The Nikon booth at the 2015 CES show in Las Vegas

Nikon booth at CES 2015
This is the Nikon booth at the 2015 CES show in Las Vegas (the full schedule of events can be found here):

Nikon booth at CES 2015-20

A 3D virtual reality technology demo - it was pretty neat but the video IQ was a bit nauseating to experience

Nikon booth at CES 2015-15

Nikon's 360 project - people are asked to jump or move and the cameras take a 360 pano video

Nikon booth at CES 2015-19
Nikon booth at CES 2015-18
Nikon booth at CES 2015-17
Nikon booth at CES 2015-16
Nikon booth at CES 2015-10
Nikon booth at CES 2015-11
Nikon booth at CES 2015-13
Nikon booth at CES 2015-14
Nikon booth at CES 2015-9
Nikon booth at CES 2015-8
Nikon booth at CES 2015-7
Nikon booth at CES 2015-6
Nikon booth at CES 2015-5
Nikon booth at CES 2015-4
Nikon booth at CES 2015-1
Nikon booth at CES 2015-2
Nikon booth at CES 2015-3
Nikon booth at CES 2015-12
Joe McNally and Ron Magill presentation:

Pictures credit: horshack

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  • neversink

    Thanks for the pics… Perhaps one day CES will be held here in Nairobi, Kenya in East Africa!!!!!

    • Andrew

      Kenya would be a nice place to visit. I would have a place to stay so the cost of the trip should be low. Would love to take the D7200 (when released) on such a trip.

      • neversink

        Kenya is beautiful and diverse. Even with a place to stay, you would need extra money for Safaris, which are costly, unless your friends want to do a do-it-yourself Safari. That’s possible but you still need to hire a guide and if you camp, you will need an escari (guard.) A good registered licensed guide is essential, as they are very familiar not only with the location of the local wildlife, but they are knowledgable in ecology and all the one’s I used knew about all the local flora as well as the fauna. Hope you come….

  • That cut-away pic of the D750 and D700 is very cool. Nice to see how Nikon engineers shifted internal parts.

  • doge

    Those people in the 3rd pic look so incredibly bored. Are they being sold a time share?

    • JCTibu

      LOL Indeed!

    • Kyle

      good one.

    • Henri

      You’re from Winnipeg aren’t you.

    • Henri

      SMRT

  • JCTibu

    wondering if someone shoot the question about the flare issue in the D750…..

    • MB

      And how people refusing to use lens hood make a big deal out of it …

      • Rick Johnson

        Those who know anything about it know that a lens hood makes no difference.

        • MB

          How is that?

          • Lachie

            Because the issue is very different to normal flare seen in photos taken with a lens without the hood on.

            The flare seems to only occur at specific angles, probably unique to each camera, and is from internal reflection inside the camera near the mirror. It only seems to occur at specific angles with strong backlighting, and because of that, it wouldn’t matter if you used a lens hood or not.

            • MB

              So thats how it is … it is some special kind of flare that exists only when special kind of people (that knows) are using some special kind of cameras … OK … but somehow I doubt that you are that special kind of people and that you have tried that yourself …
              For the rest of us hoods does work and does eliminate this issue …

            • Lachie

              You are correct, I don’t have a D750 that I can use and try to get this kind of flare to show up.

              As I said, only some people get the issue, and unless everyone with a D750 tries to replicate the circumstances in which this flare is experienced, then we can’t know if every single D750 will have the issue, or if it’s an issue of quality control in the manufacturing process (Unless Nikon issues a total recall).

              This flare isn’t lens flare, which happens when light reflects inside the lens after entering the front element from side on or at an angle. This seems to be a small fault in the mirror box that allows light to reflect off a surface when the mirror flips up.

            • mikeswitz

              It happens when the light source directly hits the lens. You can call it whatever you want, but if you flag that light source, I promise, you will not get that bar.

            • Rick Johnson

              This is getting way off-topic, but since you’re convinced it’s user error, here’s an example that happened w/ me this week while taking video on a D750 w/ a 50mm f/1.8 AND lens hood attached. The sun is above and behind the girls.

            • Lachie

              Thank you, an example of the lens flare further proves my point that a lens hood doesn’t prevent the flare from occurring.

              The way the flare distinctly begins about 1/10th from the top of the frame is totally different to lens flare, which would have occurred from the top of the frame downward and not have been so straight in shape.

            • mikeswitz

              Because you can shoot video with a D750 doesn’t make you a videographer. Learning how and when to use grip equipment would be a good first step.

            • Rick Johnson

              Considering this was an amateur video for home use, that hardly matters.

              However, if the flare was intentional, I doubt grip equipment would matter here since you’d be shielding yourself from the very light you’re after.

            • mikeswitz

              I was a professional cinematographer so i know what I am talking about and no you won’t be shielding yourself from the very light you are after and you don’t need to spend any money. All you need is an assistant with a magazine or 8×10 card or anything to prevent the sun from directly hitting the lens. The assistant must see where the source light is coming from and block that tiny bit of light from hitting the lens. This will work for an amateur assistant as well as an amateur videographer. Also knowing how to create negative lot need not cost a fortune. If this is a design flaw, its pretty minor and probably a result of making the D750 smaller and lighter and I personally think the trade-off is well worth it. But I have never been a big fan of DSLRs being used for video cameras in the first place.

            • Rick Johnson

              In this case, I believe you’re confusing a professional situation with a dad who was recording handheld-video of his kids having a snowball fight between still photos, with only a D750 and a hooded 50mm f/1.8 in-hand. 😉 Interestingly enough, I didn’t get the reflection in any of the stills, despite similar lighting. Does this defect ruin this memory? Not really. Is it annoying? Yes.

              I’ll trust your professional experience, but with the caveat that not every scenario
              is intended to be professional quality, nor does every opportunity to
              capture a memory present itself when we’re carrying a bag full of gear (or anything more than just the camera). The best I could have done here is place my hand above the lens had I caught the defect as it was happening.

            • Thom Hogan

              It’s not clear that using a matte box actually fixes the problem. The fact that a lens hood doesn’t should be a warning that it might not be fixed by a matte box.

              I still don’t have a copy of the camera that reproduces the problem, so can’t test it, but the one thing I’ve noticed in every sample that’s been submitted to me is how narrow the angle that produces the problem is. Moreover, the part that’s producing the problem is out of the imaging area itself ;~). You might need a very deep matte box to hide the problem.

            • mikeswitz

              I never mentioned a matte box. In fact I don’t think a mattbox would have helped Rick anymore than a lens shade. The angle of the sun and the very precise angle of the lens seems to dictate a blockage further away from the front of the lens than a matte box. I provided a simple solution, that I think would have alleviated the problem. The real subtext of this whole issue is about the D600 and Nikon’s “crappy” QC and posters who continually need to be right.

            • Andrew

              Welcome to the world of manufactured products, new product releases always have QC problems. Even my expensive automobile had problems that required two trips to the dealership to be fixed. I assure you that if you worked on the Nikon team you would not do any better. The variables are increasing for producing sophisticated products, especially products that may receive manufactured parts from different suppliers. From what Thom reported, Nikon received parts from two different suppliers and one of them may have caused the problem on some of the cameras. Many people are not experiencing the problem. Anyway, these cameras have warranty coverage.

              By now we should all have learned our lessons. If we cannot tolerate defects, then we should wait at least 3 months before buying a newly released camera. If you do your homework on QC, you will realize that Nikon is not alone, it has now become the nature of high technology manufacturing.

            • mikeswitz

              Exactly. I think this whole thing is a tempest in a teapot. My point was to offer a workaround until this not very important issue is resolved.

          • Chad

            Nikon cameras come with a 1 year warranty.

            • neversink

              Admin – You have been spammed by this guy Chad!!!

            • Those comments don’t show up in my admin panel. Those low lifes figured out a way to post a comment with me getting a notification. Please flag them so I can delete them.

        • mikeswitz

          Anyone who knows anything about photography knows that if the lens hood doesn’t work a flag will.

          • Spy Black

            You gotta chill on this one dude. The guy was taking a video of his kid.

            And let’s face it, there’s a problem with the D750. The same problem is inherent in a lot of other cameras as well, but it’s worse on the D750.

            • mikeswitz

              During the oil can days your mantra was “clean your damn sensor”. I agreed with you because people who buy an FX camera ought to know how that is done and at least it would temporarily fix their problem. I know he was just trying to shoot his kids in-between getting a couple of stills. That wasn’t my point. You don’t have to be be a pro or even an advanced amateur to deal with this “problem”. While shooting into the sun you are going to see evidence of source light hitting the lens. Not necessarily, the bar across the top, but some evidence. Once seen the problem is easily fixed by a number of techniques. I simply question if this is a major problem. Certainly nothing on the scale of Nikon’s oil splashing and even Spy Black wasn’t freaked out by that.

            • Spy Black

              “You don’t have to be be a pro or even an advanced amateur to deal with this “problem”.”

              I don’t agree with that. You absolutely need to be a pro to address this “problem” properly. And it IS a problem, just like:
              “During the oil can days your mantra was “clean your damn sensor”

              That was also addressed to pros who should know better. I cut slack on amateurs (and even semi-pros) on that issue, because that’s like asking them to work on their car engine when the check engine light goes on. If you’re not savvy with car engines, are you gonna fucĸ with that?

              “I simply question if this is a major problem.”
              It’s a problem. Not as bad as the D600 issue, but it is a problem. As I said, it’s inherent in a lot of cameras, but so far the D750 and (surprisingly) the mirrorless Leica M 240 are the worst offenders.

              But you can’t expect people who notice it and not like it to not complain about it. As casual shooters no one’s going out to buy stuff like flags or bellows hoods (or substitute the nearby Maxim magazine for a flag), because they won’t even know that stuff exists in the first place or of such techniques.

            • mikeswitz

              I dunno, why not educate an amateur

            • Spy Black

              Why not educate camera manufacturers on building proper mirror boxes? 😉

            • mikeswitz

              I’m not sure I know how to do that. Do you? And are you really sure that Nikon manufactured all the parts in the mirror boxes. It seems that Nikon manufactured some correctly. But if you can teach them how, be my guest. A little knowledge never hurt any company, especially from someone who actually knows what they are talking about.

            • Spy Black

              Well, now you know how silly “I dunno, why not educate an amateur.” sounds. They’re going to go about their world in whatever way they know, as will Nikon.

            • mikeswitz

              Not sure I follow your logic. Nor the logic that all your “clean your sensor” stuff was only aimed at pros. If Nikon wanted to teach me how “to build a proper mirror box” I would gladly learn. The assumption that only pros want to learn about their cameras seems pretty specious.

            • Rick Johnson

              Amateurs are happy to learn, but teaching with a bit less smug helps the student be receptive to the advice, especially when it’s unsolicited.

              It’s fair to say that I didn’t prevent it, thus I should accept the results. However, if the lighting and dramatic flare were intentional, I’d still prefer it to be minus strange light box reflections. That’s where Nikon steps in w/ a fix.

              As for approaching the situation professionally, I was happier to be involved in the snowball fight rather than completely analyze a situation for every preventable flaw.

            • mikeswitz

              Sorry if I seemed smug, I didn’t mean to be. I was just getting tired of people (amateurs and pros alike) comparing this to the oil splash D600 issue. It seems as if the problem is about tolerances within the mirror box and not a huge issue which Nikon will probably deal with. My smugness(?) came from saying over and over that it is a problem easily dealt with in the mean time.

            • neversink

              I hate cleaning my sensor, but I do it. I gave a little workshop – pro bono – to a school on sensor dust and sensor cleaning in Kenya for some students of photography. Actually the workshop was about other aspects of photography, but sensor dust came up. So we spent more than half an hour just discussing what most people, pros or amateurs or students, hate most about digital photography – Dirty Sensors. I demonstrated, but suggested they be very careful as it is a meticulous and frustrating job and must be done gently and with care. The tendency to want to throw your camera into the garbage heap can be overwhelming after cleaning a sensor and seeing that you may have just moved more dust around, if carelessly performed…. Or worse, scratch the sensor.

              Now, sensor cleaning is much harder than putting a card or hand over the source of light to block and prevent flair. So, why is it that you want to educate amateurs on sensor cleaning, which is much more difficult, than on proper technique as mike is doing.

              Spy, I don’t understand your argument at all. We photographers, pro and amateur alike, should all be educated on all aspects of photography.

            • Spy Black

              Because there is an issue here that needs to be addressed, and hopefully under better conditions than the D600 issue was. So far that appears to be the case, although Nikon may have taken a bit too long to acknowledge the issue, especially after the D600 issue. But at least now they have and hopefully they’ll be a remedy for those who want one, just as there now is for those who want their D600 issue addressed. By the way, I still haven’t sent my D600. 😉

        • neoplatonist

          total bullshit

      • Dingle Berry

        I know you’re a Nikon fanboy, but you should accept the fact that the flare issue with the D750 and not user error. Did you not see the video where someone shows off the flare issue then does a temp fix and it’s gone afterwards. Stop dicking riding Nikon so much and get your ass out of your head. The D750 would have been a perfect camera if it wasn’t for that problem.

        • ZoetMB

          And you should stop being a dingle berry and instead read Hogan’s column on the issue where you’ll discover that Nikon has apparently used multiple vendors for a related component and the parts are slightly different sizes. One apparently doesn’t give the flare and one does.

        • Andrew

          The D750 is still a perfect camera if you buy a unit that does not have the problem since not everyone is affected. Like any product on the market, simply return it within 30 days or wait for Nikon to issue a fix if you did not discover the problem within the return period. This one looks like an easy fix. And besides, Nikon cameras come with a 1 year warranty.

      • CERO

        the problem is the AF sensor array that is protruding.. thus causing a reflection and a dark black line. It affects some D810 and D610’s as well, but does not affect ALL D750’s.

    • jstevez

      I tested mine very carefully and I couldn’t replicate the flare; which means that some D750 are issue free. I would return any camera to Nikon and demand a flare free D750.

      • Andrew

        Thom Hogan also said the following: “The flare problem was not part of my original review of the D750 simply because I can’t produce it on my camera. Nor on another sample I borrowed.”

        Thom’s experience fits in with my earlier statement that it is likely a manufacturing issue and not a design issue since it appears that most buyers have not experienced the problem. But an equally valid observation is made by ZoetMB that Nikon outsourced the component to different manufacturers and one of them supplied parts with a slightly different size.

        Conclusion:

        So what all of this means is that the D750 flare issue is within the constraints of a new product release and anyone buying the D750 may (a) not experience the problem, (b) experience the problem and would get the camera exchanged, or (c) experience the problem and would need to send it in to be fixed. The result of all this is that Nikon would in the future take additional steps to make certain that its suppliers will at all times manufacture parts that do not deviate from its specifications. So I would not hesitate to buy the D750 knowing that I would have 30 days to get any issue resolved.

        • scott800

          Initially i could not replica the problem; tried a few lenses and different light sources (sun, pen light, led torch), and thought I was reflection free. Shooting photo and video at a wedding last week i spotted the problem In my post below, i snapped a photo when the problem presented itself. I tried my other body with 35mm and saw it again. It’s there, and my belief is that it every d750 has this issue (because of the new body plastic material/shape?), but is very hard to reproduce, so many users never see it. I shot seven different weddings before it came up once, after i saw it on the live view (video mode) and took a quick photo. If I did not notice it my picture count with the issue would still be zero in several thousand. Again, I posted the screenshot of the photo below and did speak with Nikon regarding the issue. They are definitely aware of the problem.

          • scott800

            All of that being said, the rarity of the problem almost makes its a non-issue. I mean, in thousands of photos in many lighting conditions I’ve only seen it one time (on both cameras), in a photo I did not plan on taking.

          • Thom Hogan

            I’m still not convinced every D750 has the problem. One thing I’ve already noticed (as have several of the people I work with in the background) is that there appear to be different condenser lenses over the AF sensor in different copies of the camera. In other words, the part causing the problem was sourced from multiple suppliers.

            • scott800

              With the mirror and shutter up we can see the problem creator. It looks like the d750s are missing a piece(?). The d600 has a black cover when compared to the d750 which leaves this component exposed. (sorry for the crappy iPhone pics)

            • scott800

              Heres another shot, just as bad, but easier to see the cover part behind AF sensor and how the reflective surface of the AF is causing the issue

    • scott800

      I tried to recreate the flare on both of our 750’s, I was not able to re-create the flare until this week, while shooting a wedding, noticed it while shooting video and took a quick photo. Both cameras have this issue: It is definitely an internal reflection of some kind and presents itself against bright source. (This is with the 85mm lens at f3.2, hood on)
      In 7 weddings this is the first time we experienced the issue and it was visible on both d750s. I called Nikon Support and they told me that they were “working on something” and added my 750’s to my registered gear list to notify me as soon as they had any more information on the issue.
      I know none of this is new information, but just thought I would post, apologies for the quality of the shot, I didn’t really change the settings once I switched off live view and out of video mode.

  • br0xibear

    • Andrew

      You know how it goes, the D7200 will come out first and it will be good enough for most people waiting for the D400. Now that pros have embraced the D750, the D7200 will have a DX image sensor in a D750 (FX) body which many have found to be quite nice. The buffer in the D7200 will be decent though not great. And for now, professional sports shooters are forced to get the D4s.

    • fjfjjj

      “I know you guys won’t believe this, but… you know the DX system? The one that we never make any great pro lenses for? Well, I got some news, and we’re not gonna make any great pro cameras for it either. Yeah, sorry guys, I can’t figure it out either.”

      • Jeff Hunter

        Why would Nikon make two sets of pro lenses? They make one set of pro lenses that are usable on both DX and FX bodies. Some photographers carry both a DX and FX body on shoots. Having to carry a separate set of pro lenses for each body would be extremely cumbersome and make no sense.
        The DX lens line is meant to be less expensive for Nikon’s less expensive DX bodies for photographers that either can’t or don’t want to invest more money in DSLR gear. There is no rational reason for Nikon to make a pro lens line only for DX bodies!

        • DX lenses would be much smaller, and APS-C is enough for most situations. This may not matter to you, but it does to all the “leakers” Thom Hogan talks about. You can include me in their numbers by the way, and I’ve been shooting Nikon all my career. Bought an x100t recently, and when the X-Pro2 materializes, bye bye Nikon. Reason? Lenses.

          • HF

            Only if you sacrifice DOF. As soon as you try to incorporate equivalence they get almost as large, too (see weight and size of the Fuji 56/1.2, for example).

            • I took DoF into consideration. Not sure about Canon, but the G type Nikkor primes needs to be stopped down to get acceptable sharpness (and reduce LOCA for some lenses). So I use both the 50 and 85mm lenses from F/2.4+ Some people stop down even more.

              The lens on my Fuji X100T is as sharp at F/2 as the Nikkors at F/2.8. Both sharpen up more as you stop down. I shot the 56mm F/1.2 wide open (but could only check photos on the back of the camera, it wasn’t my camera) – and again, it’s very sharp wide open. Based on reviews I’ve seen, Fuji’s lenses are more optimized for wide open sharpness than Nikkors. So in practice, DoF equivalence is there for many XF lenses at their current size.

            • HF

              I was in the position to directly compare the 56/1.2 and 85/1.8 (had both, but sold the Fuji as I didn’t like the control layout and handling). My 85/1.8g is very sharp wide open already (fine tuning is very important). May wife shoots a lot of portraits and it’s incredible sharp with no need to stop down (D610 and D810). I found no advantage of using the more expensive 56/1.2, as when viewed at the same size (16MP) the Nikon was better in my opinion. Fujis lens is increasing in sharpness when stopping down, too, by the way, as are most lenses (http://www.lenstip.com/420.4-Lens_review-Fujifilm_Fujinon_XF_56_mm_f_1.2_R_Image_resolution.html). And since we have a crop sensor, the lp/mm need to be 1.5 times higher to reach the same lp/ph. Fuji 56mm is a very good lens, but the 85/1.8g is exceptional for the given price on FF in my opinion. The 50mm is in an other ballpark. It clearly is weaker especially in the corners. Going to 2.2 helps a lot (and then we are about equal in terms of DOF to the 35/1.4 of Fuji for example). But look at its price and size. Doesn’t matter that it’s a full frame lens, still very portable.

            • neversink

              I get acceptable sharpness in my 85 at f/1.4 — The sharpness is acceptable. It’s just a narrow field of sharpness. So, if you are shooting wide open with that lens, you will have a narrow plane that is sharp, unless you are at “infinity” and shooting a subject far enough away where everything behind will be in focus.

          • Jeff Hunter

            The vast majority of DX buyers do not want to spend a lot on DSLR gear, therefore, pro grade DX lenses would probably sell so little that Nikon would have to charge more (than they do for their pro DX / FX lenses) just to cover expenses. You DX pro lens guys baffle me!

          • JJ168

            How much lighter your pro fuji f1.4 lenses will be compare to the nikon G 1.8 lenses? I bet the 1.8 primes +d750 set up will still provide better pictures, shalower DOF, maybe cheaper too while not much heavier…

            • You can bet all you want, but I can tell you this: Fuji’s 16 megapixels are not in the same ballpark as the d7000’s 16 megapixels for instance. I’ve shot the d7000, my workhorse camera is the d800, and my newest toy is the X100T. I’ve been shooting the d800 for the past two years. Check my portfolio here: http://molinari-photo.500px.com/portraits

              Yes, the d800 outresolves the x100t, but even though I’ve read about Fuji’s sharpness in most reviews, I was still floored by this little cam’s performance. Not to mention its unique capabilities (sync like an MF cam, for instance). So since I got it a month ago, I’ve been trying out the X-T1 (borrowing from a friend) and some Fuji lenses, and it is considerably smaller than any Nikon setup (same FoV, comparable DoF at optimal apertures on both systems). And it’s not just the camera+lens size, it’s smaller accessories (smaller tripod, smaller bag, etc.).

              If Nikon had half the lenses for APS-C that Fuji has, at a comparable price, and a DF like body on a horizon (not much bigger than an X-Pro), I’d prefer to stay with Nikon. But there’s nothing on the horizon, we don’t even know if Nikon’s going to come up with a new mount for APS-C mirrorless or not.

    • Tam

      my clas.mate’s ex-wife makes $67 /hour on the internet . She has been fired from work for 9 months but last month her pay check was $14079 just working on the internet for a few hours. go to this website;.R­ead Here.

    • ZoetMB

      Joe McNally would not be the guy begging for a DX camera. Better luck with the next joke.

    • Luis F. Vidal

      Next tag line will be “I crop my FX shots”.

      With all these FX promo I am more convinced than I ever was that Nikon will be pushing FX more aggressively than before. And if they lower the lens prices too I’m totally cool with that…

    • catinhat

      Love it, br0xi 😉

    • waterengineer

      Hilarious. But, not really. Thanks for the morning chuckle. You owe me a keyboard because I spilled coffee on it laughing at the post.

      • br0xibear

        Sometimes it can all get a bit too serious and hyper critical on forums/blogs. It’s good to take a step back and laugh…and to think about things, especially in light of what just happened in Paris.
        Strange days indeed.

    • neonspark

      don’t worry, the D400 will have a leg up on the 7DII since nikon knows exactly what to produce. it will be worth the wait.

  • Looks like “I AM…” is gone. Wonder what the new tag line is for 2015.

    • New tag line is “I WAS”

  • doge

    Are there any photos of their DX or CX areas? Most of these shots look like they’re pushing FX really hard. I’m curious to see how much effort went into their displays for their other products.

    • Andrew

      I think the year would be 2016. If Nikon comes out with the D400 later this year after releasing the D7200, then CES 2015 will display DX cameras. That may also be the year CX cameras will be showcased if we see a major upgrade this year.

  • Ian Lindo

    “Experience the full frame advantage”.

    Yup. Already confirms what others have said about Nikon focusing much more heavily on its FX format over DX.

    • ZoetMB

      And yet the camera they released at the show is the DX 5500. You always market the high end in order to make consumers think that that same quality appears in the low end. Even back in the film days, the marketing strategy was something like, “use the brand that the pros use” targeted to people who would never buy a Nikon F, but would buy a Nikkormat or the later equivalents.

      • Captain Megaton

        The funny thing is you could take exactly the same photo with that Nikkormat as you could with an F2…

        • neversink

          Hey, Nikkormats were great cameras, although I preferred the F series of Nikon film bodies!

        • ZoetMB

          That’s what I loved about the film era. There were certainly some advantages to the highest-end cameras in terms of body build, robustness, shutter vibration and shooting speed (if you used them with a motor drive) but since film was the sensor, you put your money into lenses, not necessarily the body. And also that there were only four adjustments you could make: ASA, shutter speed, aperture and focus as opposed to the hundreds of settings on modern digital cameras.

    • KnightPhoto

      Still this migration to FX is a good thing for us shooters too, not just Nikon. Sure I want a D400, but not as my only camera.

      • Ian Lindo

        Agreed. I can’t speak for anyone’s shooting style other than my own, but personally, I wouldn’t trade the low light performace and overall image quality of my D810 for machine-gun FPS or a “crop factor” any day.

  • Dexx

    I find it funny how Nikon arguably the best DSLR company in the world and at least in the top 2 can’t make a decent video at CES. This is total dogshit. Yes, it’s a video in an expo center with thousands of people making noise and milling about but what it should be is an example of how Nikon products can be used to overcome these problems to create at least a “good” quality video. I mean, they have like 100 cameras set up for the 360* jump booth thing and can’t even get a second angle for their speakers??? The audio is really bad and instead of using a nice countryman headset or something equivalent they choose what looks like a big black lollipop on the speakers face. I find this embarrassing frankly. If I wasn’t in the middle setting up for a live production this weekend I would go to vegas myself and do it for free just so I didn’t have to listen to people say “Nikon sucks, even their company speakers sound and look like crap in their demos!” Really disappointed in this.

    • fjfjjj

      What makes you think Nikon made this video?

    • Neopulse

      The uploader is testcams and not NikonUSA. I don’t think this was made by them.

      • ZoetMB

        Exactly. And this may not have even been made on a DSLR – it could have been a Pad or a cell phone video, although it does look like it was made on a tripod.

        But I will give Dexx this: when I’ve attended a photo show, the sound in most of the booths on stages like this is usually horrible. In fact, it sounds better on this video than it does in front of the stage. They generally use tiny little speakers and the levels usually overdrive the amps.

        • Horshack

          I shot the video hand-held with a D750.

          • ZoetMB

            Great hand-held work for that length of time. I actually have problems shooting long segments of hand-held video with my D800 especially when using a long lens. What lens were you using? Did you use any special strap on the body?

            Were you on manual or auto-focus? When I leave my camera on auto-focus for video, the lens constantly “chatters” and even an external mic, if mounted on the camera, picks up all the noise.

            Do you realize that there’s an editing flaw in the video? Most of the McNally segment repeats.

  • Val Evans

    It seems that many people who purchase the first release of a Nikon DSLR these days often find that when the defecation excrement impinges upon the rotary oscillator, they find themselves stranded in the proverbial tributary without the necessary implements of propulsion.

    • scott800

      hehe

    • Guy With-camera

      huh?

    • captaindash

      Though seemingly axiomatic, I offer that Nikon is wont to conspicuously supplant the defecation mechanism with another mechanism modelled 10 units surpassing the former, especially when said plight is comprised primarily of a viscous liquid derived from petroleum, ‘n stuff.

  • Spy Black

    “Nikon’s 360 project – people are asked to jump or move and the cameras take a 360 pano video”

    Why is Nikon still partying like it’s 1999?…

    • PhotoLaw

      Becuase they didn’t know what else to do with all those D600 bodies. Now, now… I can’t “acutally” see if they’re D600s or not. I’m a happy Nikon customer.

      • Spy Black

        So you too are partying like it’s 1999…

    • nwcs

      Still cool, though.

    • nwcs

      Still cool, though.

  • Horshack

    FYI, if anyone is interested in the D750 shooting parameters you can see the gallery of images with EXIF at http://horshack.smugmug.com/Other/CES-2005-Nikon/46806211_cJnqj2. It was a good test of the D750 in varied lighting and shutter speed requirements – some of the photos are at very High ISO.

    • HF

      Nice. Any flare issues? Just kidding.

  • Thom Hogan

    Nobody really talking about the elephant in the room.

    Why would Nikon be spending well more than a million dollars on a trade show booth promoting FX cameras to what is effectively a consumer-focused show at a time when Nikon says they need to cut costs?

    Personally, I believe Nikon is mostly just executing on autopilot in terms of sales and marketing. “Hey, that’s what we’ve done in the past, let’s do it again. But oh, we need to change our message to our current one (buy FX).”

    The irony is that Nikon was really the only one at the show to introduce a truly consumer ILC camera (D5500). Yet their message was anti-consumer DX pretty much all throughout the booth and presentations. Nothing about their CES presence says to me that they have any real understanding of consumers when it comes to cameras. Unless, of course, you want to spend millions of dollars to market high-end options to a press/reseller audience.

    To me, Nikon’s continued presence at CES seems out of place. No Coolpix intros. No Nikon 1 intros. A lukewarm D5500 announcement. In other words, not a lot “consumer.”

    I remember when COMDEX started winding down (at least in Las Vegas). It was because the smart vendors all released that the same amount of money applied in a different way was more productive. Nikon hasn’t realized that about CES yet. They need to.

    • ZoetMB

      This is an issue with all the big trade shows that feature products for consumers but which only admit the trade. Most don’t really have a reason to exist anymore. Most of these shows were originally designed for independent retailers to come to one place and see and order the products for the year. But now that there’s so few independent retailers, the show is really primarily for the press. I’m amazed 160,000 people still show up. Who are they?

      I’ve worked in the publishing industry and Book Expo America (formerly the ABA show), although a much smaller show than CES, has the same problem. There are usually many more exhibitors on the floor now than attendees, since the number of independent booksellers in the U.S. has declined significantly since the advent of Amazon, etc.

      As for a company like Nikon, what message would they be putting out if they didn’t attend CES, even if CES might not be the best use of marketing money? Apple can get away with not being there, but can Nikon? It might make some people think they’re walking away from the business. As for the FX push in the booth, from the photos it looks to me like that’s the exact same booth and graphics they used at the PhotoPlus show in NYC in October. And I’ll still maintain that Nikon thinks (rightly or wrongly) that you push the high end to create a brand impression, then let the retailers sell the low end when the consumer realizes that the high end is a $6000 body or a $2500 lens. Even back in the film days, I don’t remember too many Nikon ads that featured the lower-end consumer cameras – they mostly featured the high-end F line systems and pushed the fact that this was a camera for pros. In the early 70s, I went to buy a Nikkormat and had sticker shock even at that level of the line.

      • HF

        Interestingly here in Germany I have the impression that Nikon increased advertisement in tv. Almost every day at prime time you see adds for D5xxx or D3xxx. Nevertheless, I think you have a point in your analysis.

      • Thom Hogan

        Well, first of all, I consider myself press. I’m saying that I wonder why Nikon is at CES, and I’m not alone in this. Talking to my other press friends, they are starting to think the same thing. So the answer to “what message would they be putting out if they didn’t attend CES” is simple: if Nikon managed the change by managing the press, the answer is “a good one.”

        As I note, they could have spent all that money in a different way. Since we’re talking DSLRs at the booth, I’ll bet they spent the equivalent of at least 30 cents and maybe as much as 50 cents FOR EVERY DSLR BUYER they’ll attract this year. On one trade show not attended by very many of those buyers.

        Large companies become bureaucracies that perpetuate what they’ve done in the past far beyond when it is useful. My preference in Silicon Valley was always to “sunshine” every decision that represents six figures or more in my budget EVERY YEAR. It’s what led my companies to try cutting edge marketing ideas instead of perpetuating old ones.

        Yes, the booth and graphics that Nikon is using is essentially making the rounds (PhotoPlus, CES, Photokina). I actually wasn’t considering the cost of designing and building a booth in my estimate, only that of shipping it to the next trade show and installing it. But once you buy that booth and lock into the graphics/presentation, you get into that perpetuation game. These days, things turn on a dime due to the Internet, so I’d say there is a huge risk in putting large sums into using the same message over and over.

        You’re correct about the old days. Nikon’s brand was built and reinforced on the highest end camera pairs (e.g. F4/N90s, F5/F100, D1/D100, etc.). It’s good for them to continue in that vein, but their current droop in consumer products once again mirrors the same problem they had at least three times previously. They overextend into consumer cameras, get clobbered by something, regroup at the high end, and try again.

        I guess they’d say that this works for them. After all, they’re a bigger company today than they were. But my sense is that Nikon is facing severe retraction if they can’t figure out how to fix the more consumer side of their offerings. High end retrenchment will not save them this time. Which makes this year’s CES appearance all the more questionable. If they’re at CES with this big a presence again next year, they’d better have a real consumer answer for the future.

        • ZoetMB

          Regardless of whether they attend CES or not, they need a real consumer answer for the future and that has to be more than the next minor iterative equivalent of the 5300 to the 5500 or the next iteration of the 3300 (3500?).

          But even Apple hasn’t done anything to change the game in a long time (except possibly for the upcoming watch). The phones, pads and laptops have all been iterative releases (some even taking steps backwards) for quite some time now.

          Apple was at first criticized for abandoning MacWorld, but they were able to use the excuse that trade shows were unnecessary once they had the Apple retail stores. What does Nikon have? I still maintain that if you go to CES (or any of the major photo shows) and see Canon, Sony and Olympus with large booths and no Nikon, that’s going to send a message that “handling of the press” is not really going to be able to overcome (and which Nikon doesn’t do a good job of anyway). Didn’t Sony not go to CES one year (but returned the next)?

          I actually think it’s the opposite of what you suggested: if Nikon came out with something mind-blowing for the consumer market, they wouldn’t need CES to market it. They almost need CES more when they don’t have anything significant new to show.

          When I wrote that Nikon was using the same booth, it wasn’t about booth costs, but about by using the same booth and graphics, they were automatically using the same marketing campaign, which for the photo show, was geared towards the higher end, even though sections of the booth were dedicated to Coolpix and Nikon1, etc.

          • Thom Hogan

            High tech goes in cycles: experiment to find a new market, iterate to exploit the market, disrupt to renew the market. Smartphones are in the iterate stage, cameras should be at the disrupt stage yet the makers are still iterating.

            Trade shows put hidden cycles into play, amongst other things. Apple’s real reason to get out of Macworld was to decide their own schedules, though then they went and established their own yearly cycles (annual dev conference and fall product renewal). That the major show for them was in January was also a problem. Just doesn’t correspond to to consumer buying cycles well.

            But my point remains the same: the million+ Nikon spent could have bought them a lot of attention of the actual consumer.

            As for consumer products, if Nikon really wants to continue to play in the true consumer arena–and again, I believe that they’re committed to that now–we need to see something that actually ignites interest. I don’t care if it’s a Coolpix, a Nikon 1, or a low-end DX camera (mirrorless or DSLR). To their credit they tried with the Nikon 1. But they also failed in actually dialing that in (price, feature set, etc.). So they got the initial buzz of “newness” followed by the inevitable backlash of reality.

            The next year is going to be a tough one for Nikon. They have to deliver a D5, add megapixels, intro a prosumer DX of some sort, fight off mirrorless in the core prosumer area they used to dominate, fix the Nikon 1, reinvent the Coolpix, and more. Failure at any one of those things will almost certainly cause them to contract. Indeed, they could succeed at all those things and still face contraction if they can’t amp things up.

            • Andrew

              You are laying out quite clearly the issues Nikon has to deal with, with respect to their various product offerings. The issue is essentially how to push their products forward to make each product relevant. I feel that the D750 and D810 have hit the mark with respect to the AF system’s low light performance and competent video performance. The AF systems have become so good in those cameras that one can confidently buy them and not be concerned what Nikon comes out with next. This is good and bad. These cameras can generate a lot of sales for Nikon but photographers will hold on to them longer. But in contrast, D610 and even the D800 reminded me of the D80 which Nikon released, but was soon supplanted by the venerable D90. And it did not help that the D90 had video which the D80 lacked. Once a competent product is released, it may not have to be replaced by consumers for a long time to come.

              As for the Nikon 1, those cameras must have involved significant investments that needed to be recouped. So they were priced substantially higher than what the competition was offering. And Nikon did not sell them in large enough numbers to lower their price except when it was time to refresh the product line. I see the early Nikon 1 as a technology play that Nikon was trying to perfect and which they will eventually get right. Whether 2015 is the year to accomplish that feat is quite questionable. I am not holding my breath on the Nikon 1 with its smaller CX sensor, but I think Nikon will do something quite notable with the COOLPIX A this year, but they need to give it a body design that is more enticing like the Nikon 1 V3. Consumers do not just want functional things, they want beautiful things; and that is an area where Nikon needs to be consistent. And in particular, they should not design a camera that can easily slip out of the hands.

              I think Nikon’s biggest sellers will be the D3500 and D7200. Both will be at a price point that the general public and prosumers respectively can afford. The D3500 will simply take perfect pictures without much know-how (or photographic knowledge), and the D7200 will inherit the awesome body of the D750, its tilting LCD screen, AF system, and video performance. Maybe these are the two cameras Nikon needs to increase their fortune.

            • Thom Hogan

              Nikon’s push to FX is definitely going to provoke a lot of what I call Last Camera Syndrome. They are basically caught in the properly rock/hard place connundrum. If they’re successful at moving their top customers to FX, those customers will likely upgrade less often. The long term net win is zero, possibly negative.

              Consumer electronics–as opposed to enthusiast cameras–is a pricing/story game. What’s the story and how low is the price? The Nikon 1 was a CE product. Nikon told contradictory stories from day one: less than 300 parts! more than DSLR price! Consumers don’t care how much money you spent on R&D (though I think Nikon didn’t spend all that much on the Nikon 1 in terms of cash; it was more the internal resources they shifted). The consumer wants to buy into the story, and at a real consumer price. Nikon gave the market neither. Funny thing is, when they fire-saled the product to the price points it should have been at, they sold enough to distort the mirrorless market shares. Go figure.

              Nikon keeps thinking they’re a consumer company. They’ve tried four times by my count, and ultimately failed all four times. That’s partly because they’re narrow in focus. The only CE product they have are low-end cameras. Sure, they can buy shelf space at Big Boxes, but they have to amortize that over a single product line, cameras. When you look at the true CE companies, look at how broad their product lines are.

              I’m not sure there is a D3500. My sources last year told me that Nikon wanted to replace the D3xxx line (or at least supplement the current one) with something lower that was mirrorless. Call it the D2000.

              However, the big stall in DSLR sales is right in the D3xxx to D5xxx pocket. You could see that almost 18 months ago when the multiple generations started filling the inventory space simultaneously: the inventory turns on the low end DSLRs took a nose dive. A perfect D3500 or Rebel 7Ti isn’t going to change that, I think.

              I’ll say it again: the only ways Nikon returns to growth in the Imaging Group is via price increases and total disruption of the camera market with something that’s not incremental, but makes EVERYONE want to replace their DSLRs. That needs to be supplemented with products that serve as entries to their high end (e.g. Coolpix that are also rethought).

  • br0xibear

    Nikon 300mm F4 – Hands on from Matt Granger…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYe3ht8-oJs

  • Off Message

    Were Nikon really showing a 600VR fitted with a 3rd party foot in their booth??

    (See Image 13.)

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