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The remaining 2013 Nikon predictions from Impress magazine

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Two weeks ago the Japanese magazine Impress published a PDF file with a preview of their Nikon predictions for 2013. The January issue of the magazine is now out and here are the remaining details:

  • Nikon D7200 will replace the D7000 (probability at 90%): 39 AF points and ISO range up to 25,600
  • Nikon D9000 will replace the D300s (probability at 35%): newly developed sensor, 8-10 fps, 51 AF points
  • Nikon 1 V3 mirrorless camera to be announced (probability at 75%)
  • Nikon D4x DSLR - probably with more MP (probability at 30%)

I have to mention again that those are just predictions and some of them could be based on previous Nikon Rumors posts.

Scanned page source: xitek

This entry was posted in Nikon D400, Nikon D7100, Nikon D7200. Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Andrew

    admin: are those probabilities nr’s or the magazines?

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      The probabilities are from the magazine (see scanned page).

      • kin notwell

        they just pull random numbers out of a drum

        • Plug

          86% of statistics are made up on the spot.

          • Pat Mann

            I always write them on the back of an envelope first to give them more credibility.

  • D90

    Why would they skip the next logical number of 7100 with the D7000′s replacement?

    • PeterO

      They’re just catching up to the other DX models to make it current in the numbering.

      • http://www.facebook.com/miguelmaria.moore Miguel María Moore

        Makes sense. However, let’s not forget that the D3xxx and D5xxx series are refreshed every 12 months or so, whereas the D7xxx series is done every 24 months. Is Nikon going to skip numbers every time they refresh the latter? I don’t think so…

        • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

          Maybe the second digit relates to the year the camera was released, and we will see a D7300 because it was released in 2013, while the D3200 and D5200 were both released in 2012, and the D5100 was released in 2011.

          (Of course, this doesn’t really work because the D3100 came out in 2010 and the D3000 and D5000 both came out in 2009, not 2010)

      • ScienceTheBear

        i’m sorry, but it doesn’t make any sense to me. i want to believe that the people in the market for a D7x000 don’t care about it’s model number and whether it’s “current”. that’s like jumping from D3 to D8 just to stay current with the D800.

  • 800mm f/2.8 DX VR

    I will be very suprised if the pro DX camera is any slower in framerate than the 1dx – 12fps with autofocus and metering, 14fps without.

    Admin: the D7200 prediction – does that say 25,000 native ISO or max ISO?

  • d300user

    D7200:
    24 MP APS-C CMOS sensor
    39 AF Points
    25600 Max ISO

    D9000
    16 MP sensor with the low pass filter removed
    8-10 FPS
    51 AF Points

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      Is this the translation from the magazine?

      • d300user

        That is what I understand on the bulleted list.

    • AlphaTed

      Just 16MP for the D300/s replacement ???

      • Tonio

        The fastest logic nikon ships allows 10fps @16MP. Unless it has better logic than the D4 it’s 16MP or 5.5fps @24MP (which is what the D600 does)

        • JEDNZ

          Actually the fastest logic Nikon ships is in the Nikon 1 V2. 14MP at 60fps..

      • Nikonhead

        16mp is plenty. Same as the D4 . The 16mp should be better in low light than the 24mp

        • rkas

          Megapixels doesn’t affect low light performance…

    • Mike M

      Not questioning your translation, as much as the “logic” of the material that a 16 mpix DX camera would be shipped without a low pass filter? It’s clearly a sports camera so that decision makes little sense even if the pixel density isn’t far off the D800 making moire relatively unlikely.

    • Nikonhead

      Don’t forget the built in wi-fi and in camera timelapse

  • David G.

    I wonder how much a D7000 replacement would cost. The same as the D7000 (~1200$) or more like ~1500 ? I don’t think it should cost more than $1.5k to keep a margin with the D600. Pure speculation, I know, but I’m curious!

  • shivaswrath

    surprising about the D9000…

  • My

    Hmmm wasn’t the d90 released after the d70/s?? This makes sense based on that!

    • CB

      No, there also was the D80!

  • Nikonyooooo

    This website sucks. Admin has no pride in what he does.

    • Laurent Proulx

      He show us info. Do what you want with that. Stop insulting !

    • Jasper

      I you don’t like this website, then why R U here??

    • AOL

      @NikonRumors:disqus You’ve got… hate mail!

  • Nikon Shooter

    Is this the same magazine that predicted the D700x?

    I think the only times Nikon Rumors makes some really bad predictions is when either the Admin buys into other publications’ BS or when the “tips” that he receives have come from the readers of those publications.

    • Parampreet Dhatt

      Nikon Rumors is simply posting the rumour published in the magazine, not confirming it.

    • Pat

      D700X, according to multiple sources, was once a prototype camera (24mp sensor inside a D700 body). But it was eventually canned in favor of the D800 (the 24mp sensor had no video was one reason), which was originally scheduled for summer 2011 release, the quake and flood changed all that. The time gap between D700X and D800 was too small for it to make sense.

      So the D700X was more than just a rumor.

  • EnticingHavoc

    The D9k would be exactly what I’m looking for. The low fps 24mp to 36mp FX cams do suck.

  • Parampreet Dhatt

    With 39 AF points and ISO upto 25600, the D7x00 hardly seems like an upgrade from the D7000 except the 24 MP sensor.

    Instead of having a high-end and low-end bodies, I hope they come up 2 high-end bodies, one with high MP count, one with low MP, but better low-light performance and faster burst rate.

    They would have the following common specs:

    -Pro-level bodies with full weather sealing (dust, water, moisture)
    -An upgraded 51-point AF system with more cross-type points than the existing one.
    -1920×1080 60p/30p video recording
    -100% pentaprism viewfinder

    The high MP one would have the following:

    -24 MP sensor (same as the one on D5200)
    -ISO upto 25600
    -6 FPS (but with a significantly better buffer size compared to D7000)

    The low MP one would have the following:

    -16 MP sensor (brand new one)
    -ISO upto 51200 or 102400
    -10/12 FPS (with a big buffer)

    This will be similar to D3X and D3S, one model with good MP count, one with better low light and burst mode.

    Hopefully both will be priced around $1500-1800

    • thomasverbeke

      Always the same; people wanking about build quality. There will be only one body called D7200; it’s going to have all the high end specs you expect except from the “pro” build quality the D300s has; it’s going to improve a little bit from the D7000 (more like the D600 probably). What the problem with this so called build quality? Me myself prefer a camera that’s just wheather sealed to carrier a block of metal arround…

      • House MD

        After some 4 to 5 years of consumer(!) use d80′s body received some ‘play’ and fells no longer robust as it was out of the box. That is why I want magnesium body not to experience any squeaking etc.

        • thomasv99

          I understand; but 4 to 5 years is a long time in electronics :)

          • House MD

            I agree but cameras are not just electronic devices but also mechanical/optical. Actually D80 is still not too bad for my needs. What I would want in my new camera is better low light performance, more controls on camera body, bigger size and magnesium body. D300s is the most obvious choice, some time ago I was just about to buy it. But it is rather old, and for last 2 years I am patiently waiting for Nikon to bring D400 to market! I have 3 DX lenses, and see no reason for me to switch to full frame (especially taking into account price tag…). D7000 seems more like ‘horizontal’ upgrade, though I want to move one level up!
            I don’t want to switch to Canon also. Nikon made us hostages of the situation. HELP! %))

            • thomasv99

              You should def. wait because a D7000 or D300s or both replacement should be coming this year; however don’t buy the D300s; it sensor is somewhat behind current standards (due to it’s age; so low light isn’t going to be up to what is possible using current technologies)… My 2 cents: there is going to be a D400 but it not going to be cheap and it’s going to have to go all the way spec wise if they want to differentiate it from the D7000 successor (looking on what the D5200 does compared to the D7000 spec wise that is). However when talking full magn alloy body I’m not sure.

            • House MD

              Thanks for advice!

              Definitely I will wait for D7000 replacement and D400 and chose between one of these cameras. Hope it will not take long time for these cameras to appear.

              My guess D400 wouldn`t cost more than 2000$ (D600). Probably D7200 (or however it will be named) should cost somewhere around 1300-1400$

              I thought about going fullframe and using my lenses in crop mode. It is an option for sure, but it is more pricey as not only the body (even D600) but FF lenses are also more expensive.

              Switching to Canon – no way for sure. It was rather cry of the soul :)

              Come on Nikon bring us cool DX cameras!!

    • Pat Mann

      There’s not enough potential performance difference between 16 and 24 mp to justify two separate high-end cameras with these specs. I would expect the high MP DX camera to come in at 40-50 mp to justify a separate camera from the 16-24 mp group, which seems to be converging on 24 mp.

    • Pat Mann

      The 39-point AF sensor seems to have been tweaked for the D600 to provide AF performance at f/8 with a central group of sensors – a significant upgrade for those trying to get to 400+mm with AF with DX cameras for less than $8000 in optics. I expect that improvement to show up in the D7200. The ability to get to f/8 with good AF performance with a D7000 replacement will be a significant upgrade for many.

    • spicynujac

      I would far prefer the “low” 16MP (which has plenty of MP unless I am printing poster size material, and the HIGH ISO performance. I wish someone would focus on this need, instead of the race to the top of who has the most MP. I am crossing my fingers that the D7000 replacement will have great low light performance. If so, consider it sold.

  • http://twitter.com/wijnands Jeroen Wijnands

    There never will be a D300s replacement. If that was going to happen it would have been released more than a year ago.

    • Shawn R

      You say that with such certainty. What will you do IF you are wrong?

      • http://twitter.com/wijnands Jeroen Wijnands

        Giggle like a maniac and start saving for it.

  • Bill Lise

    Just on the off chance that there is someone looking for the actual magazine referenced in this posting, there is no magazine called Impress. Impress _Japan_ is the name of the publisher, which publishes numerous other magazines and books. The name of this monthly magazine (translated into English) is Digital Camera.

  • M

    i doubt that they will release a kind of semi-prof body with an over 1 year old sensor (24mp) here are a couple sony sensors: 16mp (D7000+D5100) 24mp (D600), 12mp (D90, D300/s, D5000)
    once again it comes down to what Sony announces… sensor wise.

  • Shawn

    Why the number “D7200″ and not “7100″?

    • Shawn R

      Same name, same sentiment, different person, ha. I didn’t see your comment before I posted mine.

    • MyrddinWilt

      Why D9000 rather than D400?

      It looked like the D9000 name was originally going to be used for the D600 which would make sense given the features and positioning of the camera as prosumer. But then Nikon realized it could charge an extra couple of hundred bucks if it called it the D600 instead.

      So why wouldn’t they call the D300s/D7000 replacement the D400 for the same reason?

      Differentiation between the D7000 and D300s replacements is going to be hard in any case. They already have a 24 MP sensor in the D3200 after all. Can’t see a point to having two separate bodies unless the D400 has a 36MP or higher sensor.

      • disqus_XYy3jBJLjx

        >They already have a 24 MP sensor in the D3200 after all. Can’t see a
        point to having two separate bodies unless the D400 has a 36MP or higher
        sensor.

        Its about higher frame rate in D400.

      • Shawn R

        I don’t think he asked about the D9000, just the D7200 naming.

        Also there are plenty of reasons for a D400 with any MP sensor. One of which is simply that there are currently no sub $3K Nikon SLRS (barring the D300/s) with such “professional” level features as separate AF-ON AND AE/AF Lock buttons on the back. You can’t find these on the D7000 or the D600.

        Yes, these are important, more important to me than frame rate or MP count.

      • desmo

        i SUSPECT Dx00 will be used for FX bodies in the future, otherwise D600 would’ve been Dx000

    • Thom Hogan

      Why D7200 instead of D7100? For two reasons, primarily. First, when the pro generation number is even (D4), the consumer models tend to be numbered with even numbers; when the pro generation number is odd (D3), the consumer models tend to be numbered with odd numbers. The 7 in the D7000 came from the D3 generation. Likewise, the D90 was also in the D3 generation. But the predecessor to that, the D80 was in the D2 generation.

      Second, if the D7000 replacement is just really a small incremental upgrade, we’ll get D7100 or D7200 numbering. But as someone pointed out, if the other cameras are x200, then having an x100 one seems to make it look older, not newer. If the D7000 replacement is a bigger, more substantial upgrade, it will almost certainly be called the D8000.

      Nikon’s been pretty consistent on this for decades (it dates back to the F4 and N8008, for instance). But they do run out of numbers from time to time, which is one reason why we’re on four-digit numbers now instead of two.

      • RMJ

        That’s the worst theory ever.

        D70 was during D2, so was D50. D60 was introduced on D3 era, same as D5000 and D3000, which are “even numbers” (they sure are in reality) according to you (since D3200/D5200 are even too…) and are against your theory.

        I don’t see any reason why they would skip to D7200. The numbering would be off again in about year when D3300 comes out. And once again when D3400 comes out in about two years. Nex time, they would have to skip to D7500 to keep up with the name cycle and they won’t do it. The new numbering system was taken in use to have more model numbers in the future so surely they won’t waste them right away or the whole system has to be changed once again after couple generations.

        Nikon finally has a decent numbering system, so keep it.
        (the only unsure thing with it is the x00 series which will soon run out of number but I think we will see change in that too soon)

        • Thom Hogan

          Yes, the D70 was introduced after the D2h, but it was designed in the D1 era and given that it was leaked before the D2h, it may have been originally intended to appear earlier. The D60 was similarly designed in the D2 era, but appeared next after the D3. But once an era is in place, Nikon’s habit has been to name designs with an even/odd first digit that matches the pro camera. It’s the old “pro camera introduces technologies, then trickles down to the consumer cameras” philosophy that Nikon has been (mostly) following since the F4.

          If we were privy to Nikon’s future scheduling, we’d see D4, D4000, D6000, D8000, plus D400 cameras, with the D4 technologies spilling downwards. I doubt that this will survive into the D5 era, though, as Nikon will once again run out of numbers to do what they’ve done in the past (only D1000, D9000, and D900 are available to continue the naming process).

          I’ve never said I liked this naming process. To some degree, the current iteration is clearer than they’ve had before, but I still find all the camera company’s naming practices somewhat geeky and problematic. With Canon using #D and Nikon using D#, I guess you can say that they’re naming so that you can figure out what the competitive camera is. Makes for a great duopoly, I suppose.

          • RMJ

            What is geeky or problematic with the new naming scheme ?

            After D3000 comes D3100 then D3200 then D3300 and so on. Same with D7000, D7100, D7200, D7300 and so on. We can predict Nikon’s future model names for the next ten years very easily.

            The only question is x00 series that WILL run out of numbers very soon. If D400 won’t be renamed to D9000 then Nikon has to change naming of it’s after next generation. D800 can have one follower, D600 also if it goes backwards in numbers to D500 (it has happened before so it’s nothing new). After that there is no more free model names to use for those.

            But the the much more logical choice is that Nikon will start using D810, D820, D830 and so on in the future, same goes with the entry level full frame : D600, D610, D620. This will also give a chance for “the new D700″, the D710 and it’s followers if Nikon decides to continue it. D9x0 serie can be reserved for future use.

            This way Nikon won’t run out of numbers and it becomes very logical at every level.

            • Thom Hogan

              Well, let’s look at the previous 10 years: D50, D40, D40x, D60, D3000, D3100, D3200. D70, D80, D90, D7000.

              While the four digit numbers are an improvement, we still have 1 digit, 3 digit, and 4 digit numbers. And someone not “in the know” can’t make sense of them, which leaves them vulnerable to sales person finessing. And which is better, a D300s or a D7000? When you add in variability in cycles, you get disjunctions like that.

              I used “geeky” in the sense that it takes a fairly elaborate explanation to tell someone what D3200, D5100, D7000, D300s, D600, D800, and D4 mean, especially when you also have J, V, P, S, and L in use in your camera lineup, with one, three, or four digits involved. Four of those DSLR models are current, one has been virtually replaced, two are long overdue for replacement.

              There’s a form of marketing that actually uses this level of potential consumer confusion over names to advantage. Let’s see, is a P7700 a better camera than the D7000? Well, it’s 700 better ;~). And don’t say this doesn’t happen: I’ve stood in stores watching sales personnel do exactly what I suggest, as in “this P7700 is a newer camera than the D7000 and uses newer technologies.” Again, to an uninformed customer, Nikon’s naming schemes are geeky: in need of explanation. Whether they get the right explanation of not is another thing.

    • Jon Porter

      To avoid confusion with the P7100.

  • Shawn

    Did I miss the memo or something? Other than common typos (I’ve done so myself several times), wouldn’t the D7100 replace the D7000? Any reason they would jump straight to the D7200? Not a big deal, just wondering.

    • Michael Choong

      D3200,D5200, then D7100. Isn’t this look more odd?? Dx200 newest series seems better for marketing strategy.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      This is just a prediction, nothing more. I just posted it for informational purposes.

      • Nikonhead

        How is it informational if it is a rumor?

        • neversink

          You are talking semantics. i believe admin posted it informing you of some other third-party’s rumors. Get it???

        • Parampreet Dhatt

          Doesn’t a name like Nikon Rumors suggest that this website is about rumours…

    • Johan

      Nikon has D3200 and D5200. D7100 doesn’t look as good as D7200 when cheaper cameras are already with Dx200 names.
      Exactly the same reaseon we didn’t get Xbox 2 when Sony had announced Playstation 3

  • ScienceTheBear

    i have to say that Nikon didn’t do their DX product line right. imo, they should have released the D5200 in a D7000-type body with articulating screen and specs not quite up to D7000 par. then the D7100 should have come in with a body comparable to the D300s and specs to beat it, making it the top of the line DX body. at least, that’s what i would have done. 4 DX cameras is overkill.

    • iamlucky13

      Nikon has had 4 DX cameras for the better part of a decade, and has tended towards increasing numbers and diversity of models to keep growing market share even as the industry becomes more competitive. Having added FX to the mix does not necessarily mean they’ll drop a DX model, especially since the overall volume has increased.

      I can’t say whether they’ll continue to produce 4 models of DX with both FX and mirrorless to also promote, but there are a lot of reasons in favor of doing so, especially since the electronics share a lot of commonality between models, and the bodies share a lot of commonality between generations. This helps keep the added development costs of one more model modest, while allowing a well-structured price progression that helps them market to the widest range of customers (approx 50% increases for the cost of each body: $500, $750, $1200, $1800 or so).

      And to re-emphasize, a D300s replacement does not conflict with the D600, even if they end up identically priced, because they each trade off features – A D300s replacement would have a higher end body, while the D600 will have higher overall image quality.

    • iamlucky13

      Nikon has had 4 DX cameras for the better part of a decade, and has tended towards increasing numbers and diversity of models to keep growing market share even as the industry becomes more competitive. Having added FX to the mix does not necessarily mean they’ll drop a DX model, especially since the overall volume has increased.

      I can’t say whether they’ll continue to produce 4 models of DX with both FX and mirrorless to also promote, but there are a lot of reasons in favor of doing so, especially since the electronics share a lot of commonality between models, and the bodies share a lot of commonality between generations. This helps keep the added development costs of one more model modest, while allowing a well-structured price progression that helps them market to the widest range of customers (approx 50% increases for the cost of each body: $500, $750, $1200, $1800 or so).

      And to re-emphasize, a D300s replacement does not conflict with the D600, even if they end up identically priced, because they each trade off features – A D300s replacement would have a higher end body, while the D600 will have higher overall image quality.

      • MyrddinWilt

        True, but look at what the chattering classes here DEMAND! NOW! NOW!

        They really, really, want a DX camera with a D300 type body with D4 type resolution.

        Oh wait, isn’t that called the D800 in DX mode?

        The problem with having four DX cameras right now is that the D3200 is basically a DX format D3X. In fact it is considerably better than the D3X in some ways as it does ISO 6400 rather than 1600. Yes it is in a cheesier case and has consumer controls but it is less than 10% of the D3X price new and only came out four years earlier.

        There will obviously be a third DX model. But the D7000 already has 95% of the D300s features. I bought the D300 because I wanted the weather sealing, not because I needed an all magnesium body to carry about. The D600 is weather sealed with a D7000 type case.

        So I think there will be a D400 to replace the D300s and the D7000 will just remain in the catalog at a slightly lower price for another year then disappear. That is how Nikon used to phase out the older models. The F3 was on sale next to the F4 for years. The D90 stayed in the catalog for quite a while as well.

        The only thing that might change that would be if they had an even higher resolution DX sensor ready to go. My iPhone has an 8MP sensor, there is no reason a 36MP DX sensor won’t work. I would probably choose a D600 over a 36MP D400 but the birding folk would go the other way.

        • timon_comment

          We seen some people here below,

          Some people do not know that 3.8μm 24MP sensor is a worse choice in APS-c DSLR camera.

          In APS-c camera that a 3.8μm 24MP sensor is even worse matter than a 4.8μm 16MP sensor, here is not talking about high ISO, but related to the pixel-level’s imaging qualities! Do you merely want to buy the most number MP and comes with worse imaging quality? Why did you buy DSLR camera but not a cellphonecam?

          Some people do not know that the faster fps is easier to bring worse vibrations and softened of the images. Especially in mid-end and low-end cameras. And, a camera body weight is far much lighter than a flagship model.

          Some people do not know that in usually the 1/8000s shutter unit is likely even worse vibration than the 1/4000s shutter unit, In mid-end and low-end cameras. Did you truly need shutter speed over 1/4000s and not imaging quality?

          Some people do not know Nikon have not yet provide electronic 1st curtain mode.

          Some people do not know that much higher ISO is likely even worse front-end noise reduction way hid on the camera, but you impossible to disable it.

          Read more, in timon_comment, Question 1 and Question 2,
          http://nikonrumors.com/2013/01/01/nikon-patents-a-lens-for-mirrorless-aps-c-camera.aspx/

        • http://www.facebook.com/ceasar.sharper Ceasar Sharper

          Just to let you know, my D800 in DX mode is still slower FPS than my D300S FPS. Also, the D5200 does not have the FPS nor the level of sealing on the D300. So I’m waiting for a back up with a high FPS.

  • Nikonhead

    If Nikon does not put out a D300s replacement they will lose alot of customers because they will start buying Canon 7D markII.

    • Geert

      Or they will buy a FX camera like a D600. DX is for mirrorless cameras, FX is the future for DSLR’s.

      • js200022

        The D300 is a pro camera, I think the option would the D800.

        • Zouk

          The D300 is an all-round crop body. I think the full frame equivalent would be something like the D700. The D800 isn’t quick enough to really merit a comparison.

      • BroncoBro

        You are forgetting that there are many advanced amateurs, and pros like myself, that have a collection of lenses suited to the crop sensors. I don’t want to have to go to full frame because I’d have to spend a ton of money replacing those lenses. I service small to medium size commercial accounts and publications that can’t afford the photographers with high overhead. So truly, FX is not a good business decision for me. And, I know I’m not alone out there.

      • http://www.andrezandona.com/ Azando

        Or not…

        I said this on my reply to Nikonhead and I’ll say it again the D600 is languid, it lacks character and has no disposition. It’s a great camera but it has this “it’s not enough” feel when compared to other cameras in the FX world. The D800 is dressed up with an excessive amount of makeup. It is a fantastically hot date that looks great and impresses you and everyone but boy! Talk about high maintenance at home…

        There’s no perfect camera and/or camera format but a D600 and FX are not substitutes to an upgrade on the D300S. Plain and simple, You can’t substitute the top of one line by the bottom of the next. And I emphasize “next” not “better” line since “better” is very relative when it comes to top of DX and bottom of FX comparisons.

        As for what the future of DSLR’s is, I don’t know what crystal ball people have but I wish they shared it with others. Sigma just announced the first medium range f/1.8 lens for DX so their crystal ball must be different. Either that or they live in the present, the present where the vast majority of sales is on DX cameras and therefore where the market demand resides.

        Most people will get what works for them now. What may not work for them in 10 years is what MAY not work for them. This is photography, an art form almost entirely dedicated to the present moment, not the stock market, a conglomeration of people speculating on the future price and value of goods. You get and use what’s out there NOW that fits your needs. And you wear it to the ground while you become a better photographer. Meanwhile folks rubbing their crystal balls at home get good at pixel peeping…

    • Azando

      That’s exactly where I stand. I’ve come so close to pull the trigger over the last month. I don’t care for the D600 or D800, one is not enough and the other is too much (in terms of $ and specs).

      I ran the numbers and looked at selling my D300S and my glass and getting started with purchasing Canon glass. Did not do it because I need my gear over the summer for a few gigs.

      I’m starting to loose my sense of loyalty with Nikon, particularly when it comes to DX, sure the D7100 just came out but how long have loyal customers (not the “kit lens Costco Joe”, very capable amateurs and pros) been waiting for a D300S replacement? Have we been heard?

      I don’t see why I should be loyal to a brand that refuses to listen to their customer base and instead tries to force them down a path they don’t want to go in (like leaving DX and a kick ass system with two D300′s pulling the wagon for a languid D600 or a D800 with an excessive amount of makeup, sure she looks pretty and impresses everyone but boy! Talk about high-maintenance at home…)

      This all my personal opinion and Nikon couldn’t care less about what I as an individual ranting on the internet have to say. But as a customer I’m going to go where I feel I get the service and products in line with my needs. The thing is I’m not alone in it and the elusive D400 is, at this time, spiraling downwards in the realm of possibilities and the 7D MarkII is spiraling upwards and leaving the realm of possibilities and likely to become a reality. The clock is ticking, Canon is listening to what the customer wants while Nikon is trying to force the customer down a path they do not want to go. I’m giving them another 4-6 months, if nothing comes out I will proudly and confidently jump ship and leave Nikon.

      As customers we should feel well served and heard not guided and ignored…

  • D700 lover

    still nothing for D700 … what if D600 is a joke and D800 is too much ?

    • neversink

      Get over it. the D700 is dead. Long live the D800.

    • Geert

      The D800 is for the D700!

    • Sahaja

      Go buy a 5DMkIII then ….

  • Saulo

    Trying to reason a little bit about Nikon’s marketing logic based on their 2012 behavior, the order should be
    (i) D300s replacement with all bells and whistles (pro body, 24MP, 10fps, 51 points, ISO 51200, HD vídeo @60fps, etc.) for around US$ 1.800 (body, USA) to catch all the starving Nikonians that have D300, D300s, D7000 and D90, and haven’t jumped yet in the full frame bandwagon (D600) and a couple of months after that
    (ii) D7000 replacement (with same general features as the D7000, 24MP and some improvements in buffering and vídeo) for around US$ 1.200 (body, USA), for the minority with more patience, and/or tighter budgets and/or good sense ;-).
    I believe many would jump to a higher end camera, even if they don’t really need the extra features, only because they feel insecure about the DX line future, so buying a higher spec would buy time in order to think about upgrading to FX at the next iteration.

  • G0nzo

    Nikon D9000 will replace the D300s (probability at 35%)
    Or
    Nikon D9000 will replace the D700 (probability at 65%) <- the real replacement. ;)

    wish the D9k will have a FX and a resolution of 16-20mpx, that would be cool as great.

    • neversink

      The D700 is dead. Long live the D800. The Nikon D700 has been discontinued. Get over it….

      • G0nzo

        no reaaally, so as the D3 and any old camera %-P that’s why there’s “replacement” or “replace” in the comment.

      • neversink

        Gonzo – The D700 replacement is already here. I know some people are too stubborn to understand it, but the D800 is the real and only replacement for the D700. That’s it. There will eventually be a replacement for the D800 some years down the road. And there will be those who say that’s not the replacement for the D800, ad nauseum. Get over it and shoot with whatever camera you choose. Don’t like the D800 or D4, then keep the D700 and enjoy it. I love both the D800 and D4 and was very happy to say goodbye to the D700 and D3s….

        But in reality the D700 is gonzo and the replacements are already here. That is why the D700 is discontinued. Because it has been replaced!!!!!! Ciao!

      • neversink

        Gonzo – The D700 replacement is already here. I know some people are too stubborn to understand it, but the D800 is the real and only replacement for the D700. That’s it. There will eventually be a replacement for the D800 some years down the road. And there will be those who say that’s not the replacement for the D800, ad nauseum. Get over it and shoot with whatever camera you choose. Don’t like the D800 or D4, then keep the D700 and enjoy it. I love both the D800 and D4 and was very happy to say goodbye to the D700 and D3s….

        But in reality the D700 is gonzo and the replacements are already here. That is why the D700 is discontinued. Because it has been replaced!!!!!! Ciao!

  • seb

    It would be nice if Nikon make some super zoom lens replacing current 80-400 which is rubbish and been on the market for 13 years.The best option would be something like 200-500 f4-5.6 or 4.5-6.3 vr similar to Tamron 200-500 which is rubbish as well,had that some time ago but image quality was poor and no vr so sold it back.Nikon 200-400 too expensive and too big and heavy.

  • js200022

    IMHO, Nikon’s strategy seems to make sense:

    FX: x00
    DX: x000

    It is easier to identify the cameras.

  • http://nickerwin.com/ Nicholas Erwin

    Looks the D7200 has no improvements to the D7000..same ISO range. I want NEW! D9000.. ok. Maybe. Whyt can’t they do a D400?!

  • ojoe

    “Nikon D9000 will replace the D300s (probability at 35%)”

    Thirty Five percent chance… Well that about sums it up doesn’t it?

  • Herman

    Why would Nikon deviate from such a succesful Pro DX series as the D100 / 200 / 300(s)? I fail to understand Nikons strategy and just wish they would offer more transparency to their loyal customers! Just where is that damn D400 Pro DX that half the Nikon World is waiting for??? Does Canon first need to introduce a 7D Mark II??? Come on Nikon… wake up!!!

  • Cybes

    I am itching for a D300(s) replacement, none of the Nikon models currently released tick all the boxes in the way the D300(s) did for me.

  • WaltMaken

    Any guesses concerning if the Nikon 1 V3 will have a left-hinged variable angle monitor like the Nikon D5100 & D5200?

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