Weekly Nikon news flash #417


→ Did you know that Nikon makes this ES-1 slide copying adapter? I didn't.


→ In addition to the free battery grip offer, you can now also get a free 12 months subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud:


→ Two new price drops on the D3400 and D5500 cameras:


→ Nikon's 100th-anniversary film submission is now open:

"We’re creating a very special anniversary film, made entirely of your images from the last 100 years. It’s your chance to be an official contributor to the history of Nikon, and a part of our future too."

→ New video from Steve Perry: Secrets to the Nikon AF system.

Nikon Vision Food Truck - you can order from the menu only if you can see it.

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  • IronHeadSlim

    The slide copier is one of my favorite Nikon legacy products! Only good with 55mm and full frame.

    • Hans J

      The 105mm VR wouldn’t work?

      • Captain Megaton

        looks like its a 52mm thread

      • 24×36

        I think that’s too long a focal length; you would probably need an extension tube between the lens and slide holder.

      • Delmar Mineard Jr

        Go to B&H web site and under Q&A for this item is several work arounds on how to use this adapter on a 105mm VR lens.

      • Teko

        The main issue here is the focusing distance needed for 105mm. I believe your lens require more distance than 60mm, or 55mm lens that it was intended for. So using of bellows, or other light proof device would be needed to gain more distance required btwn your lens and the slide itself.

    • Jan-Petter Midtgård

      You can also use it with the AF-S Micro Nikkor 60mm f/2.8G ED and the BR-5 adapter ring.

      • EPICVIS

        Yeah, I have ES-1, BR-5 and 60mm f/2.8D for 1:1 slide copy.

        • GHE3

          Can I just confirm that the br-5 is the only necessary accessory to get the es-1 and the 60 macro to work? It’ll work on both the 60G & 60D?

          • Jan-Petter Midtgård

            I have used it on the G, and it seems that EPICVIS has used it on the D, so yes. You do not need anything else besides a full frame camera and a light source.

    • 24×36

      You also need the PK-13 extension tube to get the 55 f2.8 Micro to 1:1.

      • IronHeadSlim

        Yes, it needs the PK-13 extension tube. It was designed for the AIS 55mm, which is still available new. I didn’t know you could adapt other lenses as I’ve had my 55mm since the 1980s and that worked great. It was pretty cool when I got a D700 to digitize my slides with this simple device.

    • peter w

      Every time I need to get a digital copy from one of my slides I make a slide stand from LEGO, or Fischer Technic, – made in about 2 minutes from spare parts laying around all over the place.
      I use a tripod or better a staple of books, a camera, a 105 F2,8 AF-S micro, a piece of white paper in the background and a SB600 flash. Works like a flash.

      • You should do a guest post on that 🙂

      • ZoetMB

        And where do you place and aim the flash? Does the image area cover the frame or do you crop?

        • peter w

          Flash is on camera and aims on the white paper or bord behind the slide distance 50cm approximately.

          One large book shields the slide from direct flash light.

          A guest post takes ages to write… and my slides, well, to me going digital was a real blessing.

    • Teko

      Actually I’ve used it with Nikkor 60F2.8D with BR-5 adapter to copy slides on fullframe camera.

    • jerome Boisard

      It’s working well with 40 mm micro nikkor
      Really nice to reveal the nice shots of my grandfather!
      See under 😉 :

  • I use the PS-4 Copying Adapter attached to the Bellows PB-4. The bellows attaches to a Micro-NIKKOR-P 55mm f/3.5 lens. That’s attached to my Df. It’s an awesome combination that not only lets me copy my thousands of negatives from the “old days”, but gives me the ability to do some VERY close-up work. The ES-1 is nice, but you have to use it with the current 55mm lens and you’re limited to slides unless you make some sort of jig to lift the negatives into position centered in the device, or put each one in a slide mount. It’s the best way I’ve found of digitizing b&w negatives. Scanning has a host of problems depending on the scanner and has never given me good results.

    • Hans J

      how do you hold the film negatives?

      • The slot that you feed the film into is pretty thin and keeps it flat. There are two pins located at the correct position on which to rest the bottom edge of the film with the image area centered in the optical path.

        • Hans J

          I know its a lot to ask, but would you be able to take a photo of your setup and show me? I’ve tried for years to get good scans to no avail

    • Spy Black

      The PB-4 system was the best bellows system Nikon ever made.

      • It’s a beautiful piece, that’s for sure…almost Linhof-like.

  • Nikon could probably sell a negative copying adapter to allow people to comparatively quickly capture negatives.

    • MB

      It’s easy … just use slide copying adapter with modified slide plastic container … Dremel is you friend 🙂

      • It’s a though, but I’m hoping not to run my negatives through something I’ve Dremeled 🙂

        • Jan-Petter Midtgård

          You can probably use a film strip holder like those you get with filmscanners. You can buy them separately.

  • ThomasH

    Yes, the ES1 is an old product. It has its flaws, because its so simple. Not suitable for uncut film, for DX cameras requires extension rings, such as Nikon K4 and K5, etc. I wrote a review in 2008 on Amazon about this product. https://www.amazon.com/Nikon-ES-1-52mm-Slide-Adapter/dp/B00009R8VM/ It appears currently under a different product number in Amazon, a typical Ama-Chaos and duplicity of product id’s.

  • HotDuckZ

    I lost a lot of money for PS-6, PS-4 set and of course this one.

  • Julian

    Got an older version of this somewhere in the cupboard…

  • Bart

    Does anybody have an idea what is the reason why these amazing deals for the d750 and d810 are never found in The Netherlands? I can only find a good price for these camera’s at some shady websites which I think get the camera’s from abroad and ship them here. All the official retailers never come with a price drop or an offer like the addition of a battery grip. Standard price for a D750 body only is about 2100 euro’s (this is including tax) and this price never changes.
    The only realistic option for me is the German Amazon which offers the camera for a much better price.

  • The slide copier is a really nice product! Although intended for use on a FX body with the 55mm lens, it also works fine on DX body with Nikon’s 40mm micro lens since it also has a 52mm thread, and the crop factor of the DX sensor makes the 40mm lens fill the frame comparable to using the 55mm lens on a FX body. I’ve used it to copy thousands of slides/negatives using the 40mm/DX body combo with good results and can really recommend it.

    • KnightPhoto

      Thanks for that tip regarding the 40mm macro on DX with this Slide-Copying adaptor! (wouldn’t have occurred to me a use for the 40 macro, which is a lot cheaper and less hassle than a scanner)

      • Exactly, scanning film is expensive – this is a cheap solution (given you already have a lens).

        • Pat Mann

          And this is also much faster! But clean the slides first or you’re in for a lot of dust editing.

  • Here in Belgium (Europe), the D750 is at 1999€ + 289 € for the grip and 144€ for the creative cloud… this is 2432 € or 2,664$ ! this is almost double of the US price 🙁

    • Richard Hopkins

      I remember when the D600 came out, it was cheaper for me to fly from the UK to New York and buy one there than it was to buy one locally. Tax might make up some of the difference but still…

      • br0xibear

        I think you’re looking at it the wrong way.
        It’s the prices in the US that are unusually low compared to other parts of the world.
        I’m not going to go into why that is and turn this into a political discussion, the information is out there…decide for yourself regarding world economics/politics.

        • Pat Mann

          Isn’t that what he said? Cheaper in the U.S.

        • ZoetMB

          Prices in the U.S. are not normally unusually low if you remove VAT. They’re very low in these cases only because Nikon put these particular models on sale. For products where retailers can set their own prices, one could argue that underpaid U.S. retail workers enable lower pricing. But that’s not the case here because Nikon sets the pricing.

          And then there’s also the fact that the US$ has been pretty high against the Yen, Euro and Pound lately.

      • Allan

        Camera prices in the U.S. are subsidized by the bagel and pastrami industries. You did have a bagel and a pastrami sandwich during your trip across the pond, right?

        • ZoetMB

          There are actually very few true Kosher delis left in the U.S., even in New York City. There used to be thousands. And you’re supposed to eat pastrami on rye, not on a bagel. It’s a misdemeanor to eat pastrami on a bagel in NYC and it’s a serious crime to eat it on white bread. If you add mayo to the white bread, they give you hard labor.

          • Pat Mann

            Was really sorry to see that Katz’s was no longer in Austin on our last visit. It was much nicer than the NYC one.

            • ZoetMB

              Sure that was related to the Katz’s in NYC? They’re opening a branch in downtown Brooklyn and I was under the impression that’s going to be their very first branch.

              There’s this place in Houston from a former NYC deli guy, but it’s not Kosher (they have bacon on the menu!): http://kennyandziggys.com

          • Allan

            I should have put a comma after the bagel.

            There actually was an article written within the last 1-2 years, I think in the NY Times, about the demise of delis in New York City. Sad

            Montreal, my home town still has a lot of delis. Thank G-d. (I live in Dallas now.)

            In Montreal, it’s called smoked meat. Apparently, there were two distinct Romanian recipes last century. One went to Montreal and one went to New York City. It’s easy to taste the difference; both excellent. In Montreal, it’s a sin to eat smoked meat on white bread; if you ask for mayo, you’re a dead man.

            About 35 years ago there was an article in the New York Times written by an American writer, comparing Montreal and New York City bagels; she preferred the Montreal bagels. Me too.

            Do you know why they put white vinegar on the tables in Montreal delis?

            And don’t get me started on pickles.

            ZoetMb, thanks for commenting. I’m still smiling.

            • ZoetMB

              If you haven’t already, check out the documentary “Deli Man” (http://www.delimanmovie.com). It’s a lot of fun.

              There is a place in NYC that does Montreal style smoked meat. It’s called “Mile End Deli”. There’s one in Manhattan, one in Brooklyn and they also have a stand at the Saturday Smorgasburg event in Williamsburg.

              In addition to the loss of real Kosher delis, there’s also a dearth of really good bagels in NYC. It’s a lost art. You can still get pretty good bialys at Kossar’s, but it changed ownership and even those aren’t quite as good as they used to be. I have little doubt that Jewish deli and bagels may indeed be better in Montreal than in NYC. A more diverse population, healthier eating habits and exorbitant commercial rents have driven these places out of business. The only reason Katz’s still exists is because they own their building and they sold the air rights and adjoining property.

              There is one good Jewish deli left in Rego Park, Queens, “Ben’s Best”, not to be confused with the awful Ben’s chain, but it’s very expensive. When that owner retires, I think it will be gone.

              (Apologies to everyone else for straying so far off topic).

            • Allan

              I have printed out your deli suggestions and will have to try them on my next trip to the Big Apple.

              Thanks.

              (Montrealers put white vinegar on their french fries.)

            • Carleton Foxx

              If you need pastrami and don’t live within the 212 or 514, don’t bother buying it from a grocery store or via mail order. It doesn’t travel well.
              Make your own by buying a hunk of corned beef, covering the outside with a 2:1 mix of black pepper and coriander, smoking it for a couple of hours then steaming for a couple more.

    • We get a deal on cameras, then make up for it with ridiculous prescription drug prices. It’s all a wash.

      • Eric Frame

        Not sure where you shop, but I get prescriptions for $3 at costco.

        • Not sure what you’re taking, but I’ve got one that’s $129 at Costco. But, you’re right, many generics that have been around a while are pretty cheap.

    • nwcs

      How much of that is the cost of VAT + regulations (warranty differences, return period differences, local regulations, etc.)? Plus market size considerations.

      • ZoetMB

        VAT alone is 19% to 25% in many countries. Although don’t forget that sales tax in New York City is 8.875% unless you have an exemption certificate or have the equipment shipped out of state.

        • nwcs

          Yes, but these comparisons are rarely made apples to apples. And the cost of regulation varies. For example, if a country required a longer warranty or longer return period or the removal of warranty exclusions then the cost is passed onto the buyer. That part is almost never figured in when these comparisons are made. Also if a country requires a brand new item to be used as a warranty replacement (instead of remanufactured/refurb) as some places in Europe are doing then that cost will be passed along as well.

    • T.I.M

      Oui mais vous avez de bonnes frites!

      • Allan

        When I was in Belgium and ordered a $5 cup of coffee, I got a free cookie. When I ordered a 50-cent cup of coffee, I got a free cookie! I got a free cookie every time I ordered coffee!

        Belgians are highly civilized people.

        (Though I have my doubts about mayonnaise on french fries.)

        • T.I.M

          Speculoos cookies are delicious.
          I was born in France (100 meters from the Belgium’s border).
          My grand-mother was Belgium.
          It’s a great country but the weather sucks.

        • T.I.M

          It’s not mayonnaise but piccalilli (very different).

          • Allan

            From Wikipedia:
            Fries with mayonnaise or one of a wide variety of other typical Belgian sauces is a fast food classic in Belgium.

            From CooksInfo:
            In the Netherlands, Piccalilli is popular on French fries in the south of the country, and in Amsterdam.

            T.I.M, where did you have piccalilli on your frites?

            • T.I.M

              In Belgium and north of France.

            • Allan

              I will have to try piccalilli. I had never heard about it.

            • peter w

              Calais is famous for french bread stuffed with french fries and piccalily and to it a newspaper with fish drenched in vinegar and fatt. It is extremely close to England.
              It is not quite as we think of French quisine. ;).

          • peter w

            Sorry to correct you.
            On French fries (or Flemish Fries as we call the thick cut version in The Netherlands), there are many sauces possible, among which mayonnaise (called Mayo) is a traditional favorite. In Holland it will allways be some cheep mayonnaise which should not carry the name.
            In Flanders, other populair sauces may be pepper, stoofvlees, (haven’t snacked there for over ten years, sorry).
            In Holland, you will see all kinds o0f sauces and toppings, like patatje oorlog, patatje joppie, patatje kapsalon.

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/506938bc198fd1f82643c9e57849197ad477cfbc2938726364a0502dc2b85ffb.jpg

    • Piooof

      I guess the special US prices are a consequence of Nikon losing #2 to Sony in the US. They are ready to sacrifice margin to regain market share. The European customers are probably too loyal to Nikon to get this treatment — but this may change if Nikon goes on taking them for cash cows like now (D7500, D750 prices…).

  • DirtyHarryC

    This is a joke. All the Special offers D750/D810 only US. Not in Europe.

    • Eric Calabros

      Well they say America is land of opportunities, for good reason 🙂

      • Fly Moon

        hahah

    • Aldo

      dont worry we pay more than 30 percent in taxes n ss and it’s only gonna get worse

  • Lubos

    That is really aggressive sale, both the D810 and D750, especially D750. It is hard to resist this one with battery grip for that price. We should expect some new upgrades soon.

  • Captain Megaton

    D3400 price really low. Dumping?

  • Jeffnky

    Be sure to check out the rules for the Nikon 100 film…

    “2. Anyone in the UK, ROI, Sweden, Denmark, Norway or Finland over the age of 18 is eligible to enter, with the exception of employees of Nikon, their families, the contest judges, and individuals engaged in the manufacture or sale of photographic equipment.”

    “17. This promotion is open to UK, ROI, Sweden, Denmark, Norway or Finland residents. Employees of Nikon and their immediate families, its agents or anyone professionally associated with this activity may not participate in this offer. Offer void where prohibited.”

  • CERO

    1500 for a D750… arggh x_X

    • Aldo

      With an mb-d16 no less… You can sell that thing for 300 bucks and end up with a brand new d750 for 1200. steal! basically half off

      • nwcs

        Thing is, who would buy one for $300 when you can buy a third party one for much less? That’s the main reason why the grip is even included.

        • Aldo

          ah… I’m sure there are plenty of good third party grip stories out there, but I had a horrible experience with one and decided to stick to the nikon brand. I’m cheap, but I when I feel I have to spend the money I do it… even if that means overpaying.

          • nwcs

            Apparently not enough people are buying them, though. I’m sure they work well but they love charging for it, too.

    • Spy Black

      Now if they would only sell the body alone for $1200…

  • Aaron Pepelis

    Since my Nikon Cool Scan 9000ED broke, I have almost bought the slide copier so many times… but then I realize most of my stuff left to so is 35mm, 110, and 120. I bought a 60mm f/2.8 micro and some pieces of wood to make this: https://petapixel.com/2012/05/18/how-to-scan-film-negatives-with-a-dslr/

    I also just packaged up my 9000ed to send out to get fixed. *fingers crossed*

  • Carleton Foxx

    That’s the dilemma with Nikon and Canon (and Leica in the film days): They may be a little slow with new tech, but just about anything you can imagine doing with a camera they already have a an accessory or a part that will let you do it. So how could one switch to one of the newer companies? What if I want to do microscopy? Or I need bellows for a project? Or that crazy Canon MP E Macro Lens? Or one of Nikon’s superteles? Can all that stuff really be adapted to Panasonic Gx8?

  • The only xxxx series Nikon that I’m interested in is the D5300, (GPS + articulated screen FTW) …and I haven’t seen that one go on sale in a while. I guess I’ll continue hunting on eBay…

  • AYWY

    The AF system article highlights a deficiency of the current AF modes – why should this be the photographer’s problem? It should be the camera companies’ problem – automatically giving us AF tracking that works. Instead of users having to dig through pages and pages of reference about their AF modes. Imagine a smart phone that asks user whether they want “dynamic area af” or “3d-tracking”.

    Indicate what i want to track and it should just work.

  • approved

  • I was waiting for all the lights to go out.

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