Korean “comfort women” photographer wins lawsuit against Nikon

Daily Mail: Korean "comfort women" photographer wins lawsuit against Nikon (more on that story from 2012):

A Japanese court on Friday ordered camera maker Nikon to pay damages to a South Korean photographer whose Tokyo exhibition on Japanese wartime sex slaves was temporarily cancelled, the company said.

The Tokyo District Court ordered Nikon to pay 1.1 million yen ($9,100) to Japan-based cameraman Ahn Sehong, a company spokesman told AFP.

Ahn filed a lawsuit in 2012, demanding compensation of 14 million yen, after Nikon abruptly cancelled his event scheduled to be held at Nikon Salon in Tokyo, a site where people can hold individual exhibitions.

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  • Eric Calabros

    Now the photographer can buy a 500mm lens with that money to shoot Pro DX shooters starving in the mud

    • Because there’s a comical parallel between waiting for a new piece of camera gear and being forcibly and repeatedly raped by 100’s of men for years.

      • well said!

      • Patrick O’Connor

        I’m pretty sure the photographer wasn’t “forcibly and repeatedly raped by 100’s of men for years.”

        • His subjects were.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            Eric’s comment wasn’t about the “comfort” women. There’s nothing funny about their situation but you can’t equate the photographer’s settlement with any kind of reparations for those women.

            • Eric drew a parallel between the so-called “Comfort Women” – the subjects of the exhibition that was cancelled – and those waiting for pro DX equipment. The clue is in the word “discomfort”.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Hmm. That’s not what I got out of it. I thought it was a simple play on words.
              Eric?

            • mikeswitz

              Um, no. Read it again.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I see your point but, from what little I can tell about Eric, I don’t think it was in any way malicious or making light of the women. I could easily see one of my sons, who’s a little older than Eric, making a similar joke but with innocent intentions. In these kinds of cases, I try to weigh the possibilities against the source. Of course I could be wrong and often am.

            • mikeswitz

              Agreed, sometimes bad jokes are just that. I’m sure Eric meant no harm.

            • Sorry, Barty, but I think it’s maybe you that drew the parallel, not Eric. To me it was a snarky comment, the irony of which further highlighted the egregious nature of the rapists.

            • “discomfort” is an obvious play on words. In this case it touches on a very dark subject matter.

            • i just didn’t read it as exploiting the distress of these women for the sake of getting a laugh. It made you laugh at those who are holding out for DX and in turn pointed out how terrible the rapists were.

      • br0xibear

        Hi Barty,
        I’ve read and discussed things with Eric for a long time here on nikonrumors, and he’s really not the type of person who would make nasty comments.
        Yes his play on the word “comfort” is misjudged, but I don’t think it’s anything more than that.
        And you’re right, it’s an extremely serious subject, not a place for comical parallels of any sort.
        Anyways, just wanted to wish Peter (Admin) and all those on nikonrumors a good Christmas.

        • I’ve read various comments from Eric here over the years too, and I don’t have any reason to think that he was being intentionally “nasty”. I think “misjudged” is probably correct.

          • Eric Calabros

            Your concern about “parallels” reminds me The Big Lebowsky movie, where Walter says “Am I the only one around here who care about rules?” while holding his gun, and as Dude did, I just can say “Will you just take it easy man?”
            Comfort, is not even a correct translation of what they meant about those women and yet you draw a red circle around that? What’s next? We’re not allowed to play with the word “woman”?
            I am from a country where people may end up in prison just because of so called “inappropriate wording” about a man lived thousands years ago, so I’m systemically aware about consequences of making fun. What I didn’t know was that Politically Correct Police forces are not just ruling in my country, they are everywhere.
            I stop writing here in NR from now on.
            “I mark it zero”, wish it makes you happy, Walter.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Don’t take it to heart. One of the unfortunate effects of the anonymity of the internet is the dehumanization of our fellow man, evidenced by harsh rhetoric and judgements that might never cross one’s mind in a face-to-face situation.
              People usually mean well even when those efforts injure others.

            • F90toF6

              Eric I also read your previous comment with a disrespectful parallel between women being raped and camera gear. Maybe you didn’t mean any harm when you wrote it but if you comment publicly on a serious topic such as this then you must consider what you say.

              It’s not about political correctness or people trying to silence you but if something is writing that others take offence to then there is no harm in saying so.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I basically agree with you except that, these days, people take offense at pretty much everything you say. If we refrain from saying/writing anything that might offend someone, we might as well be zombies. I will ALWAYS say/write what I think with appropriate consideration for my audience. But I will be the sole arbiter of what is appropriate consideration.

            • Eric Calabros

              I didn’t say anything wrong, and I didn’t insult anyone. But responses are beyond ridiculous.
              I removed what I wrote, and will never post a comment here again.
              Thanks Admin, and sorry for ignition of this silly conversations. Good luck to you all.

            • Did I do something wrong?

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I’m not sure what benefit there was to posting this article but the fallout…Wow!

            • It’s Nikon related news and I have reported on that topic before. Maybe it also supports my theory that Nikon doing business with Samsung will not go well in Japan.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I don’t remember it being as intense in the past but that’s my fault. I should let people speak their mind without comment but …

              Sorry.

              I’m not sure how this relates to their doing business with Samsung, though. Whatever else, Asians tend to be very pragmatic when it comes to making a dollar. Or Yen. Or Won.

              My biggest concern is for Eric. I’d miss his commentaries.

            • Mox Factor

              nah, but you should expect subjects like these will bring out every kind of viewpoints and some will inevitably clash. have a good holiday season and keep posting.

            • F90toF6

              Eric we have all said things in our lives that maybe someone else took in a different context. As I said maybe you didn’t intend to offend but a few people did take offence.

              I have read through the comments and I don’t believe anyone attacked you but just pointed out how they interpreted what you wrote.

              Reminds me of an article on Steve Huff by Jason Howe that used the Japanese Rising Sun flag and he didn’t realise that the flag offends people in Asia. He changed the flag jpg, learnt from it and moved on.

              http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2013/06/13/user-report-the-japanese-summilux-canon-501-4-ltm-by-jason-howe/

  • Anomouse

    Kind of a lowball settlement considering the Nikon Gallery is a pretty prestigious exhibit space that would have helped his career. And he probably spent at least $9100 on preparing his exhibit, much less shipping it to Japan.

    • AYWY

      True, after all the original amount pursued was to the tune of 110,000 USD….

      It is still a kind of ideological win, though I believe Nikon was just caught in a bad situation. They simply bowed to right-wing politics. Japan needs a whole generation of undead old men in high positions to die off before they can move on and settle with the ghosts of WW2.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        Easy to say but most westerners don’t understand the various Asian cultures and their way of thinking. Add to that the fact, those “undead old men” aren’t the ones who committed the crimes but a lot of folks will blame them, demand apologies from them and seek reparations from them.
        In America, most of us have no problem admitting what our ancestors (not mine but still…) did with slavery and Jim Crow laws, etc.. but if anyone comes to me with their hand out, I’ll shake it and that’s all.

        • Lorenzo Amato

          Except that the politicians in charge at the government, in Japan, are direct descendents of those rapists (or better, the generals ordering the soldiers to “comfort” themselves that way), or even worse the doctors performing medical experiments on war prisonners, and they often are very public in saying how much they are proud of this heritage. Consider also that there are still eye-witness and victims alive from that period. So, it’s not ancient history, it’s happened yesterday.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            So you’re willing to be held liable for anything your ancestors have done? And, once again, I am not defending anyone but rather, I’m saying: don’t judge others unless you want to be judged for your sins. I, personally, have way too many to endure judgment.

            • Lorenzo Amato

              Yes, if I honor the memory of a nazi grandfather (or, in my case, of an Italian Fascist grandfather), and, more specifically, if I honor the memory of what he did as a soldier, then I AM accepting the responsibility of being judged for that. I loved my grandfather, but I (and my entire family) never accepted his attachment to the Italian neo-Fascist party, nor we ever wanted to “honor” him as a former soldier, although, mind you, he has never done anything against any militar or moral code (he was captured and judged in England, and found innocent). So: YES, you honor bad things your father or g.father did, then you are sharing the heritage of those things. And this is what these politicians do. They have the same family name of many criminals condemned for atrocious crimes, as they are their direct grandchildren. They honor their horrible acts in public and via “hidden” quotes or messages. Try and google “Abe + 731” and see the picture: that’s a message to all who know, saying that he is proud of what that number represents. So, YES, this is responsibility, and liability, because it is accepted and honored WILLINGLY by these politicians. No need to say that those who vote these politicians, and in general candidates who claim to be proud of what happened in east Asia, are backing-up, and are responsible for what these politicians say and do. Democracy is also taking responsibility of those you vote, and if the government you vote and support has vetoed an exhibition about war crimes that this same government is actively deying and deleting from history books, while at the same time honoring with public ceremonies their relatives who promoted those crimes, then YES, YES, YES, you are liable.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Liable to God. Sorry to be so brief but there’s really nothing else to say.

            • Lorenzo Amato

              Leave God out of this. Men did choose to rape and kill other men and women, not God. And today men decide to honor the rapists, not God. Other men have the duty to judge them. And creating awareness of what happened is part of this duty. While opposing the truth is part of the evil. And apparently Nikon took part in this. Fear of the government, apparently. God has nothing to do with this. Maybe the Devil, but certainly not God.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              So you think we’re a higher power than God. Duly noted.

            • Lorenzo Amato

              Ok, sorry, but these last answers are not honest answers. Now I really see why other people say that you lie and cheat. I don’t use those terms, but I see their points. You are using God as an excuse to not care and not take responsibility about matters that happened to other human beings, and that concern also your “beloved hobby”. If you think that owning a Nikon and supporting Nikon in any circumstance is more important than caring for war victims, go on. I am preatty sure that God is not with you, especially because you are using His name as a substitute for “I don’t give a crap”.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Really? That’s what you’ve gotten out of all this?

              Anyway, nice owl photo. Did you take it?

            • DieMusik

              so much respect for you.

          • ZoetMB

            I’m not buying it. While I agree that since this was a Government policy, the Government should apologize (and possibly compensate), I do not blame the sons for the sins of the father. Why should I take any responsibility for anything bad my father or my grandfather did? I had no control over their actions.

            As far as I’m concerned, no one gets blamed for anything in WWII who was under the age of 15 when the war ended in 1945. That means anyone born after 1930 (anyone younger than 85) is “off-the-hook”.

            The only exception I would make is anyone who benefitted financially from the suffering of others. Many Jews for example had their homes and belongings (such as art) stolen from them during the war. They deserve that back.

            Similarly, I don’t blame anyone who is descended from slave owners in the U.S. You can’t choose your parents and grandparents, etc.

            • Lorenzo Amato

              Then what I wrote was not clear eough. It’s not a matter of being a descendant, it’s a matter of saying aloud of being proud of those actions. If my father raped a woman, I would apologize to the victim, or maybe I would not say anything, dunno, and this would not make me responsible of anything. But being public about saying that my father did the right thing in raping that woman actually makes me part of the problem. I don’t know how else I can say this very basic thing. Yes, this is responsibility, and since we live in a democratic world, it’s shared by all those who vote the people who say so.

            • peter w

              I think you made yourself quite clear Lorenzo. Not responsable for the act in anyway, responsible for denial.
              There should be a time, in which this should lose its relevance. It would be silly if the people of Carthago – who are they? – would still be blaming the Romans – who are they? – for the destruction of their city 150 years BC. Hey, isn’t this what’s happening in the Balcan all over the time? Wars in remembrance of troubles that ‘started’ in 1389.
              At least at a certain moment, the denial in itself is of no other relevance other than being stupid. As such, it is a sign of not being able to handle critisism and a severe lack of flexibility. Bad news.
              However, not only may this denial be felt as offensive, it is often used to for provocation, and to enhance animosity. Very bad news.

              I would have liked to see my sensor clean from this kind of spots.

    • petervandever

      He lives in Tokyo.

  • FountainHead

    The cancellation was the best publicity possible.

    • Lorenzo Amato

      For him as a photographer yes. For this subject-matter to be known in Japan, no. And that was the point of the exhibit.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        I don’t know about that. I think more Japanese will be drawn to the subject by the publicity of the case than would actually go to see it. I’m thinking the only ones who would attend are already familiar with the subject and are overtly sympathetic to the cause which is a good position to take. In any case, I’m guessing the photos are available on-line for anyone interested.

      • FountainHead

        Actually, I disagree.
        The cancellation probably brought more coverage than if the exhibition had just gone on normally.

        People are waking up to the horrors that were perpetrated on these women. Whichever way that comes about is great with me.

        • Lorenzo Amato

          Sadly, I disagree. The cancellation is news only in Western countries, not in Japan. Here nobody knows anything about this (I live in Japan, and I happen to talk about these subjects once in a while; people simply don’t know what happened, and don’t want to know).

          • Patrick O’Connor

            Of course I don’t know your circumstances but in my experience, the degree to which Japanese will share anything with you depends on your relationship with the individual. I would certainly accept any conversations you’ve had with people who are close to you as accurate but not so much with mere acquaintances.
            Just out of curiosity, where do you live in Japan?

            • Lorenzo Amato

              Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, near Hon-komagome station. Why you ask? Anyhow, I had this conversation while talking about tentative revolutions with killings of “innocent” rich people in Sicily, XIXth century. Ppl were shocked by what I was telling (actually teaching) them, and said this could never happen in Japan, ’cause for Japanese soldiers the only ennemies are the ennemy soldiers, not the civilians. I pointed out that XXth century taught us otherwise, and I was answered that maybe, “maybe”, something may have happened in east Asia, but nothing was certain about those facts. This is, of course, ignorance, fuelled by misplaced patriottism. They were being sincere about this. One thing you learn about Japanese people is that they never show their pride to people they don’t know. So 1) I knew them, and they knew me well, 2) they were saying what they actually thought about the matter.

            • Lorenzo Amato

              At this point I have to stop posting here. I have a problem with the visualization of the messages (everything I write ends up being misplaced, and I cannot see what I am typing). So it’s quite hard to address such an important (and also personal) argument in this technically hard way. I hope the admin will manage to solve these technical problems. See you soon.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I’m having the same problem. I asked someone else if they were having the problem but received no response. I’ve been typing my responses in Notepad and copy/pasting them into the reply box.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Just curious. No hidden agenda or anything. I’ve been all over Japan and always ask people where they live/lived/traveled/etc.

              Thanks for relating your experience. There’s really nothing to add to, or subtract from, it.

          • FountainHead

            At least the foreign ministers meeting in Seoul today is a step forward.

  • LaunchShipCaptain

    The story about comfort women is pretty amazing. Even European women were brought over just to be raped by Japanese men during that time.

    No wonder they tried for decades to try to hide the story and sweep it under the rug.

  • J.R.

    It is disgusting how the Japanese people are still trying to deny, cover up, & lie about their crimes against humanity to this very day. Such a contrast to the honest Germans who still voluntarily exhibit the Holocaust sites in their own country to their own German people so that history will not be repeated.
    Shame on you all Japanese. Learn from the Germans what true honesty & respect for humanity is.

    • Simon Nied

      Well said Sir. I don’t usually comment here, but it must be said that Japan committed one of the worst WWII atrocities. Just read “Rape of Nanking” or find something about Unit 731 and the worst part of it that they still try to cover those actions.

      To Nikon:

      It is a shame what you have done! Not only because you try censored historical facts, but because you act against fellow photographer, your customer and artist.

    • Patrick O’Connor

      Just out of curiosity…which particular mile did you walk in Japanese shoes?
      Personally, I think it’s disgusting how people make judgements against an entire people based on the actions of a relative few, while they stand on the sidelines as if they were without sin.
      That said, I hold nothing against the individuals in either case because we’re all just trying to do our best, even when we fail miserably.

      • J.R.

        70 years of lying, denial, & whitewashing of history on a ‘national level’ by the Japanese government, & the majority of the Japanese people allowing this cheating to continue on for 70 long years… compare this to how the German government & people to this day handled their past & showed respect to the rest of humanity with honesty & courage for the last 70 years. The two behaved in a completely opposite manner. This is why the United Nations, The European Parliament, The American Congress, & The American Historical Association, etc. already all sent formal warnings to the Japanese government & people urging them to stop their CONTINUED whitewashing of history & denial of crimes.
        Your ignorance is disgusting.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          Two completely different nations, cultures, and situations. And I don’t really care what any of those groups, or their individuals, say or think.
          Finally, you should really look into removing the beam from your eye before attempting to remove the speck from your brothers’.

          • J.R.

            The United Nations, The European Parliament, The American Congress, The American Historical Association, The Australian Government, the Dutch Government, etc. already all DISAGREE with your ignorant nonsense.
            This is why they have already all sent formal warnings to the Japanese Government & People urging them to stop their CONTINUED whitewashing of history & denial of crimes.

            PS.) I noticed that you erased the last part of your writing where you accused me of “ignorance” first.
            And you accuse me of mistaking disagreement for ignorance? Very funny.
            What a shameless LYING hypocrite child you are.
            Please CONTINUE on supporting Japan’s dirty lies against humanity.

            • America has whitewashed enough of IT’S history to cover the Great Wall. So, too, many other nations. So, if you want to talk about hypocrisy, you can start there. I laugh my ass off every time I hear an American official criticize China for human rights violations while we incarcerate more individuals than any other country…on an absolute as well as per-capita basis.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              That’s more like it. 🙂 The bulk of individuals America incarcerates deserve it. Those few who don’t, are an unfortunate but unavoidable byproduct of our imperfect but better-than-most judicial system.

            • So, either you admit that America somehow produces more miscreants than other countries, or other countries are filled with crazed scofflaws running amuck. Patrick, I can go to Canada and because we are so culturally similar, I hardly feel like I’ve left the US. Yet, they jail their citizens at a rate of one EIGTH of America. Let’s face it, something isn’t correct about that.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I agree there’s a problem but probably disagree about what it is. The more freedom you give individuals, the more likely some are to abuse it. Put another way, dictatorships have very few real criminals, they fill their jails, primarily with people craving freedom.

              I prefer the former condition.

            • Yeah, it’s probably that totalitarian state we call Canada. :-).

            • Patrick O’Connor

              🙂
              Well, in a country of about 37 people, if you commit a crime, everyone will know!

            • peevee

              More that 90% of crimes in the US are committed by blacks and hispanics, who’s numbers are negligible in Canada. That is your explanation. Remove black and hispanics from the statistics (both number of crimes and population), and our crime is the same or lower as in Europe and Canada.

            • Well, I guess we can take The Donald’s advice and ship all of them off somewhere. Then you’ll have to find another boogey man to blame for all your problems. Spectacular ignorance.

            • peevee

              You call the cold hard statistical facts a “boogey man”? And it will be hard to ship American criminals anywhere, who would take the scum? It is not 1800s when Liberia accepted our freed slaves (now one of the poorest and most criminal countries in the world), too late now.
              But maybe it is a good idea to reform our criminal justice system – maybe time to stop letting 80%+ of criminals go free on probation and incarcerate them instead? And stop letting criminals use prisons as crime universities – interacting with each other, learning criminal ways from each other? Solitary only, even if for shorter prison terms, would be much better. Maybe then we would not have 80%+ recidivism rates within 5 years of release (and that is only with those who are caught within 5 years, in practice it is close to 100%).

            • yeah, OK and stuff.

            • ZoetMB

              That’s ridiculous. The majority of people in U.S. prisons and jails are there for non-violent drug offenses under the “three strikes you’re out” policies and poor people who couldn’t afford decent legal representation.

              Our judicial system is certainly not “better than most”. It’s a system totally geared to favor the rich. Smoke a few joints, go to jail (especially if you’re Black). But destroy the banking system, pass GO and collect your multi-million dollar bonus, paid for by taxpayers.

              Prison in the U.S. is a big business. Every time someone tries to close one, the unions and localities go nuts and it’s kept open.

              The U.S. has the largest number of people in prison in the world and the second highest per-capita rate. We have more people in prison than China (1.36 billion population) or India (1.3 billion), yet we have a population of only 319 million. 2.8% of the U.S. adult population is either in prison, jail or on some form of probation or supervision. That’s a ridiculously high number.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Merry Christmas!

            • Don’t you love how uttering a few simple comments related to a series of photographs manages to suss out everyone’s bias? 🙂 Now we can attack each other for something more meaningful than EVF vs. OVF or DX vs. FX. Human fu#$ing beings….lol.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I have always maintained that the bulk of the problem is the anonymous nature of the internet. Had the same people been involved in the same conversation in person, it would have been a much less volatile experience.
              That’s not to say there wouldn’t have been an argument. In fact, just this past Thanksgiving… 🙂

            • …pass the cranberry sauce, will you brother?

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I’ve already addressed your comments regarding your reliance on institutions in another comment so I won’t repeat myself here.

              I edited that comment, deciding on another tact. Nothing wrong with that but it does expose your hypocrisy. You have no regard for anyone changing their mind about a position. If Japan suddenly gave in to all your desires, you would still hold them in contempt.

              I don’t cheat and I don’t lie. I have been a hypocrite at times but endeavor to correct it when it happens. I like to think I’m child-like at times but I’m pretty sure that’s not what you mean.

              I don’t support Japan in this case. I’m merely stating that neither you, the UN, Angela Merkel, or anyone else has the right to judge them. If you can’t understand the difference, perhaps you’re the one who should grow up.

            • J.R.

              You have already been exposed as cheating liar in the above. Shame on you.
              I don’t care for your continued childish cheating lying ignorant nonsense in support of Japan’s CONTINUED lies against humanity.
              If you have a problem, then feel free to go complain directly to Angela Merkel or the United Nations for judging the silent majority as also culpable. It is clear that you still have no clear idea on what grounds they are putting the fault also on the ‘people’. Come back when you have properly understood my valid original comment.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Where do you get “lying” and “cheating”? We disagree but that’s all. I haven’t attempted to make this personal or call you names. Where does this anger come from?

              And why do you keep repeating the same line about Ms. Merkel and the UN? Do you think I’m lying when I write that I don’t care what they think?

              Lastly, I do understand your original comment and it is valid as far as it goes. I just happen to disagree.

            • J.R.

              I really cannot care for your CONTINUED dirty lies & nonsense. You have already lost all credibility when I exposed your cheating lies in the above. Shame on you.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Are you really Stormwatch? You sound exactly like him/her.

            • J.R.

              Your cheating lie has already been exposed in the above & you have lost all credibility. Your continued irrelevant dishonest nonsense is useless.

            • EvilTed

              You need to take your meds now.
              There, there, it will be OK…

        • EvilTed

          As is yours

    • Mox Factor

      i hope it’s implied that when you say Japanese people, you only mean the ones who are lying about WW2, because there are also those who are ignorant of history, and those who wholly agree with you, and it’s just the loud children(brainwashed?) and rich elderly politicians and company owners(Trump-like?) who are in denial.

      • J.R.

        Whenever making a speech about the Holocaust Angela Merkel always makes it clear that it was not only Hitler & his Nazi generals & soldiers who were culpable for the crime. She always adds that the ‘German people’ were also culpable for condoning and allowing the violence to grow into a social/national level & that they were equally at fault.
        This is the consensus in Germany. The behaviour of the Japanese people for the past 70 years allowing serious lies against humanity to flourish can only be called pathological. Such lies & denial & whitewashing of history would have never been possible in Germany or in Europe in the last 70 years. That is why the United Nations & world governments have already stood up against Japan & sent formal warning letters to the Japanese government which a clearly called upon the Japanese government & people to stop their CONTINUED lies. If you have a problem then please go and make a formal complaint to the Angel Merkel & the United Nations for judging the culpable silent majority.

        • And, by extension, for what crimes are YOU culpable?

          • Patrick O’Connor

            It’s kind of weird arguing from the same position as you. Past comments have shown you to be a liberal wacko while I’m clearly a heartless conservative! 😉

            • You must be one of those Compassionate Conservatives…what the hell ever happened to them? Anyway, from what you’ve said here, my operatives have put you on our list of possible converts. 🙂

            • Patrick O’Connor

              We’re kinda like the Japanese in this scenario: if we show too much compassion, liberals will twist it around to make us look foolish. You guys are pretty good at that.
              I’ve always wondered what happened to rational, reasoned (NOT liberal) Democrats. From your comments, expect to get a call from my people.
              Maybe my people will meet up with your people and we’ll never hear from either again! 🙂

            • You guys are easy targets, so we keep at it. If the loudmouths of our respective peeps went away forever it wouldn’t be long enough.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Innocent people usually are! 😉

              Actually, I think the loudmouths serve an important purpose. They force us to look at ourselves in a way that only a more extreme example could. Whether or not we make use of it or not is another matter.

        • Mox Factor

          i would wholly disagree that kind of sentiment depends on the ability of the people to 1) leave the country and move elsewhere, 2) influence the government at all.
          you can’t say black slaves were all culpable for themselves being culpable for allowing themselves to be made into slaves by the confederacy. that’s victim blaming. in a world where most Japanese people were illiterate farmers, it would be wrong to assume they knew or condone the actions of their fascist imperialist government. that’s about as stupid as saying all Americans condone Operation Desert Storm, even the people who were striking and failed to do anything. hell, watch The Cove and proclaim all those ignorant Japanese city folks condone what they don’t even know about.

          • J.R.

            If you have a problem, then please go and make a formal complaint to Angela Merkel & The United Nations for judging the silent majority who are also culpable.

            • Mox Factor

              holy crap, that’s what you got out of what i said? i feel sad for the people who taught you English.

          • neversink

            Mox – You’ve got it backwards. It isn’t the slaves who would be culpable of committing the crimes, according to Merkel’s philosophy, against themselves. Instead, it would be the European colonialists in Africa who had nothing to do with the slave trade but were silent who were culpable. And it would be the west African tribes who aided the slave traders in raiding other tribes who are also guilty, according to Merkel’s words.

            • Mox Factor

              so they’re the ones comparable to the Japanese civilians who had no idea what’s going on other than bombs were dropping all around them? ok. because i’m not deciphering what Merkel said, i’m deciphering what the racist J.R. is trying to spin.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          So you think all Muslims are culpable for the relatively few Islamic terrorists??
          Do you ever think before writing?

          • J.R.

            Obviously you did not understand what I meant. Amusing uneducated child.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I don’t really care about Ms. Merkel or the UN. I generally like to think for myself with consideration given to reasoned individuals or groups. In this case, they have no standing to make such judgments so…no consideration.
              “Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects” ~ Will Rogers

            • J.R.

              Judging by you irrelevant nonsense, obviously you still did not understand what I meant.
              I repeat, …If you have a problem, then please go and make a formal complaint to Angela Merkel & The United Nations for judging the silent majority(the ‘people’) as also culpable. Obviously, you still have no clear idea on what grounds they are putting the fault also on the ‘people’. Amusing ignorance indeed.

            • Mox Factor

              seriously, read what Patrick said, then read what you said. he doesn’t care what Merkel said, and he’s replying to your interpretation of what she said. there’s a difference there you don’t seem to get. again, comprehension fail.

          • neversink

            Relatively few? There are quite a few, even though they may not be in the majority, of Muslim terrorists throughout the world. From Hamas, to Al Qaeda, to Hezbollah, to Al Nursa Front, to ISIS, to Al Shabbab, to Boko Haram and on and on and on. There have been more than 27,000 Islamic jihadist terror attacks in the world against innocent civilians since the 9-11 attacks.
            The majority of Muslims have nothing to do with these attacks. But the vast majority of Muslims are silent and therefore their silence makes them culpable in the same way that Chancellor Merkel states that most Germans were silent and aided and abetted Hitler during his final solution of the Jewish people.
            Until the majority of Muslims reject the violent rhetoric and the violent verses of the Q’Oran and have a renaissance similar to the Christian Reformation, as President Sisi of Egypt has suggested, then we will see more and more killing in Allah’s name.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              “The majority of Muslims have nothing to do with these attacks.” Sounds like relatively few to me. I’m not saying relatively few terrorists are Muslims; I’m saying that relatively few Muslims are terrorists.
              Should they remain silent? Of course not.
              Should the Germans, during WWII, have remained silent? Of course not.
              Should the Japanese government and people acknowledge and attempt to atone to the victims of war crimes from that time? Yes. Of course.
              Should I judge anyone for their faults? NO. That’s not to say that I shouldn’t judge their actions.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        Your pov isn’t any better than J.R.’s. Where do you people come from?

        • Mox Factor

          not a sideline commentator.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            Okay. Care to share?
            In my case, my wife is Japanese and we’ve discussed this and other related topics at length. Over the years, I’ve had similar discussions with members of her family, her friends, and the friends and acquaintances I’ve accumulated. This has given me some insight into their point of view which have been many and varied. A few have been ignorant of these events but most are aware and saddened by them. Most Japanese are very close with their thoughts and emotions. If they seem reluctant to talk about these events, it is just how they react to most things and not indicative of their thoughts and feelings about this subject. Of course there are exceptions but I am not qualified to say one way is better than the other. Sometimes I have benefited from it, other times not.

            • Mox Factor

              i’d prefer not to disclose personal information online, 1) i can claim anything, 2) i’d rather not say. lets put it this way, i get my firsthand hearsay from people who were in both Chinese and Japanese sides of the war, and by in, i mean both willing and unwilling participants. take this how you like, but i’m closer to this subject than most of the outsider pov here and have more at stake on the subject countries as i live in one and travel to the other. the level of ignorance and hypocrisy here is disgusting, attacking a group of people on an article about a lawsuit on exactly that, attack on a group of people… and they are continuing to make excuses about their behaviour.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Thanks for the insight.

    • DieMusik

      Well said. It is amazing how two-faced Japanese people can be on their history. The young generation don’t even know about the Pearl Harbor. I agree with J.R. 100% on this.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        Please read my reply to Mox Factor that starts out, “Okay.”

        • DieMusik

          I did. Your wife and her family are in the minority in Japanese society. We should not perhaps generalize to be fair, but it is the people who continue to vote for those politicians. It is a very complicated issue, and sometimes the people had been victimes of Japanese imperialism. However, they are collectively responsible as well. Knowing full well the atrocities committed by the Japanses people who moved to Korea and China during the first half of the 20th century there is no point to be splitting on words. We may play on words, but the horrors suffered and scars left cannot be comforted by some cleaver arguments. There must be repentance and atonement like the Germans did.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            The Japanese people aren’t as bad as you seem to think nor are the Germans as good.
            For your own sake, be careful what you wish for.

            • DieMusik

              Yes, perhaps aren’t as bad and aren’t as good. That is not my point as I don’t intend to villify an entire people. But, they owe it to their next generation to set it straight. It can be done only through the political process. It’s their collective responsibility. I do know exactly what I wish for: A more unified Asia. If Germams made a shrine dedicated to the Nazis like the Asukuni and didn’t make peace with the victims of their aggression there would not be the EU. Japan needs to do like Germans did so that Asia can be more unified.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I don’t know your nationality but here in America, very little useful American history is taught in the schools. There is, however, a readily available source of information, although accuracy isn’t guaranteed any more than in the classroom, called the internet. Also, you could fill a book with information that governments don’t provide. In fact they have…lots of them.

              As for Yasukunijinja, it houses almost 2.5 million war veterans from across several hundred years, only (from a relative point of view) 14 of which are considered A-Class criminals from WWII. They weren’t considered war criminals at the time of internment and Japanese culture would not look kindly on removing them, or anyone, now. Several people think it unseemly for the Prime Minister to visit this shrine but tell me, should he ignore the over 2 million men who served faithfully in order to ignore these few? I was there earlier this year. It is very beautiful and definitely NOT dedicated to those war criminals or anyone else specifically. Unless someone told you, you wouldn’t even recognize it as a memorial.

              And lastly, if you think their accepting responsibility will improve relations with their neighbors, you don’t know ANYTHING about Asians (as a whole of course).

              Anyway, this whole debate (with you and others) has been interesting but tiring. Merry Christmas!

            • DieMusik

              They continue to refuse to remove the A-Class criminals. That is ample to show the true meaning of the shrine. From your perspective it may look beautiful but certainly not to the victims. It’s only adding insult to the wound. I don’t know why you bring up nationality or knowing anything about “Asians”. But, my grandparents are Japanese, so perhaps I know a lot more than you think I know. And may safely assume you are a White American married to a Japanese wife? Yes, it may not be the silver bullet but accepting responsibility is certainly the starting point. When you amend a relationship shouldn’t you apologize for your wrongs? That is just common sense that does not require much knowledge about “Asians”. But, anyway, Merry Christmas to you as well.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Neither your relationship with your grandparents nor mine with my wife qualify either of us to understand Asians. It’s a moving target only partially obtainable through study.
              While I agree with your comments regarding relationships, the relationship between Asian countries is not of that nature. Read the headlines today regarding armed Chinese coast guard ships in a region of the East China Sea, claimed by both Japan and China. There is NO love lost there.

              p.s. The people running the shrine are NOT related to the government in any way and have been chastised at times by the Emperor and others.

            • DieMusik

              “The people running the shrine are NOT related to the government in any way and have been chastised at times by the Emperor and others.” —> so what? Senators go and pay homage to war criminals in their official capacity. So wonder because they are grandchildren of those responsible for the atrocities. Do whatever to make yourself feel good being married to a Japanese wife. As for me I would take the bitter with sweet and take responsibility for the wrongdoings of my ancestors (at least “feel” remorseful and sorry). Talk to a German youngsters. I once mentioned about Germany’s Nazi past. He was contrite and got teary. I certainly have not seen that with ANY Japanese person to date. So, yeah. Continue making excuses for the rapists and murderers. If that somewhat contributes loving your wife better I think I will pass a blind eye specially for you.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I read everything so many of you have written and addressed your comments thoughtfully (I think). For you, as well as others, to summarily disregard my comments and focus only on your own points is kind of rude.
              But that’s okay. Perhaps you’ve had a bad day or feel particularly strong about this subject. I’m not judging…

            • neversink

              You are a propagandist with long erudite explanations that tend to avoid the real issues at hand. But I hope you had a good Xmas, if that is what you celebrate…. and I wish you a Merry New Year.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I disagree but that shouldn’t come as any surprise! 🙂
              My Christmas was okay, thanks for asking. I don’t generally care for holidays because I’m not much of a people person. Again…no surprise. 🙂

            • neversink

              No surprise, but enjoy. I love people, even if I disagree with them, as long as they don’t commit evil acts. Peace.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I didn’t say I don’t love people. I just don’t have much in common with them so, except in the case of small talk, it’s uncomfortable for everyone.

            • mikeswitz

              Dilbert?

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Well…my dog IS smarter than me! 😉

            • mikeswitz

              Does he say “My master is smarter than I.” ?

    • EvilTed

      @J.R.
      “Instead of being tried for war crimes, the researchers involved in Unit 731 were given immunity by the U.S. in exchange for their data on human experimentation” – Source: Wikipedia

      Then there’s the whole part about nuking innocent civilians, not once, but twice.

      Sorry America, but we have no position of moral high ground when it comes to war atrocities…

      • Phil

        After the carnage on Okinawa and constant kamikaze attacks, warnings from the US and repeated calls to surrender that were ignored by the Japanese government, the US had every reason to believe that the Japanese were not going to surrender and fight to the last man had the US invaded the Japanese home islands. From that perspective, the bombs were justified.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          That’s not why we dropped the nuclear bombs. Washington was afraid if the war continued, Russia, no longer preoccupied with Germany, would take Japan due to their proximity. Seeing Japan’s potential, that was unacceptable so they needed Japan to surrender to the U.S. as soon as possible. While the results might suggest they were justified, I can’t say if they were or not.

          • neversink

            And let’s not forget the Japanese program during World War II to produce nuclear weapons first. Given the psychological make up of the Japanese military leaders and their appalling agressive attacks against civilians, and given their unwillingness to ever surrender, the Imperial Japanese Army would have never thought of not dropping these bombs on American or Australian or Chinese cities. Thankfully, they were not successful in their desire for being the first nation in the world to develop a deliverable nuclear weapon.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Good supporting information but not why we dropped our bombs. Perhaps you know (I don’t) but were we even aware of their research or capabilities at the time?

            • neversink

              Yes, the US knew about it. They had intercepted a German submarine during the war delivering uranium to the Japanese military. The Japanese received much of their uranium from Germany. I was going to link you to a different article, but just discovered this one:

              http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-japan-bomb-20150805-story.html

              In the article, there is the quote from the wife of a deceased Japanese nuclear physicist who worked on the Japanese bomb, which shockingly, in some reports, was scheduled to be completed four days after the Japanese had surrendered:

              Chieko Takeuchi, widow of the atomic scientist, recalled her husband saying, “If we’d built the bomb first, of course we would have used it. I’m glad, in some ways, that our facilities were destroyed.”

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Thanks.

        • EvilTed

          That is the American side of it.
          Another “truth” of it is the Russians had already invaded Manchuria and were a week away from flooding into Japan.

          Some would say that the bombs were a show of strength to the Russians and the beginning of the cold war.

      • jondon

        These innocent civilians endorsed their government and worshiped their Emperor, their sons, husbands, fathers and brothers were actively and willingly committing unbelievable atrocities on truly innocent civilians and enemy combatants. Had Japan developed atomic weapons before the U.S. I shudder to think how they might have used them. Sow the wind and you shall reap the whirlwind.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          You could make an almost identical statement about Muslims and Islamic terrorists. Judge not lest ye be judged.

          • jondon

            I have to disagree, Japan as a nation was fighting a war which the majority of its citizens supported. These citizens supported their government, emperor and family members who were responsible for acts of unbelievable cruelty on genuinely innocent civillians.
            It is unfair to equate muslim people who are citizens of many countries with the Japanese nation of the 1940s. The vast majority of muslims are peaceful people who do not support fundamentalist terrorism, and regularly find themselves victims of these terrorist groups.
            It is reprehensible that the Japanese nation refuses to confront past atrocities and that Nikon could play a part in this refusal. He who ignores history is doomed to repeat it.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Regardless of any truth in your statement, having not been personally hurt by any of Nikon or Japan’s actions/inactions in this case, you are not in a position to hold them accountable nor have the right to do so. But on the whole, I think your words haven’t been as hateful as some others.

              Although they were merely used as a device here, I would not equate the lack of terror activity, in the majority of Muslims with being peaceful. I think the parallels between the WWII Japanese and modern Muslims are very strong and would not attempt to judge either group.

            • jondon

              Would I also have no right to judge a German company or indeed the German nation if they actively denied or attempted to cover up the Holocaust?

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I’ll try to make this as quick as possible.

              I believe the Bible. Every word and line of it. God states that if you are guilty of any of the law (eg. lying, stealing – even if it’s only a pencil from work), you’re guilty of the whole law. So, I equate all sin BUT not the appropriate response to crimes against individuals or humanity. Judging an action and determining an appropriate response is commanded and different from judging an individual.

              The Bible also states that if you judge others, and it makes no qualifications, then you will be judged for your offenses.

              I sin, therefore I try not to judge but not always successfully. When I fail, I hope someone will point it out to me as I am doing here. I could be a lot more diplomatic about it but that’s difficult for me. I hope to be forgiven for that as well.

            • BG

              So, in short, running to the defense of people who are covering up and denying war crimes is your religious duty? You’re neither making a very good case for the people you defend, nor for your religion.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I’m only going to write this one more time: I’m not defending anyone but rather warning folks about the danger of judging others.

      • J.R.

        Sorry that you are incapable of seeing the difference between reactive rational defensive violence to save more lives as opposed to Japan’s senseless irrational needless violence & their unwillingness to stop. Amusing…

        • EvilTed

          Reactive rational defensive violence?
          I guess it’s better than irrational defensive violence, eh?

          I hope your belief in the past protects your future.
          Dark times are upon us once more…

          • J.R.

            Sorry that you are incapable of seeing the difference between reactive rational defensive violence to save more lives as opposed to Japan’s senseless irrational needless violence & their unwillingness to stop. Amusing ignorance…

            • EvilTed

              You have been to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, I take it?

              You have witnessed the warmth and friendliness of a city that we sent to hell in an instant.

              I’m sorry, you are just a misguided old fool that wants to see history in the eyes of the victor and paint over the atrocities that this country committed.

              Atrocities that include pardoning or giving really lenient sentences to known nazis and employing their scientists.

              Next you will be claiming that America won World War 2 🙂

      • neversink

        Let’s not talk about moral ground. Are you aware of the millions of innocents killed by the Japanese during World War II. More importantly, the Japanese had three on-going programs to build a nuclear weapon during World War II. Do you think if they had been successful that they would have hesitated to aggressively drop a nuclear weapon on San Francisco and Los Angeles and elsewhere?

    • Gosh1

      The Japanese empire stands collectively guilty of all these hideous crimes against humanity, as does the Third Reich and the Soviets under Stalin, whose purges of Poland and occupied countries in the 1930s taught the Nazi invaders a great deal about industrialization of genocide by a NATION.

      2015. Black Earth : The Holocaust as History and Warning. By Timothy Snyder. 462 pp. Tim Duggan Books

      http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/06/books/review/timothy-snyders-black-earth.html?_r=0

      http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/sep/13/black-earth-timothy-snyder-review-the-holocaust-as-history-and-warning-chilling-timely-instructive

      My point is the Japanese nation is no different, and remains unrepentant and supremely arrogant decades afterwards.

  • I’ve read this argument with interest as I love many aspects of Japanese culture but I’m simply not comfortable with their denial of these horrible crimes. The use of nuclear weapons against Japan is important but irrelevant to this discussion. The main issue here is Nikon’s decision to censor an important work because it makes some influential sections of Japanese society uncomfortable. We can’t blame all of Japan for the failure of it’s leaders to acknowledge the crimes of their fathers, especially as we judge them from a western standpoint, but we can blame Nikon for trying to gag the work of someone who wants to highlight the matter.

    • Patrick O’Connor

      Excellent points but I don’t think it’s as simple as the “blame Japan/Nikon” side of this debate seems to think. I don’t doubt your, or their, intentions but 1. It’s a complex issue and 2. I find it hypocritical to hold others accountable for actions, or inactions, when I hope to be forgiven for quite a few of my own.

      • True, but without a statement from Nikon it’s hard to come up with other reasons for cancelling the show. I don’t know if Nikon offered the court any explanation. Without an alternative narrative for cancelling the show, the view that they bowed to pressure from groups who deny these atrocities took place seems the most plausible.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          You don’t seem to understand my point. I’m not interested in Nikon’s reasons because while their actions may be wrong, we don’t get to decide their guilt or innocence. The inaction of the Japanese government and its people, past and present, may be wrong but we don’t have the option of judging them for anything.

          The right of judgment belongs to God and no one else. Perhaps you don’t believe this or don’t believe in God or at least your belief is different from mine. If so, that means nothing to me. I hate to be so blunt but I get tired of explaining things that should be obvious.

          • neversink

            I hate to be so blunt, but we can judge anyone we feel like if their crimes have been proven to heinous. Maybe God has the last word, but our legal systems around the world, if it so chooses and is above government influence, has judged and condemned criminals from Charlie Manson to Al Qaeda soldiers to Nazi leaders to all sorts of criminals.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Am I the only one who has difficulty typing on NR? Lately, I’ve had to compose my comments in notepad and copy/paste them here. That’s probably a good thing because it gives me more time to consider my comments. Maybe not enough time! 😉

              In those, and all, cases, we’re judging their actions. Punishment should be for the purpose of rehabilitation or prevention from commmitting other such crimes in the future. Some Native American tribes treated crimes as if the individual were sick and in need of healing. This is probably a bit naive but not too far off the mark. Punishment in the name of revenge (judging the individual to be bad and incapable of reform) is generally not allowed.

          • BG

            Of course it’s on people to judge. Because given there is no god, nobody else ever will.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              The existence or absence of God is NOT a given. Some people believe it, others don’t. Disparaging others for their beliefs doesn’t make a very good case for atheists or Atheism.

            • BG

              I’m not criticizing you for your religion (this is your business, though we obviously don’t agree), I’m criticizing you for stating that people should turn their blind eye to defendants of war crime and atrocity. When confronted with injustice such as the one you’re defending, it is our responsibility to speak up, loudly and clearly.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Writing “…given there is no god” is disparaging. Stating that you ‘don’t believe there is a god who will…’ would not be.
              I have absolutely no problem with calling out the actions of those who committed these atrocities, and they are that: atrocious. I don’t even have a problem for someone to suggest what the Japanese government, Nikon, and the Japanese people should do.
              My concern is this attitude of moral superiority (judgment) versus an attitude of correction out of concern for the individuals involved.

            • BG

              Quoting you (from above): “The right of judgment belongs to God and no one else. Perhaps you don’t believe this […]. If so, that means nothing to me.” So, me stating what I think to be true is “disparaging”, while you stating what you think to be true and adding that any different opinion “means nothing” is perfectly fine?

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I said it means nothing to me, not that it means nothing. Try to keep up. 😉

            • peter w

              (Atheism is a very difficult construct. It is imposed on people who don’t believe in things made up thousands of years ago, – or just quite recently like Marx communism and Freuds psycho-analyses -, without good reference to evidence. Things made up because people can’t live with the certainty of incertainties about their origin or the reasson that they live, etc, etc… )

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I was actually replying to BG’s comment by mirroring his earlier comment.
              Did you construct this explanation or copy it from somewhere? I ask because it seems overly technical, too simplistic and (sorry to say) kinda useless. If I had the time, and in a different venue, I’d love to dissect it with you. These kinds of topics are VERY interesting to me.

            • peter w

              The idea is probably not mine, the formulation is (non native). Check Popper and his successors. There are hints of Wittgenstein (about what can you talk) and Plato (what is there to be seen) in these thougts.
              Reading better, I see that your first sentence is right in a logical sense. My personal reassoning would be: it should not be an issue of consideration. There is your uselessness back upon ya. 😉
              Yet, in a nihilistic world, who would mind to spend a useless thought, while a lion rips off our heads, or cancer destroyes our livers.
              I like uselessness, it has brought us so much. For instance, useless thoughts have brought us references for our behaviour, which we could consider positive or negative in effect to us, and could thus be labeled good or wrong. And later these thoughts could help us reconsider. Or simply impose on others.
              Happy to see you, somewhere.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              I didn’t mean posting or considering it was useless. The disjointed range of ideas, however, is non-actionable. You can’t even discuss the article as a whole. That’s why I wrote I’d like to dissect it with someone, you in this case since you are familiar with it and seemingly interested in the ideas.
              I don’t view the world as nihilistic and, as such, think all ideas are useful but not necessarily for that moment.
              On the whole, though, I believe that overly analyzing a subject, and of course the threshold varies depending on the subject and situation, can detract from our understanding if not held in check.
              I’m sure I’ll see you and pretty sure where it will be. The question is: when.

            • peter w

              I agree with you about how thoughts can distract from understanding, and on the matter of control of these wandering thoughts on a forum like this. The use of the term use / usefull / usefullness may be such a subject that easily leads to wandering, so lets conclude: ideas are potentially usefull. However, the wandering, is – I think we agree – highly valuable. Should not the wandering of thought, creation of ideas, be a basic part of understanding? Or perhaps even more drastic, the understanding just a means to validate ideas for personal uhm… use? Well, it would be nice if an idea would be understood, at least the moment it arises. Hold in check? Check.

              As to when: now is that I live, that is my firm believe, and it appears we are here together. I enjoyed that, thank you very much, and I wouldn’t mind enjoying your company again. Most probable to me, this would be in a world called Nikonrumors.com. Which is an amazing feat, this paralel world ‘Nikonrumors’, is what I consider while my head is being ripped off by a lion. You wouldn’t have know from that nasty lion, if I wouldn’t have typed it here. Amazing. A beautiful but ferocious beast, which totally fails to adapt to my ideas of civilisation.

            • peter w

              It seems my reply didn’t pass sensorship. Perhaps because of the word believe? Perhaps to much off-topic – well, if ever there was a topic to leave the pavement -, perhaps it is just pending, because an unfortunate reference to a beautiful world: this site nikonrumors dot com. which could look like spam, in a technical way.

            • I just proved your comment – it was on hold because it had a link

      • neversink

        Nikon is a corporation that sells their products internationally. They should and must be held accountable for their decisions, particularly on an issue such as this. That is what corporate responsibility is all about. They are the one’s who agreed to the show on the comfort women and then they silently changed their mind.
        I would forgive you for some of your actions. It just depends on what they were. If you were an individual soldier in the Imperial Japanese Army, I would never forgive you for raping an innocent woman. Sorry.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          You are free to buy or not buy their products as your conscience dictates. You do not, however, have the right to judge THEM. That may seem like a fine distinction but there it is. I’m guessing not a few individuals don’t understand what that means. There is a world of difference between judging someone’s actions and judging them.
          While I wouldn’t want to forgive someone for raping a woman, I would hope I could. Either way, it isn’t my forgiveness they need. If someone were to rape my daughter, I’m pretty sure I couldn’t forgive them and, for that rape, it would be MY forgiveness they required. The alternative would be their death and my incarceration for it.

          • neversink

            How dare you tell me what rights I have and don’t have. I have the right of freedom of speech, which is being taken away from many citizens in many countries of the world. I have the right to express love or hate if I feel. I have the right to judge if I choose. The right is there. The truth can never be distorted though, and hopefully whatever words I utter, will always ring 100 percent true. Anything less than 100 percent truth is a lie.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Only God has that right. You can steal but you don’t have the right. You can kill but you don’t have the right. You can judge but you don’t have the right!

              A lie is telling an intentional falsehood. Being wrong isn’t lying and I’d be surprised if anyone were capable of being 100 percent truthful in complex issues such as this.

            • neversink

              On this I agree…. But we have to try to be truthful and never hide the incriminating evidence or else we are accomplices, in a way, to the evil committed.

  • peter w

    Strange how this works. Should ‘we’, who personify with Nikon-products so much that we look around for news on this brand, feel ashamed for the opportunistic behaviour of a Nikon exhibition centre in Japan, concerning the violent acts of a country 60 years agoo, due to the bad coping of this country with a very inhumane part of its history?
    A 153 emotional comments. No one to consider changing to change to Canon? Oh, that’s Japanese too? Leica is at least half Japanese now. Perhaps Phase One and Hasselblad can make a difference. Phase One is Danish, the Dane are quite intolerant to refugees at the moment…
    Such a cruel world to photograph?
    The photographer did a good thing. He registred the stratches of our civilisation, to make us think of it. Many do.

    • peter w

      By the way, there are many religions around there, and many cultures, which present different kinds of civilisation, each based on different kinds of ideas about right and wrong, intended to control the safety of a society. Some of them quite opposite. For instance in in some civilisations a woman who has had sex imposed on her would be punished (killed) for that. In North-Western Europe freedom of sexuality is a fundamental right – at least formaly. Which is considered absolutely disgusting in many other cultures. As a matter of fact, it used to be unacceptable in the same North-Western parts of Europe not long agoo, and so it still is, among many worried parents.
      It could make you think on the phenomenon ‘civilisation’. Locked in a place and a time.

    • Rttskr

      Please get your facts straight.
      The Danish government gives more handout-money to an imigrant than to their own citizens who work hard and study in their universities.
      The ones with children are even guaranteed free housing, that’s better than how they treat their own citizens.
      If you’re whining about how the Danish government dare to ask the wealthy among the immigrants to pay for their own expenses, keep in mind the Danish people go through the same process when asking for emergency welfare, they have to spend their wealth first before they are allowed to get welfare.
      For immigrants it was free money from day 1.

      If anything, the Danish government was intolerant against its own citizens compared to the economic immigrants. By the way, please call them immigrants instead of refugees, they are welfare shoppers who come to Denmark from Germany, and Germany isn’t exactly a war torn country in trouble.

      • peter w

        About mixing things up. They don’t come from Germany, they come from Syria, Mali, Pakistan etc etc, and they come through Germany. And most of them stay there – in Germany -, or they pass on to Sweden. Thanks for the other facts and possibly corrections concerning Denmark.

        • Rttskr

          They come straight from Germany because they were not satisfied with Germany’s level of welfare.
          When you shop around like this and pick and choose which welfare service you want, you are no longer a refugee. Just an immigrant.

          • peter w

            In that sense, they are all immigrants, because they are safe in Turkey and Lebanon. Some governments consider the situation for them in Lebanon and Turkey unstable. Off course, people from Pakistan and most African countries are not to be considered refugees of war. These people have quite a different kind of problem, but pop up in the same centra.
            I think we have different ideas about aiding Turkey and Lebanon in solving the Syrian and Iraq problem. I have no problem with that, feel free to defend your country. You might have guessed that I exaggerated widely in my first comment. The point considering Phase One was not the only one that was stressed to the maximum.

            • Rttskr

              You compared Denmark to a country that had official policy of enslaving and killing children, raping women, and pumping experimental biochemicals into men who were just innocent civilians, and for what reason? Because you think refugees ought to be treated better than the ethnic population of Denmark. Everything about your post was outrageous.

              Whatever, your argument that Turkey and Lebanon are unstable does not apply to Germany.
              Germany, Austria, Switzerland, France, and Italy are all stable European countries. But stability and safety is not enough for someone who is picky, they want more, they want benefits, they want monthly hand-out of lots of money, they want free houses provided by your tax money, and many of them will complain on national TV if they don’t get those free houses.

            • peter w

              If you bring ethnicity in it, our discussion ends here.

            • Rttskr

              Would you care to point out where I talked about ethnicity of anyone?

              It seems like you just want a cheap opt out instead of addressing the argument. But you can flee if you like, I don’t really care.

            • peter w

              Ethnicity is in your post. read it yourself.

              But you are right in the opt out. I don’t like discussing migration with someone who totally missed the point of my little evaluation, and who is offended that his rich and fat country (I live in a rich and fat country myself, we are almost neighbours) is insulted in such a silly way that it can’t be true. In fact, it wasn’t true, you missed that point. Glad to see you don’t care after all. The longer we discuss this, the sillier we both are, because we read each others opinion, and we will not get closer.
              Happy new year to you, with a nice Nikon to make pictures, or a Phase One if you prefer. I mean that.

            • Rttskr

              Ethnicity is in your post.
              So let me understand this correctly, you got offended because I used the sentence “ethnic population of Denmark”?
              Is “ethnic” a forbidden and banned word in your country? What else would you use instead? Native?
              Would “native” trigger you less? or is that also a high risk word that is forbidden where you are from?

              someone who totally missed the point of my little evaluation is insulted in such a silly
              way that it can’t be true

              Let me tell you how we differ then. You are someone who gets insulted by the word “ethnic”, a legitimate word in the English vocabulary that is used to describe an indigenous people of a region. Is that not silly? Please reevaluate the way you think.

              Whereas I am someone who gets insulted when you compare my country to war crimes of child murder, using men and women in slavery, and as lab rats in biochemical weapons testing.
              According to you, I am rich, fat and evil because I want don’t give every immigrant a free house and better treatment than the “native” population.

              Yeah, let people tell who is the more silly between the two of us.

  • AYWY

    Mmmmm…. fun update. Korea and Japan governments have finally resolved to settle this issue once and for all. Info on news sites such as BBC.
    The amount mentioned is actually small. However this is not a battle about money – it is a battle about principles and responsibilities.
    I think at least, Japan can start to move on.
    (Now I’m just waiting to see if there are news of any old men on the far right who is commiting sepukku over this… none so far. 🙂 )

    • Patrick O’Connor

      I’m not advocating any particular resolution by replying but I wonder if the settlement or details will be broadcast in Japan. While I firmly believe it is up to the individual to become informed, the reality is very few do so…in any country.

  • Patrick O’Connor

    I tend to be very literal. To me, “see” means sense your physical presence with my eyes. From my world view, it’ll either be in this life (not likely) or during the judgment, if not later. I don’t know when that’ll be but you can look for me in the line to get angel food cake. I’ll be an old guy with a grey beard, not a lot of hair, and wearing a goofy “old guy” hat. 🙂

    I don’t get the lion reference but I’ve never known lions to be overly ferocious. Certainly single-minded in their quest for food but I think even cotton-tailed bunnies might bite you if you mess with them at meal time. 😉

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