Nikon USA announces “I AM GENERATION IMAGE” campaign

Nikon-USA-I-AM-Generation-Image-campaign
Nikon USA announced today a new "I AM GENERATION IMAGE" campaign (iamgenerationimage.com) with the hope to persuade smartphone millennial consumers to upgrade to a Nikon camera:

Press release:

Nikon Inc. Announces New 'I AM Generation Image' Integrated Campaign to Celebrate and Support a World that Communicates Visually

“I AM Generation Image” Will Include Inspiring Content and Encourage Others to Share Their Own Passions Through Authentic Imagery

MELVILLE, NY – Today, Nikon Inc. has announced its new “I AM Generation Image” integrated campaign, which is the imaging leader’s new platform to amplify the voices of individuals who want to stand out in a world of visual noise. The brand campaign aims to reinforce confidence in the entry-level and enthusiast DSLR markets, and inspire people to create images far beyond just “good enough,” to have their stories heard. “I AM Generation Image” will officially start today, with the launch of an immersive website featuring the content of a select group of creative individuals representing some of the eyes and voices of this generation.

“Each day we upload tens of thousands of images, making us the first generation to truly embrace pervasive visual communication. Whether it’s love, laughter or a call to act for the greater good, the feeling you get when you look at a photo or watch a video should reflect the intent and emotions of the person behind the lens,” said Lisa Baxt, Associate General Manager of Communications, Nikon Inc. “Generation Image was created to answer this need, and celebrates the stories of our lives and the important role that imagery plays in telling them, while inspiring users to capture more, and capture better using Nikon.”

Defining “I AM Generation Image”

The concept of “Generation Image” was born from a desire to understand people’s relationships with their images. After extensive research, it became clear that the number of images captured and shared every day is significantly increasing, and that quality is critical to celebrate and purposefully represent the motivations of this new generation of image makers. Across the country, people are using their cameras as a tool to share what is important to them and each have the potential for significant impact. From families or hobbies, personal causes to accomplishments, this new segment of creative individuals enjoys expressing and sharing what they are passionate about through photos and videos. On social media channels, the hashtag #IAMGenerationImage is a rallying cry. It echoes the desire to deliver the best images possible, in order to convey emotions and passions that rise above the noise.

“I AM Generation Image” reminds us that we are all part of this generation, and Nikon will enable our stories to ring loud, true and authentic. The campaign will help to define this generation as the first to overwhelmingly express themselves through images en masse and on a global scale. The successful “I AM” international campaign has acted as a worldwide catalyst for millions of fans to self-identify with the Nikon brand. The new campaign builds upon the “I AM” architecture to make imaging a personal experience for North America.

Campaign Elements

In North America, the campaign begins today in the United States with an experience site that features content from a select group of extraordinary individuals who document their own passions through imagery. This group of visual storytellers will capture content that will be seen through an immersive experiential website that acts as a portal, offering a glimpse into their fascinating worlds. These individuals are a diverse group of personalities who are not professional photographers; they represent a wide range of stories from entrepreneurs, philanthropists, comedians and more. The online portal will also act as a hub for the campaign, offering followers a chance to become personally invested with the lives of this imaginative group as they share content in real-time. Formal participants in the campaign will share imagery under the hashtag “#IAMGenerationImage” and Nikon will encourage widespread consumer participation through its social channels.

The “I AM Generation Image” Campaign will be driven by non-traditional media, including video advertisements, digital media on relevant websites, rich media and social paid promotion.  Additionally, a series of videos defining the campaign will drive to the branded microsite. Consumers will see an immersive experience through rich media advertisements, and both mobile and desktop users will enjoy an interactive experience with high production values for video and sound. Users will also be encouraged to interact with the campaign by tagging their own visual stories with #IAmGenerationImage for the chance to be incorporated into the campaign. Advertisements will run through the end of 2014 and the Spring of 2015 to support the various aspects of the campaign.

The integrated campaign was created and will be executed by Nikon’s agency partners, McCann Erickson, ID Media, MRM / McCann, Initiative Media and MWW.

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  • John

    #IAMYourFathersCamera

    • Patrick O’Connor

      My father’s camera was a polaroid!

    • lorenzo

      change it in Grandfather

    • neversink

      My father’s camera was an Exacta vxii-a with Zeiss lenses which he passed on to me which started me in this crazy career……

      • John

        I was having fun with young people not using DSLR. My Dad gave me his Kodak Signet Rangefinder with Synchro 300 Shutter. No light meter. Tiny viewfinder. Film wind and rewind had not levers, only knobs. It just worked!

    • My fathers camera was a Contax IIIA with assorted Zeiss lenses. Extraordinary precision equipment.

  • MikeonNikon

    IAM Too Little Too Late? A few of my graduate students, squarely in the demographic targeted by these ads, bought D3xxx cameras over the last couple of years but got frustrated at how hard it was to share the images online. They didn’t like all the steps between taking the image and finally getting it onto Facebook or other social media sites. Most of them are back on their (upgraded) smartphones.

    • mikeswitz

      …and what a bitch those selfies were….

    • lorenzo

      Do they really need a D810 to put 360 x 270 pix picture of the cat on the web?

      • Andrew

        No, but they will soon think of other ways to use their cameras. Maybe that part-time job to help pay for their school fees.

        • lorenzo

          you meant “to pay for the camera” LOL

          • Andrew

            No, creativity knows no bound. Work as an amateur wedding photographer on weekends offering your clients fantastic rates, take pictures and frame them to sell, stage products and photograph them with different lighting effects or decorations for clients to put on their websites, etc.

            If you can earn enough money to pay for your camera, then why not earn some extra to pay for your books and some towards your school fees. Students can work in the weekends and summer holidays. I spent many years at the University collecting two degrees and I did a few odd jobs. It is not much fun being broke 😉

        • Thom Hogan

          This is a live marketing campaign. You don’t wait for your selected subjects to discover what you should have been saying from the beginning. Waste of US$5-7m dollars.

      • MikeonNikon

        They got into DSLRs to have more control over their images, for example shooting with shallow DoF or getting good images in low light. I let them borrow my 35mm f/1.8 DX lens and they liked it a lot. For most of them, though, the convenience of their smartphones won out. One student stuck with her DSLR and she is getting quite good.

        • Luis F. Vidal

          The one that loves photography.

    • Andrew

      Students need motivation, ten extra points for using their cameras 😉

    • Mr_Miyagi

      Good point about the importance of connectivity. Image quality isn’t everything for the young crowd this ad campaign is apparently aimed at. Once again, Nikon marketing is wide of the mark. The folks in Japan HQ seem to have little or no understanding of their global target audience.

      • jake337

        WiFi SD cards and WiFi adapters didn’t just hit the market yesterday.

        • peter

          And they are CLUMSY to use.
          I often find myself fist shooting with myD800, only to take the same shot with my mobile phone to share.

    • Luis F. Vidal

      Those few don’t love photography, they just like to share snapshots.

    • jake337

      I guess they overlooked WiFi SD cards and nikons WiFi adapters. But hey, I guess it’s still nikon fault.

      • peter

        I’m sure you have not used either.

  • DB White

    I have an idea for a new campaign: “I AM generation imagine…imagine that NIkon might someday listen to it’s users, imagine that Nikon might someday update the D300, imagine that Nikon will eventually release a D700 update with a 24 MP pro body. Imagine.

    • RxGus

      The d750 is quite competent as a d700 replacement. More than enough Pro’s are singing its praise, and a multitude of 700 owners are happy as a lark with it. I think it’s time to bury the hatchet on the “no d700 replacement” nonsense.

      If you aren’t happy with the d750, I would venture to guess that you aren’t going to be happy no matter what Nikon releases.

      • Andy Aungthwin

        Rx, you are wasting your time. Guys like DB White think they know more than the combined experience and smarts of the Nikon board members as well as McCann Erickson, ID Media, MRM / McCann, Initiative Media and MWW.

        It wasn’t that long ago that I would have had to sell one of my kidneys to get an FF body and now look at what’s on offer?

        A FF like the D610 for just over $1000 5 years ago?

        Yeah, imagine that.

        • DB White

          Incredible that you think you know what type of camera I should buy without even knowing what type of photography I do!

          I don’t buy a camera mindlessly based on what a magazine or blogger says. I rented the D750: very happy with the autofocus, continuous shooting rate, and high iso image quality. The tiny body is almost a dealbreaker for me. I could also do without the articulating LCD screen or the seven new special effects modes. A D810-ish body with 24 MP sensor for $2700 would be perfect.

          I do agree that the D610 is an excellent bargain right now, particularly when 10% off at the Nikon refurbished store. The D810 is also a bargain for studio and landscape photographers.

          • KnightPhoto

            How about “A D810-ish body with 24 MP sensor for $3300” – would that be perfect? or would that be a problem?

            • fjfjjj

              I’d buy that in a heartbeat. They should call it the D710 and release it in 2012. Fingers crossed!

            • KnightPhoto

              Haha yeah it matches the D400 they should come out with in 2011 😉

      • Andy Aungthwin

        Rx, you are wasting your time. Guys like DB White think they know more than the combined experience and smarts of the Nikon board members as well as McCann Erickson, ID Media, MRM / McCann, Initiative Media and MWW.

        It wasn’t that long ago that I would have had to sell one of my kidneys to get an FF body and now look at what’s on offer?

        A FF like the D610 for just over $1000 5 years ago?

        Yeah, imagine that.

      • Ian Lindo

        But…but…I thought EVERYONE with a D700 had a grip attached shooting in burst mode all of the time!!

      • DB White

        I’ve tried the D750: snappy autofocus, great high iso image quality, and reasonably fast continuous shutter rate. It will be a home run with most wedding photographers. I’m used to a larger body with dedicated AF-on button. The D750 body feels very small and cramped: too much like a D3200. I would rarely use the articulating LCD. I would be VERY happy with a 24 MP sensor in a “D810-ish” body, but I doubt NIkon will release that camera. I’m trying to decide between the D750 and the D810; they are both excellent cameras, neither meets my needs perfectly. The D610 is a real bargain ($1350) when on sale at the NIkon refurbished store, but the D750’s autofocus and better high iso performance might be worth the additional $1000 in the long run.

        If I was a landscape or studio photographer the image quality of the D810 is almost breathtaking.

  • lorenzo

    > hope to persuade smartphone millennial consumers to upgrade to a Nikon camera:
    How come? They recently stated that they don’t see cell phones as a dangerous competitor, are they changing their mind now or they finally woke up from the wasabi-sushi-sake dinner?

    • Andrew

      I think you are misinterpreting Nikon’s statement. The world’s population is expanding, more people are using camera functionality as a result of smartphones. This expands the potential market for Nikon as these users migrate to more sophisticated cameras. People are smart, do not for a moment think that they cannot tell the difference between a DSLR camera and a smartphone camera. You do not believe me? Then go on an assignments and take out a smart phone to photograph that wedding. They will escort you out through the windows 😉

      • fjfjjj

        The photographic industry is shrinking fast, and isn’t polarized between smartphones and DSLRs. Being a dominant DSLR force today doesn’t necessarily mean anything tomorrow. Nikon is already talking to its investors about exiting consumer photo altogether. Sorry, but large firms where quick learners at the bottom can turn around failing corporate strategy are exceedingly rare. Nikon Imaging could easily go the way of Kodak at this rate. What’s darkly humorous is how Nikon is attempting to stay relevant through their famously bad PR department, instead of by responding to real market trends.

        • fjfjjj? Who ARE you?

          • Nothing personal, it’s just been on my mind that so many people don’t use their real names here. Like it matters? I usually like your comments and rarely see anything that would create heartburn. So, why the alias? That question isn’t for you, it’s rhetorical.

            • fjfjjj

              Thanks for the comment. Some of what I say here might be good, and some of it is surely crap. So the main reason is that I like to control what people find first when they search for my real name. There are other reasons, but those are rather specific to what I do in real life.

            • Fair enough. I used to feel the same, but I’m now sixty years old and don’t give a shit any more. 🙂

            • fjfjjj

              Keep on truckin’ 🙂

            • LOL

            • You are correct, though. I can see Canon and Nikon suffering a slow death as the demands of public ownership overwhelm them. Capitalism will be gone in 20 years as companies will no longer be able to remain viable unless they are privately held. THAT is where the pressure is in all of this.

            • Thom Hogan

              Some day you’re going to realize what you just wrote.

            • fjfjjj

              Cryptic comment. Would you elaborate, Thom?

            • Andrew

              He is talking about reaching that age where you also (like 60 year old Grady) will be “truckin” along. That is, moving very slowly. At least that is how I read his comment.

            • Thom Hogan

              I guess today isn’t that day ;~).

            • fjfjjj

              I don’t know, Thom. I’m pretty old. If I haven’t figured it out by now…

        • Kind of like those old anti-marijuana ads from the 1950s.

          • Rudi

            I seldom see the Grateful Dead icon nowadays 😉

            • Yeah, it’s become sort of quaint now, isn’t it? 🙂

        • alvintoro

          Hmmm… So fjfjjj isn’t your real name??? Well everytime I see it I try pronounce it out loud just see peoples reaction. JAJAJA No but in all seriousness I completely agree with your point. It is becoming harder for larger companies to stay in tune with the wants and needs of the consumers they try to serve. Putting together campagns like this one just proves to everyone that they just don’t get it.

        • Thom Hogan

          Uh, no. Nikon isn’t talking about leaving consumer photography. Nikon is talking about adding a business to their two primary businesses, one of which is consumer photography.

          But the rest I mostly agree with.

          • Nikon is also looking at entering the medical industry through the purchase of another company at the height of the stock market for these companies. Nothing could go wrong here.

          • Nikon is also looking at entering the medical industry through the purchase of another company at the height of the stock market for these companies. Nothing could go wrong here.

            • Thom Hogan

              That’s not the point. The point is that Nikon is trying to find a third business, not trying to shut down its top business and replace it with another.

              I’m on record as saying that Nikon is dreaming when they think they’ll hit the medical market running via their current strategy. Nevertheless, I’m not against them trying to diversify. They’ve needed to diversify for two decades now. Unfortunately, it won’t happen fast for them, so this is a long-term thing, not short term.

            • In the past I’ve seen to many companies diversify into industries that they know little about, and end up experiencing a serious cash drain from that new business that eventually negatively affects their core business.

            • Andrew

              Companies diversifying into industries they know little about – that does not appear to be the case in this instance. Nikon is an optics company and there are lots of opportunity in that market for a company with Nikon’s core expertise. The medical market is one that has experienced double digit growth (I believe) for decades.

              Nikon is already in the medical market with their microscopes, they are in the semiconductor market, so this move is to align them more deeply in the business market as opposed to the consumer camera market. So this looks like a good move, but that is not to say it is the only move they should make.

              Nikon has stated that they are working on a disruptive product in the consumer (most likely camera) space, so it will be interesting what that product will be. Nikon has the resources and expertise to accomplish this task, so we will all have to wait and see what they come up with.

            • Thom Hogan

              Certainly possible to diversify into something you don’t understand, but Nikon seems to want to stick something that has optical implications.

              Since Nikon is a profitable company and cash positive, they have money to invest in something. Thing is, what will bring them the most ROI? At the moment, that doesn’t look like cameras ;~(.

            • fjfjjj

              I’ve pre-ordered my AF-S Medical-Nikkor.

        • Wade Marks

          fjfjjj: I get what you are writing, but what “real market trends” should Nikon respond to?

          I read and hear a lot of criticism, but very little constructive, specific ideas as to how a company like Nikon should proceed.

          The fact is that smartphones have eradicated the entire point and shoot market for all companies, not just Nikon. That market is not coming back.

          There is no way that Nikon or Canon or anyone can make a more serious ILC behave like a smartphone in the way of ease of use, convenience, and connectivity. So it’s not enough to say just add WiFi connectivity. You can make the workflow integration with the smartphone easier, but it will never be as easy as taking the image on your smartphone directly.

          This ad campaign is not bad. It attempts to leverage the trend that is already huge, namely people’s interest in always snapping photos with their smartphone, and building on it to entice people to try a more serious camera.

          In reality that is the real challenge for Nikon, Canon, Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, et al…is persuading people to move up into a more serious camera in the first place. In essence, you have to sell people on the idea of more serious photography. The camera manufacturers should team up on this, for it will take a concentrated effort to move the market.

          • fjfjjj

            The key trend, which Nikon is burying its head in the sand about, is towards non-SLR and classically styled cameras which compete directly with full-fledged SLRs in the market. Nikon has subverted its own entries into that domain with fixed lenses (Coolpix A), minuscule sensors (Nikon 1), and reflex preoccupation (Nikon Dƒ). The firm’s combined understanding of optics, sensors, image processing, ergonomics, and embedded software is extremely special. Boggling is that they remain so avoidant of challenging the SLR paradigm, which drives up cost, complexity, size, weight and grace to provide a feature (OVF) that many consumers don’t care about. My suggestion to Nikon would be for them to leverage everything they know about cameras, especially embedded software and handling, to produce better-handling and less obtuse competitors to the A7 and Fuji X cameras.

            • Wade Marks

              So basically you’re saying that Nikon needs to enter the higher end, bigger sensor mirrorless market, to compete against the likes of the Sony A7 and Fuji X cameras.

              I agree that Nikon and Canon both need to pursue that market more aggressively and from a personal standpoint I would love to see what they could churn out to compete…but I would caution against overstating the size of that market. internet buzz is not sales.

              The market for mirrorless will continue to grow and eventually Nikon and Canon will be forced to play…but Nikon could produce the most amazing FF mirrorless and that still wouldn’t turn around the macro trend regarding camera sales.

              The main driver of the dynamic in camera sales is the prevalence of smartphones. Period. Until and unless the camera vendors solve that somehow, their market will become a very marginalized niche.

          • nzswedespeed

            I Disagree. Add wifi and have an option so it transfers to your smart device as soon as you take it over wifi. Everyone knows a dslr/mirrorless take better photos than smartphones, but the gap between whats good enough to most people is closing rapidly (look at the iphone 6 camera). I think FF mirrorless with great wifi connectivity that play nicely with smart devices (fuji probably have the best atm) is the future

            • I have two Fuji X-T1s, a camera which has what I consider to be well-implemented wi-fi, and it’s still not nearly as seamless as using your phone directly. Any implementation of wifi will still be put an additional device–a camera–in between your image and the Internet, and so will necessarily be more complex. That complexity had to be worth it, not only for you to spend time going through the workflow of uploading the image to your phone, but to justify the expense of buying the camera and then lugging it around with you in the first place. That’s where this campaign comes in.

              If you look through the galleries on the landing page you can have yourself a good chuckle about the need to reassure the target demo graphic that yes, these cameras can take selfies too, or scoff at the preening, art-school dropout material like homeless people and rusty bikes, but this is the stark, chilling reality: Nikon needs to convince people that buying a DSLR / ILC is worth it, that a smartphone, isn’t good enough to be your only camera. They need to grow the market.

              The Soccer moms are already there, and it’s worth noting that CaNikon did an excellent job over the past decade that parents would be guilty of losing the kids’ childhood forever if they didn’t buy a Big Black Camera to snap up the memories at 3.5 frames per second.

              So, who’s left? Self-obsessed, childless Milennials. How do you reach them? By convincing them that a DSLR will force the world to realize how special they are. If there is one dependable trait in this generation, it is a conviction of destiny. Life has greatness in store for each one of these special snowflakes, and if Nikon can lead them to believe that the key to unlocking it is shallow depth of field, more power to them.

              It will be interesting to watch.

            • nzswedespeed

              Oh I agree. I never said Fuji had the correct solution – more that they have the best effort atm. Smartphones are so good as they’re instant. So I believe instant transfer to your phones memory is the next move (obviously still saving to an internal sd card also)

            • Wade Marks

              There are problems with instant WiFi transfer from cameras to smartphones. It sounds great and I’ve thought that would be a great solution too.

              However, instant transfer means both camera and smartphone are always burning some extra battery, if only to remain tethered.

              And let’s say you’re out taking a bunch of photos and having them upload to your smartphone as they are taken. That certainly would be the most convenient, and really the only option that would even come close to the convenience of just taking the pictures on the smartphone.

              How does that impact battery life? Would you be happy finding out that you cannot take nearly as many pictures, and that your smartphone is low on battery as well?

              Now maybe technological advancements will solve this problem. But until it does then this is not viable.

              Now if they can get the tech problems solved then if were Nikon or Canon I would be trying to negotiate with Apple to have my system integrated into their operating system, like Facebook, Twitter, etc.

            • fjfjjj
  • whisky

    hope they’ll follow through or their next campaign may read:

    I AM Lipstick On A Pig

  • Au Yeong Wing Yau

    FAIL.

    This demolishes users’ confidence that Nikon actually knows what is happening in this time and age. It’s like record companies trying to fight digital distribution.

    Unless this is a one-time marketing campaign to get sales for the crucial Christmas season. It might actually work – marketing can do wonders to the ill-informed (“A better camera makes you take better pics!” *row-eyes*).

    My 2c:

    Dear Canikon, please do the following:
    (1) Get ‘Nikkor’ and ‘EF’ branded on the handphone lenses instead of fighting the inevitable!
    (2) All your bodies must be able to sync pictures to a smartphone.
    (3) All your bodies must have a tilt-flip screen.
    (4) Lighter body (supposedly via mirrorless). But please don’t make them unnecessarily smaller. My fingers will be cramped and I don’t want to lose a whole bunch of external controls.

    • lorenzo

      Personally I totally disagree with your “All” on #3.
      I would never buy a D900 or a D5 with that crap, but that is me…

    • Andrew

      Actually, a better camera can indeed help you take better pictures, but it will not turn you into a pro. Nikon knows pictures, so do not take their words lightly 😉

      • Thom Hogan

        Yes, a better camera can indeed allow you to take better pictures. The I Am Generation Image campaign fails to show that in any way.

        • Jeff Hunter

          It’s common knowledge that larger cameras produce higher quality photos.

          • Thom Hogan

            So you drive a Mack truck, then? ;~)

            Even if I accept your premise, you’re missing a point: why do you need higher quality photos to share on Instagram?

            If the high jump bar is set at 2 feet, you don’t need an Olympian to clear it.

            • Jeff Hunter

              You’ve missed the point of the ad campaign. Nikon is not trying to replace smartphone photography, they’re trying to spark an interest in 35mm photography in the young adult crowd. We all started out with point and shoot cameras and some where along the way we were inspired to pick up a 35mm camera because as everyone knows they make better photos and you have more creative control.

            • Thom Hogan

              Okay, let’s accept your premise. Show me one place in the campaign where Nikon has made the linkage that shows that the D750 used in this campaign is “better” in ANY way.

              Ads without explicit connections are easily ignored or waylaid.

              I will concede that there might be a sub-message involved in the campaign that works at the sub-conscious level: that DSLRs are hip enough that millennials might use them. But that’s a very low energy marketing point.

              Ads come in a variety of forms. There’s branding ads, for example, which just try to steer someone’s opinion of a brand. This campaign comes far closer to that than anything that’s going to help drive sales of products. Moreover, the big failure of the Japanese camera companies is in having an answer to the smartphone and its ease of sharing. This campaign actually could be counterproductive in that respect, as if someone is curious enough to see if Nikon’s barely implied claim is true, they’re going to run into the workflow issues of using a DSLR to do smartphone-type sharing, almost immediately.

              I’ll stick with my original take, even on deeper reflection: this campaign doesn’t address the real problem in selling a DSLR in any meaningful way. It’s highly likely to be wasted money. Note that at US$5m (the low end of the estimated cost) and 20% GPM to the US subsidiary, you’d have to sell 14,000 extra D750’s just to make back the GPM. You’d have to sell far, far more to actually make a profit from the ad. Does anyone think that Nikon will do that with this campaign?

            • Jeff Hunter

              It’s common knowledge among a majority of adults that DSLRs make a higher quality photo than point and shoot cameras. Nikon’s DSLR commercials are competing against other DSLR manufacturers not against smartphone manufacturers. The vast majority of people are happy with smartphone photos. Those people that want a bit more quality will buy a dedicated point and shoot camera. Hobbyists will buy a DSLR. If all you care about is posting to FB and Instagram you would never consider a DSLR. By now pretty much every young adult has a smartphone. If one of these people decides to pursue photography as a hobby they will purchase a DSLR, but they will continue to use their smartphone to post to FB and Instagram because it will always be easier. I own a DSLR but I continue to use a smartphone for photography when it’s appropriate. Nikon is simply trying to spark an interest in the few young adults who might want to pursue the hobby of photography.

            • Thom Hogan

              You might want to go back and read Nikon’s own comments about the campaign: they directed it at smartphones, not DSLR competitors.

              Even if I concede that every adult “knows” that a DSLR makes higher quality photos, the problem is you still have to explain why you’d need that for posting on Instagram ;~).

              The problem for the camera makers is that the over 40 crowd knows all about DSLRs and is buying them less often than before (less frequent updates because the one they have is “good enough”). They’re trying to figure out how to get the under 40 crowd to buy a DSLR, because that’s their only chance of growth in sales. I still want someone to show me how this ad campaign does that, and to do so without using words like “assumption” or “common knowledge.”

            • Jeff Hunter

              DSLR photographers come from the ranks of point and shoot photographers and smartphone photographers comprise the majority of the point and shoot crowd. Nikon is making their pitch to the non-DSLR crowd as they’ve always done. You seem to infer that Nikon is expecting hordes of smartphone users to stop using their phones for photography purposes and buy a Nikon DSLR. I don’t think their ad campaign is suggesting that a Nikon DSLR is a substitute for smartphone photography. Nikon is addressing a generation that, via their smartphones, takes more photos than any other generation has. In this group of young adults there are those who will become interested in photography as a hobby. And that’s the group Nikon is trying to reach.

              Why did I become a hobbyist photographer? I owned a point and shoot when I was a boy in the 60s. I read Life magazine and National Geographic because the photos were interesting and Playboy as well. Even a 13 year old can see the difference in quality between a point and shoot and a 35mm SLR. And yes, I noticed the type of cameras used by the photographers in those magazines and the ads for SLRs. Nikon didn’t plant the photography seed that I was born with but when I was ready to buy my first SLR at 14, it was Nikon’s reputation as the leader in the SLR market I was aware of. And because of that Every SLR I’ve owned since 1969 has been a Nikon.

            • Thom Hogan

              > Nikon is addressing a generation that, via their smartphones, takes more photos than any other generation has.

              And the call to action to that group is what?

      • Mark

        “Better” is a subjective reference to quality. Better in what way? Better compared to what? Depending on the individual’s point of comparison, the answer might be that it really isn’t “better”.

    • Patrick O’Connor

      When you start with “FAIL,” it’s difficult to take anything else you say seriously…

    • Thom Hogan

      When I pointed out #1 as a possibility back in 2009, I also pointed out that it was likely already a bit too late to be effective at that. Today, it’s WAY too late. Apple does its own thing just fine. Samsung isn’t going to rebrand someone else. Ditto Sony. Most of the remaining brands are either way too small to make an impact or are “drive to the bottom” brands trying to cut every penny out of the products they can. The game was played and the camera makers lost.

      #2 is mostly a yes, but it’s a part of a bigger problem that the camera makers still don’t do much about: workflow. They seem to not understand that their hardware doesn’t exist in a vacuum.

      #3 is a no. However, if you put a tilt screen on your second level camera, leaving it off higher level cameras seems like a huge mistake.

      #4 can be done without going mirrorless. But I’d quibble about this one. We need both small and large cameras, just as we need iPads and MacBook Airs and MacBook Pros. Your fingers also may be cramped because the UI hasn’t been rethought to allow useful control with fewer buttons/dials.

  • Aekn

    I AM sick of Nikon’s Marketing

    • Andrew

      I AM in love with Nikon’s Marketing.
      I AM in love with Nikon’s Marketing.
      I AM in love with Nikon’s Marketing.

      It is always a matter of will and perspective what you decide to focus on. The cup is either half full or half empty. I see it as half full, leaving room for improvement 😉

      The Nikon Fluorine Coat Technology advertisement is an example of excellence in advertising:

      https://nikonrumors.com/2014/11/13/nikons-patent-for-a-nikkor-600mm-f4-fl-lens-with-fluorine-coating.aspx/

      • Kynikos

        We know you’re in love with Nikon’s marketing.
        You’re on here shilling for them every day.

        • Andrew

          Well, Nikon has been doing an exceptional job lately and on the whole they deserve high praise.

          But your comment is not constructive – intellectually, it cannot be responded to. It is along the same line as many of the commenters I have been responding to quite often. Your comment is an emotional outburst. You ought to be a little more civil. I provide evidence to support my views, but you have not argued against my point but have resorted to name calling. How typical!

          • Kynikos

            Actually, mine wasn’t the emotional response. You opening with “I am in love with Nikon’s Marketing”, in triplicate, was the emotional response. And if you’re getting paid to troll these forums to defend Nikon, I guess that’s fine. It’s getting old, but nobody owns the internet.

            As Thom Hogan , fjfjjj and others have pointed out in these threads, Nikon’s business plan and marketing run the risk of driving the company into the ground. This campaign won’t sell any cameras either. Millennial don’t have the money to start with a D750/70-200 2.8 and this campaign doesn’t tell them why they need to sell a kidney to buy it.

            Those of us who want to see Nikon innovate may be barking up the wrong tree. But if you want to keep waving the pompoms, no one can stop you.

      • neversink

        Nikon Fluorine Coat Lenas Technology video was not really an advertisement or a large-scale campaign.

    • ZoetMB

      Oh, that settles it then. Thanks for the clear, rational and objective argument as to why their marketing is not good. You’ve contributed so much to the conversation.

  • benhosed

    Here’s a plan Nikon. Instead of watching Sony and Fuji eat your lunch, why don’t you build a compact mirror-less camera that is worth a crap?!? I have a lot of money invested in Nikon, but I really like my Fuji X-T1 a LOT!

    • mikeswitz

      So do i. What’s your point? Why would you want Nikon to make something you are already happy with? Why can’t everybody share lunch? Kinda like a Chinese restaurant?

      • neversink

        “Why can’t we all just get along?’

    • Ande Notos

      If they make one that is compatible with ALL current Nikon mount SLR lenses, then ok. Otherwise I find it useless.

      • Imperious Images

        I agree. A “Nikon X-T1” or a7R with full Nikkor compatibility priced competitively would be a big deal. Especially if they release it before Canon does.

        • benhosed

          I know that everybody is all worked up over the A7r but honestly, I’m just not that impressed by it. I bought one and I have hardly used it. Native lens selection is minimal, the controls and ergonomics are horrible and it’s just plain ugly. What is the point of buying a compact camera just to stick a lens adapter on it and then shoot with full sized canon or nikon glass? I’m sure I am in the minority on this but there is no substitute for a nice big DSLR. If I need something smaller I get out my X-T1.

        • Ande Notos

          It would also be very good for Nikon, because it would almost kill the competition caused by Fuji and Sony, and it would happen without having to also kill the massive Nikkor SLR lens lineup.

    • Wade Marks

      Sony and Fuji are not eating Nikon’s lunch…the smartphone vendors like Apple and Samsung are. That’s what no one wants to admit: the money is with the mass market. The mass market has adopted smartphones as their main cameras, and that business is not coming back.

      Fuji and Sony have come out with some intriguing MILC’s but they are not moving the market. They may take a small dent out of Nikon’s sales, but not much overall.

      Now if I were Nikon I would still pay attention to Sony and Fuji, and enter this MILC market. But don’t think that will be the panacea that returns Nikon to the good ol’ days. Because those days of selling high profit point and shoots to the masses are not coming back.

      • Andrew

        Correct, but the smartphones are eating only a segment of the point-and-shoot market. A part of that segment has zoom cameras that smartphones cannot compete with. And besides, a lot of those smartphone users are being introduced to photography at a young age, so when they age, a larger percentage of them will migrate to higher end cameras.

  • Mark

    Yes, this is Generation Image; there are more images being taken and shared around the world than ever before. The problem with their marketing campaign is that people aren’t using Nikon cameras to generate most of those images nor do they want to. They’re using their smartphones.

    Did you watch their ” I am Generation Image” video? It starts out with a smartphone… one that doesn’t have their sensor or their lens on it. FAIL

    They they go on to try to make the assertion that you can tell a better narrative and you have a better chance of being heard because you use their cameras… again FAIL

    They are all using the D750 – what happens when someone looks at most of the other offerings that Nikon has that say “Wifi not built in” how are people going to react?

    I like my D600 a lot because it takes great shots, but I use it less and less because it’s bigger and bulkier than my EM-10, which also had integrated wifi that sends images over to my phone very easily, or in many cases my Nexus 5 is plenty good enough for what I am trying to capture.

    • Mark who? What are you afraid of?

      • Mark

        Nothing really. I just usually keep it simple. I highly doubt I would say anything terribly offense to the point where I would care adding my additional info.

        • Thanks. It’s just a curiosity that struck me while reading some of the posts the other night….didn’t even need a reply.

        • KnightPhoto

          The WiFi widget for the D6n0 isn’t as good as built in but it does work – I’ve seen it on sale pretty cheaply (~$40), you might want to try it. I think it can download all photos as you shoot (although prob not at volume heh).

    • Andrew

      Marketing for a large corporation may have a different intended benefit than for a smaller outfit. Larger companies care about branding and relevance, and they will spend money to present an image of being hip!

      Not everyone that sees an ad rushes out to buy the product. But when they are ready, those memories do play a role in their purchasing decision. Nikon is aggressively investing in the Nikon 1 mirror-less cameras which has a smaller form factor and are ideal for web photos. The zoom range on smartphones are too restrictive. And low light images are not that appealing. We take seconds to react to these ads while their business teams spend months and years assessing and experimenting in the market.

      The fact that they are showing the D750 shows how much they value this camera. It is their new “flagship” camera in a category that is not supposed to have a flagship. This camera has built-in Wi-Fi and it is appealing to anyone that loves technology, quality production, and appreciate the Nikon brand. And there are a lot of bloggers who would appreciate this camera. Amass market ad may also be intended to expand the Nikon brand but also prepare the market for a new product Nikon is about to launch.

  • reader2

    Read on another forum:

    “Attended a wedding a year ago. No photographer was hired.

    What was interesting was the DJ running the music was also the couple’s “Cloud Uploader” who had a projection screen TV and people who attended were using their cell phone cameras to upload to the “Couple’s Cloud” and then they appeared on the big screen moments later.

    Some were actually quite good on the TV screen and novel in their approach. Lots of ‘selfies’ too of sundry people there, and more than any pro would have taken. Couple may never get prints, but I doubt if they want them either. People were having a good time with all the cell photo work and some were quite good too. One guy from Ireland had a cell phone that was quite good in the capture and he could edit with it too. Wasn’t all that bad for screen images.

    So it could be that a DJ may be the new camera person now running a photo site for couples. Whole new generational school of thought: “Your treasured wedding photos saved forever in ‘Our Cloud.'” (Off the DJ’s biz card.). Print, in general, may become more irrelevant to the younger generation too, and a cell image may be enough to satisfy them too.”

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=95231.0

    • “Reader2”. What is your name? What are you afraid of?

      • Thomas

        Why do you care? Are you a stalker?

        • No, not a stalker. It was innocent enough really, it just struck me while reading yours and a couple other posts, why do people not use their real names in here? I mean, it’s not like we’re talking about anything that would matter.

    • ZoetMB

      This is not really so new. Long before smartphones, I attended a wedding where they had a pro photographer, but they also put disposable cameras on the table for every guest. They asked all the guests to take pictures. Using that crappy little disposable, I took a photo of the bride and groom cutting the cake (with the groom feeding cake to the bride) that became their primary photo – it was much better than anything the hired pro got.

      If all you want is your wedding photos on Facebook or on a website, than what you’ve described suffices. But most brides (and especially their mothers) want something of a bit better quality and bit more permanent.

      And you said it yourself: a great percentage of those photos are going to be bad selfies because the attendees are there to have a good time and (in some cases) get drunk. They don’t really care if they take good photos or not.

      And I bet especially at more formal weddings that the wedding parties will start asking the attendees to limit the cell phone pictures. That can get really annoying all night long.

  • john457

    they still sell those big heavy slow and clunky devices? I guess the baby boomers generation still buys them, I guess that’s the generation they talk about in the ad

    • HF

      Yawn. I like the size and the speed is great, too. Try tracking with an A7r.

      • john457

        my a6000 is as fast as D4S and more than 4x lighter and way smaller!

        • HF

          As fast? FPS, maybe, but that does not equate into the same amount of keepers. The Samsung NX1 is praised all over the net, but initial tests I read about indicate 4/15 shots in focus in more difficult situations. There are lot’s of reviews testing the A6000, IR is nice place, for example. The A6000 is incredible for the money, but there still is some way to go until the C-AF is on par.

        • HF

          You take fps for tracking accuracy? Customisation, sealing, robustness, IQ ……. ?
          Cheaper, yes (easy to see when looking at the build), smaller, too (mount a 400/2.8 on it). For leisure? A6000 is great.

          • john457

            yes for leisure like most people on these forums. Real profesionals don’t usually have time to visit forums especially one like this

            • You are actually wrong – many pros visit this blog.

            • john457

              Ohh I’m sorry I’ve insulted NR! Do you talk about the pros who take 5000 or those who take over 50000 pics a year?

    • Antonio

      “they still sell those big heavy slow and clunky devices?”

      Does it really matter?
      Go pro with your cell phone and show them how fast and light you’re to cover all speed sports: from surf to motor sports you have a large and well paid world wide market ready to pay you the big bucks for your images.
      Just show them what generation they shall talk about.

      • john457

        I’m talking about the mirroless with way faster shutter speeds, awesome image quality, face detection autofocus, advance tracking that’s 10 years ahead of DSLR

        • Antonio

          I would agree with no problem in case all that is true or if you just point out a single example of a camera that meets those criteria today, even with no need for the 10 years advance.

        • AF and Tracking? You pretty much defined the reasons NOT to get a mirrorless. You only forgot the battery life and a couple of other things.

        • Wade Marks

          john457, you do realize that DSLR’s are still way more capable of accurate AF tracking. Some MILC’s may have fast AF, but it’s not nearly as accurate.

          MILC’s have come along way and will still continue to advance, but for now the most capable overall cameras are still DSLR’s.

  • Too bad Nikon can’t figure out an algorithm to perform the most important functions of all…where to point the lens and when to press the shutter.

  • The second video is a nice approach. The real problem is that smartphones in the US are often bought on contract, meaning little to no money down, and monthly payments to use it. The camera world does not have anything that lines up with that in price level. At the low end of compact cameras, the build quality and features are substandard. Price points are definitely a barrier to getting a better camera, or buying lenses.

    The other issue is convenience. If there was an upload setting, either Facebook, Flickr, or some other web portal, then some cameras may be used more often. Not everyone wants a copy of Lightroom or Photoshop, nor do they want to edit images. Good JPEG images out of the camera, or in-camera raw editing, or even smartphone and tablet editing, could be attractive for some consumers. Many cameras lose to smartphones simply on convenience and ease of use.

    On-line forums are an issue for camera companies. Invariably older individuals rant about missing models, or missing features. Cameras too different than the dials and buttons filled lumps they are familiar with using, are often panned as amateurish. Reviewers too often focus upon expert features, instead of ease of use aspects that could attract potential purchases. Modern cameras are imaging computers, along with all the complexity that offers far too much customization. We’ve seen smartphones that had aspects that needed to be learned fail in the consumer market, while easy to use prevailed. While many of use professionals, and some enthusiasts, will poop on ease of use cameras, that’s really what the average person wants.

    • The things you talk about are where the volume is. And that’s what Canikon need…VOLUME. I think Nikon is smart enough to realize that their market is THERE and not with the four guys on a blog comment section moaning about how the new model doesn’t have knobs like their old Argus. I support that conclusion with the evidence of the lack of a D400. Despite the ravings on these and other boards, alas there is not a D300s replacement.

  • gone

    I AM GENERATION GONE

    • Andrew

      Ah, then what are you doing here 😉

      • Jeff Hunter

        Everyone knows 35mm cameras take better photos than point and shoot cameras.

  • yorrick

    Is the situation that bad for nikon?:) Maybe they start listening to their present customers instead of searching for the ones that will never buy their camera.

    • EnglishPaul

      No. They’re profitable and churning out some great cameras. The whole camera market is in state of transition that’s all.

  • Julian

    Thom Hogan has a fairly critical write up of this latest campaign: http://www.dslrbodies.com/newsviews/nikon-is-generation-image.html

    • John

      Thom, critical of Nikon?

    • Thom Hogan

      I think you can leave off the “fairly.” ;~)

      My problem is this: in many ways Nikon is enabling its competition here. When you don’t produce meaningfully different results with over US$5000 worth of gear than you would from an iPhone 6, you’re basically selling iPhones, not DSLRs.

      Yes, Nikon has shown in this campaign that they understand that sharing of images is important. Now exactly how are their products enabling that better?

      • Phil Harris

        It’s obvious to me that it’s about the creation of a better image, not the mechanics of sharing it. Everyone knows how to get an image out there, Nikon are trying to show that better images are more valuable.
        A fairly simple point I would have thought…

        • Thom Hogan

          Okay. Now show me how any of the sample images are “better” because they were taken with a DSLR. Then show me where Nikon shows the ad consumer that.

          “Everyone knows” is a really bad thing to base an ad on. Ads usually try to tell people the thing they DON’T KNOW in order to get them to change their buying.

          • Wade Marks

            Good point about the comparison. It would be interesting to see some comparison between the same shot taken with a dslr and a smartphone.

            Of course you then get into the argument about which smartphone, etc…and I don’t think Nikon wants to take on a company like Apple in the marketing wars.

            • Thom Hogan

              “…doesn’t want to take on a company like Apple…”

              Well, if that’s the case, the war is lost. Might as well call back the troops and go home. And Nikon’s spending US$5+ million to take on whom, exactly, if not Apple? ;~)

          • Phil Harris

            It’s a 30 second ad. The point of which is that you should strive to produce images which stand out from the sea of phone pictures. It doesn’t stretch credulity at all to suggest that a DSLR will take pictures better than a phone, that is what they are trying to say.
            A 30 sec slot won’t allow you to show actual comparisons, the whole thing is about implanting an idea.
            I think it’s a rather clever use of 30 seconds to get people thinking that maybe their pictures could be better.
            Sometimes being close to a subject means you cannot see the woods for the trees.

            • Thom Hogan

              Let me suggest something. Go grab a handful of 20-30 year olds. Ask them what a DSLR does better than their smartphone. Be prepared to be surprised by their answers.

              In general, when I survey the younger folk, what I’m finding these days is that discount what a DSLR can do better to the point where they don’t think a DSLR is better at all. They almost immediately tell you what it can’t do.

              And that’s the problem I have with Nikon’s ad campaign. It makes an assumption (that everyone knows a DSLR is “better”). If the person seeing the ad doesn’t think that, then the ad is 30-seconds ignored.

              Note the change I suggested in the article on my site: I Am Standing Out. I’d back that by at least a quick summary of why the DSLR image will stand out. In other words, the DSLR can do everything your smartphone can (share), but it can create images that go further (stand out). Of course, I’d have to fix Nikon’s sharing software along the way, too ;~).

            • Phil Harris

              I suspect we shall have to agree to disagree.
              In my opinion there is no way within the limitations of a 30 second commercial to do anything other than create curiosity.
              It’s simply not possible to show differences in the time available.
              I was encouraged yesterday in my local camera shop to see a young girl (maybe 12 or 13) with her mother, looking at a DSLR as a potential Xmas present. Her mother had suggested that a bridge camera looked like a better deal, but the girl was certain that she wanted image quality above all.
              I think if shop staff can explain the differences face to face, maybe with actual examples, the message can get across. This is one reason I find the growth of online sales to the detriment of real shops, expertly staffed, so disturbing.

            • Thom Hogan

              Please note that the 30-second commercial invites you to a Web site, where you have far more than 30 seconds. Again, show me where Nikon manages to make any specific claim with regards DSLRs in that Web site. They have all day. They simply don’t do it.

            • Phil Harris

              Perhaps some MTF charts along with a few 100% crops would make it more interesting?

              The web site looks pretty good, about as technical as it needs to be in my opinion.

              Much as it galls you, marketing in the 21st century is about creating an appealing lifestyle for people to buy into. The cynical amongst us know it’s all bull, but then the ad isn’t aimed at the cynical, it’s aimed at people trying to think of what to buy for Xmas.

              I have nothing but respect for your knowledge of all things photographic, I own some of your books and have always found them excellent. As far as marketing and it’s nuances, I respectfully suggest you don’t quite get it.

            • Thom Hogan

              > it’s aimed at people trying to think of what to buy for Xmas

              No it’s not. Exactly what does the site (let alone the ads) ask you to buy and why?

              Yes, I understand that they’re trying a lifestyle approach, but what I think they failed at is actually driving any change in opinion. People are arguing with me that “everyone knows a DSLR is better.” Well, if that’s true, you don’t need an ad ;~). If everyone knows its better, they’ll buy one when they need something better.

              My MBA work at Indiana University (in marketing, by the way) taught me to that for marketing to work well, you need explicit, measurable goals, not vague feel good stuff that has no call to action.

      • I think it’s interesting that McCann Erikson handled the campaign, and this is roughly ten years since landing the Nikon account. Do you think another agency would do a better job? Do you think it is time for Nikon to shop for another ad agency?

        • Thom Hogan

          I can’t believe that I’m going to defend an ad agency ;~).

          In my experience, the client dictates what the final result is, and often in ways they don’t understand. Sometimes campaigns get defocused by constant back-and-forth where the client keeps trying to micromanage. With Nikon there’s multiple levels of problems, as the final decisions would all come from a Japanese executive in the US trying to listen to corporate.

          When I dug into the very successful D40 campaign and how it came about, it was mostly the ad agency’s idea and NikonUSA mostly went along. This new campaign doesn’t quite feel that way. It feels more like Nikon trying to take an old campaign that worked and paste the current message of the day on top of it. I can’t believe that would have originated at McCann Erikson.

          Here’s what I think is happening: Nikon is waking up to the smartphone. They’re trying to say “hey we understand you want to share images.” Great. But where’s the product connection, where’s the demonstration that you can do something with a DSLR that you can’t with a smartphone?

          In essence, Nikon is trying to pound a square peg into a round hole. Maybe a better choice is showing the world why square pegs exist and why you’d use them over a round one ;~).

          Direct answer to your last two questions: no. The problem originates in Nikon marketing, methinks.

  • Larrry

    Interesting. Nikon launches “I Am Generation Image” and on the same day Sony launches the upgraded second generation A7m2 model. Fluff vs functionality. How about “I Am Out-of-Touch” as the world passes us by. As a comparison, remember WordStar, the original word processing and “must have” program ported over from mainframe to these new things called PC’s? Sure they were the leaders but the rested on their laurels rather than a vision for the future and this upstart called WordPerfect ate their lunch. Then of course, Microsoft power dominated. Neither Nikon (nor Canon) have that type of power, but the run the risk of following WordStar as other innovate around them and build their pipeline of support products, like lens.

    • EarlFargis

      It’s an interesting analogy because left unsaid here is the rest of the story on how Microsoft took over office productivity from Lotus and SuperCalc in spreadsheets with Excel or WordPerfect with Word. It wasn’t just building a better mousetrap. It was Microsoft controlled the operating system, Windows. So as the world transferred from MS-DOS character-based programs, Microsoft used their internal knowledge of their own new graphical operating system (technically the 3.x GUI wasn’t really an OS) to their advantage to leave the laggard character-based programs in the dust.

      Sony has hinted at playing similar games. It isn’t just a case of Sony making inroads into mirrorless which conventional wisdom will take over the world. Sony is a leader in sensors which Nikon uses extensively. A Sony executive recently said in an interview that going forward Sony may not share certain sensors with the competition or delay releasing them to the competition while they get a head start using them exclusively.

      While Nikon has resources to design sensors and farm out the manufacturing to other foundries it’ll be interesting to see if Sony can use their sensor business to trip up Nikon. For example, the D610, D750, and D810 are all dependent on Sony. Even if Nikon had a killer FF mirrorless body ready to go they’d be dependent on the Sony sensors used in the A7/A7M2, A7R, and A7S. There’s no indication Sony will sell the processor in the A7S to anyone else. Will they play games with the others?

      • EnglishPaul

        Except I think the volume sales Nikon is able to achieve for Sony due to its market share probably drives some of the R&D costs for the sensor in the first place. Perhaps Nikon even directly fund some of the R&D as well as providing expertise who knows. Either way I’d be surprised if Sony decided to play games.

      • Curtis

        Have you read somewhere that Sony said they won’t sell the A7s sensor to anyone else? If so, that would be a bummer. Or are you just saying that you haven’t seen it in yet in any other camera?

        • EarlFargis

          Sony wasn’t specific in what sensors they’ll keep for themselves, which ones they’ll delay giving to others, and which ones they don’t plan to play games with. I’m just speculating over the A7S one since I haven’t heard so much as a hint of a rumor anyone else is getting it.

  • EarlFargis

    I’ll stick my neck out and be a contrarian on the general opinion here this Nikon ad campaign sucks. I actually think it’s pretty good at targeting a new generation’s passion for creating images, not mere snapshots. That’s their market. The web site they’ve set up is reasonably slick telling the stories http://www.iamgenerationimage.com/home.

    The problem I see is that trunk (with customized “I am generation image” logo) of lenses they’re handing out is outside the price range of most people, forget kids just getting a start in life in a tough economy who are struggling to get out of mom’s basement.

    So the kids turned on by the ad campaign are going to see they’re handing out D750s, look it up on the Internet, see it’s $2,300 body only, and decide they’d rather pay rent for a couple of months.

    Aspiration is wonderful in photography. Companies for decades have roped us in on the bottom of the entry level ladder and encouraged us to climb it based upon high-end pro gear. However, I think to rope a new generation with a passion for creating images they need to target them with equipment they’re likely to upgrade from their smartphones.

    • Kynikos

      Well observed.
      D3300, 55-300mm, giddy-up.

    • Thom Hogan

      Definition of marketing: “action or business of promoting and selling products or services.” The link between the message (hey, millennials share images) and product (hey, DSLRs produce better photos that can be shared) is missing.

    • Andrew

      One thing that is missing in the ad is the excellent D3300 camera currently selling for $549 with Lens. They should have paired the D750 with the D3300 to show their high end and the low end camera products.

  • Kynikos

    I AM Sick and tired of Nikon wasting their money on marketing plans clearly thought up by 50-year-olds who delude themselves into thinking they know what the kids want.

    • Antonio

      Take a pill for your sickness and do not mind about the money they waste. I’m sure you’ll feel relieved and enjoy your cell phone much more…

      • Kynikos

        Son, I’m hoping Nikon will outlive me so it can service my gear until I die. Campaigns like this scare the crap out of me… Nikon’s “Kodak moment” if you know what I mean…

        • Antonio

          Yes I do but I’m afraid this campaign it is just a minor aspect of their strategies.

  • Kynikos

    Is the very top image in this post a subliminal take on the “I’m Tiger Woods”campaign of happier times? Backward Nike swoosh on the cap. A person who might be of multiracial ancestry….

  • Joven

    ZZZZZ

  • doge

    I AM | BROKE, UNEMPLOYED, FACING MASSIVE DEBT, STILL LIVING WITH MY PARENTS. BUT CHECK OUT MY INSTAGRAM PAGE FOR COOL PHOTOS I TOOK WITH THE $5000 WORTH OF CAMERA STUFF I JUST BOUGHT BUT CAN’T AFFORD. #YOLO

    • mikeswitz

      No, they were taken with a $200 phone they can’t afford.

      • ZoetMB

        There’s actually almost no such thing as a $200 phone. $200 is what you put down, but you’re actually paying full price for your phone by committing to that 2-year contract, which embeds the rest of the cost of the phone. A phone + service can easily cost $1500 a year – $15,000 over ten years. That makes a DSLR that lasts 10 years seem pretty cheap.

        • mikeswitz

          Which is exactly why I said they couldn’t afford it.

  • john457

    Just got my a6000 and is as fast as D4S and more than 4x lighter and way smaller! and about 10x cheaper…:) I know, it’s hard to believe but it’s real:)
    Anyone will like to buy my D600 with a bunch of lenses?

    • Antonio

      I notice that you only took 9 hours to take the decision to sell the heavy stuff.
      However I’m surprised you didn’t decide to sell the D4s but the D600 instead…

      • john457

        I’ve never had a D4S and would never waste so much money on one but depp inside I always wanted that 10/11 FPS.. the D600 has a crapy AF and is way slower

        • Antonio

          I see.

          But pls notice that speed of use it is not just FPS and the D4s 16MP sensor plays a role there.

          I leave you a third opinion from someone (WisEd) that uses it and posted a comment some months ago at Dpreview:

          “Since dp review is taking so long. I’ll attempt to do a quick review from the viewpoint of an owner. Lets start with the bottom line, there is simply no better camera in the market right now. If you own a chest of Nikons this is it. I own a D800 and can confidently report that this camera is superior in all respects except one resolution and its inherent ability to crop. Personally snapping ten pictures a second is a stat for sports photographer the amazing thing is that the D4s will take 200 pictures at that speed from a subject that is in movement with almost all the pictures in perfect focus. Furthermore, it can focus with a 200-400 plus a 2x converter at F8 under any condition, lighting fast and with razor sharp fidelity, a tough test which the D800 can do about, at best 50% of the time at best. Its operation with the SB910 is flawless, simply perfect exposure every time. I keep my D800 at a max of 1600 on the 4s I’m getting the same results at 16000. No Nikon camera comes close.”

          However, if you are already convinced that the camera you referred does the same and offers you an image that doesn’t suck just go for it…you save a lot of money and you get all you need.

  • Guest

    Nikon is probably the worst camera company on the planet when it comes to features geared toward the “I am generation”. (WiFi connectivity, uploading photos directly from the camera, camera phone control, tilt screens, touch screens, etc.). Strange that they would market themselves in this way.

  • Guest

    Nikon is probably the worst camera company on the planet when it comes to features geared toward the “I am generation”. (WiFi connectivity, uploading photos directly from the camera, camera phone control, tilt screens, touch screens, etc.). Strange that they would market themselves in this way.

    • rich

      not sure what you are saying. Have you played with coolpix, nikon 1 system or the d5300, d750. They got features you are referring too.

      • nwcs

        True, but they did them only halfway.

  • I am so very tired of this fast montage of American urban landscapes, commonplace sentimentality and/or lifestyle images, so I don’t see why I should go for a Nikon camera or for any other camera for that matter. This overly-stylised language is no cleverer than banal, and honestly, Sony images do pop out better in fast editing anyway. The challenge to win, in my opinion, is to be more creative, appealing to the masses using a more niche approach. – ION

  • Jeff Hunter

    This is a very nice ad campaign. I’m guessing most of us started out with point and shoot cameras but something along the way sparked our interest in learning more about photography which led to an interest in 35mm photography. If I had been exposed to an ad campaign such as this when I was a teenager it would definitely whet my appetite to explore photography beyond the point and shoot realm. I think these ads are designed to inspire would-be hobbyists. Nikon is not marketing their cameras as a substitute for a smartphone they’re trying to find more potential hobbyists. Jay Maisel would be proud, as he is famous for telling his students to never be without your camera. It will be interesting to follow these ads and their photographers’ activities.

    • EnglishPaul

      Agreed Jeff. I found the ads – particularly the one with the homeless guys – very good. It’ll be interesting to see where they go.

  • Global

    “I AM – WHAT I AM… Introducing Nikon FX Cameras & Lenses.
    Build up your forearms, Popeye, this ain’t mirrorless!”

    😛

  • a-traveler

    “Generation Image,” having been raised on Camera-Phones, won’t buy into to the idea that they want/need FULL FRAME DSLRs. This ad campaign could put Nikon out of business.

    “Generation Image,” lives on the ‘net. Facebook, Instagram, etc, etc why would they want a camera that can’t post to the ‘net??

    “Generation Image,” is tech savvy and knows that BigBulkyDSLRs have no IQ advantages for posting on the ‘net. “Generation Image,” doest make BIG Prints where DSLR IQ would be an advantage.

    • Jeff Hunter

      Nikon is not trying to replace the smartphone camera, the sales pitch is to potential hobbyists who might be intrigued by 35mm photography. Most if not all of us started out with point and shoot cameras but something sparked our interest in 35mm. That’s the point on Nikon’s ad campaign.

      • a-traveler

        Why would an iPhoneographer, who lives in a world of photography/shared photos, want to become a hobbyist?? Does he/she feel the need to replace Instagram with 500px ??

        I started off with a 6×6 film camera 50 years ago, and I’m presently replacing my DX cameras with mirrorless (and iPhones).

    • mikeswitz

      “This ad campaign could put Nikon out of business.”

      Was “Generation Image” raised on hyperbole?

      • a-traveler

        This is just another bad decision added to a long list of other bad decisions.

        • mikeswitz

          That may very well be, but it’s not what you said.

    • ZoetMB

      Maybe, maybe not. What Nikon is pushing here is the idea that your smartphone can take you only so far. Yes, you can have high resolution, but the tiny sensor makes it overall poor quality. Yes, you can take photos quickly and easily, but most have the quality of snapshots.

      What they’re pushing is the idea that if you want to take this a step further, you need to step up and work with something better: bigger sensors, bigger lenses.

      Will it work for the 16-year-old girl who wants to take silly pictures of her friends and post them on Facebook? No. Will it work for the 21-year-old art student? Maybe. Etc.

      Besides, what choice does Nikon have. They can sit back, do nothing and watch their market slowly erode. Or they can do something to try to get more people to buy DSLRs. Personally, whether this campaign works or not, they don’t really have much of a choice.

      But it would have been a far better campaign if the full line of DSLRs already had WiFi and easy-to-use communications already built in.

      And I think they made one major mistake: In the second ad, they should not have shown that big yellow case filled with equipment. That implies that you can only create those images if you walk around with 100lbs of equipment. What they should have shown is that it’s no big deal to carry a DSLR at your side.

      • KnightPhoto

        Excellent point, show a DSLR hanging upside down and discretely at you back/hip for street and/or no-strap at all (I think they did that part). I find that is one thing with newby’s/soccer Mom type owners is they are babying their cameras too much inside cases etc. A camera should be out and ready to use (hood on, lens cap off) or at least quickly accessible. Quite often I have no strap whatsoever on my cameras.

        Anyhow I think the campaign is not a bad one – the audience already know DSLRs produce the best image quality, so you don’t have to get too technical in the Ad, better to hit the emotions.

    • Well, not really. Look through the ad campaign, and the people chosen so far. This is not the youth of America. This is maybe Generation X, with the 30s and 40s crowd. Why? Because some of them have the money now for a nice camera. The baby boomers are too old to care about most new cameras, and even the few that did already bought a D800, or downsized to mirrorless something.

      The demographics of Facebook and Instagram are exactly the same age group targeted in the ads. Browse through the website a bit, and it becomes obvious what segment they are targeting.

      http://iamgenerationimage.com/profile/darren-jeffries/gallery/120

      Advertising is the attempt to sell people something they don’t really need. The attempt here is to create a desire to own and use. All advertising is that way, in that if someone did not already have something in their life, the advertising is trying to convince them. Can a Nikon D750 be an object of desire? We’ll see if the sales figures improve over the next six months, which is the time of the ad campaign.

      Realistically, the younger (and even shorter attention span) segment of the population doesn’t have the money for what Nikon is selling here. They’ve also moved on to SnapChat, What’sApp, and other short attention span distractions. Maybe they have a smartphone, but the monthly contract is probably the limit of their willingness to spend on something.

      Viewing images on the internet, any mobile device, or a 4K television, doesn’t take much in technology. Most people would have trouble telling whether something was photographed with a mobile phone, tablet, or DSLR. Short DoF and blurry background

      may provide some clues, but there are easy to use apps that sort of do that too.

      No one needs a camera today, especially with the density of smartphones now in the United States. So there is no convincing of “need” for a DSLR, nor even mirrorless. Numbers, features, buttons, dials, are not enough to sell anything. The desire to have and use something is a different matter. Create desire, and maybe people will buy.

  • Luis F. Vidal

    With all the kind of negative comments I have read here I believe that some of you will never going to be happy no matter what Nikon do with marketing campaigns or products. And a change of brand will not help you neither because you will whine on the other brand forums until you return to Nikon and this blog again, first to praise Nikon and then to whine again. I guest that for you Nikon is the best bad thing…

    • a-traveler

      Negative comments are what’s called for in this instance.

  • Curtis

    I’m glad to see that Nikon finally recognizes that the world is connected. Hopefully now they will actually add the features to their cameras that the target audience of this campaign wants.

    It’s 2014, and still only a handful of Nikon DSLR’s have built-in WiFi.

    “Generation Image” isn’t going to buy a camera that can’t instantly publish images to the web. Nor are they going to buy cameras without NFC remote control. They want to be able to use the image sensors in their cameras with the apps on their smart devices.

    Nikon makes the best SLR systems on the planet, but when it comes to connectivity, they are way behind. Hopefully this is an indication that they have “woken up”.

    It will be interesting to see if Nikon has the gall to release another camera without built-in WiFi after running this ad campaign

  • DSS

    Nikon is failing to understand the importance of convenience to the average Joe/Jane.

    Most casually shared photos are from weekly social events or a regular day out. The average person does not want to carry something as big as a DSLR. around their neck or in their tiny purse when they go out. They’re shooting those snapshots not because they’re this much into photography, but because it’s become convenient enough to take them and share them so quickly with a device they carry around anyway.

    I LOVE photography and even I can’t bring myself to carry mine around every single place I go. I sometimes feel ridiculous going to a bar or club with friends, with my DSLR around my shoulder (regardless of how “awesome” it is to me). While they can snap a flash photo on their phones and instantly upload to instagram or facebook, I have to dive into my menu, connect my camera to my phone, pick the photos I want to download, wait for it to download and find it in my phone’s image gallery. I need to take an extra three or four steps before I can upload something to social media. That’s an extra 5 minutes I’ve lost right there. While I personally don’t mind going through this somewhat painful process, most people can’t be bothered.

    Also, most people are not serious enough about their snapshots to spend an additional $500.00 to $3,000.00 on a camera to accompany their phones when their photos at instagram size will only be marginally better with a DSLR. DSLR photos shine brightest in comparison to cellphone photos at full resolution, when printed or viewed large.

    You also have to invest time in learning HOW to use a DSLR. Jesus… all those dials and buttons…. it’s hard enough for me to explain how to zoom, focus and shoot when I hand mine over to a friend, let alone someone trying to figure it out on their own.

    DSLRs are for people who are willing to suffer for their art, and I’m sorry Nikon…. there’s not enough of us out there to keep you going when more convenient products with “good enough” quality exist and are improving every year. You’re going to have to adapt faster.

    One idea is to create cameras that have built-in instant social media connectivity, access to apps and a touch screen that you can turn on and off at will. While I’m willing to do the whole WiFi thing through my phone, millions of other people couldn’t be bothered. By cutting out the middle man (the phone) yet still retaining that option to connect to the phone or TV or whatever device wirelessly, you’re giving people more convenience with better image quality and they might even decide to carry a bigger camera around. Put that image quality and convenience into an even smaller package, and you’ll do even better!

    These are just my opinions as a user of DSLRs and social media, someone who spends time around social media whores (and I say that with love) and knows what they’d want. They like my photos, they like the results I get with my equipment, they even enjoy playing with it once in a while, but they’re just too overwhelmed with the size, cost, complexity of use and lack of convenience.

    • a-traveler

      Very well said !!

    • KnightPhoto

      Excellent post. It IS technologically possible to have a 1-button post to Facebook. I.e. I just took 10 shots, upon review I really like #7, so while I’m looking at it on back of camera, I hit the “F” button and away it goes. No questions prompts or typing. I’ll enter my Facebook account one-time only, when I first buy the camera. The upload could go thru the phone, or wireless in my home, or publicly available wireless which is getting more and more common. I don’t think building a cell-phone into my camera is necessary or advisable, Remember that Nikon – 1 button press and no other prompts (unless I want them). If you read Thom’s vision he has a lot of other good ideas about Auto-ingest and catalogue when your camera arrives home and recognizes it’s home network.

      • mikeswitz

        Add instagram to that and you got a winner!

        • ZoetMB

          You have the output menu driven with a default. The one-button press sends it to the default. Setup in the camera permits you to add all the login and password information in advance.

          -or-

          The one button brings up icons on the rear display of all the outputs you’ve set up (Facebook, Instagram, whatever). The 1st icon is always the default, but you can scroll to the others to choose an alternative. One of the alternatives is your phone, so you can send a photo to your phone, then take that photo and email it.

  • Shaun

    I’m still waiting for the I AM LENS ONLY INSTANT REBATE campaign to begin.

  • I would love some D400 and Dƒ2 rumours.

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