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Nikon issues official statement on the D600 dust/oil issue

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For the first time Nikon officially acknowledged the dust/oil spots on the sensor inside the D600 camera. The suggested solution is to clean your sensor and if this doesn't resolve the problem, contact Nikon support. The article did not mention that the sensor doesn’t get any more oil/dust spots after aprox. 3000 shots. Here is the full text:

To users of the Nikon D600 digital SLR camera

Some users have indicated the appearance of multiple granular dust spots in images captured with the Nikon D600 digital-SLR camera. These granular dust spots are reflections of internal dust generated with camera operation, or external dust particles that have found their way into the camera, either, or both of which, have adhered to the camera's low-pass filter.

While the structure and concept of digital-SLR cameras makes the complete elimination of these dust spots very difficult, it has come to our attention that, in some rare cases, they may be reflected noticeably in images. Therefore, Nikon is informing users of a service to reduce this issue.

Resolution

As a first step, please follow the guidance from the User’s Manual (pages 301-305) related to the “Clean Image Sensor” function and manual cleaning using a blower. If these measures do not remove all dust particles and you are still experiencing problems, then please consult your nearest Nikon service center. They will keep your camera, examine it thoroughly, and service it as needed.

Nikon USA article

Nikon Europe article

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  • Martin

    D600 ;)

  • http://www.facebook.com/daniel.nowland Daniel Nowland

    So they haven’t really admitted there is a problem…

    • Eric Calabos

      a samurai never says sorry :-)

      • gr8fan

        That’s too bad! Maybe that’s why they have joined the dinosaurs…

      • quixote

        Canon does. Mitsubishi? Never.

        • nikonian

          Canon only has started to in the last year and a half. Prior to that canon was even worse than nikon

      • David Martin

        A samurai only commits Hara-Kiri

    • umeshrw

      Reminds me of the civil servants’ jargon in “Yes Minister”.

    • lorenzo

      Correct, and told us to fix it!

      Quite different from “we improved QC to make it not happen again”.
      When and how will they admit the D800 LT focus and greens?

      • Nose

        People — its just dust.. on a sensor. Do you get boogers in your nose? Blow your nose. Do you take a crap? Wipe your ass. How valuable is your ass and your nose to you? Got dust on your sensor — clean your damn sensor. You’ll probably clean it far less than you’ll wipe your ass.

        • lorenzo

          You didn’t get the point, did you?

          And please use more polite words.

          • anon

            someone got butt hurt. reality check.

        • Roberto

          I’d argue it’s not that simple. From what I can establish, the nature and cause of the spots has not been established. Some people say dust, others say oil. Nikon now finally appear to say dust. If the spots result from a mechanical issue then this needs to be identified and addressed. If the spots result from the overenthusiastic application of lubricant, and will cease appearing when the excess is dispersed, this needs to be spelt out. If you have a D600 with the spots issue, chances are you will find that the spots appear in a distinct pattern. The spots on my D600 appear mainly in the lhs third of the frame, which to me suggests that debris is being showered over the sensor when the shutter operates (and there are hundreds of them when you do a test shot of a white piece of cardboard at f/11 and go looking for them). My guess is that there’s an underlying mechanical issue/s which needs to be addressed, and that cleaning the sensor will provide a temporary fix but will not resolve the issue. Until Nikon addresses this matter and identify what is causing the spots then we’re all guessing and speculating on what the spots are…and keep in mind here that a rocket blower won’t shift the spots…In the mean time I’d suggest to Nikon that they are losing future customers. In my case, I’d budgeted on buying a 135 f/2 DC this year, but I won’t be doing so now. For the time being I won’t be investing in any more Nikon gear, and as good as the D600 is, I couldn’t recommend anyone buy one until the spots issue is sorted. I don’t expect perfection in QC…but I do expect a manufacturer to quickly identify a manufacturing defect and move to put in place a recall/repair program…If your D600 doesn’t have the spots issue, then I’m happy for you. But mine does, and the sensor requires cleaning every 500 or so shots. I don’t have this issue on my much used (and loved) second hand D700.

        • Roberto

          I’d argue it’s not that simple. From what I can establish, the nature and cause of the spots has not been established. Some people say dust, others say oil. Nikon now finally appear to say dust. If the spots result from a mechanical issue then this needs to be identified and addressed. If the spots result from the overenthusiastic application of lubricant, and will cease appearing when the excess is dispersed, this needs to be spelt out. If you have a D600 with the spots issue, chances are you will find that the spots appear in a distinct pattern. The spots on my D600 appear mainly in the lhs third of the frame, which to me suggests that debris is being showered over the sensor when the shutter operates (and there are hundreds of them when you do a test shot of a white piece of cardboard at f/11 and go looking for them). My guess is that there’s an underlying mechanical issue/s which needs to be addressed, and that cleaning the sensor will provide a temporary fix but will not resolve the issue. Until Nikon addresses this matter and identify what is causing the spots then we’re all guessing and speculating on what the spots are…and keep in mind here that a rocket blower won’t shift the spots…In the mean time I’d suggest to Nikon that they are losing future customers. In my case, I’d budgeted on buying a 135 f/2 DC this year, but I won’t be doing so now. For the time being I won’t be investing in any more Nikon gear, and as good as the D600 is, I couldn’t recommend anyone buy one until the spots issue is sorted. I don’t expect perfection in QC…but I do expect a manufacturer to quickly identify a manufacturing defect and move to put in place a recall/repair program…If your D600 doesn’t have the spots issue, then I’m happy for you. But mine does, and the sensor requires cleaning every 500 or so shots. I don’t have this issue on my much used (and loved) second hand D700.

        • JoeAngel

          It’s not dust you dolt. It’s OIL. It’s far from common among high end cameras.

      • Groosome

        I like the fact that they have options at the bottom of the USA article asking you if the answer was helpful yes/no. I used it to inform them that I won’t be buying one until it’s permanently fixed going forward. I encourage others to do the same.

        • lorenzo

          I have done exactly what you say in several surveys that I received directly from Nikon USA. I will have less friends and more enemies but Nikon has to understand that I don’t like to be fooled by them. Like you I told them that I won’t buy anything until they fix them.

          “Will you recommend Nikon to friends?”

          I answered:

          “No until you come out and acknowledge the problems”.

          What they did for the D600 is NOT an acknowledgement.

          It is wasted time, I don’t blame Melville or El Segundo they obey orders from Japan and I can’t contact Japan directly.

  • MM

    Excellent! A D6000! Finally!

    • http://www.facebook.com/daniel.nowland Daniel Nowland

      It’s hard enough getting Nikon to admit a problem with a product they HAVE made, let alone one they haven’t! (or have they?)…

  • Mudda

    No point cleaning before 3,000 shots, right?

    • http://twitter.com/MARKDSTUMP MARK STUMP

      Depends on how important your next shot is.
      Maybe you just play around w/ it a lot to get to 3K quickly.

      • Moopheus

        Just hold the shutter button down for 10 minutes.

        My first digital camera was a Canon A60. After a while, the sensor died. After almost a year, Canon finally admitted they had shipped cameras with defective sensors. These guys just don’t seem to have much incentive to move very quickly on these issues.

  • Catalin Sandu

    Umm, better correct the title. I thought this is a new rumor about a future D6000…

    • Up $#!t’s creek!

      lol…. its the d700 replacement!

  • bjrichus

    Not really what they should have said (from the perspective of a western businessman who has to deal with P.R. lies all the time), but a major opening for a Japanese company, who are at least acknowledging that there are users with this problem.

    We all know that new products will fail more than they should and modern digital cameras are really “portable image capture computers” rather than the more traditional shutter and lens on the front of a light tight box, so are much more complex than cameras of two decades ago but to quote a marketing friend of mine, from our perspective anyway, this is “Way too little, way too late.”

  • http://twitter.com/aaronmoller aaronmoller

    Rocket blower worked for me.

  • Miki

    “and service it as needed”
    And what is needed? Will they only wet clean the sensor or replace/eliminate the route couse of the oil spots?

    • MJr

      Obviously and sadly they’ll go for option a.

  • http://twitter.com/RHMImages RHM Images

    I already sent my D600 to Nikon at around 3000 shots. They cleaned it. 500 shots later it was almost as dirty as before. Can’t send it in over and over with shipping at my expense… and be without my camera for 2+ weeks. Rocketblower isn’t enough

    • Dyun27

      Buy some Eclipse fluid, an air blower, type 3 sensor swabs and be done with it. I don’t see the point in waiting for Nikon for a week to clean your camera when you can do the same thing at home in the span of 5 minutes. Practice on an older body and/or watch instructional videos on how to do it yourself. There’s a lot of them out there. It’s intimidating at first, but easy enough.

      • chubbs

        Thanks for this! I don’t have a D600 but I do need to clean my sensor.

        • Renard Richie

          google copperhill images and you’ll be happy. I got it and i never send a camera in for cleaning. 60 bucks for one camera YEAH RIGHT

        • Renard Richie

          google copperhill images and you’ll be happy. I got it and i never send a camera in for cleaning. 60 bucks for one camera YEAH RIGHT

      • whmitty

        After sending in my D600 I still had to give it one more wet cleaning and it has been fine for a few months now. I had to do the same with my D7000 which was just about as bad when I first got it but they cleaned it up when I sent it in to fix the abysmal back focus problem. Then all was well again as it has been with the D600. Still, to say the very least it all reflects poorly on Nikon.

        • Calibrator

          No back focus problem on my D7000 but exactly the same story with the oil spots (it wasn’t simply “dust” because I had to use the right wet clean fluid to get rid of them).

          I’m not satisfied with Nikon’s answer and it will surely affect my future purchases (not that Nikon gives a damn).

    • Zoltan666

      fully agree with Dyun27, I cleaned EOS 1Ds very dirty sensor about 4-5 times with Eclpse Fluid and Sensor Swab. it takes about 5 minutes. do it very gently in clean environment. my sensor after cleaning had no spots at all. good luck

    • alx

      Changing lens always bring some dust.

      • loki989

        Not in my experience, and certainly not in the timeframe RHM has mentioned. My previous Nikon SLR and Sony SLT were cleaned once every 5,000 and even then they didn’t need it. Maybe if you take the lens off in a dust storm…

      • Derek

        I agree, I take a rocket blower with me all the time to clean my D200 and D300. From my observations it seems as though the mirror attracts the dust like a maget to steel. When you take your shot the mirror dumps it on the sensor. My weekly cleaning always include a Q-tip to the mirror.

    • Derek

      RMH Images, sounds professional, you even got the little RMH avatar. I always thought a professional knew how to clean a sensor. I clean my D300 sensor at least once a week!

    • Floragraphy

      Had the same issue as you. Got it clean about 3 months ago and the spots appeared again last week. So I took it back to Nikon service in Hong Kong and was told that they will need to keep the camera for 2 weeks and REPLACE the SENSOR at no cost!!! Asked why they do not make a total recall of all D600 and they said it only affects some cameras. So if you have dust problem, Nikon will not replace the sensor.

      • Floragraphy

        Sorry -addendum to the above post

        I meant to say “WILL replace the sensor”.

  • zen-tao

    It’s amazing such a wiset people those Nikon guys are. If your sensor is dirty just clean it. Why haven’t we thought that before? They should be politicals or witch doctors. I’m still scratchin my scalp.

    • No longer Pablo Ricasso

      Don’t do that! It will get on your sensor!

    • gr8fan

      Maybe, but you are entitled to get a CLEAN sensor when you pay $2,100 for a new body..

      • 800mm f/2.8 DX VR

        your sensor starts off clean . . . .

        • RC

          Maybe he should have said that we are entitled to a camera that doesn’t prematurely foul its own sensor in an unreasonably short period of time.

      • 800mm f/2.8 DX VR

        your sensor starts off clean . . . .

  • Banned

    I clean my sensors myself with reusable swabs, works great. Cheap. I wet clean as often as I need. Usually before a shooting session.

    • RC

      What are they called?

  • MD

    Having the same issue with my d800

  • Joshua

    I sent my D600 to upstate NY for servicing after the camera became professionally useless. It came back clean, and within a week it was just as dirty. I went to J&R (where I bought it) and debated with them for an hour… they said they would call me back after speaking to a Nikon Rep. 2 weeks later I got a call from J&R saying to bring the camera and all parts down – I did and they offered me store credit or a new D600. I took the store credit and got the D800. Thank God!

    D600 owners, don’t put up with this! Take the camera back to the place of purchase – no matter when you bought it. Say it is “defective” and you demand store credit in order to get a new camera. Tell them to talk to the Nikon Rep. It will work – might take a few weeks, but be patient.

    • Oh No

      If I went through something like this, I would just switch to Canon NO QUESTIONS ASKED. We should not be guinea pigs for their products. If they can’t provide a working, functional, reliable product then just go to the competitor! As simple as that. And this is coming from a 10+ year Nikon shooter. I am tired of the mishaps.

    • Derek

      Eventually you will have to clean that D800. I guess you will take that back too?

      • Greg Heller

        The active word here is ‘eventually’ not after taking it out of the box or just shooting a few hundred shots in a fairly clean environment, Believe me Derek if you had the problem on a brand new camera that cost $2000 you probably wouldn’t be a happy camper either. You may want to read this article before you are condescending to people airing their concerns. link: dpreview(dot)com/news/2012/11/21/nikon-d600-dust-timelapse

        • Joven

          While you’re posting that link, also note that the creator of the video said, he shot at f/16 and made sure to “adjust the curves and play with sharpening to make this look as bad as I possibly can.”

          It looks like YOU should read the article that you’re showing people.

  • William Braker

    No mention of the oil issue on the D800 though! Pretty lame response from Nikon – sensor clean does nothing for most of these spots, and only in some cases can you move the spots with a rocket blower.
    For what its worth, I got Nikon to pony up for FIVE shipments (UPS second day) of defective D800s to New York for “repair” – you just need to be polite, yet firm, and demonstrate the issue by taking a picture of a white computer screen at f22 and then use auto-levels in PS to pull up all the spots. Pretty hard for Nikon to refute that sort of evidence, especially when I could prove the spots were increasing using a brand new Nikon lens and not changing it (grin).
    In my opinion, here is how to tell oil from debris from regular dust:
    Bad oil spots will be round, large, very dark, and often have a light colored halo around them. These will show up in some images around f8
    Minor oil spots will be round, dark, small with no halo. They never move. I can’t see these in images unless I use PS auto-levels.
    Environmental dust can look like minor oil spots, but it is often comma shaped, lighter in color and more irregular. These can sometimes be moved off the sensor with a rocket blower. Some bits of dust are quite large.
    I’ve also seen some round, huge discolored spots on some “repaired” D800s – they look just like a thin oil spot spread out, covering about 5% of the sensor. I can’t see them in regular images, but one has to wonder if their presence does reduce resolution somewhat. I presume these are residue from Nikon’s wet cleaning. They sent me one body that had three of these spots on it.
    ~fishguy

    • Did u know that

      >> sensor clean does nothing for most of these spots, and only in some cases can you move the spots with a rocket blower.

      That is my experience as well. The built in sensor cleaning does next to nothing with the type of spots/dust/oil/whatever I have on my D600. After running it repeatedly it might shift 1 in 20 spots – totally useless.

  • Mike

    They will “keep” your camera…sounds a bit harsh!

  • Jiri

    Some dust or oil spots occurs at all DSRLs sensors, or at the glass in front of sensor – more precisely said. More pixels = more detailed picture results in “bigger” dust spots at computer screen. Cleaning of the glass in front of the camera sensor is current maintainance of thje camera. Smaller aperture – greater depth of field and more spots. Large aperture – no spots :-).

  • peteee363

    it is too bad they cannot develop a air knife to push air continiously across the sensor. then oil and dust problems may be solved. but keeping a sensor swab seems to be easier to keep in my bag, then rolls of film in the old days.

    • lorenzo

      Beside the fact that that air should go out (making the camera no longer sealed) it could be done but may require a huge external battery. Which one is worse?

  • Mitch

    I had my D600 sensor cleaned after about 2,000 clicks because the dust was showing up badly, even at medium apetures like f/8. Since then, no problems!

  • Marco

    Well, acknowledgement is the first step to get things right I believe. Now no one can say this is only a rumor perhaps caused by other competitors or that Nikon is not even aware of the problem.

    So, Nikon please, get your quality teams in the plants working to fix this once and for all. Thanks!

  • Pat

    Good first step and great for the D600 users.

    Now where’s the acknowledgement for the left AF issue on the D800/E???

  • Rick

    I have oil spots after 1000 shots. Is this for free? Or do I have to pay anything at all for it to be serviced? It’s crap if I have to pay anything for a camera I just started using

    • Greg Heller

      I believe you pay the shipping at least to Nikon.

      • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

        Correct, I had to pay the shipping to NY for my D800E – the AF completely stopped working a while back. The camera was under warranty.

  • Fibble

    wAAAAHAHAHAHAHAH WHY DOESN’T NIKON RELEASE A D400 SO I CAN CLEAN OIL SPOTS OFF OF ITS SENSOR IM MOVING TO CANON AT LEAST THEY HAVE A SENSOR TO CLEAN OIL OFF OF WAAAAAH.

    I hope I’ve been able to capture the essence.

    • peteee363

      according to dxomark, the d600 is rated third best sensor, the best canon is only 15th. my d700 is only rated one number lower then the best canon, really want to get that canon?

      • SiliconVoid

        I am so bored with brand-war responses.. especially when they are ‘validated’ by abstract data…

        According to DxO marketing information they test the sensors performance ‘before’ it is processed and written to a raw file, and we know every manufacturer does processing for noise, color, DR, sharpness etc before the data is put back together as a raw file to be saved or processed for jpeg. So in essence you are seeing a ‘score’ for a level of performance you will technically never be able to produce unless you have modified your camera to extract pre-processed image data.
        Understanding the process and then viewing in context, you can technically end up with the same image from two completely different brands/models due to the processing, enhancement, and acceptable data alterations implemented by the manufacturer.

        • peteee363

          yes, you are right, but! if you do not like how dxo scores sensors, who has a better way to do it? from my opinion they have no axe to grind on thier opinions, and they were just brutal to the new nikon j2. so it is not like they are pro nikon. also, i work with some people who shoot canon cameras, and they are not happy when they compare photos we shoot side by side. on paper they seem similar, but nikon does have a way with the processing they use to finish thier images. but i would be interested to see who makes a better sensor comparison?

          • SiliconVoid

            I could present a lengthy dissertation, but suffice to say I use both Nikon and Canon bodies regularly and which one I pickup for any specific purpose is purely based on what I see at the end of the day with my eye – the only measuring device I need to consider.
            =)

            • desmo

              please flush after
              the “lengthy dissertation”

        • Hg

          Don’t bother arguing with this guy. He will talk at length about his own expensive gear and limit the world to his own narrow view of photography until everyone else wants to punch him.

          • RC

            I think his point is valid. If it were true that Nikon was “that” much better than Canon, we’d see a difference in the images, and people would all choose Nikon. But they don’t. Most people choose Canon because the images from Canon cameras are more pleasing to a wider audience.

            • Flea

              All this in reply to someone who was making a joke that he didn’t get.

            • RC

              So what’s the joke?

          • SiliconVoid

            ? (@Hg) If that reply was about me, I am sorry there are people in the world with more photographic experience and equipment than others. That does not mean they have any narrower perspective than a newer/younger member of the photographic community or some equipment reviewer who uses a camera for a week.

      • SiliconVoid

        I am so bored with brand-war responses.. especially when they are ‘validated’ by abstract data…

        According to DxO marketing information they test the sensors performance ‘before’ it is processed and written to a raw file, and we know every manufacturer does processing for noise, color, DR, sharpness etc before the data is put back together as a raw file to be saved or processed for jpeg. So in essence you are seeing a ‘score’ for a level of performance you will technically never be able to produce unless you have modified your camera to extract pre-processed image data.
        Understanding the process and then viewing in context, you can technically end up with the same image from two completely different brands/models due to the processing, enhancement, and acceptable data alterations implemented by the manufacturer.

      • Fibble

        Someone didn’t get the joke. Like that went waaaaaay over your head.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bobcozzi Bob Cozzi

    This is better than their response up to this point. Grease and dust (I don’t believe the use OIL as a lubing agent) is excessive very early in this camera due to shutter/mirror design. It won’t be corrected until the follow-on to the D600 is announced (probably in 2014/2015) but they may do a modification and start shipping. The term “Rare” is interesting since I received and returned 7 D600 cameras to Amazon until settling on the current unit I still own. But I have cleaned it myself with Eclipse fluid and swabs and its fine.

    • http://www.facebook.com/sam.note Sam Note

      I think new FX camera will be announced before end of this year like replacement of D600. Nikon have very big loss with D600. New camera will be mostly same as D600, without optical low pass filter and new shutter mechanism.

    • Calibrator

      I doubt that every DSLR is affected as much as these consumer models (D7000, D600…) from Nikon.
      Did you ever hear that the D800 or D4 are suffering as much from it?
      No?

      The pro FX models are being made in Japan while the D7000 and D600 are being made in Thailand. Now, I don’t say that Japan has the better factory, but they may have a different manufacturing process.
      How much lubricant/grease is used on which model? What lubricant/grease is used? Perhaps that differs as well?

      So, a new “consumer FX” release might not solve the problem. In fact Nikon didn’t care with the problem on the D7000 and now the D600 has exactly the same issue!
      Personally, I will follow new body releases from Nikon much more thoroughly the next time I buy one as I expect that they still haven’t a solution for this – so, yes, I practically expect the D7100 to have the exact same problem.

      This press release shows that Nikon sticks to its trusty stone-walling strategy and mostly blames their customers for the “dust” problem.
      This is basic marketing in our times, folks! Reduce the amount of people complaining by seeding doubt – and save costs (of having to clean all those existing bodies – or even recall them for replacement).

      I wonder how many people tried to clean their sensor themselved, damaged it and now have to buy a new body on their own money…

  • Evangelo

    Now it is time to officially acknowledged the crippled HDMI out issue ….
    And one H U G E step further , to try resolving this problem with a fimware update ….. When i use the words NIKON and Firmware Update , alltogether in one sentence , i feel like i am gonna be cursed by mother nature …

  • loki989

    So, let me ask a dumb question. What do you think about buying a new body and snapping 4k photos and then cleaning it? Is there any reason that wouldn’t just avoid the problem? (other than the small hassle).

    I’ve also been looking at those refurb D600s thinking of making the jump to full frame. It just seems like Nikon QC has gone to shite even on new gear, so I really don’t like the idea of factory refurb gear from them.

    • RC

      Buy from a place with a good return policy. The refurbs are probably returns from people that freaked out prematurely.

    • Derek

      I have also considered buying refurbished. Something tells me that 99% of these units were sensor cleanings. If that is the case we would be getting a good deal. Unlike most of those complaining, I have no problem cleaning a sensor. I clean my D300 sensor at least once a week. I just dont think there QC has gone to —-, I think it is more to do with camera snobs blowing it way out of proportion.

    • Calibrator

      No, I personally don’t think that would solve the problem.
      My theory is that there is not only excessive lubricant (which will fall off) but that it also takes *time* for the remaining lubricant to harden enough to stick on where it was applied.

  • Joe

    does this mean Nikon has not solved the problem
    So I should not buy a USED D600

  • Leontin

    Oil on sensor is from the house…This is a NIKON tradition (also D7000).
    I am wander if D7100 will have same bonus.

  • One More Thought

    The D600 is a fantastic camera and it’s a shame that it has had this issue. I have to believe that this problem has cost Nikon quite a few D600 sales, and driven some looking to upgrade into FF into the Canon 6D. It seems that the sales momentum of the D600 was halted by this issue.

    Nikon needs to understand that one of the strengths it has going for it is a brand reputation for quality and work zealously to protect that. Once that reputation is gone it is very hard to bring back.

    • gr8fan

      “The D600 is a fantastic camera and it’s a shame that it has had this issue. I have to believe that this problem has cost Nikon quite a few D600 sales”: You are 100% correct. It is a pity that such a brand doesn’t take responsibility of mistakes or failures.

    • Renard Richie

      Not even close. Canon 6D sucks and there is no way people are switching to canon because of that camera. If you say 5d Mark 3 i would have to agree. but Canon 6d sucks balls compare to D600.
      Who wants a flash sync speed of 1/180th?

      • desmo

        5D mkIII is considerably more expensive
        better built
        better AF
        but still may lag slightly in sensor performance

        • Renard Richie

          You have made my point stronger. Canon has no answer for d600. Not 6d unless u go to the more expensive brother 5d mark 3

      • js200022

        Well, that is not entirely correct. The 6D is a good option for the D600. It has better high ISO (see link below) and it is a great still camera. This is my complaint about the D600 since the beginning, the 6D has a metal body while the D600 is plasticky and looks very cheap. Both cameras have some good and some bad. You need to see which one is better for your needs.

        http://thenewcamera.com/canon-6d-vs-nikon-d600-high-iso-test/

        http://www.engadget.com/gallery/canon-eos-6d-hands-on/5290674/

  • http://twitter.com/schultzphoto Jason Schultz

    I’m getting oil marks on my D800 – fairly new yet. I just swab it and be done with it. It’s a 2 second fix.

  • primary focus

    There really needs to be a class action on nikon for them to wake up on this issue and supply a final fix to d600 owners than continue that the buyer is responsible for their lack of workmanship

    • http://twitter.com/Jmills74 Jim Mills

      they are offering to fix it if there is truly an issue with your camera. What will a class action solve?

  • primary focus

    There really needs to be a class action on nikon for them to wake up on this issue and supply a final fix to d600 owners than continue that the buyer is responsible for their lack of workmanship

  • Mansgame

    Kind of lame…no mention of cause or why this camera is more prone to it than others. Wonder if the D7100 will have the same issue.

    • js200022

      There was a thread in dpreview about the D600 dust/oil issue a few months ago. It was reported, with photos, that some areas the paint has clearly flaked off of some interiors.

      This seems to be one possible source for the internal dust.

      http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/50141626

      • Calibrator

        In the case of my D7000 this definitely isn’t the explanation for the “dust” spots. Two reasons: There is no scratch in the mirror box and the dust particles on the mirror are much larger than what collected on the sensor.

  • Mihai B

    My D7000 have the same issue! Nikon….. wake up!!!

  • upuaut

    Nikon might as well say that Canon sneaked in to the manufacturing floor and planted the oil problem in the D600. IN essence, blame it on Canon.. Just as good as their acknowledgement of the problem.

  • David H.

    “These granular dust spots are reflections of internal dust generated
    with camera operation, or external dust particles that have found their
    way into the camera, either, or both of which, have adhered to the
    camera’s low-pass filter.”

    …. I am worried that the “reflections” have adhered!!!! LOL :)

  • Marco

    I bought a Nikon D700 when the D800 came out, I shot over 10.000 frame and multiple lens changing (it’s the only body I got). No dust, no oil, no AF issue, works great. Actually, there’s no new pro camera body in Nikon’s lineup that work flawlessly as the D700/D3s/D3/D300/D300s. Nikon should start again to make things just better. My 2cents.

    • SJ

      I have a D7000 and D800 and have not had a problem with either and they both work flawlessly.

      • Calibrator

        I have a D7000 and it was an “oil monster” right from the beginning. It got better after about a year and two wet cleanings.

        • neversink

          Come and listen to a story about a man named Jed
          A poor photographer, barely kept his family fed,
          Then one day he was shootin’ table-top food,
          And up through his lens came a bubblin crude.

          Oil that is, Nikon gold, Tokyo tea.

          • Calibrator

            ;-)

      • Rudi

        I have a D700, D800 and D4 and I never had a problem with either camera. All are working great!

        • neversink

          My experience is your experience. No problems with any of the above cameras.

      • Rudi

        I have a D700, D800 and D4 and I never had a problem with either camera. All are working great!

    • RC

      My D600 is fine after one initial wet clean. I’ve shot over 5500 frames now.

      • whmitty

        I too had the contamination issues with the D600, I paid to send it to Nikon and zero problems since then. Unfortunate? Yes. The end of the world? No. Do I give a rip now? Absolutely not and knowing what I know now I would buy the camera again in a heartbeat. For me the image output of this camera is worth the cost in time, trouble and yes, even the shipping costs to Nikon. And life goes on.

        • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

          My D600 is still collecting dust, but it is building up much more slowly. Before I had it serviced, the dust was really sticking to the sensor surface and just wouldn’t blow away. Now it is at least user-cleanable.

          • Nikon D600 owner

            My D600 had 3 trips to Nikon service and did not get fixed. I do not believe Nikon has a fix for this and this statement did not own up to the problem. Shame on you, Nikon.

            Kyle Clements, thank you so much for what you did to shine light on this problem!

          • whmitty

            Although I appear to have gotten lucky I also suspect Nikon has got an authentic problem. I would GUESS one of the reasons Nikon doesn’t issue a mea culpa is that they are trying to “save face”. This is a big issue for both the Chinese and the Japanese. It’s a perspective which complicates otherwise straight forward problems and does little to comfort concerned customers who don’t relate to the concept.

            • Ben Dover

              I was an early adapter, bought my D600 in September 2012.
              made about 10.000 shots till now. Not one dustspot, 100% clean.

              This camera is a joy to use !!

            • momo

              nice try, Nikon!

            • Ben Dover

              it is with deep deep sadness that I have to announce my camera (D600) also has been infected with the spot-virus.
              Man, I feel really depressed!

              I had an assignment the whole weekend for a series of product macro shots. Back in my office I opened the files in Lightroom to make my first selection, and what I saw was pure horror…. maybe hundred smaller and bigger spots in the upper left part of the frame, ruining my whole photo shoot…
              After more than 10.000 shots without any problem, I thought I was one of the few lucky customers… bad thought…
              Man, and I love this camera so much! What a shame, and shame on you NIKON !

            • jake

              exactly, it is exactly an asian company issue , they just trying save their face by hiding or ignoring issues even if they are as well known to the public as this dust issue.

              Thom Hogan pointed this out a long ago but noone took it seriously at the time.

              But I think Nikon is worse than Canon, Sony , Samsung ,etc in this regard because it is a member of Mitsubishi consortium companies.

            • WhatLooksGoodMustBeGood

              that makes Apple an asian company as well …

            • whmitty

              My limited experience with Apple has generally been positive however they also blindly consider their products beyond reproach.

            • Jimbob Billydee

              Yeah, well just be glad it’s not North Korea. There’s a country that has serious denial issues. The great, venerable Kim Jung Un would proclaim how wonderful they are and then censor the sensors’ dissenters censures.

          • Calibrator

            Now you probably have indeed dust, before that it was oil (or some other lubricant) from the mechanism inside.
            Same story with my D7000.

      • http://www.facebook.com/BigDaveP David Portass

        I hired a D600 for a wedding last month, it was already at 600 actuations so fairly new. I shot around 2500 frames on it and no dust/oil problems.

        What did piss me off was the inconsistent metering whether it be on spot, average or matrix, fortunately I went fully manual later in the evening but what was worst was when I put my SB-900 on it or tried to trigger my SB-600′s via the popup commander were all over exposed even though with the same settings, it was perfect on my D7000 and D300s.

        As soon as they roll out the first firmware update I might hire it again but currently looking for a reasonably priced D3s to replace my D300s.

        • RC

          You mean you rented a new camera for a wedding? All I can say is that you really need to be familiar with a camera before you use it for an important event. Also, I would never trust Nikon’s wireless triggering for professional use. It has proven unreliable to me in the past, and I had 4 SB800s. I have found the $30 Yongnuo radio transceiver sets from Amazon to be far more reliable. Just make sure you carry a light meter with you, and practice using it. I’ve found the results much better than trying to use the iTTL system.

          • http://www.facebook.com/BigDaveP David Portass

            Sorry, should have made it clearer, I rented it and received it 2 days before to get used to the controls and how it works. I also had my D7000 and D300s with me as well just in-case.

            For the most part the D600 worked ok but the metering wasn’t predictable, the slightest thing would throw it out to be over or under exposed where my other cameras wouldn’t. I used it to get quirky shots from the day with a 50 1.4 or 8mm fisheye. My D7000 with 17-55 2.8 was my primary camera for the day for the important shots.

            In saying that, my SB-900 and 3 SB-600′s are all reliable and do what I expect them to do in commander mode from the D7000 or D300s without any special configuration or settings, it just wasn’t happening on the D600 which annoyed me as I really wanted to like this camera.

        • RC

          You mean you rented a new camera for a wedding? All I can say is that you really need to be familiar with a camera before you use it for an important event. Also, I would never trust Nikon’s wireless triggering for professional use. It has proven unreliable to me in the past, and I had 4 SB800s. I have found the $30 Yongnuo radio transceiver sets from Amazon to be far more reliable. Just make sure you carry a light meter with you, and practice using it. I’ve found the results much better than trying to use the iTTL system.

    • Aldo

      I bought a d800 when it came out…first batch… no focusing issues just amazing pix

      • jake

        oh well , lucky you but many of us got many many defective cameras from Nikon this time.

        many D800/e , D4 and D600 are defective ones.

        I got 3 defective D800e before I got a perfect one that I currently shoot.
        the most serious issue with Nikon community is that when many of us really having serious issues with our cameras from Nikon, many many many extreme fanboys like yourself trying to deny it rather than force Nikon to tighten its QC once more.
        you do not have a defective D800 does not mean there is no issue with most of D800 cameras sold now.

        • gsum

          He wasn’t lucky – you were unlucky. The silent majority such as I, have not had any problems.

    • quixote

      Their main concern back then was to produce a high quality camera for pro photographers. Now their concern is to cram as many pixels as they can to attract uninformed amateurs and vidiots.

      • jake

        yeah exactly , it is actually embarrassing, though.

      • neversink

        I have both the D4 and D800 — Because the D4 costs twice as much, I’d love to say the IQ is more stellar than that of the D800… but to be honest, I think, although different, they are of equal high quality….

      • RC

        I don’t believe that is an accurate statement after you take into consideration the improvements they have made. I have both the D300 and the D600, and I can tell you that the D600 is worlds better than the D300. In no situation would I choose the D300 over the D600 unless I absolutely needed 8 fps (something I have never needed).

      • RC

        I don’t believe that is an accurate statement after you take into consideration the improvements they have made. I have both the D300 and the D600, and I can tell you that the D600 is worlds better than the D300. In no situation would I choose the D300 over the D600 unless I absolutely needed 8 fps (something I have never needed).

      • T53

        Exactly. Lord I wish I had a DSLR with the build quality and dependability of the Nikon F5 or F100. Two of the best cameras I have ever owned.

    • enchanted

      Agreed!

    • Did u know that

      I totally agree – I regret the day I sold my D700 to afford a D600 every time I pick up the camera. Had a D300s a couple of years ago as well – a stellar camera indeed, took close to 90.000 exposures with it and never had to wet clean it once!

      • Renard Richie

        im assuming you never shot it at f11+
        no camera immortally protected from dust. I can bet money on that.

      • Renard Richie

        im assuming you never shot it at f11+
        no camera immortally protected from dust. I can bet money on that.

      • http://twitter.com/prevedovich Prevedovich

        Frankly speaking those people who praise Nikon’s new low-pro FX/DX cameras did not work with Pro ones. The sweetest time in my life is D300s with full coverage of the viewfinder with the focus points.

        • Joven

          So does that mean you’ve never shot with an FX camera? Those AF points aren’t edge-to-edge either.

    • jake

      actually no one is talking about the D700 or the D300s , they do not share this issue but the D800E /D800 and D600 do have this issue, and the real problem here is Nikon does not admit that the dust on the sensor issue is very unique mechanical design problem to this gen of Nikon FX.

    • T53

      Same here Marco. I bought a D700 new a year and a half ago change lenses frequently. To this day…not one spec of dust on the camera. This was the Nikon I knew from my days shooting my F5 which was and remains a fabulous instrument. Nikon needs to go back and figure out where everything went off the rails. Quality has taken a holiday.

  • dan

    man i just trust nikon less and less, day by day. let’s see what other defect the d7100 brings.

  • SiliconVoid

    The situation isn’t an issue of whether the sensor can be cleaned, hell you can clean any sensor, it is the implication that even once the excess oil is gone from the shutter/mirror mechanism (and cleaned from the low-pass filter) there is concern the shutter box assembly is letting in too much dust.

    I have an older D200 (which does not have any dust cleaning function at
    all) and it does not ‘collect’ dust as quickly as some have complained
    about the D600.

    I hope any possibilities of this are corrected by Nikon during product assembly now that they have at least ‘acknowledged’ the complaint – even though they did not acknowledge it as an ‘issue’.

    I am really looking at this body being the upgrade to my D700 – wish it was as solid as the D700 though, heh.

    • Calibrator

      I doubt that the body of the D600 is less “air tight” than that of other modern DSLRs.
      That being said, I expect people with a “lubricant spot problem” to have “fun” with that for more than a year. Perhaps then the lubricant has hardened enough to stick on whatever surface it was applied in the manufacturing process.

      The sensor cleaning function of the body may or may not work – I can’t really judge this on my two year old D7000 – but the spots I had (and I had a massive amount of them) were definitely not of the normal dust variety that can removed with a rocket blower or water-based fluid.
      I had to wet clean the sensor with a solvent to get rid of them.

      So my advice is go and buy a new consumer body from Nikon, use it like you want – but don’t expect it to have it 24/7 with you if you aren’t willing to wet clean it yourself (if you have lubricant spots, that is).

      • SiliconVoid

        Oh I agree with you in that regard, and I do not require a device to maintain 24/7 operation without maintenance.. My concern (and possible issue based assertion) is the level of maintenance this body may need if there is anything else compounding the problem of a dirty sensor. At the rate dust is collecting (~3-4k operations) it suggests dust is getting in more than ‘normal’ – regardless of whether any dirty sensor problems.

        The D200 mentioned is my primary macro setup (great colors from its CCD) and is approaching 130,000 activations. Quite often it is stopped down f/11+ where dust can easily start becoming visible, and I do not have to clean that sensor every 4k actuations.

        How that relates to my expectations of the D600, is simply that it should perform at the same level of operational durability any previous Dxxx series does – two of which have set my first-hand ‘expectations’ for all future models.. =)

      • SiliconVoid

        Oh I agree with you in that regard, and I do not require a device to maintain 24/7 operation without maintenance.. My concern (and possible issue based assertion) is the level of maintenance this body may need if there is anything else compounding the problem of a dirty sensor. At the rate dust is collecting (~3-4k operations) it suggests dust is getting in more than ‘normal’ – regardless of whether any dirty sensor problems.

        The D200 mentioned is my primary macro setup (great colors from its CCD) and is approaching 130,000 activations. Quite often it is stopped down f/11+ where dust can easily start becoming visible, and I do not have to clean that sensor every 4k actuations.

        How that relates to my expectations of the D600, is simply that it should perform at the same level of operational durability any previous Dxxx series does – two of which have set my first-hand ‘expectations’ for all future models.. =)

  • Greg Heller

    Your Honor, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Jury, my client neither confirms or denies the allegations…

  • Greg Heller

    At least Canon owns up to their problems, so much for Nikon being honorable. They really have a bunch of weasels running the show now.

  • Dave Ingram

    I’ve had a D600 for just about 2 months now and am getting fairly regular spotting that a Rocket blower and Visible Dust brush don’t seem to be getting rid of. Hard to believe that a 2K camera would have this poor QC and I can’t imagine that the D7100 (which looks to me like the same build) is going to be any better.

    My concern is that Nikon could use any attempt at wet cleaning the sensor to void the warranty. In comparison, I used a D80 for 5 years before finally having to do a wet clean – by that time the warranty was up so wasn’t too worried about it and I had upgraded to the D600.

    I wonder if it is the “dust removal” function that is actually adding dust – would be interesting to compare user’s experience with that feature turned on and turned off.

    • desmo

      your correct about warranty,
      let them wet clean it under warranty
      if for no other reason than to protect your warranty

    • desmo

      your correct about warranty,
      let them wet clean it under warranty
      if for no other reason than to protect your warranty

    • Renard Richie

      Visible dust won’t clean the oil that splatters on the top corner left of d600. You gotta wet clean that and makes sure when you do you won’t touch the 1mm around the AA glass. If you do you’ll splatter the oil there yourself

  • dgmosby

    Received my D600 (ordered from B&H)and shot the first test shot Dec 18, I
    not shot many pictures with it, about 600 and have had not dust or oil spot
    problems at all.

  • http://www.facebook.com/dkittle Don Kittle

    I ran up 7k shots on my D4 and the sensor was a mess. Likely a wedding in September and then some family shoots over the fall really contributed. I swap lenses about half a dozen times during a shoot. For what it’s worth, my old D700 got dirty and needed dry cleaning once in a while. I also shoot Mamiya and it’s got the same issue. Seems to just be a fact of lift with digital. Granted, the D600 seems to be a lot worse initially – hopefully the problem doesn’t persist for everyone after the first 3k shots.

    • Did u know that

      >> Seems to just be a fact of lift with digital

      How funny then, that not any of my previous Nikon DSLRs (D70, D200, D300s, D5100 and D700) has not had anything remotely similar to what I experience with my D600 when it comes to dust/oil.

      I have shot tens of thousands (close to 90.000 with the D300s) with each and every one of my previous DSLRs, and none of them has even been close to the amount of dirt my D600 builds up on the sensor after just a few hundred shots after each time I clean it.

      The D600 is a lemon and will go down in history as Nikon’s biggest fail in newer times. For me their reputation has been damaged beyond repair.

      • http://www.facebook.com/dkittle Don Kittle

        Wow, sorry to hear that. I guess those of us who don’t own one have no idea just how bad the problem is..

        Hopefully Nikon eventually do the right thing for D600 owners.
        //D

  • Marco Santa Cruz

    acknowledge after the release of new product whose hype will most likely leave this forgotten!… nikon’s been learning from american politics (or politics in general)

  • Marco Santa Cruz

    acknowledge after the release of new product whose hype will most likely leave this forgotten!… nikon’s been learning from american politics (or politics in general)

  • Song

    If you take good care of your equipments, they should be clearing Free. I never have to clean the sensor of my DSLR (six years with Nikon D200 & almost a year with Nikon D800). Of course I did clean (only the front filter) of the lenses time to time.

  • Song

    If you take good care of your equipments, they should be clearing Free. I never have to clean the sensor of my DSLR (six years with Nikon D200 & almost a year with Nikon D800). Of course I did clean (only the front filter) of the lenses time to time.

  • Gazooba

    Apparently, giving your sensor a cleaning has everyone in an uproar. Nikon handled it poorly but come on, clean your damn sensor and get back to taking pictures.

    • RC

      People need to realize that the sensor isn’t that fragile. Once you clean it one time, subsequent cleanings will be a piece of cake.

  • Gazooba

    Apparently, giving your sensor a cleaning has everyone in an uproar. Nikon handled it poorly but come on, clean your damn sensor and get back to taking pictures.

  • ericnl

    hopefully the next thing they will do is to finally release that firmware update for the D600. I’m thinking they were waiting with this for the D7100 to be released, so now is the time.

    I’m hoping it will not only let you switch your aperture in live view mode, but it will actually let you set your shutterspeed in shutterspeed priority while using video…

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