientation
    Auto picture control
    Snapbridge
    Full support for AF-P lenses
    Flip screen
    Touch screen
    Better skin tones/colors/white balance
    Deeper grip
    9 frame bracketing
    Lo-1 (ISO 50)

    • Patrick

      I’d say the pros have it! (Although you didn’t list on the con side: $1300)

      • BVS

        True, but any new camera is going to cost something. I’d probably wait till at least the anniversary in July before making a decision anyway, to see what else is announced, wait for reviews, and see if there’s any early discounts like they did with D5600. It’s actually only $1247 on B&H, and if I can sell the D7100 for a few hundred then it’s not too bad.

        • Allen_Wentz

          Keep the D7100 as a second and backup camera. Even after you are confident that the new body has no major flaws.

        • Patrick

          It seems with most prosumer bodies they begin discounts on the first 6 months, plus gray mkt and refurbs should appear by then. Your d7100 is a very capable body of you want to save come cash and watch them work out the kinks…

        • DaveyJ

          I would keep the D7100 as a backup!

    • Jim Huang

      Yeah, I too have a D7100 with more than 140K shutter (time to get a new camera before it failed). While not many people use dual card slots, AI/AIS lenses, battery grip…etc, but still a bit of a d*ck move by Nikon for removing those features. If they reduce the overall price of the camera for removing those features, then ok, fair enough, but D7500 costs about the same as D7200 when they both first launched.

      Anyways, I got myself a D750 last week instead of D7500. There isn’t that much of a price difference between two.

      • BVS

        It’s true, the D750 is at a great price right now, and I’ve been considering it as well (since it was released actually, lol). There’s a few things holding me back though:

        1. Additional size and weight of both body and lenses. The D7100 is already near the limit of what I want to carry around.

        2. Additional cost of lenses. I’d need to buy some lenses as well to go with it (e.g. 24-120). I have some FF primes but no FF zooms, and the zooms can be pricey.

        3. D750 is a couple years old now and could be refreshed soon, and I’m curious to see what Nikon replaces it with (if anything). Of course, any replacement will be more expensive, but if the features are compelling enough it could be worth it.

        4. D750 has some ergonomic issues that are annoying, such as the AF-ON button being too far away, and the screen coming on whenever you change ISO.

        • Jim Huang

          1. But D750 is only about 5mm wider, 10mm taller and 5mm thicker than D7500. I mean looking side by side, without a ruler, it is really hard to tell.
          In my real world usage, I would not tell the difference.
          2. There is always the second hand 3rd party option. I’ve got the Tamron 24-70 VC and I’m really happy with it.
          3. Yeah, but what else can Nikon really put into the new camera? Snapbridge, new AF and AE sensor (maybe?), 4K, touch screen, auto picture profile and auto AF finetune. Of course, I’m not saying they’re aren’t good upgrades, but not sure if they are worth it. Also, if you already short on money to get lenses, then it may be a bit difficult to buy the camera at launch.
          4. While they’re not much of an issue for me, but I can understand how they can be annoying.

          D7500 is basically a D750 with a DX sensor with some more modern tech (2017 VS 2014)

    • Highlight metering would win it for me, well and and extra fps doesn’t hurt for wild life. I think people just like to complain, it’s a good solid camera.

    • Allen_Wentz

      I would argue that real-world, odds are the resultant image captures will only be “lower resolution” on a strict pixel-counting basis. I would bet that IQ (to trained eyes/brains, not some DxO nonsense) will clearly be superior to older D7xxx bodies with 14% more pixels. We shall see ;~)

      Personally I have never liked the D7xxx bodies, but IMO the D7500 specs are appropriate. I think of D500 and D7500 as fitting into wherever Nikon is going with its _new_ product model positioning, which is NOT simple evolution of 3200, 3300, 3400…; 5100, 5200, 5300…; 7000, 7100, 7200…; etc.

      Thinking in terms of the product evolution norms of 5 years ago is wrong-headed thinking IMO. Crashed compact camera sales, shrinking DSLR sales and the onslaught of mirrorless means Nikon MUST evolve a different product lineup.

      Just my 0.02 of course.

    • Brent Rawlings

      And no grip.

  • Lex Cross

    If you are going to complain about the lack of grip then please do so here only after posting a selfie of yourself holding your current grip.

    As someone who sells cameras I can tell you that I RARELY sell grips. More often than not the response I get to mentioning a grip option is “what’s that?” Nikon will make something different for you. In fact, they already have. It’s called the d500. And d7200.

    • Shutterbug

      I have never in my life seen a grip on a 7XXX series body in the ‘wild’. Not to say they aren’t used obviously but it supports your observations as well. I bet 90% of D7500 customers don’t care, or don’t even know about grips. Here on camera specific message boards you always bring out the vocal minorities that make it sound like Nikon is going out of business for not offering a grossly overpriced grip alongside the D7500. Many would opt for the third party grip anyway for a fraction of the cost of the Nikon version – and those are going to be available.

      • Ric of The LBC

        Seagulls

        • Hans J

          It’s the 80/20 rule 80% of request come from 20% of the users. In this case its more like 95/5 tho. haha

          • Brent Rawlings

            Who shoots portrait handheld without a grip? I did it for a few years with my D70 and it drove me crazy, let alone causing discomfort. The grip is an necessity for me and others.

            • Hans J

              I use a grip. I like the a grip.

            • Adnan

              LOL me! :)))
              I’ve shot a lot with FE2 ,F100 and FM3a 🙂
              and with D90 ,D5000,D7000 as well but I’m not a Portrait man.

            • Brent Rawlings

              Yup, portraits are the hardest. I bought a cheap studio umbrella set and backdrop stand back at Christmastime off of eBay. It takes a lot of work to do portraits. I’d done shoot wildlife and landscapes, not that I’m very good at them. But I like it. It’s a great way to relax and get away from work.

              I’m a fair way off from the D500 price here in Canada. I’ll either have to get a third party grip or use the camera without one until I can afford Nikon’s offering.

            • Adnan

              Nice 🙂
              I’m a Canuck too!
              I have duel nationality but born in Canada and PG is my hobby as well 🙂
              The D7200 is in Canada and I was hoping to swap it there with the D500 but here in Pak. on some bodies price is really surprising low besides 30% custom duty.But some lenses are nearly 50% more than the US price as I’ve bought a lot from B&H NY store.
              Use it without the grip until you are able get the original.Your camera’s resale value will increase.
              Cheers!

            • Allen_Wentz

              The utility of adding a grip or not totally depends on each individual camera body.

      • docnorth

        I think most of us agree about the second card slot or the grip and that for professional or “semi-pro” use D500 is now THE DX choise. My only reservation is about the Ai coupling. Many or some potential D7500 users still own (like me) older Nikkor AF tele’s without sw motor. These lenses can only be combined with older telecoconverters, e.g. TC-14b or TC-301 and then work as Ais lenses. Still I think D7500 will provide metering (step-down?) at least in M mode and hopefully EXIF data.

    • Brent Rawlings

      I’ve used a grip on my D90 and D7100 since I’ve had them. No grip = no D5700.

      The D500 is the answer.

      • Adnan

        Good for you man,there are places where ppl. can’t get D700 batteries anymore and relying on grips.

        • Brent Rawlings

          That’s too bad.

          I should have added that I sold my D90 after 4 years of use in 2014 and replaced it with the D7100. Now I’m looking to add the D500 and keep the D7100 as a back up. If only the D7500 had a grip! Such shortsightedness on Nikon’s part, imho.

          • Adnan

            If you are going all DX a D500 and D7200 will be a great combo.
            i’m using D7000 and D800 ,have the D7200 and packed it again after taking 200+ shots for this D7500 , Now I will reopen and buy D7200’s grip and might get a D500 body as well as I’m not a pro or regular PG. D7000 will be converted to infrared just confused in 650 and 700 something as my light changes when I travel from harsh light area to cooler light areas.

            • Brent Rawlings

              I’m no pro either but I love the craft. The D500 could potentially be a last camera or one to last 5+ years. I have to save up!

            • Adnan

              As the “upgrade” history shows this D300 /D500 series might be an 8yr. upgrade.IMO better invested in long term model D500 will serve you 8 yrs.with a grip until the next model comes out.
              Nikon might change the next D7xx model back with grip and second card as they might have snubbed the D7500 for D500.You can have another chance at the next model ,who knows….

            • Brent Rawlings

              Yes, the D500 has the features, functions and quality I’m looking to invest in.

              What do you make of third party grips? I’ve only ever used Nikon’s on my D90 and D7100.

            • Adnan

              No ,no 3rd party grips ever used along with Sigma and Tamron lenses.
              Only Nikon ,yes Nikon ones are expensive but the one they make for the specific model is the best and they can’t use excuse during service.
              Beside with one Firmware upgrade they could get one in trouble.Lenses might loose AF and grips can stop being identified.

            • Allen_Wentz

              I am a big hands person who likes single digit bodies but thought I would try the D500 for a while without a grip. I am happy with the D500 feel as is and have no battery issues that would require a grip.

            • Brent Rawlings

              Allen – I just picked up a D500 with Lexar 64 GB XQD and a extra battery from a private seller for a $600 savings (here in Canada). Very low actuations. It’s an extremely clean and very well cared for body like new!

            • Allen_Wentz

              I think there is no “D300/D500 series” because Nikon is in the midst of restructuring its models to adjust to market forces and whatever Nikon’s response to mirrorless will be.

              Note that these latest cameras have been D500 not D400, and D7500 not D7300.

            • Allen_Wentz

              I cannot imagine buying a camera that I did not intend to last 5+ years – – at least!

    • Adnan

      LOL 🙂
      You must be selling cameras to “soccer moms” ;))

      • Lex Cross

        My customers literally range from shooting professionals down to 8 year olds who saved up for months to get her first camera (and did her own research like a boss.)

        That 8 year old probably knows more about cameras and photography than 80% of this forum.

        And have some of you ever met actuall soccer moms?! Most of them aren’t simple minded. Know what they’re doing when their kid is playing at the park? Talking talking to the bird photographer about his gear. Then they go research. It’s not the majority that want everything for nothing. A LOT are ready to overspend for their kids soccer game cause everyone tells them they need 10 frames a second for 8 year olds “playing soccer”

        • Adnan

          Great range of customers you have 🙂 cheers!

          I’ve taught some “soccer moms” with D7xxx / D600 / 610 and D750 including my wife. 🙂

    • Excuse me, don’t you have a D7200 grip discounted to $30…? :))

  • Adnan

    No second card = risk of loosing data.(for me the main concern)
    No grip = can not use it for long enough with AA cells.
    D7200 is still better but for action and advance AF D500 is king of DX.
    As often Nikon does one step forward 2 steps back.They think it’s a “threat” to D500.

    • Shutterbug

      You will be able to get third party grips for it…that is a given.

      Nikon historically is not protective of it’s higher end bodies, at least not even close to the level that the competition is. The D700 surely took a lot of D3 sales, the D800 killed the D3X, the D300 killed the D2Xs, and the D500 probably took some D5 sales (though with the sensor size difference probably not as many). I’m glad Nikon doesn’t cripple their mid-range cameras so severely compared to other brands.

      I wouldn’t call the D7500 “2 steps back”. More like a huge step forward and a little shuffle back, but a large net gain. Again I think people are focusing on that card slot and ignoring the huge functional improvements over the D7200 like 8Fps, expeed 5, huge buffer, D5 Meter, better AF features, 4K video, touch screen, etc.

      • Adnan

        I agree but for a few bucks more why not get the D500 ?

        • Shutterbug

          $550 USD (it would be more but the D500 is currently on sale) isn’t just a few bucks to a lot of people – that’s 50% more expensive than a D7500 and enough for an excellent lens. The D500 is a ridiculous performance bargain, but only if you need its capability. Soccer moms and the like probably don’t need to buy above a D7XXX level, for example. I wonder how many would have still bought it if the D7500 was available at the same time as the D500 because the D7500 represents such a large jump from the D7200 regarding action shooting. The D7XXX series is quite successful for Nikon, history has shown thus far that there is plenty of room in the lineup for a $1000-1200 price point DX body, with or without a premium $1800-2000 DX body. Time will tell though I suppose, but both the D7200 and D500 sold very well.

          • Adnan

            Right now I’m in Pakistan and D500 body is around $1240 USD.Very tempting actually and it’s not Grey market.

            • Shutterbug

              Well that’s a way better deal than it is over here! That would be very tempting indeed.

      • MB

        You sure one should get one of those 3rd party rubbish grips?
        First you will risk breaking your camera while removing battery cover to be able to jam it in, then you will have to live with a clunky cable on the side (for a short time though until lousy designed electronics fries up your camera) … if Nikon did not design the camera for a grip you dont want to force it …

        • Shutterbug

          Have you used Vello and Meike grips before? I have and they are well reviewed and have no known issues over many years of Nikon bodies. Considering the alternative is no grip, at least it provides an option for the few that not having a grip seems to be a dealbreaker for. Your description of the 3rd party grips is grossly exaggerated – look them up on B&H and you will find literally hundreds of 5-star reviews.

          • MB

            No and I dont intend to, but have you ever actually used or saw one on D3x00 or D5x00? There is a huge difference between the ones they just copied from Nikon (like the ones for D7x00) and the ones they designed from scratch …

      • You sure D7500 / D500 is better in noise than D7200? Just look closer, they are just the same. Btw. unfortunately 3rd party grips really problematic. Meike especially (controls always reversed, contact errors…) but even Pixel (the best 3rd party grip I’ve ever seen) stucked hardly on my D7000 once… There is no free lunch, Nikon is Nikon.

        This D7500 made only for the 4K video fans, not more not less. It’s not my kind, but it’s ok as long as Nikon keeps both model in the market. If Nikon shuts down D7200 production, now that would be a shame IMO.

        • EnPassant

          Sadly I think D7200 production stopped as it was too expensive to build compared to D7500. Nikon will only keep selling remaining stock of the D7200. So better buy one of Nikon’s best cameras before it is sold out.

          • Quite sad…I knew it was too good to keep. Bought one already. As I can see now I have my DSLR for the next 5+ years for sure.

        • Shutterbug

          All objective testing I’ve seen, including that from Bill Claff (often considered the most reliable source) shows it as better at high ISO. DR is about 1/3 of a stop better at base ISO on the D7200, and high ISO DR is slightly better on the D500. Overall the sensor is better, and that opinion seems to be shared by most of the high profile internet bloggers/reviewers. It also matches what I have seen myself, but as always YMMV.

          I respectfully disagree on the grips – there are literally thousands of 5-star reviews for them, so on some level they are keeping people quite happy. They won’t be for everyone, but then again nothing is.

          The D7500 is not only for 4K. I am surprised how many features are getting overlooked compared to the D7200. Expeed 5, 8 FPS, much larger buffer, better AF, D5 metering, articulating touch display, etc. etc. Also, as has been mentioned many times here, the D7500 is not targeting D7200 owners but rather D300, D90, D7000, D7100, D5XXX, D3XXX, etc. The appeal to a D7200 owner would be the significant speed bump or perhaps if they needed 4K video, but D7200 users are definitely not their target.

          • “on some level they are keeping people quite happy” — That’s true.
            “the D7500 is not targeting D7200 owners” — I believe you since almost every model targets the owners of at least 4-5 years old bodies (or more). But almost a fairytale come true in 2010 with the D7000, and since then IMO Nikon is on the downhill. To advance means keeping the good things, not dumping them. Someone mentioned that Nikon steps one step forward, two steps back — that’s definitely true. The D7000 had only one tiny deficiency: the AF system. Instead of advancing we had to face the following glitches: D7100 — banding noise, catastrophic buffer, D7200 — no LCD protector (yes, I miss that easily replacable plastic part very much), D7500 — one slot, etc. mentioned above. I know the flood was a real pain, but come on… Much costumers (at least in CEE region) in this segment, are able to switch bodies every 5-6 years, and looking for slightly better photographical specs, but will never consider the D500 or any FX bodies. Now that’s why I am whining. 🙂

            There is one case this behave would be justifiable a bit: if Nikon announces a D9xxx camera. Since Nikon is not pigeon-hearted to release a product that cannibalizes more or less the segment one step above, I think it has a real possibility now.

      • EnPassant

        Third party grips need an extra external cable. Not fun. Besides D80 and D90 could take Nikon grips at same time D300 was selling.

        Nikon historically IS protective of their pro cameras. It started with the analog AF era. Before that mirror pre-release was available in the FE2, FM2 and FA cameras. But until the release of F100 1999 the only option to get mirror lock up was the expensive, huge and heavy F4 and F5 cameras. they also made a mess with their metering system so that older lenses couldn’t meter on cheaper cameras.

        Nikon needed a full frame camera for the masses and the D3 sensor was the only available for them at the moment. The few lost D3 sales didn’t matter as most who needed the D3 already bought one. Besides the replacement D3s with an improved sensor was already in the works.

        The D3X hade a long time selling as the MP king. It was already past its best, more than 3 years old when D800 was announced. So no lost sales there.

        D2X was replaced by D3 released same day as D300. It being killed by D300 is just nonsense.

        And D3s owners switching to D750 is more proof that those owners propably had bought a used D3s and couldn’t afford replacing it with the D4 replacing it. because actually a D750 fitted their needs better than the pro camera.

        There is definitely some crippling going on with other brands as well, like Sony APS-C A-mount lenses not being able to use the full image circle on FF cameras.
        But unless you don’t give your own exemples I don’t know what you think about. Because generally I can’t see that other brands are worse.

        That’s a difference of perception depending of individual needs. Sure the updates are nice. But most of them are because of updated electronics and image processing which cost nothing or very little to include compared to D7200.
        So the main improvement for the body was the tilting screen. But I bet it was cheaper to add that than to keep the Ai-feeler as that is a more delicate construction than a tilting screen that with the D750, D500 and propably D820/850 is a cheap standard part in the Nikon drawer.

        A single card slot, no grip connection and a lighter plastic (with carbon fibre composite, no magnesium alloy) body is much simpler and cheaper to make than the D7200 body. So lower cost and higher price means more profit to pocket for Nikon.

    • Sandy Bartlett

      I don’t want a grip with a DX body.
      My D700 only had one slot, never saw any complaints.
      Nice buffer, fast.Inexpensive. Will have proven great AF and tracking, if not as good as the D500. I would own in a heartbeat over any Fuji or Sony. For those pro’s that shoot advanced amature and want 2 slots and a grip, the D7200 is still class leading also.

  • André van Sloten
  • D700s

    Nikon is going to lose 8 sales because they aren’t offering a battery grip. I think they’ll survive that loss.

  • jstevez

    Did everyone forget all the negative comments after Nikon released the FF D750?

    • BVS

      …and D810, and D7200, and D4s, and…

  • Skyliner

    I’ll buy the first crop body with 36mp.

    • Then you may wait a few years for the lens able to resolve that resolution. 🙂

  • Brent Rawlings

    Any speculation on what the introduction of the D7500 may have on the price of the D500?

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