< ! --Digital window verification 001 -->

No GPS or Wi-Fi functionality in the Nikon D610

Nikon-D610-logo
A quick update to the Nikon D610 specifications I reported last week - the D610 will not have built-in GPS or Wi-Fi capabilities. I guess those features will first make their appearance in the D5300.

This entry was posted in Nikon D610 and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Digital Keen

    So….. The D610 is the D600. Wow.

    • bgbs

      Kind of like J2 is basically J1

  • Glen78

    There has got to be something different, maybe three SD card slots?

    • Spy Black

      Yeah, Id be surprised if there isn’t something different. Stereo mics maybe. Yeah, kinda lame overall. We’ll have to wait and see what comes out.

      • Eric Calabos

        ProRes output could be a savior

        • Spy Black

          ProRes is mostly Apple-only, is not that great to begin with, is insanely time-consuming, and is essentially obsolete anyway. I edit directly from raw h.264 footage in Premiere without the need to convert.

          • Eric Calabos

            ProRes is 1:9 compression but has 12bit color and lots of DR, so for those who play too much with highlights and shadows or color correction, its not obsolete at all. Its still a requirement if you goin to submit your documentary videos to BBC and many other broadcasters

            • Spy Black

              You only have as much bit-depth as your original camera records. Dumping to a 12-bit isn’t gong to give you any more dynamic range, unless you camera can record video raw, and I’m not familiar with any DSLR that does that.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      If there are any improvements, I am not aware of them. All of the specifications I received so far are identical to the D600.

      • 1j2

        The D7100 would have no AA Filter and a better AF-Modul than the D610 in the same body for half the price. What’s wrong with these people?

        • UnknownTransit

          Nikon don’t want to hurt their d800 sales. The D800 is still the good FF camera. If they port the d800′s 51pt AF over, no one will buy the d800 and the camera will compute against the Canon 5d mk3. Canon is not releasing a 6d mk2, so there’s no point of Nikon making a better d610.

          • RxGus

            Other than the idea that they could flat out “win” that marketing segment…

            If Nikon wants to increase its market share, it needs a few products that blow Canon out of the water. They need a couple places where the decision to go Nikon is obvious (like Canon did with early adaption of quality video).

        • Sahaja

          The AA filter is there for a good reason – they wouldn’t put one there if their engineers thought they didn’t need it.

    • Lcky

      seven sd slots for sure.

  • instamatic

    If proves to be true, Nikon keeps disappointing, and shows how much out of touch they are with their user base.

    • zoetmb

      Agreed. Why do you put the more advanced features in the lower-priced camera? While a consumer and enthusiast/pro may use the WiFi and GPS for different things, they both need it. It would seem to me that you put new features in the higher-end models first and as the price of technology decreases, you move those features down to the lower-priced models.

      Besides, WiFi and GPS should be in every camera. I just loaded iOS 7 for the iPhone which apparently updated the Photos application and there’s a new optional view that arranges the photos by location and date. I never thought I would care about GPS, because I know where I’ve shot, but I have to admit this view is compelling since it frequently gives the cross streets. So my iPhone has this (as well as much more inexpensive phones) but my D800 doesn’t? That doesn’t make sense to me.

      Even Nikon should understand that the primary use of photography by consumers these days is to send digital photos to other people and social media sites. Therefore, IMO, all Nikon cameras that appeal to consumers should have easy menu items to send photos to sites/people with perhaps a programmable physical button to send to one’s favorite (ex: Facebook). If I were Nikon, I’d even build a very simple email program into the camera so you could send photos to someone with a quick note. IMO, this is the only way you’re going to get consumers to move up to a better camera and off of their phones. You can sell the better quality and lens choices along with the smartphone functionality that they’re used to. You can’t have less.

      Now having said all that, I certainly understand that the only purpose of the 610 is to get away from the grease issue and perhaps raise the price. It wasn’t to introduce a new design, but in not changing the specs, they missed an opportunity.

      • Mike

        AF appeared first in “non-pro” cameras. Some features work their way up as much as down. But your sentiment is sound. Nikon needs another D3 & 14-24 grand slam. Even now, a D5200 user can get an image to FB or twitter faster (and “more cheaply”) than a D4 user can get it to his/her publisher. Something wrong with that.

        • autofocus

          Less than 1% of D4 users even have publisher. So they should cater to that small percentile??? Why don’t they just make two camera bodies. One DX, the other FX and put every conceivable option in both. Charge less than that of a D3100 so all the people live happily ever after. Get real. Then, get over it…

          • Mike

            You’re mad, I’m not. But thanks for the D4 correction. D4 users don’t even use FB or twitter or tablets and such, so your point stands. I assume you work for Nikon then to have this statistical information. My bad.

          • Ken Elliott

            Good luck with pricing a camera below a D3100, and putting a full magnesium alloy body with weatherproofing, FX sensor, and pentaprism. It’s not going to happen. I won’t be happy with the camera you want, and you won’t pay the price I will.

          • Andrew

            So you don’t care about those features? The fact that one person asks for a feature means that there are many others who would appreciate that feature. Unless you can give me a scientific survey showing the less than “1%” you talk about, let us just say that your opinion is no more valid than Mike’s.

      • Cyrille Berger

        D5300 will be made out of plastic. D610 is partly magnesium. Guess for which one it is easier to avoid radio wave interferences.

        • koenshaku

          Cyrille you sir are a gentleman and a scholar. Blame Canon for releasing the under performing 6D for this.. I mean sure the 6D has wifi and that is cute because you can buy an adapter for almost every Nikon camera, but when it comes any other feature give or take ISO performance and video the D600 out performs it in every way. Competition is what creates innovation until Canon steps it up I guess Nikon will continue to sit back.

          • toby reynolds

            I’m a Nikon user, but the 6D blows the D600 out of the water in terms of ISO performance

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              Either you’re blind or buying your still camera to shoot video with. Probably both.

            • toby reynolds

              I wouldn’t buy the 6D for video due to pretty bad Moire (the 5dm3 is much better). Blind? No not even close. I have compared several side by side comparisons and the 6D is the ISO king. I agree the D600 has better features, and since I have Nikon glass I will probably upgrade to it in the future

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              But that high ISO performance comes at the expense of dynamic range AND detail, and from what I can see color and micro contrast as well. I’d think you could just turn up the noise reduction on the Nikon and turn down the image sharpening and be just as well.

            • koenshaku

              You are right at higher ISOs the 6D does have better performance I have checked out several reviews that display this. If your subject starts to move around though good luck with 1 cross type focal point. Where the D600 has better dynamic range and higher megapixel. Again it get more noise at higher ISOs to a disturbing effect in video in photos it is still pretty close.

            • toby reynolds

              I completely agree with you. I wasn’t trying to start an argument with Nikon fanboys, just stating that from my research the 6D has superior ISO handling. Didn’t say it was a better camera ;-)

            • autofocus

              Then you should switch…

            • toby reynolds

              Considered it but cant afford to upgrade atm. It’s not just about noise…

          • toby reynolds

            I’m a Nikon user, but the 6D blows the D600 out of the water in terms of ISO performance

      • Gly

        I couldn’t agree with you more. Without any tangible ‘improvements’ to the D610, I honestly can help but think that all Nikon did was swap out the old name plate that says D600 to one that says D610.
        C’mon Nikon… Don’t tell me you couldn’t have added SOMETHING tangible to the D610. Even if it’s something as simple as taking off some of the ‘limiters’ in the firmware. We know you can do it.

      • Sahaja

        GPS and WiFi cost virtually nothing to add – in the quantities manufacturers buy them, GPS chips now cost only $1.50 Wi-Fi should be similar.

        The firmware to handle GPS and Wi-Fi is already in the camera and would need only minor changes.

    • Dpablo unfiltered

      You should stick to your instamatic.

  • PeterO

    Nikon is the new BlackBerry.

    • umeshrw

      And going to be nokia

      • Andrew

        Not really. Nikon recently released the D4, D800, D7100, D5200. D3200, and Nikon 1 – all giving you great pictures! They gave you all those great products all in a little over 1 year. Nikon did not let the Japan earthquake and Thailand flood slow them down. Then they have just released the underwater Nikon 1 (AW1) camera that is being well received. And you are comparing them to Nokia?

        • umeshrw

          Yes they did do all that .So did nokia come out with many great products. Just that they came out with what they thought people wanted and not what actually people wanted. I bought D800 after waiting 4 years for D400. I was lucky 800 was exactly what I wanted (Although I would have been happier if it was DX). But majority of people out there are still waiting for D700 replacement, 300 replacement, Simple additional features as wifi, important lenses. All of which canon is doing. Yes canon is a giant. All the more reason nikon should pay heed to such things.

    • rhlpetrus

      Agree, this is looking like a marketing disaster, a problem-corrected body with a anew name, what a joke.

      • visionaer

        i like the new name for the correction, otherwise you dont know, if you maybe buy the old one ;)

        • Gly

          … and there’s the paradox… are you really getting a new camera or is it just a name plate change? With no tangible difference it could be an old ‘fixed’ D600. It might bother some to know you could have bought a ‘fixed’ D600 for less than a D610.

          • Andrew

            Look, people that come to this site are ample informed. Many people have posted and suggested that one should buy the refurbished D600 camera and sell the lens and end up with a great camera for a net price of $1,350. If buying a new camera at $1,900 is too much money to some, then those refurbished cameras are a great deal. But some are too hesitant when it comes to acting decisively; that is why not everyone takes advantage of an opportunity!

            • Chill

              Andrew, your comment seems oddly out of place. I think what Gly is suggesting the D600 is the better deal. There doesn’t appear to be any difference (at this time) between the two models and the D600 issues appear to have been corrected… so why buy a D610 for more money when Nikon is ‘just swapping the name plate’.

      • Imperious Images

        I’m wondering how they’re going to announce/market the 610 if there aren’t any improvements other than the problem they won’t fully admit to. What will the headline read? “Improved the problem-free camera” lol

    • koenshaku

      Not exactly, if Canon had offered more competition in this price bracket we would see better features. Even with nothing the thing still dances all over the 6D.

      • PeterO

        We all wish that Canon had offered more competition, but I think it’s pretty obvious that the collusion between the two prevents a home run product on either side. My reference to BB was the arrogance the company showed toward the iPhone. We know the result of that. This culture of losing face if you admit a mistake is not going to fly for much longer. If Nikon only sold in Asia, sure. But their fortunes depend on world sales.

        • King of Swaziland

          No collusion is necessary when you are run by stereotypical-Japanese-management-straight-out-of-central-casting…

          Great minds think alike they say, small minds do too.

    • I AM NIKON

      Oh, put a sock in it.

  • Nicolas

    Do you have ANY idea of a release date?? thanks!

    • robert

      same question

      • Sebastien Girard

        Yep the release date of that camera was a year ago lol, under the name D600

      • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

        I have no firm release date. Nikon has changed the way they do announcements and I doubt they will have big media event for that release given the lack of any improvements in the D610 (based on what we know so far). I already mentioned that I expect the D610 to be on display during the Photo Plus show in NYC at the end of October. If that’s true, I expect the announcement in the next 30 days. It could be also that Nikon is waiting to get rid of their D600 inventory before they introduce the D610.

  • Sebastien Girard

    I never seen a so useless camera release… Hope that there will be a last minute surprise

    • david

      Yep the D40x to D60 is one example of an useless camera release by N’ ikon.

  • Mandrake

    Nikon did something similar with the D70 and D70s. At least the D70s got a bigger LCD out of the change. IIRC, all other changes were fixed with a firmware upgrade on the D70.

    • Ned Gerblansky

      They didn’t change the flash and battery through firmware.

  • FrancescoP

    The D610 is not attractive if it hasn’t some improvements.
    The LCD RGBW screen and 51-point AF of the D7100 are attractive for users who wish to evolve to FX or simply to have something more from their D600.

  • Karen G.

    “…the D610 will not have built-in GPS or Wi-Fi capabilities.” Yes! What I need.
    Read more on NikonRumors.com: http://nikonrumors.com/2013/09/23/no-gps-or-wi-fi-functionality-in-the-nikon-d610.aspx/#ixzz2fjlJ7T5a

  • matt

    Nikon missed a big opportunity. I have two aging D700′s. One with 300,000 clicks and one with about 200,000. I have used the D800 and D600 multiple times but was not compelled to upgrade. If the D610 would have included the 51pt af and had a few other small tweaks, I likely would be buying two after the new year. I’m sure Nikon would have sold A LOT of 610′s if they would have made it more of a “D700 replacement”.

  • tertius_decimus

    Who cares? Good AF and QC or die!

    • RxGus

      … or top 3 in IQ?

  • FDF

    Nikon’s logic is simple: if there’s no new feature, there can’t be any new problems. They can’t afford to have to “problematic” cameras in a row.

  • groucher

    GPS and WiFi are niff-naff and trivia. The thing that disappoints me about Nikon is that they haven’t managed to produce a FF lightweight and compact digital FM or rangefinder yet. The less I see of all the ‘features’ and bloat on modern cameras the better as far as I’m concerned.

    There are plenty of bloaters on the market but nothing for those of us that just want a photographic tool.

    • RxGus

      niff-naff and trivia?

      Just because you don’t have any use/value for those features does not make them worthless. GPS is VERY useful for how I use my camera… and I would love not to mess with external options and work-arounds to geotag my photos.

  • D10000000000

    There must be at least one improvement to produce a new product. Apart for the new name the specs can’t be all the same. Imagine Nikon show the D610 as a new camera with the exact specs of the D600: no way. They should say the new product fix the dust issue but they’ll never admit the new product is a merely replacement of the older one. They must necessary justify a new camera in the line-up, so there’s gonna be something different. My fear is that could be something ridicolous and unnecessary but I’m pretty sure something new will be added. I really hope for a total magnesium alloy body but more a 51 points af system.

    • D610 fan

      +1

  • bgbs

    Maybe its not D610, maybe they are releasing D600s, which will have minor improvements in speed, maybe ISO, but no new features.

  • where_is_the_51_pt_AF?

    The sales number for D610 would be even more disappointing (to Nikon) than that of the D600, I can guarantee you. The media and the fan-base would keep badmouthing the camera as a nothing-new release and few would want to buy one.

  • Ken Elliott

    So even if the D610 is nothing but a D600 without the “oil” problem, isn’t it still a great camera? Are all the complaints founded on the idea that Nikon didn’t “amaze” anyone?

    I guess I’m confused. The D600 is an amazing camera, as long as you LEARN TO CLEAN THE SENSOR. Pros learn how to do this, since we can’t afford the downtime. Consumers seem squeamish about performing such work. Might the complaints be mainly coming from consumers, not pro/prosumers?

    I see this as an opportunity to get a great deal on D600 bodies – especially refurbs. I’d consider one, except I’m well stocked on Nikon FX bodies right now.

    • Zeke

      Dust is one thing, but oil residue is another kettle of fish. I don’t blame anyone for not wanting to have to repeatedly wet-clean their FF sensors.

      • Ken Elliott

        Really? It’s no big deal at all for me. I’ve been cleaning dirt and oil off sensors for several years. But I also know how to use manual focus, manual exposure, etc. Perhaps I’m too disconnected from the average consumer to understand their fear of sensor oil.

        • Zeke

          A camera that soils its own sensor under otherwise sterile conditions in a few hundred exposures, requiring a wet sensor-clean, is a big time-waster to say the least. If anything, this is a bigger problem for folks doing photography for a living than the “average consumer” you’re disparaging.

          Cleaning a sensor properly is a meticulous process, and in my experience, most of the people who do it quickly (and who are convinced it’s “no big deal”) aren’t doing a very good job. One need only look at their image files.

          • Ken Elliott

            Ha. That’s a pretty cool way to insult someone by saying it it’s easy, they must be doing it wrong. My experience: people who find it difficult are doing it wrong, or have the wrong tools.

            But I’d say its less of a problem for pros – we shoot more, change lenses more, and get our stuff dirty often. So we get pretty good at cleaning. And frequent cleaning does seem to make it much easier than waiting for dust to adhere to the sensor.

            • Zeke

              I’m saying that it’s disingenuous to pretend it’s normal to wet-clean a sensor multiple times in the middle of every shoot, which is what we’re talking about with a shutter that mists oil onto the sensor over a few hundred exposures. If the D3 had done that, NPS would have been swamped with repair orders.

              And depending on the environment, it’s simply out of the question. If you’re attempting your sensor clean in the dusty Serengeti, you’re definitely doing it wrong, no matter how good you think you are.

              Anyway, Nikon appears to agree, which is why they’re doing the D610.

            • Ken Elliott

              Zeke said: “I’m saying that it’s disingenuous to pretend it’s normal to wet-clean a sensor multiple times in the middle of every shoot”

              That’s known as a “straw man argument” where you make up your opponent’s words, then argue against them. You really had to stretch your imagination to come up with this scene. And “Serengeti”? Really?

              BTW, since the camera is only a rumor, we really don’t know what Nikon is up to.

            • Zeke

              I invite any reader who cares to scroll up and decide for himself whether I’m being unfair.

              As for my Serengeti comment – yes, really, tens of thousands of us take DSLRs to dusty places like East Africa where stopping to scrub down a sensor is a non-option.

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              I smell elephant feces.

            • Ken Elliott

              Zeke, we both agree that the D600 oil issue was bad. All I’m saying is those of us comfortable with sensor cleaning don’t see this as a big deal. Certainly people who don’t clean their own sensors would find this to be a SERIOUS issue. Can’t we agree on that?

              But claiming that I am “disingenuous” is false, because you created the words that you blame me for. That is certainly unfair. But our “conversation” has become silly, so let’s end it.

            • Zeke

              I invite any reader who cares to scroll up and decide for himself whether I’m being unfair.

              As for my Serengeti comment – yes, really, tens of thousands of us take DSLRs to dusty places like East Africa where stopping to scrub down a sensor is a non-option.

            • mikeswitz

              Why don’t you sell your D600, if you actually have one, and go buy Canon and whine to them for a while.

            • mikeswitz

              Why don’t you sell your D600, if you actually have one, and go buy Canon and whine to them for a while.

        • Jarret O’Shea

          I can work my way around manual focus and exposure, but knowing and being comfortable with the inner workings of my camera is something completely different. I don’t shoot professionally. If I screw up focus or exposure, I take another shot. If I screw up wet-cleaning a sensor, I have a ~$2000 brick. Yes, I could learn, and eventually I probably will, but as of right now I have other things that take priority. It also has to do with expectations–I expect that when I pay this much for a piece of equipment that I won’t have to deal with stupid problems. If I do, I expect that it will be fixed with no questions–something Nikon wasn’t initially doing.

          • Ken Elliott

            Well stated. As I understand your point, you see sensor oil as a flaw that the manufacturer needs to resolve.

            I see this more like flat tires. If you drive a car, you’ll have to deal with it – sooner or later. If you don’t learn how to change tires, at some point you’ll be stranded on the side of the road.

            All interchangeable lens camera will get contamination inside. It’s part of what we have to deal with when we choose such a system. I have difficulty understanding why you would spend so many hours learning exposure and focus, etc, but not want to learn how to clean your sensor. I don’t mean any disrespect – I really want to understand why this is such a concern.

            I suspect too many companies use fear of damage as justification for expensive sensor cleaning.

            • Skay

              It’s not only sensor oil, which any reasonable person would not expect, and it’s not dust from multiple lens changes that you would expect, but it’s the shutter assembly throwing debris, oil, or both. If it’s OK to just deal with it, then why is Nikon coming out with a new model just to fix the flaws?

            • Ken Elliott

              Given that the shutter is mechanical, over time you would expect debris and oil to get flung off. What was unusual was the amount and how quickly it occurred with the D600. Yes, it was a flaw that Nikon should should have fixed. No question. But all mechanical focal plane shutters will wear and generate debris that will find its way to the sensor – this is not a flaw.

              Just like a new car should not develop four flats in four months. Flats are normal over time, but not when brand new. So we agree that it is a flaw that Nikon should resolve.

              But if you can buy a new car for a deep discount because people get flat tires and think the car is broken… well…

              D800 users could not fix the AF issues themselves. It had to go back to Nikon. But I can clean the sensor, if I chose to. That’s a big difference.

            • Skay

              If you had a flat day one and had to change the tire, then after 10 miles, then after 100 miles…hey, just wait it out, the flats will stop happening over time. Changing the tire is part of owning a car, right? Every respectable driver should know how to change a flat.

              Take the car to the dealership and they agree, yep…defective tires. We will change them out for you…same thing happens again. Well, just take it to the dealer, they will take care of you and the car is fine otherwise, so what’s the issue. Anyway, there are people that don’t have any issues, so you are making up the flat tire problem. Other people are continually changing the flats or just airing the tires up when the go flat, so what’s the problem. You get the picture.

              After 50 shots I had over 100 spots, pieces of debris, oil, whatever you want to call it, but don’t call it a dust from changing lenses…an issue that happens to all cameras. After 100 shots there were too many to count and quiet visible at f8… not f22, not a blank wall, but a normal photo at f8. I knew it was a gamble and I sent it back…no harm no foul for me. But please stop defending Nikon and saying this is normal for cameras to have this type of problem. You are insulting your own intelligence.

              Perhaps some folks choose to live with it, or it’s gone away for some, or fixed by Nikon, or clean it yourself…regardless there is a huge issue for which Nikon is creating a new model. Oh…the Hyundai Elantra is going away after all the flat tires and we have fixed it and it’s now called the Hyundai Elantra II. But there weren’t really any problems with the previous model, people are just making that up.

            • Ken Elliott

              I guess you did not understand that I am agreeing with you, and not defending Nikon. I just don’t get my panties in a wad over sensor oil like others do. It’s no big deal to me, since I clean my own sensor.

            • Michael Sloan

              Take your tire analogy and liken it to the dirty sensor problem in the following manner: Every 2k miles you are replacing a tire due to a flat. I’m comfortable changing tires, but I don’t think I should need to do it so damned frequently.

            • Ken Elliott

              Right. That is exactly my point. It IS a flaw, but not a show stopper, like a transmission failure.

            • Jarret O’Shea

              In this case, yes, I see it as a manufacturer flaw. I understand that dust/grime will eventually accumulate on the sensor, but I used my D90 for several years and never noticed dust spots like I saw after just a few months on the D600.

              To continue with car analogies, if cleaning the sensor is fixing a flat, then this shutter problem would be some manufacturing defect that causes the tire to go flat every 5-10,000 miles. Sure, I could change the tire every time, but I shouldn’t have to–it should last me until close to the tire rating, unless something uncontrollable (ie, running over a nail) occurs. If there were such a defect, I would expect my car manufacturer to take the car back and fix it, and save me the time of changing my tire 4x more than I should reasonably expect to.

              None of this means that I don’t otherwise love the camera.

        • Sahaja

          The closest vehicle analogy I can think of is that the D600 is like a British motorcycle – prone to leaking oil.

    • jk

      it should get a bit better video with at least full 60P at full HD and less noisy LV mode with full aperture control.
      other wise , it is the same shitty camera as the current D600 and won’t sell well like its predecessor.
      Nikon needs to get serious about improving video and LV mode of all new cameras.

      • Ken Elliott

        JK said “other wise , it is the same shitty camera as the current D600″

        Really? The D600 is a shitty camera? I don’t disagree that the video could use improvement, but I think it is an outstanding camera, and I use D700 and D800′s.

        Perhaps you could name other cameras at that price point that offer the image quality of the D600?

        • RxGus

          I am still waiting for a reply to your question Ken. Seems like jk is off doing some research to more accurately answer it.

          • Ken Elliott

            It’s a smart tactic. If he waits a few years, the $1100 D900 will arrive and he’ll win. ;D

  • Michael

    The should give trade ins (free upgrade) to those of us who bought the D600.

    • Andrew

      Why? You bought the D600 and if it had the oil problem you should have returned it. You as a consumer have rights and it was withing your rights to return the product within your 30 day warranty period. If you did not, then that was your decision. For those who wanted to keep their cameras, they had the option to take it to a service center. Now if you had bought a product and it became defective after the warranty period and “no fix” is available and it is a wide scale problem then you may have a point.

      • Michael

        The thing is I did return two of them. I decided to learn how to clean the sensor myself. Every 2 to 3k I clean the sensor. So my issue is if I send the camera back they are just as likely to say there is no issue.

  • D10000000000

    The possibilities are:
    - 51 points af system
    -whole magnesium alloy body
    -histogram in live view
    -1/8000 shutter
    -compact flash card

    • RxGus

      Why on earth would you WANT a CF card?

      Remember- this is an enthusiast camera, meaning the intended target has no money invested in old technology of CF cards. Adding a compact flash would be a step backwards for 99% of the target consumers.

      • Ken Elliott

        Why might he want a CF card slot? So he can use it as a backup body for his D3/D4/D700/D800. Or so he can use the same CF cards used by the D100/D200/D300.

        That said, it’s clear that Nikon will stick with SD cards for all but pro bodies at this point.

        • RxGus

          It isn’t a D100/D200/D300.
          It isn’t a D3/D4/D700/D800.

          It’s a camera for hobbyists to jump from DX to FX. You know, the hobbyists who only own SD cards. Who don’t want to worry about bending a pin. Who don’t want to spend more money, for less memory, and more size.

          • Ken Elliott

            You might want to go back and think about my previous answer.

            You asked why he would want a CF card and I offered possible reasons. Nothing more.

      • CF Pro

        I would rather have a CF and an SD than 2 SD slots, I have a D300s and a D700, they both use them so do all the Pro models

        • Imperious Images

          “this is an enthusiast camera” not for people who own those cameras. If you want mixed match card slots, buy a D800…problem solved. Leave the D600/610 for people upgrading from the D7000/D90 (like myself) for whom the camera was intended

        • RxGus

          The D600/610 isn’t a Pro model.

          CF is a legacy format. They may be a few percentage points faster than SD, but SD is so much cheaper, and smaller.

          I firmly believe the reason CF still exists is because companies don’t want to alienate Pro’s who already have money invested in cards.

        • MyrddinWilt

          I have a D300 and a D800 but I don’t have a CF card larger than 8GB while I have several 32Gb SD cards and plan to buy more.

          The CF cards are more expensive and prone to break the pins on the camera.

        • 103David

          Oh, Gee…how ’bout because they function reliably and they’re not so hideously easy to lose? And really, who cares about the size/weight difference when you’re talking the differential between micro-crouton size and giga-floogie size memory cards?
          Get real, fan boys, the designated mass/weight ratio of the cameras and their mem is about 800 to one. In other words, make yourself useful for a change and start improving the power density on the battery. Make my Nikon/Canon/MagLiteMaxiMegaDeathRayStereoSterilizer SING!
          Whew…fanboys,what can you do? They don’t even get it when you mock hell out of them.

          • RxGus

            But size matters a lot when you are designing the internals of a complex computer and trying to fit it all in a small, handheld box.

            The space taken up by CF cards in camera could be used for other things… that is where the size matters.

  • Jaby

    what about D600e/D610? without the AA filter + no dust issues + 51 points?

    • david

      That’s a good upgrade if they did that.

    • jk

      at merely 24.3mp (low mp), it should have the AA , in fact, the current D600 AA is extremely thin, and thus, it has severe moire issue.

      • Ken Elliott

        “at merely 24.3 mp”
        Uh… what? Other than medium format and the D800, perhaps you can name one camera that has significantly more pixels? How about any Canon that has as many?

  • Zeke

    This criticism is strange. People don’t care what additional feature is added, so long as there’s at least one? Talk about seeking novelty for the sake of novelty.

    From what we know, Nikon is fixing the one big bug in an otherwise outstanding D600, and is making the change transparent to the buyer by renaming the new one D610. Everything about that is good, not bad.

    More features would delay the release, and if they fixed the problem silently and didn’t rename the camera, buyers would be stuck trying to guess whether they were ordering one of the new ones or the old ones.

    • jk

      not only one big bug but 3 big bugs.
      you may forget the useless LV and video mode of that camera , but it must have been addressed with a FW update.

      • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

        The black boarder around video when using uncompressed HDMI out was already fixed in the last D600 firmware update.

  • Jeff

    The email size limit on my AT&T account is 25MBs. That rules out emailing NEF files on the newer larger sensor DSLRs and possibly top quality JPEG files. I’m not sure about how the various JPEG file quality options vary in MBs since I only shoot RAW on a D800 nowadays. Perhaps Nikon could develop an option that would immediately convert any RAW file to an emailable sized JPEG and send it via WIFI to your smartphone and then to whomever.
    I will probably get a GPS attachment. Although, if you know where your photo was taken in Lightroom 4 or 5 you can drag and drop to the specific Google map location and it will assign the proper lat. / long. coordinates to the photo file.
    These higher-end DSLRs are large enough already. I’m not sure manufactures can put much more technology into them without the size factor getting out of hand (literally). Perhaps eventually they will be able to, when technologies get even smaller as they generally do over time.
    The D600 / D610 debacle is truly an embarrassment for Nikon. I guess I got lucky with my D800; trouble-free so far, and it’s from a very early production run.

    • Ken Elliott

      Plenty of email servers limit the size of attachment to much smaller sizes. I’ve run into 4MB limits, and it’s not that uncommon to be limited to 1MB. Email is a poor choice for sending large files.

      FTP is the tool of choice, but others use Dropbox, Google Drive, SkyDrive, etc. You can’t fit an 8×10 into a letter-sized envolope, as it was designed for letter, not photographs. Email is the same – designed for text documents, not large files. FTP is “File Transfer Protocol” and it WAS designed to transport lots of large files.

      • Jeff

        Smartphone users regularly send photos to one another or to their Facebook page, but I’m guessing these photos are in the KB size range. Internet bandwidth is slowly becoming larger in this country. There are many countries overseas that have an internet bandwidth that truly outclasses the U.S. The U.S. has fallen behind in so many areas. It’s quite disappointing.

        • Ken Elliott

          I agree about the US network speed. We live on a digital dirt road – far from the super speedway we were promised. At least we pay more.

          BTW, Smartphone uploads don’t use the email system. They use something more like FTP. But you’re right – those images are tiny.

          • Jeff

            To quote Johnny Carson, “I did not know that.”

  • didaskalos

    No wifi, gps, is really a bummer. Including these features would add value and encourage the base. I’m disappointed with the release and increasingly with Nikon. I have an FE and an FA from the 80′s that I enjoyed immensely. Solid performers. Having a small investment in lenses I opted for Nikon digital when I revived my hobby. Nikon is making it hard on me to affirm the wisdom of my decision to continue with them in the digital world.

    • didaskalos

      I might add… If Nikon fails to add these features to the next iteration of the D800, then they are shooting themselves in the foot.

  • D600 User

    I have never understood why the D600 got such a bad rap to begin with. Some early models had problems with oil splashing off the mirror. So did the D7000. Nikon tracked down the manufacturing problem and the issue went away. I have a d600 and I check the sensor with a scope every few days. I have never a problem. To me the problem isn’t the D600, it is Internet pettiness. People love to bad mouth things and the rumors are always far worse than the problems

    • Steve

      In today’s social media world, everything and anything can go viral within days. Companies are further under the microscope and subject to more scrutiny than ever before. (and more publicity as well too). Unfortunately Nikon has been a bit behind the times in dealing with this new generation of media. When news breaks out of issues such as this, companies like Nikon need to learn to address the problem immediately. If not, it will keep snowballing until more of the general population believes it. In this case, Nikon took an extremely long time to respond to this issue and by then, everyone already had a set mindset regarding the D600, and the delayed response by Nikon was just viewed as a company that really doesn’t care about its customers or products.

    • gj

      Consider yourself lucky, and leave it at that. Meanwhile, a young lady I know has oil problems on her D600. She should have returned it when she can but she listened to folks like you and to the others who say that the problem just goes away with several cleanings. I clean it for her for free every so often as I felt obliged because I highly recommended the darn thing to her! You should have seen her bawling when she had her first paid assignment and she thought the pictures she took were all but ruined. Thank goodness for photoshop …

      • Dpablo unfiltered

        TROLL troll TROLL troll

        • D600 User

          Far from it. I see it just the other way. I make my living with my camera. I think people love stirring the pot. There is no boogeyman in my D600. If you guys couldn’t trash the D600 and Nikon what woudl you do with your spare time?

          • Dpablo [filtered]

            I’ll AGREE – there’s no boogie man in your D600. The person I directed my comment toward was “gj,” for all it had to say. First off, the camera hasn’t been out for a year so the fictitious person obviously still can return it. Second, I don’t believe the rest of the paragraph either. If you read it a couple of times it should be obvious… Who would take untested gear on a paid assignment? I remember this persons weak stupid writing style from the D800 complaining days.
            I regretfully put my filter on to refrain from saying what I think of you “photographers” and whiny [people] and fake whiny [people.]

            • gj

              Maybe I need to get more detailed with my posts. So here goes … she had quite a few shoots with the camera before she agreed on the paid one, so it was not like she was working with untested gear. She loves her D600 and she does not regret buying it one bit. But if I were not there to clean her camera’s sensor every so often, she would be hating it. It is true though in her case that the oil spots are getting less and less, but they are still there. The cleaning intervals have been getting longer and longer, but I still recommended for her to send it in and hope that the shutter gets replaced.

              I never wrote anything about the D800, it’s because I know nothing about it. Looks like there is something I should know about it though. Might as well investigate before I go ahead recommending it to someone or anyone.

              Might as well apologize to you too, Dpablo, for riling you up and messing your day.

            • Andrew

              I have reported frequently that one lab tested six D600 cameras with oil and after 2,000 shots, the oil in five of the cameras disappeared. If that does not solve her problem, I would add a few more shots. But ultimately, I also have heard reports that changing the shutters will fix the problem. Anyway, cheers guy, I know you mean well. Have a great day!

            • Dpablo unfiltered

              So she had used the camera many times and the spots didn’t become apparent until it was used on a paid assignment…
              Wow… I can’t make this stuff up….

            • gj

              In no way am I trying to convince you to believe so you don’t have to “make this stuff up”. All I can say is that the shots she took inside the venue looked okay but as soon as the party went outside, the spots just suddenly were there on the close-ups/portraits. For all I care, it seemed like the camera did an unexpected “sneeze” while she was taking pics inside. Mind you, we are talking about a 17-year-old girl now who thought it was the end of the world then when she saw about seven dust/oil spots on her pics.

              All I am saying on my initial response is that for you folks who have clean D600′s, thank your lucky stars. Because out there in the real world, some folks have really encountered this oil/dust problems. Nikon has somewhat acknowledged it in words and in action. Why do you think they’re coming up with the D610 just a year after the D600 came out? I mean, WHY?

      • Andrew

        Actually you have not understood the comment by “D600 User”. He did not say the problem just goes away. He said his D600 did not have any problem. He also stated that the problem was fixed early by Nikon but somehow people kept the feeding frenzy going. The early problem took on a life of its own. Now Nikon has a problem communicating with the public – that just has to change!

        If you spend $2,000 on a product would you wait for a problem to go away? Common sense tells me to exchange the product with a new replacement within the 30 day warranty period. Painting an emotional story about a job assignment does not change the facts. Nikon is not responsible for the poor decision she made not to return the product to the retailer. I have also made poor decisions in my life and have paid the price for it – that is life! But the good news for her is Nikon is a quality company and honors their warranty and will fix her camera if she takes it in.

    • koenshaku

      I hear murmurs that Nikon fixed it then I always check the review dates on amazon and people are still buying it and crying about it. The fix will be the D610.

  • whisky

    any word yet on a new mb-d14-1/2 battery pack?

    • Neopulse

      Same pack. Why would it need a change?

      • whisky

        nikon’s renewed strategy for high profit margins?

        • Neopulse

          That would be a terrible idea even from a financial standpoint still mass producing 2 different grips for essentially the same body. If they didn’t even make one for the D3200 that sold plenty when it was released (especially the red model) what makes you think they will do it for this? Plus it would create more loss of clients if they do that. The D610 is like a formal apology to the disgruntled D600 customers. Why add salt to the wound with something that will piss them off even more?

          • The Vole

            It’s a joke son. You’re supposed to laugh.

            • Neopulse

              Are you whisky? And his question didn’t sound like a joke at all.

    • Neopulse

      Same pack. Why would it need a change?

  • SB-900 Pro

    I may be wrong but when they fixed the SB-900 overheating problem they just fixed the overheat issue and put some warnings in the User’s Manual, no upgrades that I can remember. They just came out with the SB-910

  • Tr

    Not gps, not wi-fi. Same sensor, same af system, everything will be same than in D600. Not very interesting.

  • PeterO

    For those advocating that D600 owners with the oil splatter problem stop complaining and learn to clean the sensor – that is NOT the point. The shutter is faulty. What if the shutter were getting stuck every few hundred clicks? Would you advocate that they learn to take it apart and fix it? It’s a faulty part. If you think it fine that a $2,000 camera have such a faulty important component – that’s your prerogative. I don’t and won’t buy one, no matter how good the sensor is. “Oh, you bought a new car and it leaks oil? Learn to clean your driveway!”

    • Andrew

      I don’t agree with your logic. The facts are well known but your example distorts the facts. You buy a car and it leaks oil. You get a letter from the dealer to take your car in to fix the problem. You take your car in and it is fixed. That is the issue with the D600.

      So what is your point? This whole “Learn to clean your driveway story belongs in a fiction book – it is the first I have heard in this forum!”

      • o_joe

        Talk about apples and oranges…

        An oil leak from an older automobile is a frequent occurrence. An oil leak from a brand new BMW is NOT. That said, I am not aware of any recalls from any auto manufactures for having created and marketed a NEW vehicle where it leaked oil to the point of creating a problem (let alone redesigning part of that vehicle, renaming the whole car and going back to market with it…) On the other hand I can recall a very serious issue back in the 70′s where Ford created a the Pinto. They discovered that when rear – ended, the car would explode due to placement of the gas tank…

        So does a $2000.00 Nikon equate to a 4 cylinder Ford Pinto? Is that what the implication in the above comparison is?

        Now, if we were to compare a (new) BMW that leaked oil all over the windshield whenever it was driven then maybe, the comparison could perhaps be made then… The driver could get out every so often and clean the windshield… And that would be the problem. Having a new car is nice but the more you drive it – the more oil gets on the windshield. It makes for tough driving. I suppose you could try the wipers and the spray but – blech … that would be like smearing oily stuff over a photographic sensor and expecting crisp, clear photos…!?

        My point is that if the issue weren’t that big of a deal why would Nikon be bringing a D610 to market at all?

  • John Chea

    It’s like Apple all over again. iPhone 4, 4G, 5, 5S, 5C. It’s all the same shit without any major improvements or innovation. The only differences is that it is at the expense of hundreds to thousands of dollars.

    These aren’t phones. If I spend money on something that is almost as much as a used car on a camera, I expect it to be up to par with current technology.

    I have a D800, but I feel like the D600 and D300 users are being screwed by Nikon.

    • Sahaja

      I can understand why some D600 users may feel screwed – but those fortunate to have a camera without a continuing oil problem have got a good camera at a good price, even though the resale value of all D600s will be affected. But no one knows what the resale value of any camera will be when they buy it – all digital camera bodies loose value very quickly.

      How can D300 owners feel screwed? – they got a very good camera when they bought it. Sure there is no direct replacement – but you can’t be screwed by nothing.

  • koenshaku

    They should have named it the D605 and packaged it with a new line of Levi jeans. Hopefully these reports are inaccurate ^^

  • Marco Santa Cruz

    1. Nikon doesn’t release a new camera, d600 never sells, and as you can see d600 sit on shelves till next generation. All (most) investment in r&d (i’m guessing more in design this time) is probably not recuperated through profit.
    2. Nikon releases ‘new’ camera (d610), everyone acknowledges ‘oil splatter’ issue is fixed, of course everyone gripes and threatens to switch to canon not sony, even people who don’t own a nikon, or a dslr, or a camera. Anyway, Nikon sales for d610 don’t break records, but they do help get the d600/610 get closer to breaking even.
    _________

    This is not about turning a profit anymore, it’s about recovering from a financial blow. At the rate d600 sells (or doesn’t), they’ll end up in the red no matter what (refurbs/returns). With a d610 nikon will have a chance at making it into the black or at least out of the trenches.

    • Zeke

      And if Nikon is only changing the shutter, they can make use of almost all of the existing inventory of D600 parts.

      They could even turn unsold D600s into D610s, potentially.

  • jr456

    Frankly, I have NEVER seen the need for GPS or Wi-Fi on my DSLRs. Call me old-fashioned but those are lame features to me.

    Why on earth would I want to transfer a 24 MP image across Wi-Fi on an out-of-camera shot?? Makes more sense on a very low-end camera for the social media people who could care less how their pictures look(garbage) and the D4 folks that must get that sports/editorial type picture up somewhere immediately after they took it…no post work on those.

    For people using a D600 or D800? Take some pride in your end-product already. Why buy a camera capable of so much detail only to upload those shots as-is over some medium to some site/email that will most likely degrade the pictures in some way because you didn’t resize/crop for it?

    I just don’t get that. Might as well just keep using an iPhone to shoot your pictures.

    • m35g35

      While your argument for Wi-Fi has a lot of merit, GPS is a function for landscape photographers. I have so many picts of landscapes I have no idea where I took them, ya I know that is my fault. That said, I did add a GPS device for my D800E to avoid that problem.

      • jr456

        Good point; I take that back then about the GPS.

        Though, I still feel that so many other features would be so much more welcome over that at least for myself.

      • Sahaja

        GPS is also very useful for travel and documentary photography.

        The Nikon external unit is not that good though. Compared to some other units, it is less sensitive, consumes 3x the power, and does not indicate compass bearing

  • rob

    This is pathetic. Nikon ditching people with faulty cameras.

    Isn’t it illegal to knowingly sell damaged goods?

  • I AM NIKON

    Do you all nag this much in real life, outside of Nikon Rumours? All of you: it’s getting really old and boring. Shouldn’t you all be using Canons by now? I didn’t think so. Sit down, and shut up.

    • I AM NIKON

      I’d also like to state an obvious: Nikon isn’t new in this race. They’ve been on top ever since I could remember. Just because Nikon is lacking a few (useless) features that another camera make has, this means they’re now knee deep in sh*t?

      Get real.

      • VikingAesir

        You clearly have a very short and narrow memory. Nikon isn’t on top even now. Canon sells far more cameras and in most cases makes better lenses.

      • RxGus

        I agree with Viking.

        Canon is on top in sales, marketshare, and lenses…
        Nikon is on top in IQ

        Just look at the sideline of any sporting event, and you will see MANY more white lenses than black.

  • DreamLynx

    Wonder if they add 1/250 sync speed to this release since so many people we not happy about it being omitted for the D600

  • kassim

    No GPS, WiFi? So what’s new in it?

  • herman

    I wonder if they will fix the green screen problem, too? I mean the “more accurate” display that is green compared to any other camera in existence…..

  • Sam V

    I can almost guarantee the reason Nikon isn’t putting WiFi and GPS into bodies YET is they are trying to milk all the sales of extra cost accessories they can before it becomes all but ubiquitous as a standard feature.

    Look at other technologies and their implementation path. Take HD radio or Bluetooth in the mobile audio market. When the technology was made available, it was NOT built in to new units, not because it was impossible to do so but it was 1) easier to get an add-on module to market, but also 2) they can soak the early adopters for another benjamin before the competition starts including it. After a couple few years they offered models with those techs built in because if they don’t, they’ll lose sales.

    There’s a lot more to this conversation but I’ll add this. Part of effective marketing is telling consumers they need something they don’t yet know they need. I honestly believe that’s a decent camera that EFFORTLESSLY transfers photos to their smartphones/tablets with NO additional hardware or cost. I rarely use my Nikons for casual shooting simply because I’ve become weary of the hassle of downloading images to my desktop/laptop, importing, exporting, and uploading when all I want to do 4 out of 5 times is take a quick photo and post it online. Not really a hassle you say when we’ve always done it that way? Yes, I’d agree if it’s a large shoot/wedding/assignment when you have hundreds to offload and batch process. That’s a different situation altogether and we know it. I hate the quality of my iPhone photos but it’s just so stinkin easy to post em on FB that I’ve become jaded! And when I’m at the park with the kids, I can’t whip out the old laptop and go through the workflow.

    Nikon, you NEED to incorporate BUILT-IN wireless transfer and a QUALITY app to control/download with. It’s not hard.

  • Oliver Ulises

    For this kind of things is that I’m NOT Nikon anymore, i’m gonna change to Canon

  • Oliver Ulises

    Nikon news… nothing new.

  • Alex

    Be honest. Call it D601.

  • Oleg_M

    Black mirror brick. Dissapointed with Nikon long time ago, and today using camera from other brand. For me no more black mirror bricks like Nikon or Canon.

  • Turbohampster

    What a kick in the nuts for D600 owners :-(
    The resale value compared to D610 is gonna tank, wether the oil/dust problem is fixed or not

  • physicist

    Admin, the only thing you really should have done to make this a useful survey is to ask if people actually *looked for* sensor debris, by setting the aperture to the highest and taking a picture of a structureless object like the sky. Without such a test the spots are hard to notice and your survey is completely useless.

  • RXVGS

    Nikon are getting into the badge manufacturing business just like Canon with their 650D to 700D ‘badge upgrade’

  • Helvio

    Absolutely unbelievable Nikon releases a D610 without a larger new focus sistem…, the D600 one is too small for the viewfinder!!

  • Phillip Jones

    When I started to place my order for the D600, all the chatter about the dust caused me to hesitate. Then I saw the 6D high ISO performance, and the inclusion of GPS and wifi. 6D it was. I like my 6D. A lot, except for one thing: it is not as rugged as Nikon bodies. It has been to Canon repair twice. So when the D610 was announced as the dust solution camera, my heart jumped for joy. Maybe hanging onto my Nikon lenses was not in vain. To make it a viable competitor to the 6D, surely it included at least GPS, right? What the heck, Nikon??!! No GPS. No wifi. Sure, the faster FPS rate is nice. It’s just not enough to win me back.

  • Back to top