Sony A7R III vs. Canon 5D Mark IV vs. Nikon D850 specifications comparison


A quick specifications comparison between the new Sony A7R III vs. Canon 5D Mark IV vs. Nikon D850:

IMAGE SENSOR

Sony a7R III42MP, no low-pass filter
Canon 5D Mk IV30MP, low-pass filter
Nikon D85045MP, no low-pass filter

ISO RANGE

Sony a7R III100-32,000 (50-102,400 expandable)
Canon 5D Mk IV100-32,000 (50-102,400 expandable)
Nikon D85064-25,600 (32-102,400 expandable)

AUTOFOCUSING

Sony a7R III399 phase detect and 425 contrast detect AF points
Canon 5D Mk IV61 AF points w/ 45 cross-type points (plus Dual Pixel CMOS AF)
Nikon D850153 AF points

CONTINUOUS SHOOTING

Sony a7R III10fps (76 JPEGs and/or 28 RAW images)
Canon 5D Mk IV7fps (unlimited JPEGs or 21 RAW images)
Nikon D8507fps or 9fps with battery grip & D5 battery (51 RAW images)

VIDEO RECORDING

Sony a7R III4K/30p (3840 x 2160) with Hybrid Log Gamma & Slog2/3
Canon 5D Mk IV4K/30p (4096 x 2160), CLog w/ $100 firmware update
Nikon D8504K (3840 x 2160)

BATTERY LIFE

Sony a7R III530 shots
Canon 5D Mk IV900 shots
Nikon D8501,840 shots

WEIGHT

Sony a7R III23.2 ounces
Canon 5D Mk IV28.2 ounces
Nikon D85032.3 ounces

PRICE

Sony a7R III$3,198
Canon 5D Mk IV$3,299
Nikon D850$3,296

Check out also this PDF comparison between the three cameras based on the specs listed at dpreview.

Via pdnonline

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  • That XQD tho…seriously, I really like it.

    Also: WTF is with battery life? I’m shocked it’s so low on the 5D. To boot, the D850 takes a bigger pack in the grip, making the gap that much bigger. I use the EN-EL18 and EN-EL4 and I’ve NEVER killed a battery in a single day, no matter how heavy the shooting. (Well, unless it’s video, but I don’t do a lot of that.)

    • Spy Black

      “That XQD tho…seriously, I really like it.”

      You and 3 other people…

      • Everyone I know that doesn’t like it, doesn’t have it. I wish my D500 had TWO XQD slots. (I also wish those Sony 256gb cards would come down in price!)

        • Spy Black

          “I also wish those Sony 256gb cards would come down in price!”

          …and therein lies the rub, eh? 🙂

          • The 128gb Sony cards are about $20 more than the Lexar ones, but still quite available. And I’m still using quite ancient CF cards in my D700. I’ve got enough cards of all varieties to last…well, sadly probably to outlast the cameras and the company that made them.

            Cards and their formats have never been an issue for me. I get the biggest and fastest available and have never had an issue.

            I thinkt the people that have issues are the ones who insist on shooting a handful of smaller cards. They lose them, break them, or lose shots swapping.

            And if you’re alluding to the format going extinct, I suspect that it won’t be long before the folks that bought Lexar’s card manufacturing get going making cheap cards.

            Also, even if they stay a bit pricey, Sony will keep making them for their cine rigs.

            • Spy Black

              My bigger gripe is the two card formats. Make ’em one or the other.

            • Yeah, I’m with you on that one!

            • PhilK

              Nikon was widely reviled for that approach with the D4, and then along comes Canon several years later with their new (and current) 1DX Mark II flagship that has 2 dissimilar memory card slots.

              But not just that, look what they put in there:

              #1 slot: Cfast

              A nearly dead storage card standard that its very founders are now already trying to get everyone to switch to something else already and will not be further developed.

              #2 slot: CompactFlash

              Nikon has been using this storage format for 20 years now, since the debut of their very first digital camera. Needless to say, the format is dead as a doornail.

              Then Nikon upstaged everyone by releasing the D5 with a modular and upgradeable storage system for either CF or XQD, as per user preference.

              But of course whenever they make a choice in any direction now, whether 2 of the same or different, the haters will come out like clockwork and proclaim it to be the “wrong” choice.

            • Spy Black

              What Nikon should have opted for is any of the three formats if they were going to give you an option. Granted most would not have chosen UHS-I SD back then, but today the option to order the cameras with full speed UHS-II slots would be a nice choice for any of these new bodies.

            • PhilK

              The fact that Nikon is the only major camera maker that has ever allowed customers to pick the storage card format is not an accident.

              It is a very, very expensive way to build a product and creates lots of logistical problems. Especially on a very high-end item when dealers have to worry about the very real possibility of ordering a bunch of very expensive cameras with what may turn out to be the “wrong” option, and then they are stuck with dead inventory they can’t sell. One way or the other they will never be able to estimate 100% accurately what ratio of options to order, so they will almost without question be stuck with dead inventory as a result. This is why manufacturers avoid such product designs like the plague.

              Nikon is to be highly-commended for attempting to placate all the whiners that are never happy with the storage choices Nikon gives them. Not only does it create the above logistical problems, it adds to product design and production costs, increases the size/weight of the camera, thus making it less competitive in other ways. (Which is probably why Sony has never attempted to put XQD in any of their still cameras – just like Apple never bothers to make phones with removable batteries. A handful of people will complain about the non-removable battery, but millions of people will appreciate the smaller size/weight and more elegant casing they can design when they don’t have to make the cover removable.)

            • Spy Black

              I highly doubt that’s why Sony didn’t put XQD in the A9. 😉

            • PhilK

              Of course you do. 😉

            • Allen_Wentz

              My guess is Sony has trouble building buffer electronics, so the lame SD does not make things worse. I can see no other reason they put a super slow SD UHS-I slot into their top A9 body when even the SD UHS-II could be limiting.

            • Spy Black

              The entertainment value of your comment is greatly appreciated.

            • ZoetMB

              What makes you think retailers can’t send back inventory? They do it all the time.

            • PhilK

              What makes me think that is that I used to be one of those dealers.

              Resellers cannot just send back inventory for full credit whenever they feel like it. If that were true, very few manufacturers of high-tech products would be able to make money on anything. It would, among other things, reward shoddy or unscrupulous business practices. *

              Furthermore, resale laws often dictate (or used to when I used to be in the business) that any product returned to the wholesaler once it has been delivered to a dealer has to be re-classified as “B-stock”, sometimes known as “refurbished”. Which means a loss of money for the wholesaler who can no longer sell this product as new, and typically must take a markdown/writeoff on it, as well as have a harder time moving the product in general.

              *(Shoddy practices include poor sales projection and poor sales and ordering practices in general. Fraudulent practices include Ma and Pa Photo of East Podunk ME – which normally sells 20 Nikon DSLRs a year – ordering 10,000 D850s in the hopes of getting a larger proportional allocation when supplies are tight for this hot product – and then sending 9,990 of them back to Nikon for “credit”. Or trying to resell them on the grey market.)

            • Allen_Wentz

              No, SD UHS-II is not “full speed” and it would not be “a nice choice,” SD would be a camera performance crippler.

              Ask anyone with a D500 or D850 who has tested the body’s max performance. If the fastest SD UHS-II card made is in the camera performance is way down.

          • PhilK

            I note you did not refute Micah’s point that the people who incessantly diss XQD don’t own anything that uses them. 😀

            • Spy Black

              I don’t argue that the medium is effective. It’s lack of adoption is the problem. I don’t see it ever gaining traction. That’s always going to be problematic.

            • PhilK

              Well that’s a chicken/egg scenario. If everyone is busy dissing XQD instead of buying cameras that use it, then yes, it may end up unpopular. 🙂

              But my overall point wrt to XQD is, to the haters: stop blaming Nikon.

              Nikon could just as easily have been feted for having the foresight to get in on the ground-floor to help develop and standardize a high-performance removable storage format that was better than anything else yet on the market (allowing companies like Nikon to build higher-performance products than ever before), and being a pioneer in implementing it in a product. Instead of sticking with crappy old junk that everyone else was lazily milking to the bitter end.

              The fact that the CompactFlash association essentially encouraged member companies to fork off and develop a competing, sour-grapes format (because eg Canon apparently can’t stand the idea of being the 2nd adopter after Nikon of a great new storage format that Nikon was present during development from the start) is not Nikon’s fault.

              That’s all politics and payola.

              I for one would rather Nikon put their efforts into improving the tech instead of greasing industry palms to get cynical, inferior standards accepted in the marketplace.

            • Spy Black

              The problem isn’t people dissing XQD, the problem is industry not accepting it. That’s why people dis XQD. 😉

            • Allen_Wentz

              What “people?” No real user disses XQD.

            • PhilK

              Like I said earlier, if people spent more time buying new tech instead of griping that some new component isn’t being used everywhere else, then their self-fulfilling prophecy will evaporate. 😉

            • Spy Black

              Except it’s not people buying new tech that’s the problem, it’s industry accepting it. CF used to be in cameras before SD hit the scene, what happened there?

            • PhilK

              What happened is that SD is smaller and cheaper, basically.

              Secondarily – but far less significantly – CF reached a dead-end developmentwise, because it was based on a storage bus that stopped being developed further. (IDE)

              But that last point does not affect 98% of the cameras out there that use SD, as none of those products tax even the limited bandwidth capability of the faster CF cards anyway.

            • Spy Black

              Right, but it’s because the industry accepted it that it’s the standard today. Therein lies the rub with XQD. We can keep going round in circles with till we’re blue in the face on this, but as the saying goes, “the song remains the same”…

            • PhilK

              Only if you refuse to see an opposing viewpoint.

              Let me put it to you this way: a new storage format cannot be popular before the first device uses it. Chicken/egg.

              You appear to demand something is popular before any device makers choose to use it for the first time.

              Nikon took a bold move to get in on the ground floor of a vastly improved replacement for CompactFlash, and built the first product to use it.

              There are both risks and rewards to such decisions. I applaud them for taking that risk. The matter of market acceptance in this case was likely more a matter of politics than technology. I have a hard time blaming Nikon for that.

            • Spy Black

              Yes but SD was a new format once, and everyone accepted it, possibly as you said because it was smaller and cheaper. But it’s fate was no different then than XQD’s was when it was launched. Apparently everyone in the industry took a look at it and liked what they saw.

              That hasn’t happened with XQD. I suspect, at this point in it’s history, that that’s never going to happen. As such, XQD is already dead.

              I suspect a compact form of SATA will become the new standard. Take any present-day PCI-E SSD and figure a way to manufacture it to have the same capacities at half it’s present length, and you see the end of XQD, CFast, and probably even SD.

              A compact SATA drive is the future. Not XQD.

            • PhilK

              Dude. SATA is already dead. The fact that Cfast is based on SATA is precisely why Cfast is now dead. SATA is dead for most computers nowadays because it handicaps SSD performance.

              Dead, dead, dead.

              The reason that the Cfast cabal is now pushing for vendors and customers to switch to CFexpress only a few years after pushing Cfast, is precisely because CFexpress is based on PCIexpress (Just like XQD!) and NOT SATA. (Like Cfast) You couldn’t be more wrong about that.

              Like I wrote before, SD was used in all sorts of cheap things because it’s a cheap tech. It was used in crappy point-and-shoots for many years before any company ever put it into a ‘serious’ camera.

              Unlike the CompactFlash Association, the people who control the SD standard keep evolving the format without fragmenting it into competing political factions within the “standards organization”. If that weren’t the case with the CFA, XQD would have already been crowned the universal ‘serious’ storage card standard and there would never have been all this stupid internecine competition undermining adoption of it.

            • Spy Black

              Actually, my mistake confusing SATA and PCI-E. I meant make a PCI-E SSD half the size that it is now and that will be the end of that.

            • PhilK

              And I think I got the history wrong… apparently Cfast came before XQD, I don’t know why I was so sure it was the reverse.. which changes some of my points about politics but not about the tech being better on XQD.

              I need to verify with other sources but if true, that would mean that Cfast had more time to develop a following. (Which is now being pushed to CFexpress, of course)

            • Allen_Wentz

              WHY??? That will never be problematic.

              Camera cards are not consumables. They do not need “traction” to real-world outperform lame SD UHS-II by 100%.

          • Allen_Wentz

            Note though that however pricey 256 GB XQD may be, SD if even available in 256 GB is hella more expensive.

      • bonem

        Me too!

        • Spy Black

          OK, 4…

          • bonem

            *thumbs up*

            The Sony has 2 SD slots. Why aren’t both uhs2? What’s the point of a slow SD slot in a new camera?

            • Spy Black

              Following in Nikon’s footsteps. Imitation is the greatest form of flattery…

            • bonem

              Yeah. At least d850 has dual slots that are both as fast as possible right now. Not old tech.

            • Spy Black

              Actually, we don’t know that for sure at this time. For some annoying reason, Nikon runs the SD bus on the D500 at roughly half speed, making it somewhat faster than UHS-I, but painfully slower than the UHS-II speed that it should be running at. It’s not clear yet if Nikon pulled the same stunt on the D850.

            • bonem

              Hmmmm. I rarely run my SD as my primary, but I’ll have to check that out. I just got the new Sony SD card and xqd g series. Both super fast compared to what I used to use. Also I’ve always used sandisk sd so I’m curious about using Sony now.

            • I’m not sure what your source is, but I hit the buffer on the SD side of my D500 the other night, and it seemed to clear faster than any UHS-i bodies I’ve used with the fastest Sandisk cards. It may not be hitting the rated 150mb/s of the card, but it’s still faster than other cameras I’ve used. And they’re only Lexar 1000x cards. I’m curious to see what a 2000x card will do. But I skimped on them, since I rarely overflow the XQD slot, and don’t need speed when I shoot mirrored.

            • D700s

              Do you own a Nikon camera? You never have anything good to say. It seems every comment you make is some negative response to anything Nikon. Just so I know, what is your idea of the best camera out right now?

            • Spy Black

              Things bother me about Nikons, other things don’t. You apparently are noticing only the things I don’t like.

            • PhilK

              You have been doing a lot of griping lately. 😛

            • Thom Hogan

              He has a long history of dissing XQD.

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              Agree – good to both point good and bad with Nikon (especially at some of their decisions in the past like the classic late delivery and then cancellation of DL line). However it is possible that none of Nikon’s employees, managers read / listen to what customers nags or wants – this may also apply to the other big 2; Canon and Sony.

            • Their memory choice shouldn’t bother you. They chose the fastest thing available. Despite the spec sheets and what people can achieve with card readers, there are no cameras that write to an SD card at full rated speeds. Whatever the reason is, that’s a fact.

              According to this site https://goo.gl/7zq3Xs the fastest SD cards write below 300mb/s in the fastest readers, yet below 150mb/s in the fastest cameras.

              The fastest XQD cards write twice that fast in the D5 and D500. I’m glad Nikon chose the format they did.

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              would be nice at least have 1) sdxc uhs2 and 2) XQD slot – same as with A9 too – to get as much uptake as possible in the XQD format.

      • Wildness

        What’s your problem with the XQD? It is faster than CF and CF had reached its upper limited for speed.

        • Michael Jin

          For me, it’s the fact that only one company is currently making them as well as the fact that only one company (Nikon) is currently using them in their camera bodies, which means that it’s likely not going to be sticking around all that long… particularly so when the only company that actually makes them also happens to produce cameras and never uses them for their own cameras.

          Aside from that fact (which probably has major implications for the longevity of the card type), I think XQD is great and I would rather Nikon be putting 2 XQD slots rather than dividing their slots into different formats, which makes no sense at all.

          • Wildness

            Actually, Sony does use them, just not in their too-small digital still cameras. They use them in their high-end video cameras.

            • Michael Jin

              True, but given the abysmal adoption, I can’t help but feel like I’m buying an HD DVD player during the HD DVD vs. Blu-Ray war when I buy an XQD card…

            • Wildness

              The only alternative (No flexible SD cards are not a good professional alternative) is CFast and only Canon is using it I believe.

            • Michael Jin

              I keep hearing people talk about how SD cards are not a good professional option, but honestly, I fail to see what makes this the case. Even if you have a card fail, that’s the entire reason you have two card slots, isn’t it? Are there professional photographers out there that aren’t setting those slots to be redundant? Even if the failure rate is higher than CF, XQD, or whatever else (something that hasn’t really been the case from my personal experience), I find it difficult to image many situations where you’re going to be losing both cards at once.

              So what gives? Is it a speed issue? Too easy to lose them given their small size? In all my years of using SD cards, be it in cameras, phones, audio recording equipment, etc., I can’t say that I have ever experienced anything that would make me think that they would be unfit for professional use. Maybe I have just had good luck with them… I don’t know. o.O

            • The only card I’ve ever broken in a significant way was an SD card. And it wasn’t mistreated–it was a Sandisk with a defective seam. I’ve glued it back together, but I don’t trust it. I now occupies the MP3 storage in my car.

              I ran a CF card through the wash by accident once, and one side of the metal appeared to be coming off. I popped it back on and it never loosened. That was an ancient 256mb card, which is still in use today, in my brother’s synthesizer.

              Anecdotes aside, SD is the slowest of currently used formats. Only a handful of SD cards are faster than UDMA 7 CF (which isn’t used anymore anyway), and none are as big (2000x SD cards max out at 64gb currently.)

              Part of the problem is physical package–SD was always too small to fit as many memory modules as CF. CFast and XQD are also physically larger too, so they dodge that bullet.

              Not that it’s impossible to have small and fast memory. It’s just that everybody is working with pretty much the same chips during a given time period. A larger package always fits more chips for higher capacity and possible parallelism.

            • Thom Hogan

              I’ve seen both SD and CF cards broken, though I’d say SD tends to be more vulnerable, and mostly due to the protect tab. But neither are particularly problematic, even with rough handling.

            • Does anything even respect the protect tab anymore? And can’t one just just tape over part of it in a pinch? Like an old 5.25″ or an audio tape?

            • Eloise

              The problem with CF is more the slots in that the pins can be bent with incorrect handling.

              I also had a Sandisk SD Card which split down the seam… replaced by Sandisk under warranty and fortunately was able to read it first.

            • Thom Hogan

              For that you’d need two UHS-II slots. Tell me what camera has that.

              I’m a professional. I use SD cards. That’s not the issue. The issue is that the cameras that I use, both still and video are pushing beyond the limits of what even UHS-III (which isn’t available yet) can do. So why do I want to invest in that?

            • Michael Jin

              For video, I would certainly agree with you, but in regard to still cameras, I would argue that it’s fairly rare that the write speed of the memory card is the limiting factor. That might be the case for some particularly high MP cameras such as digital MF and perhaps even cameras like the D850 or A7RIII shooting at very high rates for prolonged periods, but I wonder how much the limits to their in-camera processing speed play a role vs. the limits of the card write speeds. It’s also only with this generation that we’re starting to see cameras that are pushing both high capture framerates as well has immense megapixel counts. Before this, you either that a slow camera with high MP or a fast camera with low-medium MP so perhaps that kept the issue in check for the most part in the past.

              Also, if you’re in the Nikon system, unless you have one of the few cameras that has a pair of non-SD slots, you’re pretty much always bottlenecked by the slower card anyway if you’re shooting redundant. Despite this, I can’t say that I’ve ever really struggled with my D810 to the point where I felt like it was pushing the limits of the cards.

              I do agree with the two UHS-II slots, though. Whether it’s SD, XQD, CF, etc. I feel like cameras should not only have two of the same slot, but that both slots should run at the same (ideally fastest) speed possible. Currently that doesn’t seem to be a common feature among manufacturers, which is a bit sad.

              In general, however, the comments regarding the professional usability of SD cards that I’ve heard have almost never centered on the limited speed of the cards and, instead, nearly universally centered on claims of their lack of durability when compared to formats such as CF or XQD. It’s mostly those claims that I was wondering about, but it’s definitely interesting to hear your unexpected take on the matter.

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              Not sure whether a M2 SSD enclosed in a caddy enclosure would be more ideal storage in these mid-large cameras ? – possibly the cost, space available and power usage + heat build up inside may make it a non viable solution…

            • Beside the size, M2 isn’t mechanically designed for repeated insertion/removal. Although, I guess if you have a 1tb, you can just plug the camera in to download and never worry about it.

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              Thanks for your a1 response.

            • PhilK

              Cost, power consumption and size are all definite issues.

              SSD’s are not normally designed to be not-swapped either, a key reason the speed is faster than the base rate of the flash soldered into them is all the RAM caching they do. If they get pulled during the middle of a write, there’s a good chance the whole partition will get seriously corrupted. Good removable media storage is more tolerant of that sort of thing. (But of course it’s never a good idea to disconnect any storage device in the midst of a write)

            • Thom Hogan

              Well, same answer: Canon and some high-end video cameras.

              Video is what is mostly pushing the bandwidth needs. 4K raw would really press it, which is why most of those cameras use SSDs.

              The high end still cameras are now pushing up against the boundaries, too.

              So, the question is, what’s the long-term solution? It isn’t SD UHS-III ;~).

            • …you’re comparing long term storage formats to short term.

              Think of it more like buying a gasoline car today, when electric might be the future. Maybe gas won’t be available in the future, sure. But you don’t go to the dealer, buy a car, fill it with gas once, then go back and buy a new car when that one is empty. You refill it and empty it.

              An XQD card (or any other, really) will outlast your camera.

            • Allen_Wentz

              But a camera is NOT a DVD player!!!! Why do people worry about card market usage? Camera cards are not consumables. But speed matters, a lot in a top body like D500 or D850.

            • Michael Jin

              My complaint is not with Nikon specifically here, but rather, the industry’s inability to settle on a good universal standard in general. It’s just plain stupid. It’s like we’re back in the early 2000’s where you have a mix of SD cards, CF cards, Memory Sticks, XD, and whatever other absurdity that I can’t remember at this particular moment (I definitely know there were variants of both the SD and Memory Stick) that we had to deal with.

              It seemed for a while that we had pretty much settled on SD for “consumer” purposes and CF for “professional” purposes and all of the manufacturers were on board. Now we’re pretty much back to the stupidity we went through before.

            • Broxibear recently commented about that – only 2-3 Sony video cameras use XQD and some still need an adapter.

            • PhilK

              He also embellished that by claiming that despite there actually being twice that number of actual Sony cameras that use XQD, that because several were variants on a similiar platform he magically claimed there were only 3 cameras that use it.

              Lies, damn lies, and statistics.

              That’s like dismissing the D750 as nonexistent because it’s just a slight variation on the “D610 platform”.

            • br0xibear

              The lies are the one’s you are telling.
              Go back and read what I posted, the FS7 model comes in three versions, FS7M2, FS7 and FS7K…only these cameras have XQD slots.
              Another three Sony video models can use XQD via an adaptor, they can also use SD via an adaptor…their native storage is SxS memory cards.
              It’s nothing like “like dismissing the D750 as nonexistent because it’s just a slight variation on the “D610 platform”.”
              You’re talking bullshit.

            • PhilK

              If a product has a different model number and comes in a different box, it is a different model. In resale parlance, it is a different SKU. (Stock Keeping Unit)

              Seems simple, right?

            • br0xibear

              What’s with all the hate in this article, people calling me a liar and a magician ? lol

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              Bit disappointed that Sony didn’t adopt the XQD memory format and use it in the A7 – A9 lines, hence this would mean larger uptake in this format and more players in town to manufacture the format and more competitive lower prices as well.

            • Wildness

              The Camera is too small.

            • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

              true prefer the A7’s – A9’s to be slighty bigger than they are – like the DSLR sort of size where there is more of a balance with short – mid size lenses and more comfortable for my large hands.

              Still don’t like the idea of these camera and lenses going up in price and now it is quite prohibited in transferring to another system or adding more gear now – especially with other things to buy in life and 554%$54 bills.

          • If the format goes extinct, it will be taken over by cfexpress which has same form factor and pinout.
            May be it will be backword compatible. If not Nikon can update software or hardware to make it so in an extreme case. But it should not come to that as sony made XQDs will be there for a long time to come. Long enough to make it a non issue for by then obsolete cameras that use them.

            • PhilK

              CFexpress stole the XQD form factor but the cards are not, to my knowledge, interoperable.

              Lots of stupid politics behind the lame-ass decisions made by the CompactFlash Association these days.

            • I didn’t mean interoperable. Usable with a hardware chip replacement.

            • PhilK

              Which hardware chip?

              You have a cite for this?

            • Something like firmware update or hardware controller. I don’t know the tech but if CF to SD converters with built in chips are made, why wouldn’t this be possible?

            • PhilK

              This sounds like an urban legend to me, tbh.

              Re: CF to SD converters – are these something that fit directly into camera CF slots and work transparently?

              Because I’ve never seen such a thing, unless the camera it goes into was specifically designed to work with a specific adapter made by the manufacturer.

            • I have. They are commonly available. And cheap too. Google search will find many of them. Actually these are the reason why we are hopeful about XQD to SD converter. Or CFExpress later on.

            • PhilK

              That’s interesting, guess I never cared about such a product so never searched for one.

              Probably lucky that the power requirements of CF are likely much more demanding than SD so at least that probably isn’t a limiting factor. (Device may need a DC to DC converter if the voltages aren’t identical, but that’s easier to deal with than a card that has higher power requirements than the slot was designed to support)

              The more interesting bit are things like filesystems and sector mapping and so on. I wouldn’t be surprised if the cheap adapters failed to work properly under certain combinations of card sizes and devices.

            • “. I wouldn’t be surprised if the cheap adapters failed to work properly under certain combinations of card sizes and devices.”
              I read reviews on amazon for these adapters and most of them are very happy and satisfied with performance and speeds. Once upon a time I was thinking of buying one so I was researching. Of course this is about CF to SD one. Don’t know about the other combos.

          • Allen_Wentz

            Who cares about how a card format does in the market? Camera cards are not consumables. Buy what you need and fuggedaboutit. The format will not suddenly cease to exist; heck one can buy Beta tape or a 5″ floppy disk cheap and have it delivered tomorrow.

            I am just thankful Nikon has at least one of the much faster XQD,

            • Michael Jin

              Generally speaking, I dislike the idea of being tied to a product that only a single manufacturer is producing because it often means that I’m paying a premium for it due to the lack of competition and if they ever stop producing it, I’m probably screwed as far as buying replacements in the longterm.

              I also like the option of transitioning cards to different tasks as I generally don’t keep using them in my camera until they die. This way I can get some more use out of them in less important situations. Since I generally don’t use any particular memory card for more than a year for mission-critical work, buying cards that literally none of my other devices use pretty much means that I’m spending hundreds of dollars ever year or so on cards that I am throwing in the trash or forced to sell for a pittance on the secondhand market.

              If Nikon transitioned all of their cameras to XQD slots, it would probably be less of an issue since I could at least throw them in a cheap walk-around camera or something, but that’s not even the case

              So yes, memory cards to me are pretty much consumables given the fact that I have long been in the habit of replacing them regularly (perhaps out of an overabundance of caution).

      • Mike

        Count me as 4 then. Importing hundreds of RAW files at a time is markedly faster than SD or CF. A “regular” XQD card is also cheaper than a UHS-II SD card of similar capacity. But UHS-II is approaching its theoretical max speed and is still less than XQD 2.0. It’s tougher build and better value if your aim is to extract max performance out of your camera.

    • Robert Isha

      i barely get 500 shots on my d850. thats if im lucky

      • Hmm. What and how do you shoot? Do you use VR lenses? Over what period is that 500 images? Are you in “airplane mode”?

        • Robert Isha

          i mostly do still life and yes i am on airplane mode . i use 70-200 the fl version. had a zeiss 100mm f2 before. same battery liife. my shooting would me 95% through the viewfinder. and the 5% would be using the screen.i got 500 shots in 2 outings Saturday and Sunday. then the following week Saturday. and the battery was put to sleep lol. on my d810 i used to get around 1200 shots per charge. i only shoot raw. cheers

          • The battery was completely dead after that many shots? What percentage?

            Some possibilities to check into:
            1. (I think this is in the manual of older cameras) if you only charged the battery until the light stopped blinking, and then pulled it immediately, it may not have been fully charged. I’m pretty sure it’s got to sit for a while after the light stops blinking to finish up. Li-ion batteries charge more slowly the closer they are to topped off. Wonder what the battery menu said it was at when you first put it in the camera.

            2. Even if it was fully charged, it can discharge sitting there, BUT this is a new camera and I can’t imagine you’ve even had it long enough for that to happen. A week could be a few percent, but that shouldn’t be a big impact.

            3. I’ve never noticed this with camera batteries, but in general, Li-ion batteries usually take a charging or two to calibrate, and the first couple charge/discharge cycles may be a little off.

            4. Framing and letting the VR run without taking a picture will eat battery. Some lenses are more hungry than others. Dunno about that ƒ/4.

            5. Was this a new battery that came with the camera, or an older EN-EL15 from your D810? I was hoping they’d done something different, but I found I couldn’t use ANY of my old EN-EL15 batteries with my D500. Not OEM, nor third party.

            Just some thoughts. Cheers!

            • Robert Isha

              thank you for all this information. they are highly appreciated. i went to aden camera here in Toronto. and wanted to buy another battery. they didn’t have the new one so i end up getting the en-el15 the black one. and so far iv taken 75 shots and im down to 86%. i do actually leave the battery on after it stops charging for good 20 to 30 minutes. its not a deal breaker for me. but since the advertise 1800 i was expecting at least 1200. ill call them tomorrow and see what they will say.. cheers

      • fanboy fagz

        hows that possible. even with the the old enel15, I was getting 1100 shots on the d600 with chimping. so youre battery is defective, AND cipa rating are quite accurate. the new enel15 battery should be getting you at least 1300 shots.

        • Robert Isha

          your probably right. or maybe is the camera. i need to contact Nikon and ask them and see what they have to say

      • Guessing from your profile thumbnail, you’re taking long exposure photos meaning that you those 500 photos might be long exposure ones which are battery eaters

        • Robert Isha

          lol. that was actually with d700. haven’t tried long exposure with d850. i know its a battery killer, but honestly. i dont know whats going on

          • My D850 is fine with the battery I got with it and also the other one I bought as a backup. Really can’t tell the exact frames per charge, but my batteries can last the whole day covering 2-3 jobs.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Another user was reporting the same battery anomaly. My guess is it is a new-body issue. I will be curious to see if it comes up in Thom Hogan’s D850 review.

        • Robert Isha

          lets see. maybe is the new shipment. or maybe they will fix it via software update.

    • reductron

      I once got 2000 shots on a half-full D700 battery. No joke.

      • Which, an EN-EL3 or EN-EL4? I’ve never tested the little battery’s life–I bought the grip as soon as I bought a D300, and never looked back! I keep the internal batteries charged out of paranoia, but almost never use them.

        • reductron

          I checked my gear last night. It was the EN-EL3. The story is: I traveled to Alaska and forgot to bring the charger. One battery was 1/2 full. Popped it in and determined to keep shooting till it’s dead. The trip ended with 2000 with that battery still not completely drained.

    • Ralf

      Snapbridge sucks batteries through a coffee filter 😉

      Also the nice liveview screen seems to take it’s toll. I hate liveview but my 24-70mm is damaged and so badly off with the phase autofocus that I have to rely on the contrast autofocus and thus liveview for anything that I need to be really crisp until I get a chance to get the lens fixed.

      • Snapbridge works for you? I can only ever get it to connect via wifi once in a great while. Transfers over bluetooth just fine…fine and slooooooooow.

    • Alien that plays the race card

      I like it too.

  • Spy Black

    Sony throws overheating in for free…

    • bonem

      Lol!

    • saywhatuwill

      And star eating sensors so no astronomy photos.

      • What a cute name for A7R3. Star eater.

    • Iki

      Gone for a long time.

  • Cesar Sales

    So, the benefits over the D850? Weight and video. IBIS if you need it. That’s it. The pixel shift is useless in a studio, as strobes won’t work with it. Sony needed to do better if they want people to switch. Too little, too late.

    • Spy Black

      There’s a market for all three cameras. Different strokes…

    • Exynos

      Eye AF
      Silent shutter
      Dual card
      Black out free
      10 fps without d5 battery
      Excellent AF in live view

      • Alexander Gray

        They never said blackout free. I doubt it is.

        • Azmodan

          Only blackout free to 8fps, as it uses real-time LV. At 10fps you only get to see last image, yikes!

          • gf

            And How does Nikon or Canon do? Oh wait, there is a short blackout after EVERY picture, no matter how fast you shoot. And they do not do 8 frames a second without extra battery grip…. So yikes indeed, yikes for Canon and Nikon that is…..

            • EGGZZ

              This NEVER was a problem for all the World Class photographers out there. It still isn’t. WTF ??
              Maybe you should find something else to do than taking pictures ?

            • Cesar Sales

              Blackout never became a “thing” until EVFs showed us what true blackout is. DSLR “blackout” is just not really a problem.

      • TurtleCat

        The D850 is dual card, although both slots are fast.

        • bonem

          Yup. Not uhs1. No bottleneck.

      • Cesar Sales

        1 don’t need it
        2 810 quiet enough
        3 really? I mean, finally?!
        4 ovf already there
        5 9fps plus 3x the life
        6 same for d810 even

        • Michael Jin

          To be fair, you asked what the benefits over the D850 are. There are very real benefits. The fact that those features don’t happen to particularly matter for you is somewhat irrelevant in regard to the question you asked.

          Obviously no camera is perfect for everyone. There are many people out there for whom the Sony A7RIII is probably a better choice than the D850 and I would actually wager that to be the case for the majority of people.

          As for me, my primary reason for sticking with Nikon is:
          1. I’m already invested in a number of Nikon lenses and accessories.
          2. For me, ergonomics, weather sealing, and reliability (in the sense that my gear needs to be able to take a beating) are important for how I do my photography and Nikon is leaps and bounds better than Sony at this.
          3. After years invested, I don’t feel like throwing away the muscle memory that I’ve built up.
          4. Like you, the things Sony’s camera (or mirrorless technology in general at the moment) brings to the table are not impactful enough for what I do to be worth the hassle.

          That’s not to say that Sony hasn’t been making excellent cameras, of course. I recommend Sony to people all the time because unless they really need the specific advantages that Nikon and Canon offer, it makes no sense as an average photographer to start investing in DSLR technology over mirrorless today.

          And no, OVF is not black-out free unless you’re using a rangfinder and the Live View AF in the D810 is put to shame by Sony’s… I would agree with you if it was close, but it really isn’t even in the same ballpark.

          • Cesar Sales

            Fair? This is the internet. Nothing is fair. These are mostly not benefits, merely catching up to DSLR tech. It’s not irrelevant because a camera is a personal thing, and if I have to add “for me” after every statement, then this just becomes a joke. OVF “blackout” hasn’t been a problem for decades – EVF is only just now catching up.

            “For me” the D810 live view is just fine. “For me” there is no benefit for Sony’s catching up tech. “For me” this is not enough to get me to switch. Geez.

            • Michael Jin

              And that’s fine. But the question you originally asked wasn’t “________ is what I do and how I use my camera. What features about this should get me to switch?” The original question you posed was much more general.

              When someone gave a rather general response to your rather general question, however, you rebutted the response as if the respondent was supposed to somehow psychically know what features were more or less important to you, how you liked to use your camera, and what your personal tolerances were.

              Certain features such as Eye-AF, Focus Peaking, and Silent Shutter are not “catching up” to DSLR’s. They are features that introduce technology that exceeds that of most current (if not all) DSLR’s. A silent shutter is objectively better than a quiet shutter. Being able to focus peak inside your viewfinder would be considered by the vast majority to be better than the current methods of achieving manual focus via DSLR, whether it’s a focus confirmation dot outside of the frame or switching to live view and zooming in. Eye-AF utilizes subject tracking technology that is objectively better than the subject tracking technology available in the current generation of DSLR’s. AF points that go out to the edges of your frame is objectively better than the AF field of the D5, which is objectively better than the AF field of the D4 and so on and so forth. We’re not in the realm of “catching up” anymore. Sure, you can argue about OVF vs. EVF all day, but you’re basically making a preferential choice based on whether you value real-time feedback more or the ability to see your exposure and have a workflow that never requires taking your eye off the viewfinder even if you do want to chimp. It doesn’t seem to me like there’s a clear winner in all cases in that argument.

              In regard to OVF blackout, you’re absolutely right. OVF blackout was never a problem until people learned that they no longer had to deal with it. It was only then that it became a problem, not of necessity, but of convenience and preference. That argument can be applied to tons of issues, though. People lived without auto-exposure for decades. They lived without auto-focus for decades. They lived without things like in-camera bracketing modes, touch screens, and flip-up screens. Hell, shutter noise falls in the same general category. For decades, shutter noise was just part of owning a camera. Nobody ever thought twice about it. Sure, it might have occasionally been annoying, but it’s something that we as a society had largely just come to accept. Did anyone think twice about the cacophony of shutter noise at any press event? Do most people think about it today? It’s only now that we have the ability to completely eliminate it while not sacrificing any quality that people are starting to question its necessity. OVF blackout is pretty much the same thing. It’s not a problem per se, but it’s just something that technological advances have rendered unnecessary and if you can get rid of something that obscures your vision even for a brief moment, why wouldn’t you?

              Whether any of this is meaningful to you personally is a separate issue from whether they are actual advancements that present advantages for the shooters that are taking advantage of them. If we were to go by your argument, a person could argue that a any AF advancement at all is meaningless because they happen to be a landscape photographer that always works on tripod with manual lenses. Most people would understand in that situation that this particular landscape photographer would not benefit from a new camera with D5-level autofocus, but would probably agree that it’s a bit silly to then suggest that autofocus doesn’t actually matter or that slow auto-focus was never an actual problem that needed solving just because this particular photographer never uses it.

              The whole “enough for me” thing is generally a terrible way to discuss technological advancements because it’s a standard the varies so wildly from person to person. For some people, a completely manual 4×5 large format film camera is “enough” technology for them. A sports shooter obviously would have a different standard.

              It seems like the Sony A7RIII is probably not the camera for you given the fact that the benefits it does offer are not ones that you care much about. But then I would ask (because why not?) whether the Nikon D850 would be a meaningful upgrade for you over the D810 and why or why not? The way I see it, the D850 and the A7RIII are so similarly specced out that the only real difference between them would be whether you prefer the mirrorless technology or are willing to forego that for the ergonomics, weathersealing, battery life, etc. Either one seems like it would be a great camera to shoot with and each outdoes the other in different areas. I personally prefer the D850 at the moment, but that’s because things like ergonomics and weathersealing are pretty important to me. If I could get all that with some of the perks of the A7RIII, I would probably be pretty tempted to make the jump as long as I felt like I wouldn’t get absolutely wrecked on the trade-in cost of my lenses.

              Anyway, it seems that you’re more of a studio shooter that’s working in a controlled environment, so what kind of things do you do and what do you personally look for when you evaluate what camera you’re going to purchase? I’m curious to know.

            • Cesar Sales

              I’m sorry, I have to admit I didn’t read that. When I clicked on read more and saw how long it was my heart sank. So I hope you got something out of writing it.

        • John Mackay

          2 depends on use case, think church, quiet music concert, wildlife etc
          4, if you think of is blackout free youdont know what blackout is
          5 you need to spend about an extra grand on the camera to get 9fps, plus added size and weight. Battery on the D850 is much better, but life won’t be a problem like before
          6 I assume that is a joke? It might be fine for still subjects, but I wouldn’t trust it to track a slow walk, not to mention video af

          • Cesar Sales

            2 – seems to me that there was never any problem shooting those subjects before this camera
            4 – blackout in DSLRs was never a problem. Blackout in EVF- huge problem. Not a benefit
            6 – for my use just fine. And that’s what this is about. My use.

            • John Mackay

              2 – your wrong, if you are shooting someone playing live music with like a guitar and mic to like 30 people, everyone will hear your camera, you will have to limit your shots. You can take the shots, but people will know and you can’t take loads. It is a big plus, but possibly not for your use. The same with wildlife, my specialty, if it doesn’t know your there before you fire, it will after. There are times you have to wait for the wind to pick up before shooting.

              4 – My first mirrorless is the a9 which is blackout free at 20fps, so I don’t know what blackout is like in a mirrorless, but I would think latency is the problem old evfs would have in comparison to DSLRs as blackout is blackout. This should be like the a9, 0 latency. It is very nice for tracking flying birds in the a9 over my d810. Your reaction time is simply improved by the duration of the blackout. I don’t think you get blackout free sports as electronic shutter is too slow for that, but I can see it being a nice to have for shooting people and still animals. People who reviewed the a9 liked it a lot.

              6 – If you don’t need it that’s fine, the d850 is fab, but you never specified that you were only talking about you, let alone your use case which is a must know for the comparison, or all you can do is cover every difference.

          • You might need to spend an extra grand. Some of us already have the charger and batteries. So that’s no extra cost.

            And even if you don’t, knockoff batteries and chargers are great. (at least in my D500–time will tell if that holds true for the D850).

            And wait until Black/Cyber Friday. I got my D500 with the grip for no extra cost.

            • John Mackay

              none? You might plan to shop lift the battery grip. Some of us think stealing is wrong. So there is extra cost.

              Joking aside, I was well aware that some people own a D5 etc (plus a spare battery, not much good if you only have the one) in which case it is not that bad, although £400 isn’t cheap. But I would be surprised if more than 10% of d850 owners had that stuff lying around, I believe there is a very big difference in volume of production. Also, if you want to be picky, technically in that case you had to spend an extra £6500. I didn’t mention it before to avoid adding a long paragraph like this to explain every little thing.

              You can’t say wait for offers as both cameras came out about the same time and are likely to get offers on them around the same time cancelling that out. As the d850 is so far back ordered the a7riii might well be first.

              Yes, you can go third party, but I have no doubt you void the warranty if you do. I would use a third party charger, but would not be comfy with battery or grip. I shouldn’t have to be put in that situation. Plus, all this still doesn’t address the extra size and weight.

      • – Nikon’s AF does attempt to find faces too. In practice, it does the same thing, whether it’s designed or marketed to or not. (at least in cameras that I’ve owned)

        – E-shutter still has it’s bugs to work out. Not good in all situations–and many that I need! Stage/event lighting has all gone LED. Sony’s E-shutter is great for the lighting of yesteryear.

        – Dual? Same as Nikon, except that both are slower.

        – Black out free mode is 8fps so…

        – …10fps mode is not blackout free

        – Nikon has better AF with the mirror down (as designed). Sony has no AF with the mirror down (also as designed).

        And I prefer Snapdragon. ; )

    • Conroy Kim

      all are good points.

      Reason why i am going with a D850
      -Ergonomics
      -Color reproduction
      -Ergonomics
      -OVF
      -Ergonomics
      -and I dont need 5 batteries for a full day.

      • lights

        Only need 1 with the new battery, maybe 2 depending how hardcore you use it one day.

      • Azmodan

        I agree on most things, but the A9 battery lasts a long time. It easily gets 2000 shots+ according to users. A7RIII might get less since it’s got 42MP, but ti should be pretty good now.

        • Conroy Kim

          thats pretty amazing how far compact batteries have come. I was just basing it off of a7rii experience and the battery life stated in this article.

      • danceprotog

        -Ergonomics
        extremely important point. I had the Sony a9 for 2 months, solid camera with high end technology, but felt like crap in my hands… The boxy body and small buttons, there is a very good reason modern DSLRs have evolved from old film cameras of yesteryear

        • I agree, I don’t think there is a worse camera than the a7/a9 in terms of ergonomics.

        • Fly Moon

          I had the A7R2 and hated the handling. Sold it with a loss!

    • They started making these “continuous lighting” things for studio work, so one could theoretical use the pixel shift for products in studio if they wanted. 🙂

      • Cesar Sales

        Ummm, I know? For my use, continuous lighting is not an option – it is damaging to my subjects. And, try getting a model to hold an absolute perfect pose for 2 seconds. Any slight movement will absolutely destroy any sharpness gained. No need to be condescending.

  • nikonfanboy

    Wow, Sony makes D850 immediately obsoleted… RIP, D850

    • Spy Black

      …if you only need 530 shots..

      • nikonfanboy

        I think people who buy any of these cameras can afford multiple batteries.

        • Spy Black

          Hopefully you won’t be changing it at a critical moment. 😉

          • nikonfanboy

            Fair point.

            I read somewhere that A7R III support usb battery pack? If true, this may help?

            • According to IR, the internal battery is required and used when using USB power. How quickly it wears down…nobody knows yet. At the very least, it doesn’t charge the internal battery when running off the USB.

              For video, this is good. For stills…the less dangle the better.

            • Michael Jin

              If you can just stick a 20,000mah battery pack in your backpack and use a 6-10ft USB cord to connect it to your camera, that’s a good chunk of battery life if it really does work that way.

            • Fly Moon

              I do a similar trick with my Nikon batteries with a USB-Battery-charger. Charging the empty battery while in field.

            • tomskyphoto

              It does – the feature was already implemented on the RII which was a big relief for a lot of video and timelapse shooters.

              The worst part about the A7RII’s battery performance actually isn’t the number of shots you get out of a single battery in continous shooting like on a wedding. Even though it’s not on DSLR level it’s acceptable and somewhere around the CIPA ratings.

              But the power draw in standby or sleep mode with the camera doing pretty much nothing is ridiculous. If you are on a hike for several hours and just take some 20+ images here and there and don’t power down the camera in between your battery may just be sucked dry by it even though you’ve only taken some 150 shots at all. Never seen something like this with mirrorless cameras from other manufacturers.

              It remains to be seen if Sony have really addressed this issue on the RIII or if they’ve just put in the bigger battery.

            • Adam Ottke

              I’m just reading these comments and enjoying them, but I don’t really care. But just based on this….so someone is supposed to hold a USB battery pack with this camera to keep it going through critical shoot times? Yeah, don’t see that working realistically well. Nice to have in a real pinch, but the point would be to not get oneself in that pinch to begin with by planning just a little bit.

              As for the rest, seems pretty strong. 10 fps at 42MP — and here we were thinking Nikon was the only one that could touch that number anytime soon…nice move.

            • Per Kristoffersson

              Sony a99ii. 42MP 12fps.

            • John Alexander

              like a year ago

          • lights

            Used the a9 for a wedding and the battery lasted the whole day. It should be the same with the a7riii.

      • Exynos

        I got 2000 to 3000 pics with my À9 in single charge

        • Spy Black

          That’s quite a conservative figure Sony’s given then…

          • lights

            Thankfully real world results matter more than spec sheets.

          • Azmodan

            CIPA testing is very tough and uses flash. Real world battery life is always much better in general.

            • Spy Black

              Does the Sony have a flash? I don’t think so. Neither does the D850. Doesn’t apply.

            • Michael Jin

              No, but I believe that the rack the focus all the way from one end to the other in-between each shot during testing, which could be one reason why the results always come out on the conservative end.

              There’s a similar thing with flashes, where they test them by popping them at full power back to back every 20 seconds or so until they die.

              While it gives you an idea, you generally should always take the results of these sorts of torture tests with a grain of salt because they rarely reflect real life usage.

            • Azmodan

              What are you talking about, it’s nothing to do with in-built flash, the testing is done with a flash added. That is why their battery life is much shorter than in real world.

            • Spy Black

              An attached flash has it’s own batteries, I don’t understand how that’s going to affect the battery life of a camera with a built-in flash.

          • John Mackay

            The rating I think is based on a whole load of stand by time and mechanical shutter. If you are shooting lots over a couple of hours, based on my experience with the A9 which also has a dismal battery life rating, you will get thousands of shots. Battery life won’t be an issue unless big stand by time is important to you, and even then, battery life will be fine, not a pain in the arse like the r2.

        • danceprotog

          same here, had the a9 for 2 months, the battery is as good or better than any DSLR battery. I just couldn’t get use to the ergonomics and small buttons

    • harvey

      guess you are going to have to change your name to ‘sonyfanboy’

      • nikonfanboy

        I am stuck with all my Nikon gears at this point. Still hoping Nikon will catch up in the mirrorless game so I don’t have to jump ship to other company…

        • Jerry Seinpheld

          I would love a nice nikon mirrorless, would love to have a light weight camera with all my nikon glass to carry around and give my shoulder a break from the d810

          • D700s

            You’re kidding right. Your shoulder hurts carrying a D810? Wow, you do need an itty bitty camera. 16oz. is the difference between painful and comfortable. Can you see how ridiculous that sounds.

            • Michael Jin

              A few ounces here and there don’t make much of a difference in the short term, but over the course of a day, it does add up. Given the nature of the equipment, you’re rarely going to find significant weight savings on any single piece of gear (except by outright omission) so if you’re looking for weight reduction, every bit here and there does matter. This is why I (along with many others) have lightened the load on my back by switching out some f/1.4 lenses with their f/1.8 variants.

              I will fully admit that I pretty much end my days with a lot of pain in my back, shoulder, and wrist from carrying my D810 with battery grip attached and camera bag for hours each day so maybe I’m a bit more sensitive to this issue than others. While I’m glad that others may not share the same pains, the machismo that so often surfaces (Well, I carry X, Y, Z, and 50 lbs of other things everyday while hiking 100 miles at a time…) whenever this topic comes up is rather unhelpful. It’s great that you can carry all that stuff all day and be fine. For some of us, we can definitely appreciate any weight reduction that we can get in our gear. Just because it doesn’t affect you doesn’t mean it isn’t a problem for others.

            • fanboy fagz

              wont make a difference at all with pain. the sony has horrible hand cramping ergonomics with that thin boxy hand grip. the d850 has a nice beefy deep grip. your fingers sit well around the whole grip where the sony is so shallow and isnt large enough to allow long/big fingers to sit well.

            • Jerry Seinpheld

              Well when you’re caring around 2 bodies all day as well as a 70-200, and two other prime lenses and climbing mountains at music festivals and shooting for 16 hours for four days in a row. Yeah every oz counts d700s.

            • Per Kristoffersson

              Maybe you should move to a smaller sensor allowing you to use lighter glass. Or try to get by with less lenses, avoiding the heavy zooms.

          • Vinnie

            Wow, your shoulder needs a break from carrying a D810? I’m 66 and carry a D800 with a grip and my shoulder don’t hurt. I carry a backpack with 4 other lens, another camera, spare batteries, and a tripod.

            • Spy Black

              Well OK, but everyone’s physiology is different. I don’t believe it’s going to make a significant difference however.

            • Vinnie

              True, your right there. But I’m not the most physically fit myself either. A few ounces lighter is not gonna make that much difference.

        • Stuck? No, you are in a good place 🙂

        • Iggy

          What’s the appeal with those mirrorless cameras?

          • Michael Jin

            I’m waiting for Nikon’s mirrorless offering myself and for me, it really just comes down to the technology. If Sony had gotten their durability, ergonomics, and weather sealing down with the A7RIII, I would probably just go ahead and make the switch even though losing money on all of my Nikon stuff would hurt a lot.

            I love the fact that you get AF all the way to the edge, unlike the limited zone that you get on even the D850. Having to do the focus and recompose thing gets annoying. I personally enjoy the idea of EVF when it comes to low light shooting.

            I like the fact that the short flange distance means that you can pretty much have an adapter for any other system. It also means that you have the option of cramming the technology into a much smaller body than a DSLR if you want. Even though I’m not of the “smaller is always better” camp, I do believe that it’s good to have options when it comes to the size of your camera and I would love to be able to have a larger ergonomic camera for normal use as well as a smaller ILC compact that can use the same lenses and technology that I can carry around in my pocket when I go out for a walk. Strapping on my D810 is just such a commitment when I’m just going out for some milk or something.

            I really like the idea of the completely silent shutter because it opens up more possibilities in terms of locations you can photograph in as well as being able to be more discreet when you need to.

            In Sony’s case specifically, I like the fact that they opened up their mount so that third party manufacturers can make auto-focus lenses for their cameras without having to jump through hoops to try to reverse engineer things and forcing you to choose between expensive native glass or third party glass that is absolute crap at auto-focusing.

            More than anything else, however, the biggest draw of mirrorless for me (and the biggest failing of modern DSLR’s) is the ease of using manual focus lenses. Being someone who enjoys using Zeiss lenses and exploring vintage lenses, I’ll take focus peaking over looking off the frame (and taking my eye off what’s actually happening in the composition) for a focus confirmation dot all day of the week when I’m using manual lenses.

        • Thom Hogan

          Catch up with what? Just dropping the mirror?

    • Caleb Berg

      Yes, I’m sure you’ll see all professional photographers at events now, holding their dinky little Sony with their finger tips. LMAO!! — In 50 years maybe.

      • danceprotog

        I had the a9 for 2 months, I couldn’t get use to the small size and especially the small buttons. And the sharp boxy body is so uncomfortable. Modern DSLR is a better ergonomic design, there is a reason we went away from those boxy little film cameras…

    • TurtleCat

      Obsolete? That’s silly.

    • bonem

      I’m already so disappointed in my purchase. WTS D850, PST.

    • Luboš

      absolutely not. D850 is better camera with better IQ. If you are saying D850 is obsolete, then you have a problem. You would never have camera that would satisfied you for more then few months. And Sony could not have the lens selection Nikon have. Even if this Sony and D850 are very similar, so what? That is not the reason to switch brands. Who should worry here is Canon. They do have biggest market share, but as for the DSLR, they are in third spot as far as I am concern.

      • Azmodan

        Why is it’s IQ better? I’ll bet in blind test no once could pick difference if you make them both same size.

        • tomskyphoto

          I’ve difficulties to distinguish the images from my D810 and A7RII even without resizing in a blind test; and 36 to 42 MP is a bigger difference.

      • But sony would be perfect for him in that case. A new camera every 6 months.

      • Per Kristoffersson

        you mean for this particular comparison the Canon body comes in third in your opinion? I’d partially agree if I was building a system from scratch. OVF and ergonomics may have the Sony in third for me. But if I was a Canon user I wouldn’t be worried at all, I’d happily pick the 5DmkIV over the others. And really, this can only mean one thing: Canon will try that much harder with the mkV. If being a distant second or third on camera body specs alone was a problem Nikon would have gone under back in 2006.

    • How so?

  • Spy Black

    I wonder how quickly Sony can deliver in comparison.

    • That is not what they realize when switching.

  • Exynos

    Sound blimp VS silent shutter
    Who will win ?

    • Adam Ottke

      Silent shutter just doesn’t work for anything moving. That’s the problem. So…sound blimp :-/

      • John Mackay

        Readout on this is 2x the r2, so it might be ok for some stuff, but no A9 obviously

      • Also artificial lighting with frequency has a problem somethimes.

    • Just shot all weekend with my homemade one around a D500…not fun! But…I sat directly next to audience members both nights, and asked their honest opinons, and nobody minded.

      Only I minded! It was hell to hold! Gotta work on the ergonomics.

      The brilliant thing is, I just set shutter priority, auto-ISO, and auto AF, and everything just worked. I dunno how well that would fly without a mirror. Also, lots of LEDs these days, and I’d be shocked if the A9/A7Riii did very well with them.

  • Caleb Berg

    The 4K video comparison fails to mention the 5D Mk IV does not cover full frame, but is a cropped video. It’s the real 5D Mk IV deal killer for 4K video use.

    • Azmodan

      Yeah, I agree, they could have at least captured Image from a 6K area, and then oversampled it to 4K. This would yield about 1.25x crop and be much nicer quality.

      • And use costlier processor and ram components? Canon is in cost cutting mode. Not to mention the lazy and complacent mode too.

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          Remember also that their sensors just can’t pull the data off fast enough. It’s obvious by this point that their new on-chip ADC could improve DR, but their readout speeds are still stuck in the past.

  • TurtleCat

    Probably not many.

  • JOHN TANG

    I won’t buy Nikon D850 because the image is not sharp with the handheld shooting. High Megapixels need SteadyShot Stabilization inside the camera. I might buy Sony a7r III because I had zeiss Otus lens Nikon mount. but I will buy lens Metabones adapter.

    • bonem

      I shot 600mm at 1/200 handheld last night perfectly crisp. Not sure what your holdup is. Lay off the caffeine?

      • Spy Black

        …or take a flask along when shooting…

        • bonem

          Already do!

      • JOHN TANG

        right! it is a fact is not sharp, if you said so good luck to you and enjoy your D850

        • JOHN TANG

          I am not saying Nikon is not good because I still had my Nikon d800e is really good camera but not D850

          • DieMusik

            Practice steadying ur hand lol

            • Michiel953

              Hands?

          • bonem

            John, if you haven’t used the D850, I’m not sure you’re qualified to make that judgement.
            I have D800 and so far the shutter slap and noise is a huge improvement when using the D850 under similar conditions. I’m seeing a big improvement with sharpness based on that.
            I’m sure the IBIS is pretty good too. Technique is the first hurdle to conquer, then gear.

          • There is quite a difference in handheld quality between D800e and D850. You will be very pleasantly surprised. I was!

        • bobgrant

          LOL…every time there’s a resolution bump, a bunch of people claim they can’t get sharp images. But you can watch two dozen vids right now with linkable samples and no one has an issue because they have good technique. The weakest link is always behind the camera.

      • Chris

        I cannot handhold 50mm for 1/100s on d810 without VR without shaking 1/3 of the shots.

        • Michael Cary Arellano

          Sounds like your technique, check out “Da Grip” by Joe McNally on YouTube

          • reductron

            Thank you for “Da Grip” pointer

          • Chris

            Nah, I do agree I don;t have iron hands. But with Df I can do 90mm with 1/30s.

          • tomskyphoto

            Just checked it out and found that it’s exactly the same technique I’ve been using for 20+ years as I’m a left-eyed shooter as well.

            Can’t remember whether I developed it completely on my own or took inspiration from someone else during my days as a freelance press photographer but it definitely works and isn’t as awkward as it may look – quite the contrary.

        • LOL. Put a smiley at the end or people will seriously start giving you advice. You actually were joking right?

          • Michiel953

            Hope so

          • Chris

            No. My solution to that issue is to turn VR on. Even now I don’t have non-stabilized lens.

            I sold off D810 not long after owning it for other reason, so I don’t get much opportunity to train my hands with it. I was running it along with Df at the time. I realized I just like Df’s results better.

      • John Mackay

        Try doing that with the lens stabilisation turned off to simulate an unstabilised prime like… allmost all lenses faster than f2.8 (I know about the tamrons and I guess other must exist).

        • bonem

          Why would I turn lens stabilization off? If I did, I’d change my settings accordingly to get sharp pictures. This is based on experience and technique and not the camera.

          • John Mackay

            A guy says he needs stabilisation to get sharp shots hand held on a high res sensor, you mock him telling him to “lay off the caffeine”, boasting you can get sharp shots hand held with a stabilised lens. You don’t see the problem? If you didn’t know not every lens has stabilisation built in… like I said before.

            • bonem

              Maybe you misread what he wrote. I’m contradicting his statement by saying it’s technique and knowledge of settings that create sharp images. And yes, I definitely threw in some humor.

            • John Mackay

              I think we can assume everyone here knows that upping shutter speed cuts motion blur unless there is reason to otherwise. You kinda missed something in your sharp image assessment, ISO value. You can prevent motion blur all day but if you are shooting at 12k iso because you have to shoot at 1/250th of a second your shots won’t be sharp. 4 stops of IBIS turns that into 800 iso, much much better IQ.

              Your original reply made no mention of knowledge of settings, and no sense as you referenced a stabilised lens when that is exactly what the guy says he needs and can only get on some lenses from IBIS. It would have only made sense if you were saying that you can get perfect sharpness hand holding at a tenth of a second or something, thereby boasting your technique is better. But you didn’t, you basically boasted that you owned a stabilised lens. Your point missed, so the joke did too.

              You arguably made reference to technique with the joke, but it falls quite flat anyway as if you are working with people you can’t say, “give me a minute, I need to get my heart rate down as I am under stress and have been on my feet all day carrying 6kg of camera gear, and can we do all the shots over here by this tree I can lean against”.

            • bonem

              You’re arguing for someone who has not used either camera he mentioned as bad or better. You misread what he said and must not have read any of his other comments.
              You’re also misquoting what I said so you’re really wasting your time responding like this.

            • John Mackay

              I quoted “lay off the caffeine”… it is right there in your first reply to him. Where do you think I misquoted you?

              I have not read anything he has said outside this thread but if I needed to you should have told me, I have not read the whole of the internet. There is no reason for me to think I need to look up another comment he has made from his post or your reply. I am not trying to argue for him, my problem was your example had to be of using a non stabilised lens or it just sounds stupid. You can argue it is a point about using good technique, but you don’t mention technique specifically and the stabilised lens muddies everything horribly. My argument is if you want to make a glib remark insulting the guy make damn sure your example is solid.

              I read his slightly broken english and assumed instead of meaning, it is impossible to get a sharp shot with a d850 even at 1/8000th of a second, he meant, it is hard to get sharp shots without image stabilisation at normal shutter speeds so IBIS is a super valuable feature on high resolution bodies. How did you interpret what he said?

              Yes, he probably hasn’t used either camera, but he might have used a d810 and an a7r2 etc and I believe the view that IBIS is very useful in this kind of body is valid.

            • John Alexander

              iconically ironic isn’t it?

    • bobgrant

      Not sharp? I shot with it for half a day and sharpness was no issue at all. It’s insanely sharp. No real difference from shooting with a D810 or 5DS. If you can’t get sharp images, it’s YOU, not the camera.

    • Vinnie

      You need to have good technique when hand holding, or else use a tripod or monopod. IBIS isn’t going to help if your technique is not good.

    • VanHoff

      “Not sharp”…

      Very demanding cameras like the D810 (which I own) and the D850, need flawless photographic technique from the user in order to achieve perfect results.

      I always tell my alumni: If you are not having the results you imagine when you try to create images, blame yourself, not the gear, you are the mutable, inteligible, evolutionary substance here, a camera doesn’t have a soul and it will never understand the way you see the world.

    • Michiel953

      Hahahaha! You might want to do some basic camera training.

    • PhilK

      I think I’m going to start counting how many times you post here your claim that you cannot take a sharp picture with a Nikon D8xx model, including a model you have never actually shot with (D850), and why you’ve thus decided Sony is superior.

      I may have to get a bigger piece of paper…

    • notsosmart

      then increase you shutter speed or drink less coffee (or combine both). and remember that shutter speed rule (this much millimeters then this fast shutterspeed 1:1) only works if you do not crop in your images. but with high mpix cameras suddenly everyone thinks that you could crop in in every other image at least x2 (because after x2 crop there is at least 20+ mpix left) and still expect it to be as sharp as non cropped images

  • VanHoff

    Here are THE truly Log Gammas for the D850 (and All Nikon cameras):

    https://www.behance.net/gallery/17239863/VH-Log-Gamma-profile-for-Nikon-HDslrs

  • Aldo

    Except for the buffer the sony looks really good on paper… oh I just had djavu.

  • Chris

    To be honest, what does specs do to creation of a great shot? I have tried many cameras and now i think m240 yields very pleasant color that i almost don’t need to tune more than exposure.

    Btw d850 is a lot more expensive in some part of the world.

    • Spy Black

      Apparently yours.

  • Eleazar Liu

    I don’t think many here know that D850 is really expensive in some part of the world. China for one has the D850 priced at 28800 rmb, equivalent of 4337 usd with LIMITED STOCK. That is why Sony announced it in china first to snipe Nikon. A7R3 price in china is 24000 rmb which soon will be around 22000 rmb. Anyway, USA is loved no matter which brand, always cheaper (before tax)

  • Kyle Medina

    FYI: D850 buffer is nowhere near the marketing of 51.

    • Spy Black

      Are you mirroring to your SD card, or using it for JPEGs or something? If so try XQD only.

      • I suspect people are also leave ADL and a bunch of other things ‘On’ as well. Extra processing = extra time aka less buffer.

      • PhilK

        {{{{SHOCK}}}}

        Did you really just suggest someone use an XQD card?? :-0 😀

        • Spy Black

          Hey, it’s not doing what he says it’s supposed to be doing, the XQD card is supposed to be the fastest card, right/? Yet apparently the numbers aren’t adding up as they should, which raises another question about all these specs.

          • PhilK

            I recall reading here that at least on the D500, if you have both XQD and SD installed it handicapps the XQD transfer rate.

            I doubt that is because Nikon is playing some sneaky game to make SD look bad, but because there are likely technical challenges in trying to write to 2 widely performance-disparate formats at the same time.

            (Eg: how do you indicate with the “write LED” that the XQD is finished writing files but the SD is not? If you make the LED track the XQD state, you risk users corrupting data by removing SD cards before the write to SD process is complete. If you make the LED track the SD card write process, you make XQD appear slower than it really is. Then there is the challenge of mirroring mode, copying files to 2 widely performance-disparate formats – no way can you ever go faster than the SD interface in such a scenario. Etc.)

          • Kyle Medina

            The culprit is using the battery grip battery. The battery in the grip drastically changes the buffer spec. You also have to shoot in 14-bit lossless compressed without the grip to reach the marketed of 51 shots.

    • VanHoff

      Did you know that applying lens profile correction, D-lightning and stuff like that slows down the buffer rendering of the D850?

      • Not much. Mine slowed down by approx 3 frames even with all that stuff applied.

      • Kyle Medina

        If you want 9fps you have to use the EN-EL18b BUT! that lowers your buffer from 51 to 29. Pick your poison.

  • decentrist

    Where’s the projected resale after 6 months?

    • Rick Porter

      Nikon wins that. At least they somewhat protect the investment of their customers. Sony doesn’t give a crap about the customers investment.

      • Eric Calabros

        Camera shouldn’t be an investment item. But yea, Sony sees even the professional cameras as consumer toys.

  • I sense some trolling here. I wonder if anyone will upgrade to the new Sony a7rIII camera… probably not

    • Tony

      I am definitely not a troll, but the advent of the Sony A7R III has at least made me reconsider my D850 pre-order (which has been outstanding for almost 2 months, with my dealer still having no idea when to expect stock).

      I have a significant investment in Nikon equipment and am looking to upgrade my battered D800, which I use primarily for landscape purposes. The options are DSLR (i.e. D850) or mirrorless (Sony A7R II/III, or possibly in the future Nikon FF mirrorless). The primary mirrorless attractions for me are somewhat reduced bulk and weight (important when hiking) and static focus accuracy (AF fine tune on DSLR’s is time-consuming and imprecise). The DSLR attraction is obviously being able to remain
      with my current Nikon system which has served me well over many years. I am not sure that IQ will be a big differentiating factor (both options are good). I originally made the decision to go with the D850 rather than the Sony A7R II both because it is easier and cheaper to stay with my existing system and because there were some aspects of the Sony A7R II which were not satisfactory from my point of view (single card slot, poor battery life, …).

      Now that the Sony A7R III addresses some of the deficiencies of the II model (e.g. dual card slots, improved battery life) and given that the body itself is more reasonably priced in the UK (£3200 for A7RIII against £3500 for D850) the Nikon/Sony choice has become a much closer call. At the moment I am still perservering with my D850 pre-order, but I may still change my mind.

    • Per Kristoffersson

      Guessing those who were already considering a switch to an A7Rmk2 will go with the A7Rmk3. And those who always need to have the very latest camera body surely will. Other than that I sincerely doubt that people outside of Sony E-moun will be lining up to get an A7Rmk3. Even as an A-mount user this does not tempt me at all.

  • saywhatuwill

    Canon has a 50.6MP camera. Is there a reason why it wasn’t used for the comparisons?

    • Athanasius Kirchner

      It’s slow, uses the old sensor tech, only shoots 1080p… It’s a different tool, really.

      • notsosmart

        I agreee, but on the other hand all that you said can be said about 5D IV too.

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          Not really, the sensor is way more competitive in DR, it shoots faster, records 4K, and is a good all rounder (versus the very specialized 5DS).

      • saywhatuwill

        I see. I’m not a Canon guy but I knew they had a 50mp camera so I was a bit confused.

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          Yeah, the 5DS would just look worse than the 5DIV in the table.

    • dabug91

      It’s junk, and not even in the same class as these cameras.

  • sickheadache

    Sony must of had some Canon People at the headquarters… Let’s produce the same old tired 2 year plus sensor…And still also produce a 1/2 ass product. Lol. This was shocking…A big sort of nothing…Oh canon fan boys know now how Sony fans are doing today! Shocking!!!

    • Heath Wirt

      The tired old sensor with 15 stops of dynamic range. 🙂

      • PhilK

        DPreview said in their preview of the A7RII that that claim is probably bogus.

    • PhilK

      Well, clearly their objective of iterating models every 2 years or less is hard to maintain if they actually have to make major improvements each time. 😉

    • Athanasius Kirchner

      What is the D850, then? Sure, the sensor is new to Nikon, but the A7RII was using a related chip for over two years.

      • sickheadache

        Thanks Troll.

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          You’re welcome, Nikon troll @_@

  • MonkeySpanner

    Has Nikon gone away from Sony sensors? Is the d500 20mp sensor a Sony?

    • Apparently they have because the D850 and the a7rIII use different sensors.

      • tomskyphoto

        The A7RIII simply uses its predecessor’s sensor much like the D810 did. Apparently Sony decided that the only marginal improvements in CMOS sensor technology during the recent few years didn’t justify a costly redesign of the sensor yet. Comparing the A7RII to the D850 in regards of sensor performance pretty much confirms that.

        But looking at the D850’s sensor performance – including the very peculiar dual gain kicking in at ISO 400 – everything about it screams Sony IMX. Just optimized for a lower base ISO with higher DR at the sacrifice of an almost unnoticeable worse DR at higher ISO.

        I’m still not convinced that the D850 doesn’t use a Sony sensor. But sooner or later we’ll see anyways and not that it would matter much.

        • A. F.O.

          Does it use does it not.
          I think the most important thing is Nikon saying it is a Nikon design sensor. Who really is making it is irrelevant because nikon doesn’t have a sensor factory and perhaps doesn’t need one.

          • tomskyphoto

            Nikon have made these unsubstantiated claims before and the sensors eventually turned out to be only slightly tweaked standard Sony designs.

            And one can’t just come up with a fancy new sensor design and go to whatever fab they please. The whole process has to be aligned with the fab’s capabilities from the very start; one more reason for Nikon to stay with Sony as their long-standing sensor technology partner.

            But as I said, we’ll see.

        • I think it would have been cheaper for Nikon to use the existing 42MP sensor from Sony and achieve the same results.

          • tomskyphoto

            With OSPDAF technology? I doubt Sony would have given it to them. To me the 850’s sensor looks like the A7RII/III’s sans the OSPDAF. Marginally smaller pixel pitch and moderate resolution increase by omitting the PDAF sensor elements from the photosensitive area.

            • Athanasius Kirchner

              That makes a lot of sense. Heck, it could be the product of the regained PDAF sensels alone. This would explain how Nikon managed to produce such rich 4K footage despite the numbers not adding up (Sony specifically settled on 42MP to make 4K downsampling easier and better-looking).

    • tomskyphoto

      The D500 sensor is a Sony IMX321. IMX means it’s a true Sony design and not one of their recently purchased sensor manufacturing businesses like Toshiba’s.

      • John Alexander

        Sony bought Toshiba sensor manufacturing

        • Athanasius Kirchner

          Yes, tomskyphoto is saying that, despite Sony buying Toshiba’s sensor gig, they still use different codes for chips (IMX is reserved for Sony designs, not made by a subsidiary or acquired fab).

  • Raymond Garcia

    People, go buy the a7r-iii or the D850, and in the process I will be looking to buy that new shinny D810 for under $1,500

    • A. F.O.

      🙂

  • KevinJP

    This video is a troll. Matt is a good at shooting but he does not know how too use camera and for tech stuff, he is a completely noob. I can get about 50 shots 14bit lossless compressed raw. Even by hitting the buffer, it is still pretty fast.

    • Kyle Medina

      Why buy a camera when you don’t use the full data. Waste of money. You only get 29 in uncompressed. Its backdoor marketing by Nikon. Just like the D5 “it shoots at 1 million ISO!”

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/32327e298921d9a3e937a85a33f0c1702c766f1e2a4f3516a3f8f3700faf7961.jpg

      • danceprotog

        Same marketing gimmick as with Sony’s “eye-auto focus”, who shoots portraits of people only to get the eye in focus and the rest of the face blurry?… Oh I forgot, amateurs do it all the time.

        • Kyle Medina

          What? Eye-auto focus has nothing to do with bokeh.

      • KevinJP

        Why shoot uncompressed while you can shot lossless compressed RAW which remains the same IQ but just smaller file size. You can save a lot of space for you diver. There is literally no down side to shoot lossless compressed Raw. Waste of space.

        • Bill Ferris

          Exactly. For the photographer shooting sports or other fast action where both 9 fps and a deep buffer are needed, 12-bit compressed RAW will deliver a 56 exposure buffer – more than enough, even for “spray & pray” folks.

      • Bill Ferris

        Again, the chart you’re posting doesn’t reflect performance with the EN-EL18b battery. Here’s the relevant chart. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5634d3a55b96f52c4ae3ece52b8a7ea30a156df77e0c983f45356fe91abedb14.png

  • Bill Ferris

    In point of fact, the camera performs exactly to spec in the video. Set to capture 14-bit uncompressed, the buffer fills at 24 exposures. (Set the play speed to 25% and count the exposures until the burst rate slows) Set to 12-bit uncompressed, the buffer fills at 39 exposures. Both are exactly to spec.

    • Kyle Medina

      12 bit uncompressed is rated at 55

      • Bill Ferris

        The buffer capacity chart you posted has been cropped to misrepresent the camera’s performance specs. I’ve appended the actual buffer capacity chart from the D850 manual.

        Watch the video starting at 5:40 and count the frames in each burst. Per my earlier comment, the camera performs exactly to spec: 24 exposures when shooting 14-bit uncompressed RAW with the battery grip and EN-EL18b, and 39 exposures when shooting 12-bit uncompressed with the EN-EL18b.

        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/5634d3a55b96f52c4ae3ece52b8a7ea30a156df77e0c983f45356fe91abedb14.png

        • Kyle Medina

          My charts was very relevant, they are real numbers. Battery grip holds back the camera which makes no sense.

          • Bill Ferris

            Whether or not you admit the cropped chart you’ve been peddling is wrong, is irrelevant. The fact is your chart is wrong. The fact is I’ve posted the correct chart and the camera in the video you posted is performing exactly to spec.

            • Kyle Medina

              I didn’t crop it, I took it from page 362. Go ahead and find it. Though you showed both batteries specs for buffer. So nobody was really wrong, so relax. To get 51 you have to use a slightly smaller compression and no grip. Which is the dumbest setup. If you are spending $3k on a camera. You would be shooting in uncompressed for maximum data, that’s why everyone bought one. Its backdoor marketing.

            • Bill Ferris

              “nobody was really wrong.” You were wrong. Just admit it and move on.

            • Kyle Medina

              You can see that my same numbers where also in your list. You’re also defending a YouTuber who still thinks he is right and wont understand what is causing him to get the less than the marketed 51, the battery. Move on man-child or do you have to have the last word in every debate?

            • Bill Ferris

              Child.

            • Bill Ferris

              So, name-calling is the best you’ve got?

            • Kyle Medina

              Please, you deleted your post responding back with “child”.” Stop with the fake white knight. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/a2064c1fe80c8dbabd90ff3d3cbf5f52ff84f23693883a4e2130fed3012e0bd5.png

            • Kyle Medina

              Send me your PDF link to your manual

            • Bill Ferris

              Try Googling “Nikon D850 manual PDF”. Would you like help finding Google?

            • Kyle Medina

              Nope, already found it. You share the battery grip manual and I was using d850 manual. Still same results.

        • Kyle Medina
    • Kyle Medina
  • John Mackay

    A7r3 shots 76 compressed raw, not jpegs. I think that is 14 bit still but I am not 100%

  • karayuschij

    Why Canon 5D Mk IV and not Canon 5Ds?

  • Piooof

    Regarding the weight, the difference is impressive on paper but the comparison is only fair if you don’t shoot very much. If yo do need the 1500+ shots the D850 affords on a single battery, you need to add 2 spare Sony batteries, and then the cumulated weight is 29 oz, not that far from the D850’s 32.3 oz (a similar comparison with the 5D gives 26.2 oz vs. 28.2 oz). So mirrorless shaves you only 2-3 oz at most (completely irrelevant if you lug high-quality lenses with it).

    • Michiel953

      Perceived weight is a function of absolute weight and ergonomics. Hang a D850 plus 600grs prime (or a zoom, ha ha) around your neck and you won’t feel very comfortable after a while (and your chestbone will have a severe dent). Carry one (600grs prime) in your righthand, wrist strap, no problem.

      A7xx? The dent won’t be less, but it doesn’t carry all that well in your right hand.

    • Exynos

      On Sony A9 , I get 2500 to 3000 shots in single battery … The A7r3 uses the same A9 battery.

      • tomskyphoto

        Of course Mr. Teletubby – what else can your A9 do? Walk on water or turn that into wine?

        Your continous spamming of other photography forums with irrelevant and often most likely personally made up Sony trivia and exaggerated claims is nothing but annoying. And I’m saying this as an A7RII owner…

      • Piooof

        The figure of 530 shots is on Sony’s website. The same website annouces 480 shots for your A9. It’s the CIPA standard, which is conservative. But to reach 6 times the CIPA battery life you must have special skills.

    • Connor

      Having come from two A7Rii’s to a D850 the size and weight thing doesn’t bother me. yes with the Sony and one or two lenses it was a little bit smaller. But once you start putting 24-70 70-200 it becomes irrelevant and the grip got uncomfortable fast compared to my D850 that balances out nicely regardless of the glass I put on it not to mention the better control layout for changing things quickly.

  • Don’t site a video. Have you tried it yourself? I have.

    • Kyle Medina

      I don’t know how to site a video.

      • You did link that video. That’s what I meant by siting.

        • Kyle Medina

          siting? I never built anything

          • Michiel953

            Possibly, just possibly, he meant “cite”? LoL!

            • Kyle Medina

              Lol

  • Oh yeah, no, I know. It’s been great on all my Nikons. I was wondering why it’s rated so low on the 5Dmkvi.

  • Дмитрий

    WEIGHT
    Sony a7R III: 23.2 ounces
    Canon 5D Mk IV: 28.2 ounces
    Nikon D850: 32.3 ounces

    • tomskyphoto

      Yes, we can read – anything else you wanted to say?

  • Why is the comparison with the 5D not the 5Ds/5DsR? That would seem like a better match.

    • John Mackay

      On resolution just about, 12 mpix more vs 8 less, but the 5d4 is the non sports flagship like the d850 and the a7r2 is for Sony. The 5DSR could make sense as an add on.

      • I don’t agree, it’s just that Canon has two full frame bodies with different specs in that “non flagship” range, Nikon and Sony just one.

        • John Mackay

          I didn’t say “non flagship”, I said “non sports flagship”, so you can’t quote that. The 5DSR has worse AF than the 5d4 and is the only one of the 4 not to have 4k video. It is not recommended as canons standard work horse camera, it is the camera if you need high resolution (it can be but the file sizes are too big and the dynamic range too low if you don’t need the resolution). As I said, it makes sense to include too, but that is not the focus of these new models. The a7r2 and d800 are already high resolution, it is about having the complete package in one body, resolution, sports and video which better matches the 5d4.

  • Wow, that D850 battery life. So you basically have to throw in 2-3 extra A7R3 batteries in order to match the D850’s usability. And there goes your “mirrorless weight advantage!”

    Then again, the Sigma 12-24mm f/4 versus the Sony 12-24mm f/4 is about a pound of mirrorless weight advantage, indeed, so there’s that if you’re into slow wide lenses.

    • Chaitanya

      D850 accepts D5 battery via the grip and that is even bigger advantage for shooter who want to shoot all day long.

    • John Mackay

      No, the rated battery life for these mirrorless is way off if it is anything like the a9. The a9 takes thousands and thousands of shots on a single battery, everyone who has one says the same so I don’t just have a magic copy. Early reports of the riii are the same. I don’t know how much that relies on the electronic shutter, but certainly not entirely. D850 is probably a little better, certainly if there is a lot of stand by time, but going by the a9 one battery will do the day, have a second for peace of mind like you would with any camera.

      • Okay, considering the massive difference in FPS, it is expected that some cameras get a whole lot more shots out of a single battery, because they’r rattling off 2-4 shots every time instead of just one. Depends on your shooting style.

        Instead, let’s consider hours of shooting. You say “all day”, but I’m assuming you mean a day that isn’t very heavily camera-to-your eye all day long, like a wedding or something. I expect I’d still need at least two batteries to be able to shoot a 10-12 hour wedding, which is still an amazing feat compared to the laughable performance I got out of the A7R2 when shooting a couple ~14 hour Hindu weddings a couple years ago. I had to keep an Anker 20,000 man battery in my pocket and leave the camera plugged in almost 100% of the time, otherwise I’d be hunting for wall outlets all day long. :-

        • John Mackay

          14 hour wedding, yea, 2 a9 batteries seems about right. I think the a9 also saves a lot of power as it has no moving parts, no shutter useage and no flappy mirror. The a7r2 has always seemed a bit… flaky, amazing sensor though. If the mark 3 fixes everything it should be great. Early reports are very good… apart from the menus of course… Part of Sony’s brand recognition I think

  • Mike

    D850 is only 9 ounces (little over half a pound) than the Sony. Interesting. Add any Sony or Zeiss lens and it’s likely heavier and less ergonomic than the D850 with comparible lens. But ya, down with DSLRs!

    • John Mackay

      Ergonomics is fair, but what lenses of equivalent quality are the Sony/zeiss versions so much heavier than? Sony have just released the remarkably light 16-35 f2.8 and 12-24 f4, and the new 24-105 looks great and 200g lighter than the excellent sigma version.

  • Heath Wirt

    Disappointing to say the least, especially after spending almost a grand on the grip.

    • Kyle Medina

      Yeah, thats terrible.

  • Didn’t they say they DOUBLED the battery capacity for the new A7? Yet rated for almost a quarter of the life of the D850.
    Really does show the toylike nature people are always deriding it for having. ISO 100 base kills it for me even more.
    If you make the camera too small for a realistic battery, meaning you have to add a grip, then why make it too small to begin with?

    I want to want a Sony, don’t get me wrong here, but I have the impression they add as many bells and whistles to things as possible in a hope to distract you from major glaring failures. You are not going to see on the box “Only 25% of the CIPA battery life of our competitor! Wow!”

  • br0xibear

    Kai’s take on the A7R III Hands-on Preview…

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq8ZWpDtWMM

  • BlueBomberTurbo

    Correction:

    A7R III can shoot 76 compressed RAW and RAW + JPG frames before the buffer fills. It’s only limited to 28 with uncompressed RAW.

  • Yitzchal

    The Sony A7rIII will crush the Nikon D850… 15 stops of dynamic range; ibis, faster, cheaper, better IQ, easy use of legacy glass…

  • Ado

    So if you are a proffesional wedding photographer, you’ll have to take 5 or 6 extra batteries with you if you choose Sony. Nikon just one extra battery. Canon….agh, also a lot.

  • outkasted

    1 frame per second faster that D850 but how long for buffer to clear?

  • RC Jenkins

    (For consistency)

    Autofocusing:

    D850:
    153 points. 99 cross-type sensors, of which 55 (35 cross-type sensors) are available for selection

  • onthedot

    God bless Sony, but any serious photographer wants a system they can depend on being there, decade after decade. Canon lost me from FD to the new mount, but I used both Nikon and Canon, so I just followed Nikon through the digital world. So many manufacturers come out with the newest system, and it dies 7 years later. It takes me 7 years to build the system I like, and I cant have it end in its prime (Rollei/flex, Mamiyas… I believe the Leica S… left or will leave people in a lurch).

  • John Asmussen

    I would like to know how many shots it can takt before its time to service normal Nikon shutter count is 150.000 how many is Sony?

  • John Asmussen

    Also i hope some Nikon buyer jump to Sony, then there might get my Nikon D850 Faster 🙂

  • D850 is doing well.

  • Nesto

    I’d love a modular piece like they used in the D5, it proves they can do it.

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