Tamron to announce SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD and SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD lenses for Nikon F mount

tamron-logo
Tamron will soon announce two new prime lenses for Nikon F mount:

  • SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD (model F012)
  • SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD (model F013)

In addition to several zooms, Tamron currently has only 60mm, 90mm and 180mm prime lenses in their lineup.

Via Digicame-info

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  • unyi3lding

    …are these for DX or FX?

    • HF

      Tamron: “The designation “Di” (Digitally Integrated Design) marks a generation of lenses, which have been specially adapted to the higher requirements of digital SLR cameras (APS-C and full frame).”

    • longzoom

      Actually, DI series lenses were created for APS-C sensors. To judge its 35 and 45 mm, it is for DX.

      • Chris

        The 45 are likely to be a very compact lens in this case

        • That’s what I’m betting. 45 is a pancake lens, 35 is a slightly bigger, image quality focused lens.

          • Eric Calabros

            VC in a pancake?

            • Tasos Papazahariou

              What does VC stand for?

            • MacManX

              Vibration Control (or someting like that). “VR” in Nikon lingo.

            • Tasos Papazahariou

              Ah,thanks.That would be a nice feature.

            • MacManX

              Vibration Control (or someting like that). “VR” in Nikon lingo.

          • unyi3lding

            Oh man, I would hop on a pancake lens instantly! However, other people have pointed out VC, which would probably be unlikely to fit in a pancake lens…

            • You’re right. Maybe not a true pancake lens, optically or size-wise, but I can imagine that it’d be possible to put a simple f/1.8 pancake-style optical design together with VC in a lens that is still smaller and lighter than a comparably sharp f/1.4 Canon / Nikon, let alone the likes of the Sigma 50 1.4 Art which is a beast by comparison.

          • unyi3lding

            Oh man, I would hop on a pancake lens instantly! However, other people have pointed out VC, which would probably be unlikely to fit in a pancake lens…

        • Nevermind, neither is a pancake lens, but both are decently lightweight. Not bad, Tamron, now we just have to wait and see the tests…

          • Chris

            Same here. Might replace my 3518g with that.

            • The 35 1.8 G, while decently awesome, has pretty “busy” bokeh especially off-center. In fact anywhere outside the rule-of-thirds box, I’d rather have the bokeh of the Nikon 24-70 (non-VR) at 35mm f/2.8!!!

              Tamron definitely stands to have a “win” on their hands here, if the lens delivers in the real world what it claims on paper.

            • Chris

              i hope price would drop in a year or so

            • I haven’t followed Tamron’s pricing strategy as much as I’ve followed that of the other third parties to know just how likely this is. But suffice it to say, it’s possible though I suspect only a $40-50 rebate might be the best they do for at least the first 2-3 years. We’ll see. Maybe a black friday sale?

    • Chris

      I think they are FX.

    • I think they will be FX, just because Nikon doesn’t make DX cameras anymore 🙂

      • Nikon now has more FX cameras than DX in their lineup. It makes sense for third party manufacturers to concentrate on FX.

        • T.I.M

          hopefully people will finally understand that there will be no D400….
          :o)

          • T.I.M

            that’s an other thing I was right about…
            :o)

          • With Nikon you never know, I personally think there will be a new high end DX model but I have not received any reliable info on such camera.

          • Deep_Lurker

            I don’t think even Nikon knows if Nikon is going to release a D400 or not.

            • T.I.M

              keep an eye on Ebay, if you see made in China cheap compatible battery grip for D400, that mean Nikon will release the D400 in few months

        • Spy Black

          “Nikon now has more FX cameras than DX in their lineup.
          I hope Nikon keeps that going.”

          I’m loviin’ it.

    • whattheblazes

      Di is full frame DC is APS-C

    • jojo

      Google translation includes the phrase “for full-size SLR”

  • Hans Bull

    Might consider the 35mm if distortion values were really low. Don’t really care about max aperture, friging, coma, bokeh and the other stuff, it only has to be sharp at 5.6-8.

  • verytoxic

    Nikon and Canon is in big trouble from third-party manufacturers because the third-party guys have been showing more vigor in releasing quality glass. What has Nikon released? Nikon just released a back braking 24-70 lens to make your life miserable.

    • HF

      35/1.8G. 24/1.8g, 200-500, …

    • Patrick O’Connor

      If you’re not going to take the time to check your spelling, why should anyone take the time to read your comments? :-/

      • verytoxic

        I’m not asking for your money to read my comments.

        • HF

          But for our time.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          The spelling comment was a metaphor for the amount of time you took forming your comments, as evidenced by your reference to Nikon’s 24-70. It’s ironic that you state you aren’t asking for money to read your comments in the same way that Nikon isn’t forcing you to buy their lenses, thereby making your life miserable.
          So…don’t buy it and enjoy your life! 🙂

          • verytoxic

            Nikon isn’t giving anything away for free. But yes I do have a choice not to invest in Nikon just like you have choice not to read my comment, and even bigger choice, not to respond to it.

            Look, my comment is interesting, entertaining, and animates people in one way or another.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              Well…it did animate me, which is becoming more and more difficult as I age! 🙂

      • fanboy fagz

        careful with your condescending tone. a lot of people are from around the world with english being a second language. keep your personal comments on grammar mistakes to yourself. always remember- internet is intl.

        • Patrick O’Connor

          I understand. My wife is Japanese and her English isn’t perfect. You can usually tell when English isn’t someone’s first language but it’s better to not assume. As I wrote to verytoxic, it wasn’t actually his spelling that I was calling out but that wasn’t obvious and I should have known better. It’s just frustrating for me to read such foolish rants.

          BTW, while you get a lot of flack for some of your comments, I actually find you to be fairly reasonable and thoughtful, as evidenced by your comment to me.

          • MacManX

            I guess you mean “a lot of flak”…. 😉

            • Patrick O’Connor

              LOL!
              Sorry. English isn’t my first language! 😉

            • MacManX

              NP mate! 🙂
              I’m Scandinavian… 😉
              I have UK family though.

    • Nikon just completed a complete lineup from 20mm to 85mm in ultralight f/1.8 G primes, with great image quality for a moderately priced lens.

      IMO it’s Canon that needs to quickly update it’s affordable prime lineup, like, yesterday. They’re off to a decent start with the new 50 1.8 STM, but then again I hear it’s the exact same optical design as their old 50 1.8? Haven’t confirmed that yet though.

      • EnPassant

        Actually Canon already updated their 24mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8 and 35mm f/2.0 a few years ago with new optics and IS. They are very good, especially the 28mm and 35mm. And IS works well down to 1/5s according to my own tests.

        Many expected the 50mm f/1.8 also would get IS. I surmise it would have been too expensive and Canon just decided to give their nifty fifty the STM treatment with better build, metal instead of plastic bayonet and 7 blade aperture instead of 5 blades.

        While Canon could have made some small tweaking to the original formula the lens diagrams look exactly the same. And test that has been done can’t confirm bigger differences than would be visible between different samples.

        So only reason to upgrade would be the better build. The 50mm lens that gets IS will propably be the updated f/1.4 lens. And it is also believed Canon some day will release a 85mm f/1.8 IS. Just speculation so far of course. But if true and if Canon also update their horrible 28mm f/1.8 and the old 20mm f/2.8 their standard prime lens line-up will look very competitive.

        • Michele Thomas

          EnPassant is correct. Canon is definitely keeping up. Instead of producing 1.8 primes like Nikon, Canon opted to produce slightly slower primes with IS (Canon’s version of VR). The result has been very sharp primes at f/2.8 for 24 and 28mm, and f/2.0 for 35mm. More impressively, these lenses are much more compact than their Nikon counterparts.

          In addition, Canon has two excellent f/2.8 pancake lenses at 24mm (crop-sensor only) and 40mm (full frame). Though I normally shoot with a D810, when I want to go small and compact, I use the pancake lenses with a Canon Sli.

          As a result, I haven’t been overly tempted–well, I do own the 50mm f/1.8G and have considered the 20mm G lens–overly by Nikon’s 1.8 primes. I’m still waiting for Nikon or someone else to produce a high-IQ pancake lens with AF for Nikon FX. For now, the 50mm 1.8, or the old 50mm 1.4D, are the smallest Nikon lenses I have.

        • Michele Thomas

          EnPassant is correct. Canon is definitely keeping up. Instead of producing 1.8 primes like Nikon, Canon opted to produce slightly slower primes with IS (Canon’s version of VR). The result has been very sharp primes at f/2.8 for 24 and 28mm, and f/2.0 for 35mm. More impressively, these lenses are much more compact than their Nikon counterparts.

          In addition, Canon has two excellent f/2.8 pancake lenses at 24mm (crop-sensor only) and 40mm (full frame). Though I normally shoot with a D810, when I want to go small and compact, I use the pancake lenses with a Canon Sli.

          As a result, I haven’t been overly tempted–well, I do own the 50mm f/1.8G and have considered the 20mm G lens–overly by Nikon’s 1.8 primes. I’m still waiting for Nikon or someone else to produce a high-IQ pancake lens with AF for Nikon FX. For now, the 50mm 1.8, or the old 50mm 1.4D, are the smallest Nikon lenses I have.

          • “keeping up” = going in the direction of the masses and beginners, by delivering slower lenses that have stabilization.

            I’ll take an affordable 1.8 or 1.4 prime instead any day, for the specialized kind of stuff I do.

            Both Nikon and Canon have areas they are leaving gaps, let’s just say that. Canon could really use a refresh of their faster but affordable prime lineup, and a few other things, while Nikon could stand to compete with some of the other specialty type lenses such as a pancake, or a tilt-shift wider than 24mm, or a new 135 f/2.

            Either way, it’s understandable that neither company can keep it’s entire lineup 100% modern and cutting-edge. With regards to affordable lenses, especially primes, Nikon went in one direction, and Canon went in another. I think Canon’s direction may have even been a better move for their forward-thinking pursuit of sales to beginners and advanced amateurs / pros who are looking to do video more and more, and don’t care as much about shallow DOF or sheer speed as they do about not having shaky photos.

            Still, Canon has “only” updated their 24 2.8, 28 2.8, and 35 f/2 with IS versions; the new 50 1.8 is allegedly the same exact optical formula as the previous 50 1.8, it just has better build quality and STM autofocus now. IMO if Canon wants to really compete with Nikon, Sigma, AND Rokinon, they’ve still got at least a half dozen lenses that are long-overdue. For their own sake, I hope they don’t ONLY have more new $1800 L primes up their sleeves in the next 6-12 months…

        • Yes, the 2.8 and 2.8 primes are nice, but I don’t know if they truly compete with an f/1.8 or f/1.4 prime. I think Canon was trying to balance the demand from video shooters who may not care as much about higher shutter speeds (thanks to faster apertures) but do want stabilization for better hand-held video.

          I think that enough photographers would still want Canon to offer an affordable f/1.8 wide prime, an affordable f/1.4 50mm prime, and an affordable f/1.8 ~85 prime…

    • 20 1.8G
      24 1.8G
      28 1.8G
      35 1.8G
      50 1.8G
      85 1.8G
      … All excellent value lenses

      • Captain Megaton

        No kidding eh? “What has Nikon released?” Geez. Some people…

    • By ‘third-party’ you mean Sigma, right? They’re pushing everytone right now, including the other third parties.

    • Piotr Kosewski

      People were asking for a new 24-70, so they got one. What’s your problem?

      Not everyone is yearning for a light camera. Some people want a good camera and it usually turns out big.

      You want a light gadget? Buy a smartwatch or something… They make ones with a camera.

  • S Cargill

    I would love to see a 35mm prime with VC. Nikon doesn’t seem to thank that VR is important on the shorter primes.

    • vcize

      Yes!

    • Captain Megaton

      It isn’t.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        YMMV

  • T.I.M

    Look like everybody is getting ready for the D900, even Tamron !
    I already have all the lenses I need but I won’t mine a good ultrawide FX Nikkor lens (13mm f/4 ?)
    See you in October (28th)

    • I wonder if Nikon (or Sigma / Tamron / Tokina) are going to feel compelled to chase the Canon 11-24 f/4. Personally, I suspect that if anybody will get to 11mm full-frame first, (second) it’ll be Sigma since they already have 2 generations of full-frame 12-24 under their belts.

      Personally though, I’d rather see some sort of prime to substitute all of the big heavy ultrawide zooms we’re seeing. A 16mm f/2.8 or 17mm f/2.8, or heck a 17mm f/2 or 18mm f/2, would be potentially far lighter, smaller, and yet faster than all of the big fat 2.8 zooms in that range. Basically, take the Nikon 20 1.8 G and make it 2-4mm wider, and add as much weight as necessary to deliver good corners. I’d pay ~$1K for such a lens.

      • T.I.M

        I’ll pay up to $3K for a 13mm f/4 PC-E
        My 24mm f/3.5 PC-E is sometimes a little too long, I have a trip to NY soon (to go get my D900) and a 13mm PC-E would be great….
        The 18mm f/2.8 is a great sharp lens but not for architectural shoots.

        • Peter

          You are the real prophet, aren’t you?

          • T.I.M

            Well I was right for the D200, D700 and D90, remember ?
            I should play lottery…

      • EnPassant

        More than three years ago Nikon not only patented a 20mm f/1.8 lens, but also an 18mm f/1.8 lens!:

        https://nikonrumors.com/2012/02/10/nikon-patent-for-18mm-f1-8-20mm-f1-8-fx-lenses.aspx/

        Maybe next year?

        • Yup, I was excited then, I was excited at the official announcement of the 20mm f/1.8, and I’m still excited to think there could be an 18mm f/1.8 out there…

      • Piotr Kosewski

        Looking at the recent tests of this lens (e.g. @photozone) I don’t think there is much to chase, really.
        Essentially, it looks like if they had a very good 14-24 similar to Nikon’s. They decided to add few complicated elements to force it down to 11mm. The lens is very good, but not excellent. And given the price and the hype, it should have been.

        To be honest, Nikon’s lineup has improved in terms of optics. I think they should concentrate more on things they sacrificed lately: build quality and ergonomics. And obviously all new/updated lenses should be E, not G.

        • You bring up a very good point. If Nikon wants to smoothly transition to having a mirrorless mount added to their lineup, all lenses need to be “E’d” right away. I highly, highly doubt there will be a (good) way to convert existing G lenses to a mirrorless system (As Sony has discovered) without it being very clunky…

          • Piotr Kosewski

            That depends what you mean by “converting to mirrorless”.

            Autofocus is not an issue. On-sensor PDAF can work brilliantly with ultrasonic-type AF motors. This has been shown first by Nikon (Nikon1+FT1 adapter), then by Olympus (E-M1) and lately by Sony (a7R II). It’s just a matter of how you set the system up.
            Also keep in mind Sony is also going back to sonic motors in FE mount. They use a linear SSM in the 35/1.4 and possibly in few more models.

            But in terms of build quality an adapter will always be a weak point (also for sealing).
            So if Nikon wants to go for a shorter flange in future mirrorless, they might find a way to make the adapters an improvement, not a burden. 🙂

            We’ve seen some interesting patents from both Nikon and Canon: tilt-shift, leaf shutter and even some ideas with moving optical elements (for VR or faster AF).
            Thing is though: all this won’t be possible in an adapter that also has to handle an aperture lever (or even worse: a big AF motor). So removing these two elements is essential.

            • I’m mainly talking about the mechanical aperture coupling and its inherent problems with precision, consistency, and control. Nikon does have TC’s that work okay with the mechanical aperture, but I’ve still found that creating a timelapse at f/11 or f/16 is extremely difficult to do because lenses (or bodies) often seem to get out of calibration and have serious issues with stopping down consistently.

              I dunno, maybe I’m just the only one with serious issues along those lines. But either way, eliminating the mechanical aperture arm from a mirrorless body would be highly beneficial in an effort to save space and weight, IMO.

              We’ll have to wait and see! I predict we’ll get a serious “pro” (FX / DX) mirrorless camera within 12-18 months…

          • Piotr Kosewski

            BTW:
            As for the future of F-mount itself: the next FX model (D5?) might tell us something.
            Lack of AF screw will be a sign that Nikon wants to modernize the mount and maybe retain it in mirrorless. (+1 from me)
            If the AF screw stays, we won’t learn anything new, i.e. that Nikon is:
            – designing a new mount,
            – delaying changes,
            – lost and scared. 😀

            • KnightPhoto

              I understand your point but the D5 series will be the last cameras (if ever) to lose the screwdriver. I think the D610 currently has the screwdriver so to me it’s logical the D620 will be the next model to lose the screwdriver, further differentiating it from the D750 line. I’d say we can use it as a signal when the D620, D7200 line, and maybe someday even the D750 series eventually loses the screw. Only to be retained in the D8x0 and D5 line, oh yah and retained in the the Df line too.

            • Piotr Kosewski

              I think exactly the opposite will happen.
              D5 will be designed for professionals – mostly for those doing wildlife, sport and journalism.
              Keep in mind the D810 is considered the “pro” body for high-res work (macro, portrait, product – things where an older, sharp, interesting lens could be useful – like the 200/4 micro). That’s why there was no D4x. 🙂
              Nikon is offering 3rd generation of tele primes with SWM. Given how poorly screw-driven AF was compared to modern systems, I seriously doubt significant number of people still use older lenses.
              And of course 14-400mm is covered with modern zooms.

              Nikon also updated the short prime range, so there is no point in using old ones.
              At this point only the wonderful 200/4 micro and the not-so-wonderful 14/2.8.
              I doubt the 200/4 will ever be replaced. 14/2.8 is pointless, because similarly priced 14-24/2.8 is better optically.

              This is exactly why D5 should be first. Because the target photographers either have modern lenses or can afford them.

              The segment where screw is hardest to remove is the mid-range. These people often can’t afford the newest lenses and still have some AF-D models. They simply update the body (top DX or bottom FX) every few years. This is exactly the case with many D300 users who ask for an update all the time. They spent a lot of money on older Nikon glass which is not worth much today. They can’t afford new Nikon lenses and – obviously – they can’t afford moving to 7Dm2. 🙂

            • KnightPhoto

              It’s an interesting thesis Piotr. Hopefully we know soon, PDQ about the D5!

              I’ve assumed that E lenses will come out in the bottom end lenses soon to support aperture changing in video without the whole Aperture lever mechanism necessary in the D750/D800/D4 lines which has to be expensive as does the screwdriver motor. I guess I’m still thinking the top-end cameras can support these additional costs but the bottom end can’t. And we’ve still got the two DC lenses and fisheye that need to eliminate the screwdriver AF before the D5 can do away with it.

              I also still think the Df line above all others needs to support all the legacy glass, and it does a pretty good job of that currently.

            • I don’t see any reason for Nikon to leave out the AF-D “screw” in the D5. Unless it really, really conflicts with their new AF system, and I don’t see how it could.

              I think the biggest “tell” would be if 100% of the lenses announced from here on out are E lenses. The most consumer E lens so far is, if I am not mistaken, the new DX 16-80. I wonder what lower grade lens Nikon has next in their production / update cycle…

            • Piotr Kosewski

              It’s not about why they should do this. The screw doesn’t interfere with anything (it does in lower models).
              The question is: why not? Or rather: it has to happen at some point – why not now?
              As mentioned before: almost “screwed” AF’s were replaced by AF-S (earlier I forgot about DC primes! :). You can afford a D5? Buy a new lens. This has to happen one day. Canon did this 28 years ago and that’s why they dominated the market.

            • If Nikon was in the business of “why not?” then I think they would have dumped AF-D much sooner from ALL bodies, and would have dumped mechanical aperture from all lenses and bodies, quite a few generations ago.

              Considering Nikon’s whole history all the way back to their earliest F-mount; it seems to me that they’re actually PROUD of such extensive backwards-compatibility, they even think it is a selling point for the Nikon lineup.

              As such, I don’t think AF-D motors and mechanical aperture couplings are going to disappear from their high-end traditional optical viewfinder DSLRs, ever. Especially the 1-digit series. And that’s fine, as long as they make new bodies and lenses forward-compatible with SWM and E lenses.

              Removing AF-D motors and mechanical aperture couplings from a mirrorless camera, even their flagship, is however highly likely for reasons of affordability and portability, as well as potentially making way for additional features that we can’t even dream of yet.

              We’ll see…

    • It’s high time they responded to canon 11-24.

      • MonkeySpanner

        It’s high time they responded to Canon’s ef-s 10-18 that is $300 bucks! And excellent!

        • EnPassant

          I already predicted that could be Nikon’s next DX lens as they already updated the 18-55 and 55-200 kit zooms and have nothing comparable for the wider end.

          The 10-24 is just too big and expensive for ordinary consumers and doesn’t sell that well now when many enthusiasts moved to FX.

          The 18-200 could also need a refresh. But I don’t think we will get any more DX DSLR lenses this year.

          • MonkeySpanner

            Well, if history is our guide, that WA DX zoom is still a few years away. Nikon likes to play around with updating kit lenses for DX.
            One thing they have been doing with kit lenses that I think they should do more of is the collapsible design (maybe they call it “retractable”?). I wish we could see what they could do with a longer lens using this design. Maybe on an 18-300 DX lens. Could be interesting if they can get the “retracted” length down pretty far.

      • Patrick O’Connor

        It’s not been that long. How long did it take for Canon to respond to the 14-24? Oh, that’s right…they haven’t. I suppose you could say that’s the purpose of the 11-24 but at f/4, I don’t think so.

        • You have a point here. But this may be because 17 TS was felt to be adequate to cover for it.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            I kinda doubt it. Completely different lenses despite the similar focal length.
            That being said, I REALLY wish Nikon would respond to THAT lens and update their 24 TS while they’re at it.

  • Back in the days of the late Don Gale, Tamron’s claim to fame was that all their lenses were lighter and more portable than an equivalent Nikon or Canon. Tokina was always the “rock-solid tank” of the third-party trio, and Sigma, well back then they were kinda all over the place between their cheap “disposable” kit stuff and their good EX stuff.

    With lenses like the 24-70 VC, 70-200 VC, and 15-30 VC, I don’t know what to expect from a couple f/1.8 primes from Tamron. They could chase Sigma’s Art lineup and go for flawless image quality, size and weight be damned, OR they could go after Nikon’s stellar new 1.8 G lineup, which achieves pretty awesome image quality wide open (but especially, 1 stop down) without breaking the bank or the wrist / shoulders / neck / back…

    I guess we’ll find out soon enough.

    • Well Tamron’s SP 24-70mm f/2.8 DI VC is lighter, cheaper, and has image quality that’s on-par with the only currently shipping Nikon 24-70mm (slight dig), so maybe they are going for all three.

      I quite like the VC system in the 24-70mm and aside from a 1/3 stop tendency to overexpose on the D810, it’s a pretty great lens. No. the corners aren’t perfect, they’re as good as they need to be in situations where I’m shooting a 24-70mm. I’m very interested in seeing what this 45mm 1.8 with VC looks like (i.e. how big it is). They might just have a couple of great sellers here, if they perform well.

    • Captain Megaton

      Sigma pulled off quite a coup with the Art lenses. People accept them as not just better value, but actually better than the Nikkor versions. (this is not universal, but a widely held view)

      Tamron, while their macro 90mm lenses have a good reputation, and iirc oem several Nikon lenses, would be unlikely to pull off the same thing. I suspect that Nikon mount (with all those 1.8G Nikkors already) may not be their primary target with these lenses.

      • Albert

        Nor the Canon mount, since the 35 f/2 IS is reputed to be superb (and has IS). In any case, if the 35 is really good, affordable, and reliable in AF, it may easily compete with Nikon’s, which has no image stabilization

      • EnPassant

        VC should add 2-3 stops hand holding capability compared to Nikon’s 35 and 50mm f/1.8G lenses and Canon’s 50mm f/1.8G. If price is right I think many will be interested.

        • KnightPhoto

          Ditto am potentially interested in VC for handheld night travel/city scenes.

        • Captain Megaton

          There’s little need for it on fast lenses, esepcially with ISO3200 being as good as it is these days, but whatever floats your boat as they say.

          • Patrick O’Connor

            No matter what conditions work with a non-VC lens, there’s always a scene that’s a little bit darker. If it doesn’t hurt anything, I’d rather have the option.

      • I think Tamron could compete directly with both Nikon and Sigma (and Canon) with a lineup of affordable f/1.8 primes that are cheaper than the Nikons, yet the same build quality and nearly the same optical quality.

  • T.I.M

    I meant I won’t “mind” (still drunk from 2 days ago…)
    I hope the D900 will have GPS, it’s a pain taking screen shoots of my Garmin.

    • lol, you know you can just create a GPS log and sync the metadata later, right?

      • T.I.M

        no I don’t know, are you talking about the optional GPS unit for the D800 ?

        • outkasted

          you can apply GPS data in post using Lightroom

          • T.I.M

            Great, but I still have to take a shoot of my GPS screen to know where I am.
            Thank you for the tip.

            • nwcs

              Look at an app like OpenGPS Tracker or one of many similar apps on iPhone/Android.

            • Tooki

              You can record the log on your phone/GPS and Lightroom will use your photo time stamps to automatically geotag your photos. Just make sure to record the GPS data and make sure the time is correct on your camera

            • Tooki

              You can record the log on your phone/GPS and Lightroom will use your photo time stamps to automatically geotag your photos. Just make sure to record the GPS data and make sure the time is correct on your camera.

            • Patrick O’Connor

              You can even adjust the time stamp if you forget. Last time I went to Japan, I forgot and had to compensate for 13 hours which also changed the date for most of the photos.

        • T.I.M, what I do is create a GPS log using a separate device, such as a simple, tiny AA battery device called a “GPS logger”, …or I just use my phone in Airplane mode with the GPS turned on, and an app called Backcountry Navigator. Then in Lightroom or with other dedicated apps, you take that GPX or KML file and add it to the metadata of the images. It automatically checks the timestamp of the image, and adds the exact coordinate.

          • T.I.M

            good idea, I’ll just take a picture of my GPS screen (I just bought one for my new car)

            • Piotr Kosewski

              You ignore all advices with the proper (and the only good) way of doing this: tracking and adding location in post automatically.
              You decide to keep using the worst possible method: taking a picture of a GPS unit and applying location manually.

              And on top of this: you want us all to live with compromises stemming from GPS.
              I guess I should feel offended…

      • Steven Taylor

        There are also third party GPS units that slot into the flash socket. I use one all the time (can’t recall the brand name) and at times when I need to use a flash I dangle the GPS device.

        I have used GPS logs previously, many years ago, and synchronized to the metadata later in Lightroom. I found it to be a very slow process when applying to 700+ raw photos.

        Btw, I use a Nikon d800. It will be many years before I change bodies but the future body I want will have integrated GPS.

  • KnightPhoto

    I like the choice of having VC in prime lenses. Interested to see the 35mm.

  • Aldo

    45mm is an interesting focal length.

    • nwcs

      I wonder if it is intended to serve as semi-normal for DX and normal for FX? Could serve both audiences pretty well.

      • Aldo

        yeah pretty much

      • Captain Megaton

        45mm is not a a normal lens on DX. It’s 67.5 mm eff. And, from my time with the GN-Nikkor I can tell you that it’s a pretty useless FL on a crop sensor. Frankly 40mm is too. You want 30-31mm ideally, and can make do with 35mm.

        On the other hand 40mm or 45mm is just perfect on FF, as a travel lens, a little bit more room without being too wide.

        • MonkeySpanner

          I have the Nikon 35/1.8 DX for my DX body – and to tell you the truth – I am not crazy about the focal length. I have a 22/2 lens for my EOS M that is a much more agreeable focal length for the way I normally shoot. A 35mm prime on DX just seems slightly too tight for me most of the time.
          BTW – I also have the coolpix A that has an 18.5/2.8 and that would make a very nice prime lens for DX if Nikon were ever interested in DX primes again.

        • nwcs

          My mistake. Brain was working backwards.

  • D810-D5200_user

    When will Tamron/Sigma do to long tele primes, like 300mm, 400mm, 600mm?

    • nwcs

      Sigma used to have several longer primes (and still has one, the 500 f4.5) but has said it wasn’t very profitable since most consumers buy and prefer zooms.

    • El Aura

      Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina all had 300 mm f/2.8 lenses (I think only Sigma still sells its version). Sigma also has a 500 mm f/4.5 and an 800 mm f/5.6 (the latter a while longer than Nikon itself had its version). The also sell a 300-800 mm f/5.6 and 200-500 mm f/2.8. Tamron also had a 400 mm f/4.

      The problem with all these ‘exotic’ lenses (fast and/or very long tele lenses) is that the classic third-party strategy of offering a more affordable version (with some IQ compromises and less features) results in lenses that are still pretty expensive (the cheapest entry is the Sigma 300 mm f/2.8 which currently sells for $3400, the 500 mm f/4.5 sells for $5000). And spending $3000 to $5000 and then getting something with IQ compromises or important missing features (the two Sigmas lack image stabilisation) is not appealing. It is a kind of uncanny valley.

      Where third-party vendors have success is creating exotics in categories not occupied by Canon, Nikon and Sony. Sigma’s 120-300 mm f/2.8, 300-800 mm f/5.6 or 200-500 mm f/2.8 are examples.

      • D810-D5200_user

        All depends on teh price point. Hope the update their options soon.

    • MonkeySpanner

      I think people who buy primes in this range are not price sensitive and probably will prefer body brand lenses.

  • Coastalconn

    I will be very interested to read the reviews. Tamron’s track record has been pretty good recently. There was a rumor when the 15-30 came out that Tamron was working on two primes that could resolve the newest 50MP sensors… I think the 35/45 are going to be optimized for sharpness and probably not break the bank…

  • Harsha

    Super. Finally a 35mm with VR/VC for Nikon bodies. Hope the IQ is better than the Nikon 35mm f/1.8 FX version. The icing on the cake is if it comes in a small form factor.

  • Russell Ferris

    No doubt they will be at a good price point.

  • Captain Megaton

    Available in Nikon, Canon and Sony mount, Sony mount version has no VC. Image circle not stated explicitly, so take your guess as to whether these will be full frame or crop. Which Sony mount.. A, E or FE, is also not stated.

    45mm would be a bit useless on DX, but is probably a pancake design so some people might bite. 35/1.8 goes up against the Nikkor 35/1.8 DX, with only VC to sell it, so unless these are going to be dirt cheap I don’t see the point.

    If FF then things are more interesting. The 35/1.8 because the Nikkor G is still $500 and the AFD version sucks. The 45/1.8 pancake because … well because that would be awesome!

    • MonkeySpanner

      A 45mm f/1.8 pancake. Hmmm not likely.
      The lenses say they are “Di” I think that is Tamron speak for full frame.

      • Captain Megaton

        You are correct, though I could swear the original Di lenses were crop format, nowadays Di is FF and Di II is crop and Di III is mirrorless. Holy incomprehensible branding execise, Batman!

        45/1.8 could still be a pancake design. Consider the CV Ultron 40/2 SL.

  • Duncan Dimanche

    the 35mm is an exiting news.. 300-400$ and i’ll go for it… i need a replacement for my current 35mm 1.8dx on my D800 🙂 (I use it as a full frame on it)

  • Prasad Palaniyandi

    45mm is perfect Normal focal length( diagonal 43.2 mm).. Would have been perfect if it is f1.4..
    But Tamron always makes sharp primes – 90/2.8 macro is one of the perfect macro + portrait lens.. creates creamy bokeh.. Hope these lenses also will hold the same quality…

  • Eric Duminil

    Nice combination of 1.8 aperture and vibration reduction.
    It could be interesting for event photography and video.

  • doge

    How about some DX pancake primes from someone? Anyone?

  • Damien Burridge

    Any more info about element count? I really like the increased perception of depth that some of my samyang lenses provide that my nikon lenses do not do as well. Auto focus is not everything, but it that and VC would be a nice quality of life feature that might interest me.

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