New Profoto Connect wireless transmitter for Nikon announced


Today Profoto announced a new Connect wireless, button-free trigger/transmitter for Nikon cameras. The Profoto Connect is already in stock at Adorama and B&H Photo. Additional information:

  • Frequency: 2.4 GHz
  • Operating Range: 330-1000'
  • 8 Channels
  • Settings: Auto, Manual & Off
  • Slides into Nikon Hot Shoe
  • Built-In, Rechargeable LiPo Battery
  • Control Lights via Profoto App
  • 30-Hour Battery Life
  • Turns Off after 60 Minutes of Inactivity
  • Compatibility AirTTL: A1 AirTTL, B10 250 AirTTL, B1X 500 AirTTL, B2 250 AirTTL, D2 500 AirTTL, D2 1000 AirTTL, Pro-10 2400 AirTTL, and B1 500 AirTTL.
  • Air without TTL or HSS compatibility: D1 Air 250, D1 Air 500, D1 Air 1000, D4 1200 Air, D4 2400 Air, D4 4800 Air, Pro-B4 1000 Air, Pro-8a 1200, and Pro-8a 2400.

Promo videos:

Press release:

Profoto just made flash easy to use for every image creator. Introducing Profoto Connect; the button-free trigger.

From time to time something comes along that changes everything, this is one of those rare occasions.

Profoto Connect is the trigger for flash that’s completely button free. This is so much more than an improvement; Profoto has rethought, reimagined and rebuilt the remote trigger from the hot shoe up to create something that makes the process of working with flash effortlessly simple.

"Profoto Connect came from a steadfast belief that flash can be every bit as beautiful as ambient light" commented Martina Nillenstedt, Profoto Head of Content and Brand, "What we needed to do was make it more accessible to more image creators - Profoto Connect does that - from today forward, working with flash couldn't be easier."

There's almost nothing to the Profoto Connect - It's just a small, smooth and discreet pod that sits on top of the camera. Albert Norelius, Profoto Product Manager explains, "When we sat down and talked with photographers, we recognized that all the buttons and menus you find on a typical remote trigger can seem a little complex - so we decided to get rid of them completely."

Instead, Profoto Connect simply has three settings; auto, manual and off. In auto mode, which for those who are familiar with flash is TTL; it's just point-and-shoot. It's all very straightforward; the correct flash exposure is calculated automatically when you press the shutter.

Auto is incredibly useful if the subject is moving, and the distance between the subject and the flash is changing because Profoto Connect adjusts the flash power to give you a great exposure in every shot - leaving you to think about the most important part – creating great images.

If you'd like a little more control, you can start in auto to establish a starting exposure, and then slide the Profoto Connect to manual mode to creatively fine tune it. That way you can achieve exactly the lighting effect you want.

You can adjust the power on the flash unit, or from the palm of your hand. "Profoto Connect links directly to the Profoto app via Bluetooth," Martina added, "If you can swipe your finger across the screen of your smartphone, then you can adjust the power output on your flash unit - it's that simple."

Ultimately, that's all there is to it. Combine the Profoto Connect with the Profoto A1, for example; The world's smallest studio light - and you have natural and beautiful light on demand.

Whether you want to balance your subject with the background, bring just the slightest hint of light to your subject, create beautiful golden-hour portraits or even work in blue hour and overcast conditions - there are no barriers between you and the image you want to capture.

"The way we see it, with Profoto Connect we're all ‘natural light shooters,’ it's just some of us don't have to wait for the sun to appear on a cloudy day, or change position when the sun does, or pack up and go home when the sun vanishes beneath the horizon." Martina concludes, "With the Profoto Connect - you're free - free to create."

Via FujiAddict, Adorama, B&H

This entry was posted in Nikon Flashes and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Back to top