New Nikon D5500 DSLR camera with touch screen coming in early 2015

Nikon-D5500-camera-logo
Nikon will announce a new Nikon D5500 DSLR camera in January, 2015. For now I can only confirm that the new model will have an APS-C sensor and touch screen LCD screen. I am not sure why Nikon decided to skip the D5400 iteration. I believe the D5500 is not going to be the only DX DSLR camera that will be released in early 2015 - a D7100 replacement is also expected and it will most likely be called D7200 (no D9300 updates for now).

I think the official Nikon D5500 announcement will be in early January (probably during or shortly after the CES show in Las Vegas), the D7200 could be announced later (maybe for the CP+ show in February in Japan).

Since the Nikon D5200 is already listed as discontinued, expect the prices of the D5200 and D5300 to drop even further in the upcoming weeks before the official announcement.

If anyone has inside information on the upcoming Nikon products, you can contact me anonymously here.

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  • Wade Marks

    Finally, a touchscreen from Nikon. I know some downplay this feature, but once you’ve used it on a camera you realize how useful it can be.

    Also, you have entire generations being trained to use and expect a touchscreen from their smartphones and tablets. Not wise to ignore this trend.

    It may take a few years, but I believe a time will come when all cameras have a touchscreen. Now some will say no way will this happen, but keep in mind many predicted that video would not become standard in dslr’s, that even AF or digital would not catch on.

    A touchscreen is the UI of the present and the future. Steve Jobs ensured that when he introduced the iPhone.

    • manhattanboy

      Nikon already has a touch screen UI for the 1v3 and 1j4. It works pretty well. Love the touch to focus and shoot. You just touch the face in the screen and the pix are taken

      • KnightPhoto

        Yes that touch to focus and take picture is a handy option.

        I’d like to try it for video too, too adjust where to focus while filming. Haven’t tried that yet, hope it works!

      • jvm156

        but on a DSLR that would require using live-view…which still sadly sucks

      • fjfjjj

        Also works great with Topaz Glow.

    • fred

      Maybe there will be a ‘Start’ button in the bottom left-hand corner? 😉

      • RMJ

        There won’t be. Instead the screen is filled with useless colorful tiles.

    • “A touchscreen is the UI of the present and the future”. Yeah, in Utah maybe, not up here, where it’s -20 in the winter. Have you ever tried using a touchscreen in this temperature? From the photographer’s perspective, levers that are easy to grasp, buttons that are easy to feel, and pads that are easy to locate are the future, not some hipstery touchscreen.

      • Wade Marks

        Fair point about cold weather. However there are still manual controls on touchscreen cameras. And it seems to me that touchscreen smartphones and tablets still are purchased and used allot in cold weather climates.

        • If everything is as before and the touchscreen is only an option (which can be turned off; I don’t want to accidentally select stuff), then fine – although I still dislike the idea that I’d pay more for something I wouldn’t use.

          EDIT: about smartphones. Yeah, they are sold and used. Not in public, if you don’t wanna lose your fingers 😛

          • captaindash

            You always pay for something you wouldn’t use. I hear you that it ain’t fun, but it’s already happening with almost every piece of electronics you’ve ever owned or ever will own. tYou don’t use every button on your tv remote for damn sure. I’m going to go out on a limb and guess you don’t use every single feature on every single camera you’ve ever bought. Even software related features took R&D and go into the cost of the product. As for the smartphones, at least now they have the gloves with the finger tips you can use your phone with. Milwaukee even has a marker where one end is a conductive stylus which I use to work my iPhone on construction sites in ungodly Canadian winter temperatures.

          • MyrddinWilt

            You get gloves with a built in touch screen stylus. They have been widely available for years.

            Or you move away from the parts of the US where you can see Russia from your kitchen window.

        • Thom Hogan

          Not all touchscreen cameras. The Leica T, for example, has things that can only be done via the touchscreen, so it most decidedly is not a glove friendly camera.

          But more to the point: if your eye is at the viewfinder, you can’t really use a touchscreen. Thus, a touchscreen becomes a tripod or smartphone shooting style type of option. And about that tripod shooting with touchscreen. Of course the D5500 won’t have a lever to close the eyepiece. If you’re going to design a camera to be used without the eye at the viewfinder, supplying a plastic widget that’s not simple to use (or even keep track of) is another of those design dissonances that I hate.

          • Aeroengineer

            Good call. Unfortunately, a lot of product planning involves comparing your feature list to the other guys. Go through a few generations, and you end up with an incoherent archipelago of features, many of which will never be used by the targeted users.

          • neonspark

            I hate to be cliche, but this is a soccer mom camera. she will neither shoot with a tripod nor even know why the eyepiece shutter is for. As such, while yes, it seems silly to omit the feature to save a few yen, I don’t see sales of this camera being any worse or better because of it.
            So if I put you in charge of the bill of materials for this camera and I told you part XYZ is more expensive, not required, not likely to matter sales wise it would be your job to keep it out.

            • Thom Hogan

              And then when all her images come out badly because of the light leak into the meter, she’ll think that she’ll never buy Nikon again ;~).

              Nobody said this stuff is easy. It’s a giant game of getting balances right. Technically, with the meter in its current position, Nikon should be using eye detection and automatically closing back side if nothing’s there to block that light.

            • Riley Escobar

              Why would a meter light leak come into play? Can’t shoot unless you’re looking through the viewfinder or using Live View, in which case the mirror is up so no viewfinder light leak.

              I’ve seen a lot of “soccer moms” shoot DSLRs using the rear LCD. Boggles the mind…

            • Thom Hogan

              Two problems:

              (1) If you’re not in live view, the meter sees the light from behind the camera as well as in front.
              (2) If you are in live view, you’ll discover that the the mirror is generally not perfect in blocking light from the mirror box. Virtually all of the Nikon bodies have some leakage. I discovered this by accident, and now test it on every new camera.

            • El Aura

              If you are meticulous enough to use a tripod, switching to manual mode before you move your eye away from the viewfinder wouldn’t seem like much of an extra effort.

            • Thom Hogan

              No, it’s not. And many of us just shoot in Manual exposure mode in the first place.

              But the problem for most people with sophisticated cameras is this: they’re already dealing with dozens, maybe hundreds of decision points and things to remember. Adding another thing you have to remember to do becomes one of those 100+1 > 101 types of things. The more things you add to someone’s shooting workflow, the more it slows them down and makes them likely to make a mistake. It’s the reason why people wanted automatic exposure, automatic focus, automatic ISO, and a host of other automatic things, after all.

            • El Aura

              Closing the viewfinder blind is also ‘another’ step to remember. The real solution is closing it automatically via an eye-sensor.
              Admittedly, switching to manual mode from A mode (maybe the most common scenario) is two steps (switching to M mode and then changing the shutter speed to match).

            • Tim

              It’s also ironic how some of these supposed automations become pains in their own right.
              Over on the NEX-7, the toggling between MF/AF is so convoluted (button beside right eyeball, one of the 4-way rocker buttons to zoom+check, assorted menus, and the whole business of having to remember to keep the shutter button halfway down whilst refocussing manually which is just unusable), I actively prefer shooting olde manual M42 primes instead, where at least tracking focussing is the *only* aggravation.

            • Carleton Foxx

              And what the hell is wrong with being a soccer mom. You say that like it’s a bad thing. Do I need to remind you people that it is in our best interests to respect the needs and use cases for all photographers, not just the very narrow group to which participants in this forum belong?

          • Wade Marks

            The Leica T is rather unique in the market for now, just like most Leica products. And yes that is almost purely touchscreen driven. But other touchscreen cameras have kept their more manual controls.

            Your points are valid. However, where a touchscreen becomes handy IMHO is in the setup of the camera, and in playback mode, where you can pinch to zoom and such. Of course when you are putting your eye to the VF you won’t use a touchscreen.

            But another point to think about: we all know that people will buy technology when it is simpler to use, and indeed when it just seems simpler to use.

            Look at the interfaces of dslr’s these days. They are rather intimidating to the average person. If Canon, NIkon, etc want to attract more users, they can’t scare them away with the complexity of their menu systems, dials, buttons, etc.

            A touchscreen makes a camera seem more usable to a lot of people. The touchscreen is associated with ease of use and elegance to most people these days, and this will only intensify as time goes by and we have the generations raised on touchscreens come to maturity and purchasing power.

            In a way Leica is on to something, and if they can develop and refine their concept they will win big with it.

            My point isn’t that a touchscreen replace all the conventional controls, but that it be an addition to that option. I bet a lot of people will respond favorably to a touchscreen.

            • Thom Hogan

              See my Nikon V3 review. I pointed out how handy the touchscreen is for changing settings, setup, etc. It does solve the 50-item menu problem a little faster.

              The problem touchscreens have for controlling a camera is simple: complexity and interactions. I’m not sure they’re the right choice, just as I’m not sure it would be the right choice for a jet cockpit.

              Yes, it’s true that that true consumers would find the touchscreen approach “simpler”, in that they’re now conditioned to using them on phones, tablets, and computers (and maybe a few cars, too). So it seems familiar. Leica did a reasonably good job of getting the mix of what’s available at the top level right in their touchscreen UI, as I noted in my review. Enough so that even I found that I was mostly paying attention to my shooting, and not to menu options/setup/etc. So there’s certainly a future there at the consumer level.

              The question is whether there will be a consumer camera purchaser soon.

          • kotozafy

            Even with current NON-touch screen cameras, you can’t really access your rear LCD menu with your eye on the viewfinder. And during live view mode I don’t think there is much interest to keep your eye on the viewfinder either. Considering that, the problem of viewfinder cap is not specific to touch screen cameras. I guess touch screen functions will essentially be targetted to navigate trough the rear LCD menu and for live view mode. In my opinion, it will bring real confort of use (By the way those rear buttons are also difficult to use when you wear winter gloves).

          • kotozafy

            Even with current NON-touch screen cameras, you can’t really access your rear LCD menu with your eye on the viewfinder. And during live view mode I don’t think there is much interest to keep your eye on the viewfinder either. Considering that, the problem of viewfinder cap is not specific to touch screen cameras. I guess touch screen functions will essentially be targetted to navigate trough the rear LCD menu and for live view mode. In my opinion, it will bring real confort of use (By the way those rear buttons are also difficult to use when you wear winter gloves).

      • MyrddinWilt

        What I want a touch screen for is configuring the camera. Nikons controls for setting up flash guns, exposure bracketing etc. are hardly intuitive.

        This isn’t something I want to be doing in the field. There I want a point and click type interface. So I would be very happy if I could set up a bunch of presets and give them meaningful names like ‘HDR-Outdoor’, ‘Wrap Flash’, etc and then call them up by twisting the command dial.

        • Tim

          Absolutely.

          The closest I’ve ever come to that is the Lumix GH2 with 3 custom modes that remembered just the right things:

          C1 = A-priority, square, b&w (normal), no bracketing

          C2 = A-priority f/8, auto ISO, 3:2 b&w (more contrasty), bracketing 3 shots +/-1EV when enabled

          C3 = M-mode, 3:2, ISO 160, pseudo-slide-film, default shutter speed of around 1s, bracketing 5 shots +/-1EV when enabled

          Or as I liked to think of them: hipster, jobbing and seascape.

          That still sets the bar for ergonomics IMHO – Nikon DSLRs in particular seem to cater for calloused control-wheel fetishists.

      • “Have you ever tried using a touchscreen in this temperature?” – Have a look into a product called Nanotips. iI’s a startup; you paint a compound onto the tips of your gloves to make them touch sensitive.

    • zorwick

      Yes, the trend is going that way, but seriously, could you imagine it? D899 with touchscreen? :))) However it could happen. I would use a touch screen in live view to select where to focus. That would be very useful. For menus and settings big NO. I am old fashioned, like to press, click, turn buttons and knobs. 🙂 Even if its an illusion, I like to feel the control of an euipment.

      • KnightPhoto

        The touch screen on the V3 doesn’t prevent you from accessing things in the same old way – with buttons and knobs. And you can turn the touch function right off if that is what you want.

        • MyrddinWilt

          Nikon will almost certainly provide an interface that is as good or better. The D5xxx is an important camera for them, it is one of their two high margin/high volume cameras. Trialing the interface on the V3 makes a lot of sense.

      • Wade Marks

        The wonderful thing about adding a touchscreen is that it doesn’t have to eliminate the other more traditional controls. Most cameras that have a touchscreen still have the manual controls. Look at the Olympus OMD line and the Canon 70D.

        And one can always turn the touchscreen off. Adding a touchscreen simply gives the user more options. But once you get used to a touchscreen you never want to go back.

        • captaindash

          You’ve hit the nail on the head. It doesn’t “have” to. Too often companies eliminate certain functions and call it an upgrade. If it’s optional, then I’m all for trying anything out. If you have no choice, I’d be pissed because where I live it can get brutally cold. If it can be used in addition to the physical controls I’d be all over it. That’s more control sans menus.

          • Piotr Kosewski

            Exactly.
            There was a time when cameras didn’t have a screen at all (seriously ;)). Every function had to be available on the body. Mode, shutter speed, aperture, flash mode and so on.

            Because of the screens cameras got less and less controls. It becomes really serious with small MILC. NO custom buttons. NO dials!
            It’s the same with lenses.
            As a result to change pretty much anything you’ll have to go through few levels of menu…
            And it’s a similar story with lenses. Many of them lack AF/MF switch…

            And now we have touch screens. Of course it’s hard to imagine Canon decides to remove ISO button from 1D, because you can do that via touch interface. But look at cheaper cameras. There are already compacts with only 2 buttons: power and shutter release. :/

    • HD10

      Likely a good time for Nikon to launch an EVF/mirrorless/touchscreen answer to Sony, Fuji, Olympus and Panasonic.

      Using the same sensor used in the Sony A6000/A5100, this camera will have very good image quality, will have more AF points with better coverage, with PDAF likely as fast as the current D7100, with a viewfinder similar in magnification to an FX viewfinder and thus much bigger than any current DX cameras.

      It will be better than what the Sony and Fuji APS-C mirrorless can offer as it will combine in one body the integrated EVF of the Sony A6000 / Fuji XT-1 and the touchscreen LCD of the A5100.

      By retaining the F-mount, having enough lens will not be an issue. A dSLR sized body means ergonomics will likely not be a pinched as many mirrorless cameras on the market.

      The only item I hoped Nikon will add to the above will be support for peaking function to make manual focusing easy.

      Finally, Nikon will have a camera that will cost less to make than any of its current dSLRs. The Nikon D5300 at $700 and the Nikon D7100 at $900 simply cannot complete against the $350 Sony A5100 and the $450 Sony A6000. Nikon will always price any new camera as high as it think the market will bear but it will have more leeway to lower the price when needed due to the lower cost of making mirrorless cameras.

      • nzswedespeed

        I completely agree. I don’t know why canikon haven’t released one if their dslr’s with an evf instead of the mirror. This would be a great way for them to see how the market takes to mirror less and would not risk their cash cow of the dslr. Would also mean the huge number of f mount lenses would work.

        • Antonio

          Just because “dslr’s with an evf instead of the mirror” will not be DSLR’s anymore…
          That doesn’t mean they will not show a large sensor’s different kind of camera some time in the future, and we can’t forget Nikon 1 is already a mirrorless system even if not the one most Nikon’s customers were not looking for.

          • nzswedespeed

            Yeah I am well aware that with an evf it is no longer a single reflex mirror camera….cheers for spotting the obvious. I think its easier to say it that way as people can understand what I mean. Yes the nikon 1 is there, but I’m personally am looking for a apsc or ff mirror less (I really enjoy the benefits of an evf).

            • Andrew

              “Cheers for spotting the obvious”? Not a friendly way to communicate!

            • nzswedespeed

              Yeah you’re right. Apologies Antonio I came off a bit harsh there. Sometimes on these sites it comes across as people trying to bring your point if views down with trivial points.

            • Andrew

              You’re a gentleman, thanks!

            • Antonio

              No problem at all.
              And to clarify, the way I expressed myself was not meant to point out what you said but as a starting point to focus on the present attitude of Nikon towards the move to a complement or another alternative to the DSLR line other than the 1 series.

      • preston

        Yes, the mirrorless cameras cost Nikon much less to make. This didn’t stop them from pricing the 1 series cameras the same as their dslrs, despite them having smaller sensors and significantly less parts (the J1
        had 183 parts while the entry level dslr had around 1000).

        Pentax already tried making a mirrorless body with the same lens mount as their dslr line and it completely bombed. Most people didn’t care for the aesthetics of the body, but nearly all reviewers agreed that the point of making it mirrorless was to allow smaller bodies and lenses, so keeping the same lens mount defeated that purpose.

        • HD10

          Pentax’s mirrorless bombed for several reasons. One of this is that AF was glacially slow. The Pentax mirrorless used CDAF to focus AF lenses designed for PDAF operation. Nikon’s using the Sony sensor used in the A6000/A5100 means that it will have very fast PDAF well matched to lenses designed for PDAF operation. Another reason is that Pentax did not incorporate an EVF into its mirrorless camera.

          Mirrorless does not always mean smaller bodies and lenses. While mirrorless can achieve that to some extent, there are ergonomic limitations to making something too small to be comfortable to use. It is easier to design a camera body to be bigger to fit the hand than to evolve the hand to fit a small camera. Moreover, one just needs to look at the Fuji X-mount lenses to understand that as the focal length of the lens increases, so does lens size. Not surprisingly, those who use telephoto zoom lenses prefer the bigger body or uses an optional grip/battery pack to better hold the camera with such lenses.

          Nikon has every reason to use the F-mount. To do otherwise will mean giving up one of its biggest advantage over the mirrorless now available in the market. Nikon risks creating doubt, fear and uncertainty if it releases a new lens mount for DX and FX cameras. It will take too long for Nikon to make new lenses for any new mount. Moreover, even if Nikon releases a new lens mount despite all the disadvantages these entail, Nikon will need to make an adapter to allow the use of F-mount lenses. At the moment, it simply does not make sense for Nikon to go this route.

          • preston

            Regarding the point about the K-01 not having an EVF – this would have made it completely useless to me as well if I was looking to upgrade an aging Pentax body, but the funny thing is that the younger generation is so used to taking photos on smartphones that they often PREFER to compose and shoot on the back LCD with the camera at arms length. I know 3 people total that own mirrorless cameras with integrated EVFs (2 have Oly E-M10’s and 1 has a Fuji X-T1) and none of them ever use the EVF!

            I still completely disagree with your opinion that Nikon should use the F-mount for a mirrorless camera. You are then locking people into getting a traditional dslr sized camera. At least if it was a new mount there would be the possibility of making it the size of a Sony A7, which tons of people would prefer. Note I am not asking for a camera that is too small for an adult to comfortably grip. People would be fine with a slow rollout of lenses assuming there were 3 or so small and sharp f/2 or f/2.8 primes that pair well with the size of the body. They would also have to have a high quality, non feature-crippling (like reducing the # of usable AF points) lens adapter like their FT-1 for this new system. They need to kill the Nikon 1 system and the DX slr bodies already in favor of a 1.5x crop (DX) mirrorless system!

            • Andrew

              What you are saying here is contrary to Nikon’s historic behavior, their business strategy, and what a lot of photographers have come to benefit from which is backwards compatibility with their SLR camera lens. Creating a new lens mount and abandoning the Nikon 1 system and DX Cameras and corresponding lens mount for Mirrorless cameras makes no sense.

            • HD10

              I currently use several cameras with different sensor sizes, e.g., Nikon FX and DX, as well as Sony NEXs and Olympus/Panasonic m4/3. In terms of reaching a meaningful reduction in size and weight to a camera system, while a more compact and lighter body will help, what will make an even bigger impact in terms of size and weight reduction is the size of the lens. To reduce lens size and weight to a significant degree, it is necessary to reduce the size of the sensor with which the lens is used with.

              The best way to appreciate a meaningful reduction in size and weight of a camera system (whether dSLR or mirrorless) is to see how big and heavy the camera body and lens will be utilizing a zoom lens which has a 35mm FOV of 24-70mm and 70-200mm and a constant aperture of f/2.8. Using these two zoom lens as a benchmark, one will quickly appreciate that while there is some size and weight reduction in camera body and lens going from full frame (1.0x crop) to APS-C (1.5x crop whether dSLR or mirrorless), it is only really in the m4/3 (2.0x crop) that the lens size is reduced to a very compact size.

              This minimal reduction in size and weight in camera body and lens when using APS-C sized sensor is the reason why it would be ill-advised for Nikon to make a new mount for any mirrorless camera that it may release. The minimal size and weight reduction in terms of camera body and lens if Nikon makes a mirrorless camera with a new mount compared to the DX dSLR and lenses militates against Nikon releasing its mirrorless FX and DX with a new lens mount.

              Nikon has actually already taken the right direction to achieve a truly meaningful reduction in size and weight of the camera body but more importantly in the lens when it released the CX system. The CX system can achieve even more dramatic reduction in lens size and weight than is possible with the m4/3 system.

              That Nikon has very poorly marketed and priced the CX system in terms of its camera body design (less so on lenses) does not detract from the fact that Nikon is on the right track with its compact and light mirrorless approach as far as lens mount is concerned.

            • Uno Engborg

              Nikon D3300 weights less than Sony A7II and it also have slightly smaller width. The main difference is the height. I guess Nikon could fix less height that too if they dropped the mirror for an EVF. The depth of the camera can’t be much smaller as this will make the grip too small. Just compare the old Sony A7 to the new A7II that is much more comfortable to hold. We see more and more decently sized mirrorless cameras. Look at the Fujifilm X-T1, the Samsung NX1, and the Sony A7II. So I can’t see why it should be so impossible to make a DSLR form facter mirrorless camera with F-mount. It’s almost as if camera manufacturers have realized the the evolution of smaller hands among their customers is a slow process

          • Nikon needs to make a mirrorless apsc WITHOUT the F mount. Why:
            1) A new mirrorless mount will require users to purchase new lenses for the new mount, meaning Nikon would be able to sell new lenses to a new generation of users now and well into the future. This is their business model. This equals money. This is good for a company seeing their profits dwindle in the face of changing times.
            2) a simple flange distance adapter, a-la FT1, would allow for full compatibility with the F mount units we all have
            3) because of the new short flange distance in the mirror less setup, adapters for other brands can be easily fashioned. Old leica glass becomes usable.

            Somebody explain why a new mirror less mount and APSC mirror less is a bad move for Nikon. Why has the company not done this yet? What sort of incompetence is running the show there?

            • Piotr Kosewski

              Actually this is NOT their business model. 🙂
              Nikon usually decides to retain backward compatibility. This has slowed down development of their products few times in the past.

              The most obvious example is the AF motor in bodies. Do you now how many FX AF lenses without an appropriate AF-S replacement are still manufactured?
              I counted 4:
              105/2 DC, 135/2 DC, 180/2.8 and 200/4.
              Arguably, these are some of the best lenses they’ve ever made. But they spent millions of dollars for AF motors in DSLR bodies. I guess with that kind of money they could afford updating 4 lenses. 🙂

            • dclivejazz

              Nikon’s practice of having auto-focus motors in the body makes it possible for people to use older lenses with new bodies. It’s not just for the currently produced lenses without auto-focus motors. Granted, it reflects an emphasis on backwards compatibility, but it’s reasonable for that purpose.

            • HD10

              If the purpose of releasing a mirrorless camera is to achieve a significant reduction in size and weight, the simplest reason why it does not make sense for Nikon to release its mirrorless camera (whether FX or DX) with a new lens mount is that except for a few primes within a specific focal length range (i.e., 24mm, 35mm, and 50mm), the reduction in size and weight between the mirrorless FX and DX body and lenses will be minimal.

              Using a mirrorless camera has benefits of its own that goes beyond being just smaller and lighter. While the OVF of a dSLR has its advantages for some uses, the mere fact that there is no need to flip up a mirror when using a mirrorless camera is in itself already a significant benefit. Couple this with an electronic first curtain and one would have made significant gains in getting better quality photos. This advantage will be even more clear when the mirrorless cameras start utilizing sensors with a global shutter. The fact that one can previsualize in the EVF the effects of one’s camera settings is still another benefit. The ability to review a shot just taken using the EVF and not the rear LCD screen when shooting outdoors in very brightly lit conditions is still another benefit.

              To summarize, the benefits of a mirrorless are not limited to the camera and lenses being smaller and lighter. If no significant size and weight reduction can be achieve in releasing a mirrorless camera with a new lens mount compared to dSLR using the F-mount, it makes sense to just continue with the existing F-mount.

          • nzswedespeed

            Great points. I agree Nikon should use the f mount for their mirror less

    • Spy Black

      As long as you can function without it, I would say it’s a good addition. Working in cold weather with touchscreen-only cameras (like my old Canon S110) royally sucks. It really only came in handy when reviewing images. It was otherwise unnecessary. Touch focus is overrated.

    • neonspark

      I certainly assure you that touch screens are not going to replace traditional input methods. They are a complementary method. Steve Jobs may have intended for his phones to do this as phones are uniquely suited to this, however the time will never come when touch replaces applications where touch is a hindrance, not a plus as fingers are too fat, screens too large, and data density too high. And there is off course no real replacement for mechanical controls such as switches, levers, etc which professionals still prefer and nikon will never do away with.
      Touch is a subset of possible UI implementations, it is by no means the one that always wins, it simply is the one that may be suited for a lot of back LCD tasks. Also remember that camera screens are VERY small, even for the constrained iphone. This will lead to huge bloated UIs so that people can touch them. I suppose in simple cameras like the consumer ones this may be ok. But it is doubtful the professional line will accept this trade off as information density is more important.

  • Eric Parker

    Nooo, please dont start with touch screens!

    • Eric Frame

      you like the 1985 screen/menu that we have now? The top screen looks like its straight out of a commodore 64.

      sorry, but I’d love a user interface thats as intuitive as today’s smartphones.

      • Nose-tap, yea!

        • Wade Marks

          Just turn the touchscreen off. Problem solved.

      • stormwatch

        I gave you vote up for the idea, but C64 is way more advanced than the antic top screen. Top screen on all modern DSLR is closer to Abacus than to C64.

      • fjfjjj

        The top screen looks nothing like a Commodore 64.

        • captaindash

          He didn’t say it looks like one, he said it looks like its “straight out of” a commodore 64″. Then again, maybe your point is that the commodore 64 had colour graphics. That puts the top screen is sub commodore 64. Ouch.

          • fjfjjj

            Oh I see, the 7-segment LCD was inside the computer. I never opened one up. Guess you did.

            • captaindash

              I was a curious child.

            • fjfjjj

              You’re fibbing.

        • Eric Frame

          You’re right. Sorry, I gave it way too much credit. Lol

      • Aeroengineer

        Be careful what you wish for. You may end up with a Windows 8 interface.

        • Eric Frame

          Haha.

      • Piotr Kosewski

        The top screen is one of the best things in high-end cameras.
        Don’t criticize a feature just because you can’t use it.

        • Eric Frame

          Hey dip sh*t, it’s not a matter of being able to use it. I’m pointing out that a cell phone has a more intuitive interface than a $6500 camera.

          • Piotr Kosewski

            Of course it has. You can’t operate a DSLR and you don’t even know why… 🙁

            Interface in DSLRs (especially high-end ones) is not meant to be intuitive. It’s meant to be fast, universal and practical. And it should be usable in as broad range of conditions as possible.

            From a DSLR we expect quick response and operating without looking at the buttons (i.e. while using the viewfinder).

            An “intuitive interface” in your understanding is a touch one. It might be easier for starters who have no prior training – everything is written in words and easy. But it is also much slower and harder to use in the real world.

            • Eric Frame

              You’re nikons perfect customer; one who doesn’t care if they evolve.

              what makes you think I can’t operate a camera BTW? Because I want something better/more convenient?

              Here’s an example. I recently upgraded to the D750 and I like that it has built in wifi. I te a lot of pics of my 7 month old and the fact that I can shoot some photos, and send them from my phone in seconds is awesome. Now, that’s not a “pro” feature, but it makes my life easier.
              Nikon could have done that a long ass time ago, and honestly, they could have made it way better than it is.

              I’m glad the D750 is so great, because I’ll keep it for a long time. When it is time for an upgrade, if they haven’t kept up with technology, I’m switching to Sony or Fuji.

            • Piotr Kosewski

              You don’t understand why DSLRs are made as they are. And if you don’t understand them, you can’t appreciate their potential.
              I’m not saying you can’t operate a camera, but pushing a shutter button is not utilizing a DSLR.

              As for the D750 story. Currently it costs $2300, so it’s more expensive then any Sony or Fuji camera besides A7s. But you bought it even though you don’t need it and don’t like it.

              I’ll tell you what I think. I’ve seen hundreds of people who state they don’t like company X, but have a lot of X’s expensive products, so they know best!
              As a result: I think you’re lying.

              And if you’re telling the truth, i.e. you’ve bought an expensive DSLR you don’t like to take photos of your child, you’re not very bright.

              Anyway, as this is not going anywhere, don’t expect any further replies from me. And learn your DSLR or give it to someone (maybe your kid). Otherwise it will only be a burden.

            • Eric Frame

              you’re an idiot. All I’m saying is they could be better. Jesus Christ.

      • cppguy16

        A dot matrix LCD uses a lot more power than a 7-segment. It’s just a practical choice, not a pretty one. e-ink would be another choice, but it’s slow to update. For some parameters it would be OK, but not for exposure.

      • Wade Marks

        I agree…today’s UI in dslr’s is just atrocious. There will be tradeoffs and drawbacks to anything, including a touchscreen. But it can represent an advance forward..because the alternative is status quo which is pretty obtuse.

  • Jed

    Poor D5400, nobody loves him 🙁
    srsly, well, I don’t really care, but what is the point of skipping 5400?

    • Eric Frame

      maybe they’re trying to line everything with a 5 in the middle like the 750? maybe the update to the 7100 will be the 7500?

      • Jed

        probably that is it
        NI5ON

      • Eric Calabros

        If its mirrorless, skipping makes sense. But when the only major upgrade admin got info about is touch feature, so its gonna stay DSLR, Sadly.

      • Jed

        please explain D4 and D4s then

        • AM I Am

          And EXPEED4…..
          On that logic, Nikon would have jumped from EXPEED3 to EXPEED5.

        • also D40, F4, F401, S4, P340…

      • It doesn’t really matter when they can technically go all the way to infinity :), I don’t see anybody mentioning waterproofing, in Ireland its a factor 11 months of the year!

  • Jeroen Wijnands

    Let’s see… Nikon takes the D5300, does a few very minor updates and adds the touchscreen and raises the price by $200. Next it sits back and proudly proclaims it does take the DX shooter seriously.

    Ah well, if it’s not too buggy it might help shift cameras.

    • Andrew

      Some people are not pleased with good news. If only there is a delete button I can press!

      • Jeroen Wijnands

        Good news would be the D300s replacement. But I must admit, I am very curious about a touch screen on a camera that you press to your face to use.

      • Thom Hogan

        So the good news is “a touch screen”?

        • I guess Nikon is out of upgrade options from the D5300 – what else can they do and still keep the camera in the same class?

          • Thom Hogan

            The issue isn’t the D5500. If Nikon is going to keep DX DSLRs around, they need to keep them updated. I have no real problem with that. The problem is more one of “product line” than product.

            Right now, the DX product line is looking more and more out of balance to the real world, and also looking less and less like a line that Nikon is investing in.

            While others build out lens sets for new mounts, Nikon refuses to build out the lens set for the DX mount. Technically, the D3xxx was the camera that iterated the most and the fastest. Now suddenly things have slowed there. Things slowed above the D5xxx, too.

            Just adding a touch screen seems to imply that Nikon is rationing out features so as to look like they’re still iterating significantly. Sure, a touch screen is better than no touch screen, but it really applies only for non eye level shooting, which is what DSLRs were originally great at. To move to arms-length shooting with touch screen without all lenses being stabilized seems wrong.

            • Spy Black

              “…and also looking less and less like a line that Nikon is investing in.”

              …and I sincerely hope they continue on that path. I’m convinced they want to forget DX, although I don’t think they can do it quickly enough. They’re throwing the dogs their bones here. The Canon 7D Mk II may have forced their hand at perhaps putting out some D300/D7100 hack, and hopefully that’ll be the end of that for DX. I hope Nikon keeps concentrating on the FX line, bringing FX back to the masses, as has apparently been their mission.

            • Thom Hogan

              Pushing DX into oblivion would be like cutting off both your legs. You won’t be walking forward much.

              Simply put, DX/APS has been and will continue to be a sweet spot. Regardless of whether you make a DSLR or a mirrorless camera, the DX sensor size has only a one stop disadvantage over FX but it has nearly a 50% cost advantage. As I’ve pointed out for over a decade, if you can drop the cost of an FX sensor, you can drop the cost of a DX sensor by the same proportion. It actually takes a very radical drop in FX sensor costs to get to the point where DX doesn’t have enough cost advantage to be the sweet spot.

              Nikon’s problem at the moment is that they’ve pushed a lot of FX products (and R&D costs) to keep FX healthy in terms of sales. But it’s never been even 20% of the DSLR sales. So even if you could grow FX by 10% a year (and I don’t think you can), you can’t make up for the slide Nikon is now seeing in DX. DX was the meat of their sales/profits. Not just in cameras, but corporate-wide. You screw up DX and whatever it transitions to, and you screw up Nikon, period.

            • Spy Black

              Actually, I’m looking at it strictly from a DSLR perspective, so I guess I wasn’t completely clear on my comment. There was a time when APS-C was the only format available for DSLRs, so it’s origins are understandable. Those days are over tho.

              However I’ve yet to see any manufacturer do anything really creative with the APS-C format. Very few have done anything really practical. Imagine for instance if the Coolpix A had an EVF and compact zoom, even if it was 2- or 3x, as long as it was still compact. That would be a more practical application of APS-C than what the A was. Most of the APS-C mirrorless cameras I’ve seen aren’t really that compact.

              That’s what makes 4/3 and 1 inch sensor cameras more attractive. My RX100 III fits right in my jeans pocket. I’d like to see manufacturers try something different with APS-C. At least Samsung up the res and gave it 4K, it’s not super compact, but they’re going somewhere else with it.

            • Thom Hogan

              Ricoh tried something interesting with APS (modular GXR), but they’re about the only ones. Canon and Nikon got into “crank out iterations” mode and will follow the HiFi makers into oblivion if they continue that approach (“this year’s receivers? A little more power and a new feature!”).

              But I’m arguing that not only didn’t Nikon do anything creative, they didn’t even do everything they needed to make DX long-term successful. Okay, so if DX isn’t long-term, what the heck is for Nikon? Living off 20% the unit volume in FX? Not seeing it.

              Frankly, m4/3 and 1″ have the same problem that the small sensors had before them: smartphones are eating upwards in terms of quality. Once you think you need to buy a couple of notches above that to have something that’ll last you for awhile (as opposed to buying every year), you’re back at the sweet spot, APS/DX.

              Technically, even full frame cameras could be as small as something like the LX100. Indeed, since I happen to have an LX100 in for review at the moment, I was comparing it to my original “we want a large sensor compact” article of many years ago. Sure enough, the LX100 is about the size of what I proposed, and that was DX.

              Smaller cameras can be made with larger sensors. Of course, that requires more R&D and engineering to do than to just trim a bit or use a smaller sensor. The camera makers keep taking the laziest route for the most part, with Sony perhaps excepted (as would be the Nikon 1). The laziest route won’t fix what ails the industry.

            • Spy Black

              “Frankly, m4/3 and 1″ have the same problem that the small sensors had
              before them: smartphones are eating upwards in terms of quality.”

              I wouldn’t agree with that. If you’re going to apply that mindset, it would also be applicable to APS-C as well. Even if a smartphone would have a comparable sensor (which they don’t), it won’t have comparable optics or handling. iPhones (for example) may have decent cameras, but the lens sucks on it.

              We’ll see where it all shakes out I suppose.

            • Eric Calabros

              Can you name a camera maker that has a complete DX lens line (10-16, 16-55, 50-140 zoom, 10, 16, 18, 24 prime)? Maybe some product managers in Nikon are saying to themselves: nobody even try about it, why should we do? I think they have calculated how much money a typical DX user is ready to spend on lenses that are not FX! and that number wasnt encouraging. The problem is that most of their DX users want to spend that not-encouraging money for the most convenient one: one of those 18-something lenses.

            • Thom Hogan

              APS/DX? Not yet, though Fujifilm is now very close. m4/3 got there a while ago. Sony is headed there.

              But this is one of those things that companies have great internal debates over. If you built my “perfect” set of base lenses for a system, you’d probably sell fewer lenses than if you just sold some super zooms, at least in the consumer space. The problem is, you may also sell fewer cameras using that approach AND the market is now changing back again to mostly prosumer buyers.

              Nikon isn’t selling fewer FX cameras today than it was. It’s selling fewer DX cameras. If they continue the same approach they’ve had, I believe that trend will continue and accelerate. Moreover, the thing that will sell in DX’s place was ENABLED by Nikon (and Canon) neglecting the prosumer market.

              When you do product planning, there’s the past, present, and future all to balance. Nikon is out of balance and has been for awhile. They moved away from their past to a new more consumer-based future believing that growth would be ongoing and got caught in the classic maturing market trap. The future is more like the past, at least unless someone can figure out a new, true consumer product that resonates.

            • Eric Calabros

              Please you tell them to split the body and grip and make them rotateable! Imagine taking a selfi with DSLR while holding it with your right hand 😉 Ok, I mean with tiltable screen they helped us keep our body in reasonable position, next thing is to keep the wrist straight. oh wait.. It mostly benefits video shooters, and DSLRs are already attention magnet in public! So never happens.
              I tried at least 🙂

            • Thom Hogan

              Ah, the old Twist and Shoot of the Coolpix 900. Back when Nikon was being innovative, not a follower. Funny thing is they sort of invented the selfie, but of course they’d never point the camera at themselves…

          • Victor Müller

            I own a D5300 and i miss the High Speed Sync option.

          • scott800

            I wonder if there is a chance for the highly anticipated focus peaking feature! I thought they might introduce it in the d750, but for some reason like to bring in some video functionality to the 5X00 line first (tilt screen, 60p, etc) . It could also (fingers crossed) produce some firmware updates that can work on current nikons. Any word on peaking for any nikon line?

          • ZZ

            Add a second dial but no built-in motor?

        • Andrew

          The touch screen is good news, but that is not my entire thought on this release. The big jump from D5300 to D5500 makes me suspect that the entire list of features should be quite substantial. So I assume that the feature list is being trickled out bit by bit and that there is more information to come. Now that’s assuming a lot 😉

          • Thom Hogan

            Okay, this one should go in Claim Chowder. “should be quite substantial.” Well, we’ll be able to look at that claim pretty soon to see how well you are at prognosticating.

            But first, a test. Were the changes from the D5200 to the D5300 “quite substantial”?

      • VikingAesir

        Yet another entry level camera is good news and something to be excited about? You must lead a very boring life. Some people have higher expectations.

        • Andrew

          I cannot help you if you insist on having a myopic vision. So I do not have a problem in this regard, it is you who needs to readjust how you see things.

          Nikon has recently released the D4s, D810, and D750 cameras, and you do not see those as higher expectations being fulfilled? Why should we be greedy and rejoice only when a high-end camera is released? Nikon has been refreshing their lower end cameras at a rapid pace and this release adds to that trajectory. So this is indeed good news.

  • ShaoLynx

    Hey Broxi, there you see? CES is old news, baby!
    LOL!

  • nikomment

    ugh, another D5xxx, Just nothing exciting in DX;
    Nikon, you are baffling. Below FX, you don’t seem to know what to do. And even in FF, you have no direct alternative to the Sony A7.
    “I Am” starting to look elsewhere.

    • Larrry

      “I Am” starting to look. I like that. Tried an A7 but returned it, however, love my wife’s A6000. Single lens system would be nice…if Sony had the lens and even base lens (non-Zeiss) priced more than Canikon equivalent f4’s. Ended up returning it due to 2 features – poor battery life, and viewfinder blackout after each shot and couldn’t figure out how to turn that “feature” off. (could only think of soccer moms following little Johnny down the field and after the first shot, he it 10 yard further down the field by the time she gets the viewfinder back.) Considering the A7 body is about the same dimensions as the Nikon FM, that would be killer in a FF mirrorless vs the bloat we have in the D models. Plus a whole array of F lens, which if not directly useable requiring a new mirrorless dedicated lens line, adapter like the Sony/Minolta A lens to F/FE mount.
      “I Am” still looking. Not selling my Nikon stuff yet, so Nikon still has time to deliver.

    • Ƹ̵̡Ӝ̵̨̄Ʒ

      Here’s a simple solution to your problem. Buy an A7.

    • Is it not smart marketing, Two levels, an entry and a pro, accordingly priced. The the amateur wants to be a pro eventually and buys the higher spec body… and then has to buy the glass too, ching ching!

  • KnightPhoto

    “(no D9300 updates for now).” Darnit

    • Andrew

      With all of the great technologies they have built into the D750 and D810, the only thing that can delay the D9300 would be the need for a new EXPEED image processor to push the frame rate a bit higher.

      • captaindash

        The new Samsung NX1 can do 15fps at 28MP. Yeah it’s 12 bit, but I’d love to have that speed. One tester had it do 100 continuous shots in jpg at that speed. RAW only gets you 1.4 seconds of 15fps, but you can dial it down to 12, 10 or 8 to extend the time. That’s what I’ve been wishing Nikon would do. Maybe it’s not 14 bit RAW, but give me the f#@king option at least. I’d rather have the option of 12 bit jpg at 15fps than just 6.5 fps no matter what. Not to mention the 8000 shutter, 250 sync, 209 focus points that cover 90% of the screen, 4K video, magnesium alloy body, tilting screen, contrast detection auto focus to -4 ev, no AA filter blah blah blah. I’m glad some other companies are coming in to shake things up a bit. Pentax (Ricoh) stepped things up with APS-C too. Good. Gives the big two a reason to step up their game and stop crippling their cameras. I’d switch in a heartbeat if anybody besides the big two had the full range of pro lenses and compatible 3rd party triggers etc.

        • JJ168

          All these awesome spec are worthless when you found hundreds of pictures from an action are out of focus. We not even touch the lenses yet.

          • Andrew

            Didn’t I tell you to stop buying defective gray market imports?

      • Thom Hogan

        No. Simply no. EXPEED4 has plenty of bandwidth for 10 fps at 24mp, and probably much more than that. Note that the 18mp V3 can do 60 fps. Moreover, if it didn’t have enough bandwidth, it would signal that Nikon’s ASIC team was messing up big time.

        The only thing delaying a D9300 or D400 or whatever you want to call it is:
        (a) management decision making
        (b) holding out for a new sensor technology
        (c) problems discovered in prototyping that require complete redesign of key component

        Take your pick. But EXPEED? No.

        • Eric Calabros

          I take A. The list is sorted by probability 😉

          • Thom Hogan

            Yes, it is ;~).

        • Andrew

          Thom, I see Nikon quite differently from you.

          I think you are missing some important things here. Nikon is giving us these incremental enhancements on a regular basis which are all gradually adding up to something quite substantial. These entry level D3300 and D5300 cameras are now giving us exceptional photographic tools:

          (1) Nikon has gone from having a 16MP to 24MP image sensor while delivering exceptional image quality (IQ) without compromising on ISO performance.

          (2) These 24 MP cameras now have the AA filter removed and thus enabling noticeably sharper pictures.

          (3) Video performance has been enhanced from 1080p at 30 fps to 1080p at 60 fps. This is perfect for sports photography and soccer moms.

          (4) The kit lens are now of significantly higher quality rivaling even Nikon’s $500 lens. Yes, the kit lens is now the exceptional NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Zoom giving you exceptional image quality. And you can get this lens bundled with the Nikon D3300 camera for only $499.

          (5) Nikon has introduced built-in Wi-Fi and now is including a Touch Screen LCD. And yet, the Touch Screen LCD is immensely useful for configuring your camera.

          You can downplay anything Nikon is doing by marginalizing some of these features by saying that some competitors are doing this or that. But the fact remains that Nikon is giving us photographic tools that are immensely capable and cost effective has garnered a lot of praise.

          There is an exciting range of high-quality, low-cost Nikon DX lens (including third-party lens) now available for these DSLR cameras. Nikon without doubt is now doing the right things as a company and I believe that their management team is the best it has ever been. They are navigating in a complex and challenging world, but the latest high-end D4s, D810, and D750 cameras have now hit the mark. No company is perfect and no management team is perfect, but no other company besides Nikon and Sony are setting such a high bar in the photographic industry.

          • Thom Hogan

            Yes, we see Nikon differently. You’re looking backwards, I’m looking forwards, for one thing.

            1. I have no problems with Nikon’s sensor progression. I do think that the Nikon/Sony relationship may have changed in 2013. If that’s true, such progression may be harder to maintain in the future.
            2. Uh, no. The D750 has an AA filter, as does the D610. The DX cameras have removed it, but actually I don’t notice sharper JPEGs. Nikon is still undersharpening at defaults.
            3. If video performance is a primary consideration in buying a still camera, then you’re not in the still camera business ;~). Nikon is still subsampling to get video, is still using constrained bit rates in compression, and still has rolling shutter issues. And no 4K ;~).
            4. Yes, the kit lens is quite good, though I’ll pass at saying it’s better than US$500 Nikkors. Because of Nikon’s push upwards in pixel count, they had to redesign the 18-55mm three times now. That’s certainly to their credit, and they did a good job making the new one good enough.
            5. Nikon is late adding both WiFi and touchscreens. Competitors did it before them. But have you actually used either? WiFi isn’t ready for prime time. Touchscreens help with menu setting, live view focus, but again, this is long after competitors did the same.

            Nikon is playing the stodgy, bureaucratic, slow-to-move player for the most part. When they experiment, they shoot themselves in the foot (Nikon 1 pricing higher than DSLRs, for instance).

            What Nikon is NOT doing is something other than incrementing (Nikon 1 notwithstanding, but see previous comment). Ultimately, technology products get disrupted. If all you do is increment, you will slowly increment yourself into irrelevance. Nikon was on that path with SLRs (the F5 was badly received), and its market share had dropped to the low 20’s as the market also declined. The D1 was exactly what they should have done, and basically saved their bacon.

            However, we’re at that same point again. They can see market share erode as the market declines, or someone, preferably Nikon, makes a break into the next generation of camera.

            My take is that mirrorless is just an iteration of DSLR. A big iteration, to be sure, but an iteration nonetheless. It replaces a key set of components with another set of components. It happens that the old set is mechanical, complex, requires alignment and lubrication while the new set is more electronic, easier to drive costs out of, and is easier to manufacturer. But it’s still an iteration in my book.

            Simple rule of thumb: look at DCF. If it doesn’t change, cameras won’t change.

        • (a) management decision: Let Canon get some sales on the 7DM2 before our better camera comes out so that they can recover some money back, before we bring out this better camera? If we lose some customers in this process? Well… we take that risk.

          Is that it or do I miss the point?

          • Thom Hogan

            You miss the point.

            • That’s good.. and the point being? 🙂

            • Thom Hogan

              To think that Nikon would collude with Canon, the company they want to unseat as number one in cameras, would be mindboggling even in Japan’s notorious coopetition-type environment.

              If Nikon made a management decision not to proceed with or to delay D300s/D7100 replacements, it would be for another reason. What that reason could be is beyond me, though. Survey after survey shows that Nikon is leaking money from customers by not acting.

            • Deep_Lurker

              An obvious reason is that Nikon really wants to herd the enthusiast market fully over to FX, leaving DX for the duffers who will never buy more than one or at most two lenses. So they might cancel the D300s and D7100 replacements, make the D5500 the “flagship DX model,” and tell those of us who want a higher-end body than the D5500 to “Buy an FX!” Or as a less extreme measure, they might introduce the D7200 as the last of the D7X00 series, cancel the D300s replacement, and otherwise pursue the same strategy at a slightly slower pace.

              I believe that it would be stupid and crazy for Nikon to do this, but it’s also the kind of stupid that I can too easily imagine Nikon embracing.

            • Thom Hogan

              That’s just an extension of what they’ve been trying to do. But the problem with that is that at the price point where you used to get a pro camera (D300s), you now get a bare-bones consumer camera (D610). They most certainly are not the same thing, and much of the folk who are in this price range know it.

              As far as I can tell, Nikon has managed to “shore up” FX so that it is holding historically high unit volume. But that just doesn’t solve their problem, does it? “Historically high” means no more than about 20% of their DSLR unit volume, certainly no more than 25%.

              In essence, Nikon has proclaimed that the D300 and D700 were failures by not following them up. Yet that’s not what they were. Just the opposite. So the “shift” they’ve been pursuing for the past two to three years has to be for a reason. Unfortunately, none of us can fully understand what that reason is. If your customers can’t understand what you’re doing, then you’re digging a trouble hole for yourself.

              To use a sports metaphor, Nikon had a very good first quarter (D1, D1h, D1x, D100). They stumbled a bit in the second quarter (D2h, D2x, D70/D70s/D80, D200). They had a great third quarter (D3/D300/D700/D90, even the early D3xxx, D5xxx). Now in the fourth quarter their offense is completely out of balance. FX is okay (D4 down to D610, with really two models that are driving volume). DX is dwindling.

              So the question is this: where is the clarity that we saw in the first and third quarters? Even the second quarter had that clarity, though execution didn’t quite live up to expectations. Suddenly, as camera sales begin to peak, Nikon is all over the place, but not in the places where they’ve been historically most successful (that would be centered on the N90s, F100, D100, D200, D300, D700 progression).

            • Deep_Lurker

              I’m not sure what your argument is. If you’re arguing that it’s a really bad idea for Nikon to pursue a strategy of trying to push enthusiasts entirely to FX, then I agree.

              If you’re arguing that it’s too stupid an idea for Nikon management to possibly be following, and that Nikon management must therefore be doing something else, then I don’t agree. I agree that “push FX” is a bad mistake, but I think that it’s the sort of bad mistake that Nikon management could be making.

            • Thom Hogan

              Push FX isn’t a mistake unless that’s all you’re doing. It’s perfectly fine to try to move DX shooters up to FX. Companies use upsell tactics all the time.

              The problem with the “push FX” strategy is that it seems to be the only coherent strategy that Nikon is currently exploring. DX is being neglected, which just makes no sense whatsoever, as not only is it the heart of Nikon’s sales, but you need DX buyers to be able to push them to FX eventually ;~).

              Nikon COULD HAVE executed a full line strategy in both DX and FX that worked something like this:

              * DX — low end to pro bodies, f/4 DX zooms and f/2.8 DX primes to stay small
              * FX — medium to pro bodies, f/2.8 zooms and f/1.8 primes to get full benefits of larger sensor

              This would still allow you to push people towards FX (two stop differential, basically). But it would also keep DX active and desirable. Just iterating the D3xxx, D5xxx, and D7xxx ad infinitum with 18-xx zooms is a very lazy tactic, and not a strategy in my book.

              I believe Nikon management is making multiple mistakes strategically, and multiple mistakes tactically. Not necessarily mistakes that hurt short term results, but they’re making long-term success more and more difficult for themselves. In essence, if you want a great Nikon camera now, you must buy FX (D7100 may be an exception for some). Pretty much everything else is targeted low and undifferentiated and/or overpriced.

            • Deep_Lurker

              I’m not sure what your argument is. If you’re arguing that it’s a really bad idea for Nikon to pursue a strategy of trying to push enthusiasts entirely to FX, then I agree.

              If you’re arguing that it’s too stupid an idea for Nikon management to possibly be following, and that Nikon management must therefore be doing something else, then I don’t agree. I agree that “push FX” is a bad mistake, but I think that it’s the sort of bad mistake that Nikon management could be making.

            • I did not mean to say Nikon is colluding with Canon. I actually wanted to say that Nikon was being snobbish about their upcoming pro-DX to allow Canon to come up with their 7DM2 before releasing their D300s replacement (which would overshadow Canon’s).

              But the recent rumours Admin put up were a tad disappointing in that there was no updated on the high-end DX.

              I have only started actively reading about (and playing with borrowed) DSLRs, more specifically DX and the D7100, only this year after spending a lot of time with my Canon PowerShot S5 IS (older superzoom). The waves of hope and disappointment over the D300s replacement over the years has been baffling!!

              Enjoyed reading “Ultimately, Only You Are the Judge”.

            • Thom Hogan

              I suppose it would be possible for Nikon to wait to see what Canon offered, but such a management decision would ultimately fail, as you would always be a follower, not a leader. When your primary competitor is bigger than you, first movement to something is tough to overcome.

              Moreover, this implies that Nikon is nimble and could respond quickly. Generally, you’re not going to make any changes to the imaging sensor for as much as a year prior to shipping. Likewise, the EXPEED/DIGIC ASICs aren’t exactly things you make big changes to quickly. Given that these two elements are what really dictate what a camera can and can’t do, I don’t see why you’d ever wait to see what the competition is doing. The lead times are too long to be a true follower.

            • Agreed. To start designing a product to compete when the competition is already in the market makes you a follower (which has been one – very naive- way of interpreting Nikon’s executives’ answers to dpreview at Photokina this year – “We are studying the demand/market of DX…”).

              In most cases, however, competing players bring out comparable (competing) products fairly close to each other in time – especially when they are incremental improvements. If so, essentially, market research (or leaks) of both has led to similar conclusions and it now depends on their technology and the development process one implements that decides the time-to-market. So, technically, in this case, Nikon isn’t really waiting to see what Canon offers.

              Also agreed.. truly path-breaking innovations cannot be quickly competed with for exactly that reason. The innovator has had a big head-start.

              – I therefore think that from your reasons above, the possibility of (c) *by itself* leading to (a).

              – I could understand that Nikon know they have a winner on their hands.. just that they are making sure they don’t trip over something and repeat D600. This is (a) making sure that there’s no (c).

              – Or, Nikon have already made a very capable hardware (from your comments on EXPEED 4), and are now ‘extending’ their original plans of the features they intended to put out, because of what 7DM2 turned out to be (following Canon). But here, it could also be that Nikon are using their FX experience (especially D810) to bring out the high-end DX (not following Canon).

              So (a) again, but what is leading to (a) is the BIG question… 🙂

            • Thom Hogan

              Can’t disagree with what you’ve written here.

              One curious aspect to me is this, though: With Nikon 1 Nikon showed that they can do phase detect on sensor. With DX/FX, Nikon has pushed sensor technology further (pixels and dynamic range) than Canon. What they haven’t done is combine the two ;~). And the right place to do that would have been the D400. 24mp, 10 fps mirrored with 20-60 fps possible in electronic mode, current leading DR. That would have been a killer product. Still would be at the moment, but moments have this way of passing by ;~).

            • Hmm.. I suppose that’s the (b). Thanks…

            • Eric Calabros

              Even chip-fabrication-giant-with-cutting-edge-facilities Samsung’s 15fps is all about 12bit raw. In case of readout bandwidth of sensors this big, we are not there yet, and for a fabless sensor designer like Nikon, its even more out of reach at the moment. That hybrid solution brings a big question too if its mirrorless part works fine: why I need mirror especially when it makes everything slower?

            • Thom Hogan

              Are you sure a mirror is really slower? The best EVFs are currently 240Hz, or 1/240 second. The blackout time in the best DSLRs is now below 50ms, or 1/500 second.

            • With the rumored specs of D7200 as they are, I can’t imagine what kind of differentiation would the D9300/D400 have over the D7200… 10 fps? Pro build? More AF points? Is there enough that could make it worthwhile?

            • Eric Calabros

              uncertainty has made them slow, another bad news is that we loyal users realized they are uncertain

            • Thom Hogan

              Don’t disagree. Nikon management was having internal arguments in 2010 when I met with them, which is a form of uncertainty.

              When you’re uncertain, you can do two things: (1) experiment; or (2) wait. Nikon has tried both. The Nikon 1 and Df are definitely on the experiment side. The continuation but slowing of iterations is on the waiting side. You can experiment too much, and you can wait too long. What we don’t know yet is whether that’s true of Nikon.

        • KnightPhoto

          Surprising. Could the constraint be that the sensor data cannot be offloaded in that fast a speed? (or is that the ASIC team you are referring to?)

          • Thom Hogan

            It’s possible that the sensor itself is the bottleneck, yes. Indeed, it’s highly likely that the big bottleneck in new designs now IS the image sensor itself. Nothing else seems constrained to me. We’ve got cards that are faster than cameras. We’ve got displays that are faster than cameras are driving them. We’ve got fast ARM cores in the ASICs. Memory surely can’t be a bottleneck.

            And that’s the other half of the smartphone problem that doesn’t get talked about as much. Yes, smartphones have gotten better as cameras. Quite fast. Why? Because the VOLUME is there. If you change the world with your smartphone-sized sensor, you have a market of hundreds of millions, maybe billions a year. If you change the world with an FX sensor, you’ll have a hard time selling a million in a year. So the R&D simply isn’t moving fast on the bigger sensors. Note, too, that some of the expensive stuff to do, like BSI, isn’t making it big sensors very fast, either, mostly because the benefit is lower and the cost is high.

    • Thom Hogan

      > “(no D9300 updates for now).” Darnit

      I’m pretty sure Canon isn’t saying “darnit” ;~) They’re saying “yippee.”

      • Photobug

        Amen. My Canon buddy just got his yesterday and he is in heaven. He owes me an update in a week. If I was Canon I would just site back and take all the $$$ until Nikon releases an equivalent model.

      • Photobug

        Amen. My Canon buddy just got his yesterday and he is in heaven. He owes me an update in a week. If I was Canon I would just site back and take all the $$$ until Nikon releases an equivalent model.

      • KnightPhoto

        Yeah no doubt Canon is happy with Nikon’s leaving that market segment completely empty. My Canon buddies are bugging me to get a 600mm IS II and a 7Dii/1Dx and be done with it. Sad thing is everything I want from Nikon is available TODAY from Canon.

  • Shutterbug

    Nikon really has to keep up at the high end APS-C! Look where Canon is! Sure, the sensor of the 7D Mk II is c!!p, but at least they have a 61 all-Crosstype AF-System and a buffer, that goes on forever and ever and ever. And 10fps aren’t bad either.

    • captaindash

      See my comment right above this. Sadly, Samsung has seemingly put everyone else to APS-C shame.

      • preston

        You need to look past the specs on the NX1. It has more focus points but does not focus as fast and as accurately as the 7Dii. Check out the video review from The Camera Store. They are trying to sell this thing and they still said they were surprised how poor the focusing was with the 85 f/1.4.

  • Victor Kina

    i was hoping for an evf….

  • Aldo

    The only good thing I can imagine about the d5500… is that is going to lower the price of the current 5300…. which imho is the best entry level dslr to get for a while longer.

    • Andrew

      Enhanced auto focus mechanism and finally come with a built-in auto focus motor. Jumping from D5300 to D5500 must mean that something more significant that the addition of a touch screen will be coming to the D5xxx series.

      • Aldo

        I think that the AF motor is feature found on the higher models. I predict touchscreen.. better AF probably… slightly better ISO…. and that’s about it.

        I think the d5300 reached a standard that will be used for quite a while longer (1080 60p, wify. gps 24mp no AA filter). And with the articulated screen makes it super sexy. Oh and you can take backlit photos with no light leakage 😛

        • Andrew

          Agreed!

      • Aldo

        I think that the AF motor is feature found on the higher models. I predict touchscreen.. better AF probably (as you said)… slightly better ISO…. and that’s about it.

        I think the d5300 reached a standard that will be used for quite a while longer (1080 60p, wify. gps 24mp no AA filter). And with the articulated screen makes it super sexy. Oh and you can take backlit photos with no light leakage 😛

        • Aldo

          Admin can you delete this double post please ty.

      • Yes, better auto focus also for live view and the swiveling screen…what about a better grip like the d750? Mirrorless? A bit lighter weight? And hopefully it won’t be priced absurdly high like the coolpix A….

  • rt-photography

    glad to see this since im planning to get a D5300 and D750 for video. nikon MUST include power aperture zebra peaking and all the other features other MFR are including to bring some videographers. not many are staying to use nikon for video.

    crippling aperture control in live view was such a dumb move. people got frustrated and left.

    4k isnt relevant now though for another year or so. most clients dont even know what the frik 4K is

    and I prefer the tilt screen of the D750 over the swivel of the D5300 because it keeps the familiar button on the left side.

    • Matthew Saville Baldon

      Because aperture is controlled mechanically from the body using a spring-loaded mechanism, they actually had to engineer a whole new motor to power the aperture in both “directions”, for the likes of the D800-series and now the D750. So it was not a “crippling” of the lesser bodies, it was simply a side-effect of their legacy lens mount compatibility.

      I for one think that Nikon should’ve started switching to “E” aperture lenses a long time ago. I would have gladly paid a little bit more $$ per lens to be done with the innumerable problems that arise with mechanical apertures…

      • fjfjjj

        Where are you getting this information? The spring is inside the lens, and its force holds the diaphragm open. The diaphragm closes variably in relation to the degree of lever actuation. The stop-down lever actuator inside the camera does not need to ‘power the aperture in both directions’ — it only needs to apply ‘stop down’ actuation. Am I wrong about this?

        I can understand why stepping the actuation, rather than releasing and re-actuating, would require a new mechanism.

        In any case, this whole aperture lever thing belongs to another age. Nikon should have dumped it. It really is just bizarre that “G” lenses haven’t all become “E” lenses.

        • actually aperture is fully closed, and spring loaded inside lens. And i-body lever forces it to open

          • Thom Hogan

            Vsevolod is correct.

        • Matthew Saville Baldon

          The older aperture mechanism motor is simply not able to control the aperture precisely enough for it to work in both the closing and opening directions. I’m not saying they have two different motors in one camera, to open and close, I’m just saying that the old design needed to be thrown out and re-worked so that both opening and closing could happen smoothly, and this is something that probably takes up space and $$$ in production, so they could only do it in the most advanced bodies.

          It is dumb, though, and I’m equally as shocked as you are that they’re still using a mechanical control when they should have started going “E” many years ago…

  • Alexander Tatevyan

    Number 4 is considered unfortunate in Japan (also in China and Korea). That’s the reason, they skip it.

    • hje

      Yes, that’s the very reason. Nikon would never release a camera with that number.

      F4, D4, d40, d40x …

      • Alexander Tatevyan

        They now realized their mistakes 🙂

        • Shutterbug

          That’s why you don’t get your D400 😉

          • stormwatch

            Haahahahahahahahaahaha

    • That is why we had d40, d40x, d4 and 4s right?

    • nzswedespeed

      Isn’t it the number 14? I’ve heard of building having no 14th floor @ instead skip to 15.

  • vFunct

    Nikon really needs an open API that programmers can develop apps for within their camera.

    And they need an OS that ISN’T Android, because that’s tuned for phone usage. They need an API that works WITHIN the context of their menu structure – something fast and intuitive.

    I’d like to be able to process then post an image to our custom website as well as to Instagram/Twitter/etc. right from the camera.

    This is the workflow of the future for dSLRs, and it’s the only way they can compete, if they build their own OS and programming API.

  • yosoul

    I can’t wait to see gwc’s using touchscreen on a dslr fitted with a 70-200…they’ll drop them like pigeon crap in piazza San Marco in Venice LOL

    • guest

      gwc’s?

      • Patrick O’Connor

        Guy With Camera

        Commonly used in the modelling/photographer biz, ‘GWC’ is any poser/creep with a digital camera pretending to be a pro/semi-pro photographer. With the introduction of digital cameras, GWC’s have appeared like an explosion in a toy store.
        From urbandictionary.com

    • captaindash

      I was gonna say something about how you’d obviously just hold the lens instead of the camera to touch the screen, but then I remembered the intelligence of the average human being. Make sure you’ve got your own 70-200 cropped in on their face when they drop it.

  • Dhruva Sen Gupta

    What’s the point in releasing new DX bodies when there is no commitment to new DX lenses?

    • jstevez

      DX lenses will also be announced; 18-65, 18-75, 18-95, 18-115 and 18-275. /s.

      • Dhruva Sen Gupta

        So more 18-xxx zooms/superzooms, and I can bet none of them will be f2.8 or better.

    • Kynikos

      Consumer grade stuff needs to be updated on a reasonably fixed cycle, or it’s seen as “old” and shuffled to less profitable shelves in the store as customers turn up their noses.

      No soccer mom wants a three-year-old camera, even if it more than meets her needs.

    • fjfjjj

      Portraiture, sports, and wildlife. And, most of all, for people who don’t care about lenses.

      • Guest

        Nikon sells only 1.42 lenses for each body and I would suspect that must of those lenses above 1 are going to pros and enthusiasts. The majority of people who buy a camera like a D3xxx or D5xxx never buy another lens at all. They use the kit lens for the life of the camera.

        • Thom Hogan

          It’s more complex than that. If over time you bought an F100, a D100, a D70s, a D300, and recently a D810, you’d have a median of 7.5 lenses at this point according to the data. That’s what legacy lens mounts do for you over time.

          • mikeswitz

            80% of the posters here wouldn’t be caught dead shooting with this camera, yet 80% feel that Nikon has personally bitch slapped them. It may be a perfectly fine iteration of the 5xxx series but it was not MADE FOR THEM! Also who cares what they call it. Look at the specs, hold it, shoot with it and decide it its what you need. After you buy it you can call it what ever you want.

          • Captain Megaton

            The fraction of D5xxx owners who are 20 year veteran Nikon users is vanishingly small. And the minor point that most of those median 7.5 lenses wont autofocus on the D5300…

            • Thom Hogan

              Are you sure about that? I’m not.

              Thing is, buying a DSLR tends to mean that you’re either (a) a previous SLR/DSLR user,; (b) someone that was convinced by a previous SLR/DSLR user that you should be; or (c) convinced by marketing that there was a reason to JOIN the ranks of the veteran DSLR users.

              Nikon grew to where it was because it leveraged its user base into the digital age faster than did anyone else except Canon. Even Canon was caught off guard by Nikon’s D1, though.

              Even if the D5xxx user wasn’t (a) or (b), once they become a D5xxx user, Nikon certainly wants them to become an (a) next time they buy.

              As for AF lenses, two points: (1) you wouldn’t believe how many D3xxx/D5xxx users discover AFTER the purchase that their lenses don’t work; and (2) the ones that know they won’t all justify by saying “well at least I can still use it.”

      • Thom Hogan

        > for people who don’t care about lenses

        And these people are buying INTERCHANGEABLE LENS CAMERAS for what reason?

        • Neopulse

          To stick with the kit lenses only I think what he/she was getting at

          • Thom Hogan

            Which is what led Olympus to invent the Bridge camera (ZSLR I think they called it) back in the latter days of film. If someone is buying for the “better results” (bigger sensor, better autofocus, etc.) of an SLR-type camera but not interested in the interchangeable lens aspect, they gravitate to super zooms. So why not just build a super zoom camera without an interchangeable mount?

            This gets me back to “what user problem is the product maker trying to solve” thing I write about a lot. By making super zooms the camera companies are essentially trying to fit square peg in round hole.

            Note which compact cameras are still selling and being made. Yep, the super zoom bridge models. So maybe the Sony RX-10 and Panasonic FZ1000 are a better answer for those people, and an APS version would be even better.

            The HiFi makers got into this same thing at the start of their decline. “Receivers” replaced separate components. And separate components added functions.

            • Aradan

              Ah! Sweet memories. Olympus did it even in the beginning of digital era. The E10 and E20 were amazing for their time. Fast f2.0 fixed lens with 4X zoom.

            • Thiom

              Now Panasonic and Sony do it – FZ-1000 or RX-10. Despite the 1″ sensors these cameras deliver more than any casual shooter will ever need. Heck, even people doing stock photography for web and news magazines are using them to good success.

              That the APS-C DSLR market hasn’t collapsed completely yet is simply attributed to the buyers’ nostalgia about shooting “like a pro” when using some Canikon (D)SLR. Once that nostalgia has faded away APS-C DSLR will be completely dead. And a few birders, wildlifers and sports shooters will not be sufficient to resurrect it.

            • Neopulse

              Don’t recall that Olympus ZSLR. Will read about it. Thanks for your reply btw.

        • fjfjjj

          Because salesmen convinced them that using ‘lesser’ cameras was tantamount to not caring about their families and loved ones?

          • Thom Hogan

            Sure. But sales people are easily manipulated (bribed with spiffs), and sometimes will just sell what they’ve got in stock. This isn’t a good argument for ILC with super zoom as being the right answer for DX all the time.

            You have to be very careful of the “because that’s what sells” type of argument. What sells changes. And can change rapidly, too. One way of keeping things selling is by making sure your product line management is correct.

          • Thom Hogan

            Sure. But sales people are easily manipulated (bribed with spiffs), and sometimes will just sell what they’ve got in stock. This isn’t a good argument for ILC with super zoom as being the right answer for DX all the time.

            You have to be very careful of the “because that’s what sells” type of argument. What sells changes. And can change rapidly, too. One way of keeping things selling is by making sure your product line management is correct.

        • fjfjjj

          I feel like the 4 black-marker doodles don’t compare well with the others. My thought is to put them in a separate grouping.

    • ZoetMB

      The majority of people who buy a camera like a D3xxx or D5xxx never buy another lens at all. They use the kit lens for the life of the camera. Nikon sells only 1.42 lenses for each body that they sell.

      People who buy these cameras use the kit lens for the life of the body.

    • Antonio

      How many lenses or focal distances do you really “need” that you can’t find within Nikon lineup or from third parties?
      As a matter of fact I see more people claiming because Nikon didn’t offer a top the line professional DX body than due to the lack of lenses.
      (Note – this doesn’t mean the present lineup is perfect)

      • jstevez

        Antonio – Saying that FX lenses work on DX bodies is missing the point. Just take a look in price of the 35mm F/1/8 FX and the DX counterpart.

        • Antonio

          You took me wrongly and please note that I only referred options outside DX lineup after saying this is not perfect.
          You have zooms covering from 8mm (Sigma) and Nikon (10mm) on the wide side to 300mm.
          You may not have fixed focal lenses covered as much as it should (wide side wise), but you may find some options if a “real need” comes and some of the lenses are not as heavy as that.
          However the advantage of APS-C is mainly when it comes to tele lenses and if you consider the professionals some of those needs are covered by FX lenses without major complains from them.
          In a perfect world we’d have a nice complete DX lineup an the fact it doesn’t happen nowadays doesn’t mean DX users will not get new lenses, besides we also have to ask if some open options about a future mirrorless mount can be slowing them down – if they keep DX sensor and F mount the chances to see it soon will increase.

      • Dhruva Sen Gupta

        Nikon has never come out with pro grade DX lenses, except for the 12-24mm f4 and the 17-55mm f2.8 (both of which are too expensive and crying for an update). And I did mean Nikon’s commitment, not of 3rd parties. I have to resort to a Tammy 17-50mm f2.8, a Tammy 60mm f2 and a Sigma 50-150mm f2.8 (non OS) to fulfil my focal length requirements.

        It’s a shame that Sigma messed up the 50-150mm OS version. In Thom Hogan’s own words “and after a brief encounter, I’ve returned the OS version. It’s not that the OS version is bad, it’s that it begins to violate the premise of DX”, and no wonder it is being discontinued. It is one focal length that is badly missing from the lineup (the DX equivalent of the 70-200mm).

        • Antonio

          I didn’t say you’re wrong when you say Nikon lineup of DX lenses needs additions and I pointed out it is not perfect but I can’t agree this can make new Dx bodies pointless.

          You referred Thom Hogan and as a matter of fact he is one of the persons that claims for need of new lenses (both DX and FX) in Nikon lineups, but when you refer “the premise of DX” you shall take into account his own words in the last available version of his article on the subject (http://www.dslrbodies.com/lenses/lens-articles/focal-length/missing-nikkors-2013-editio.html) where we points the people that value some physical aspects as fundamental for that “premise” – first paragraph after present DX lenses list. And he doesn’t exclude third party lenses as alternative to the needs of some people.

          My last DX camera was a D200 and it is far from having a light body what may show that reduced size and weight is becoming more and more important for the segment but maybe it wasn’t exactly a “premise” of the format that by the time it was introduced to the market it was more sensor’s cost and technologically related.

          I notice that Thom Hogan had a lot of intervention on this topic now and as you may see he is discussion more other aspects than lenses besides he also referred that point, as he does in the article the above link points to.

  • stormwatch

    Please, put sviwel screen and touch screen in D7200 as well.

    • fjfjjj

      Make sure not to touch the delicate ribbon cable.

      • stormwatch

        ??!?!? Not the shitty Sony style sviwel screen from 750 but the real like is in D5100-5300…there is no flat cable hanging around!

        • Spy Black

          Read my comment above.

      • captaindash

        Why are people so concerned about that ribbon? Are they also holding scissors in their hands as they tilt the screen? (not to split hairs, but stormwatch said sviwel (sp), not tilt. Swivels don’t have the ribbon.

      • Guy With-camera

        Hey I like to introduce you to my friend Mr. Sherlock…First name Noshit.

      • Spy Black

        Actually, that whole incident was overblown. At the Photo Plus Expo in NYC I talked to one of the guys behind the counter about that, as well as the whole durability issue with the articulating screen. He just smiled, grabbed a D750 with a 50mm f/1.8 lens on it, pulled the screen completely out, grabbed the camera SOLELY by the screen, and proceeded to VIOLENTLY swing and twist the camera around in all different directions. After doing that for a few moments, he handed the camera to me to inspect.

        The camera was fine. My mind however was pretty blown by that demo. I’m sure he was doing that all day long to each and every person like me who asked about that screen.

        I’ll never doubt that screen ever again.

  • Nikos Delhanidis

    again not what i have been waiting to hear 😛

  • Matthew Saville Baldon

    If all they do is take a D5300 and add a touchscreen, I’ll be sticking with my D5300 thankyouverymuch… The D5300 already has wifi and GPS, and one of the best DX sensors around; I really can’t ask for more. Maybe a bit better AF, and whatever minor improvements they can make to high ISO performance? I still wouldn’t upgrade though, considering I mainly use the camera for travel landscapes and use a tripod at lower ISO’s…

    =Matt=

    • rt-photography

      Aper

    • ZoetMB

      Cameras are not like phones – you’re not expected to upgrade for every new model in the same line. New models are primarily to attract new users and to get existing customers to upgrade from a lower line. So getting a D3xxx user to upgrade to a D5500 or getting a D5xxx user to upgrade to a D7100 or whatever comes next or getting a D7xxx user to upgrade to a D610 or D750, etc.

      I always laugh when someone who bought the D800 (as just one example) angrily says, “I’m not upgrading to the D810 because there isn’t enough of a difference. Why didn’t Nikon add the pizza-making capability I asked for?” Well, no one is expecting you to – it wasn’t designed for you unless you need an additional body.

  • Kyle

    If prices keep dropping on the current D5300, I’ll pick one up before the end of the year as a video replacement for my D90… especially if the body only goes to something ~$550
    Then, wait for the D7200 to see what it has.

    • rt-photography

      of course it will drop the most when the D5500 will be released. and after february when people are drained of money would be the best time.

  • catinhat

    How in the world are they gonna keep people excited. Even Thom is getting tired of reviewing more of the same (http://www.dslrbodies.com/newsviews/ultimately-only-you-are-the.html).
    The thrill is gone. Oh, wait, it’s back with a touch screen.

    • rt-photography

      I like Thom. he doesnt round off corners and doesnt put a ribbon on it. hes real and says it like it is. not like the fake ass reviewers who say everything nikon puts out is the best thing since sliced bread. BRAVO!

      • Andrew

        There are two sides to your argument. If a reviewer expresses views that are practically always negative, it is as bad as another reviewer expressing views that are always positive. If the views expressed from one reviewer is consistently “Canon is great, and Fuji is great, but Nikon is bad”, then there is something wrong about that. So it is easy to see you liking people who share your views, that is human nature!

        A lot of the way we view things are based upon our personalities. I for one am a positive person and I do not like to get personal, constantly criticizing other people. The constant Nikon management is bad outburst is tiring. Anytime Nikon releases a new product you always get the same players looking for angles to criticize Nikon. You may enjoy it, but I don’t.

        Many people who criticize Nikon would ruin the company if they were given a management position in it. I have worked in a dual development and management role for close to 20 years and I am amazed how people’s opinions in business really does not matter. In business you have to test every assumption to know whether your views are correct or not. There are too many armchair philosophers who do nothing but pontificate.

        • rt-photography

          I wouldnt care to be in management because its something I would suck in. what id be great in is fixing problems with products and creating new gear that takes nikon forward. I always look at things and see how it could have been better. nikon are in hibernation although the D750 was a glimpse of what they do well.

          I know Thom for MANY years. ive been following him since Nikonians (JRP and BO) started years back before their server crashed. we always would talk about Thoms reviews on that site and anytime he posted something everyone would jump to see what it was.you may say he sounds criticizing and negative but to me hes just not fake. he says it like it is, take it or leave it. I respect that. hes also very intelligent in what he says and its very logical to me. he backs things up with facts and info. hes my go to guy for trustworthy info. all the rest are living in a bubble. and when youre a kick ass photog as well then I give you more rep points as well. he talks the talk and walks the walk.

          Im not passive and sit and wait for things to be better with nikon. im vocal and active in letting my opinion out about them. I have a lot of gear invested in them and that means I believe in them and know what they CAN do. I think nikon USA is crap though. theyre out for me. when I say nikon, its solely japan.

          I dont want to get into a long reply here though.

        • catinhat

          Andrew, — my problem with your posts is that they are too positive. Maybe it reflects your personality, but here are a few hints of what Nikon could have done to deserve real praise, and it is really very obvious:

          1.) They should have had the D750 in the D810 body, and called it D810h or D810s. Upping the FPS to the D700 (with grip) level would also make some folks feel a lot better. Better yet, they could have had three D810 models, identical in ergonomics and controls, but varying in speed and resolution, at say 16, 24, and 36MP. Kind of like Sony did with the a7/s/r models.

          2.) They should have put the D7100 into the D300 body, and made FPS and buffer at least as good as the D300 (with grip). Basically, a direct response to the 7DII. (don’t start me on the Canon sensor, it is not the point here).

          3.) They should have looked long and hard at what Fuji has been doing with “retro” designs before making Df.

          Is this too fancy for Nikon? How come Sony, Canon, and Fuji have been getting those things right, and Nikon can’t, really???

          Oh, and their “1” series should have had some seriously better controls, they could have even borrowed them from their P7X00 series.

        • ZoetMB

          I disagree with some of what you’ve written. Negative reviews are fine as long as they are backed up by rational, logical arguments that have facts behind them (like sales statistics, etc.)

          There’s a very big difference between a well-written negative review and some fool poster who doesn’t write much more than “Nikon sucks” or that Nikon is misreading the market because they didn’t release what that particular poster wanted for themselves.

          I don’t think Thom is excessively negative and when he is negative, it’s not without reason, such as his continual complaints about Nikon’s sales and customer service policies.

          While I don’t think that innovative businesses should necessarily “listen” to every idiot on the web–Steve Jobs has said that people don’t know what they want until you show it to them and Akio Morita (Sony co-founder) said that Sony developed the Walkman because he personally wanted one, not because anyone asked for it–I’ve also been in management roles in corporations over the last 30 years and plenty of bad decisions (or lack of them) are made by corporate idiots.

          While all industries mature, would anyone say, no matter how much they like Nikon that Nikon is as innovative today as they were when they released the D70, the first $1000 high quality DSLR?

          While Sony’s new mirrorless cameras still have some weaknesses, I don’t think there’s anyone who believes that Nikon is as innovative as Sony has been the last few years. When was the last time that Nikon made you really excited?

    • Captain Megaton

      I was reading Thom’s review of the D5300 this morning. Pretty much nails it: wifi and gps is just the start of what a modern digital camera should be offering. Touchscreen (usefully implemented) and a standout smartphone/tablet companion app are baseline requirements.

  • Neopulse

    Would like to see this camera in action. Have sold a couple of D5300s to people who wanted to use it specifically for video. Now with the touchscreen and better ISO performance it’s going to be great.

  • Luis F. Vidal

    Seems the correct step for the D5XXX line evolution. They could also give it a great plus is they add a dedicated AF-ON that also could be assignable to other functions. And with a touchscreen a lot of functions could be just at a touch of distance.

    The D7200 will probably acquire the D750 buffer and tilt screen (I hope not. I’m not a fan of moving screens in that category) but also with the D5500 touchscreen. Probably at least 1 fps more in DX (2 fps in 1.3x crop) and lets keep our hopes for a dedicated AF-ON button and a assignable record button.

  • FredBear

    As they skipped a few and went from D700 to D750 I guess that they’re trying to ‘equalise’ numbering.
    IF a D300 replacement arrives then it would probably be a D350.
    Of maybe the ‘X5X’ series are those with a tilt screen?
    Or ‘half way to the end of the series’?
    Those with knowledge of the Japanese Psyche would probably have a better idea.

    • Captain Megaton

      I have a Japanese Psyche(tm) and I have no clue. Perhaps they are running with the calendar year now? 2013 models have a “3”, 2014 models have a “4”, 2015 models a “5”.

  • doge

    LOL.

    More buzzword garbage instead of real innovation.

    Great Job Nikon execs! You really know how to get people interested in your products.

    • Captain Megaton

      The Sony A6000 has already won. The mid-range APSC dSLR has become uninteresting to the people who might have once considered it seriously, Nikon can pack its model with a touchscreen whatever, it doesn’t matter: people can get the same performance, for the same price, in a far smaller and more convenient package elsewhere.

      • russ

        I own an A6000 and a bunch of Nikon gear. The A6000 is an outstanding body, unless you want to shoot action with a high percentage of in-focus shots and unless you want a sharp lens at a reasonable price and unless you want balance when using a telephoto lens. I use my A6000 with the Sony 20 mm lens as a walk-around landscape and street-sceen camera — for that purpose it clearly beats anything Nikon offers in terms of the combo of size/weight and price/performance. For everything else, a Nikon DSLR is the rational choice. That said, I agree that that the Sony offerings are interestingly innovative and garner well-deserved consumer attention whereas the Nikon DSLRs are boringly iterative. We’re at an inflection point.

        • rt-photography

          I shot video at a wedding with a A6000 and the A7s

          Great iq but crap, the button layout is just, crap. Especially the record button. It just not the right place. You have to constantly change your steady grip to turn it on and off. It should be where the af on button should be but to the left of where it is.

        • Captain Megaton

          The Nikon dSLR is the rational choice … for people who have already decided they want a dSLR. Each year though that’s a smaller and smaller group of people. Indeed: inflection point.

    • Andrew

      You’re an absolute riot 😉 But ha, nothing bad having some fun…

  • Quasimodo

    I always wanted to control a camera with my nose………

  • Global

    Hey, hey! Welcome to the 2010’s, Nikon. 4 years late, but not bad.

    As long as there is an “off” switch, I’m good with it.

  • Cynog

    My own view, from personal experience with a Panasonic GX7 is that touch screens are more trouble than they’re worth. That said, I’m not bothered as long as they can be completely turned off.

    • Captain Megaton

      I find them handy, especially navigating the “info” screen. And anyone who has ever used the arrow buttons with the on-screen keyboard to enter image comments can appreciate the advantage of a touchscreen I think.

  • XNikonShooter

    Nikon is out of touch. Another consumer grade body. Really? Scratching my head when a true upgrade to the D300 would be a camera that many
    dedicated Nikon shooters would love to pair with their full frame bodies.

    • Ceasar Sharper

      Agreed. When I need to increase my ISO, my D300 is a poor companion to my D800

      • XNikonShooter

        I simply got tired of waiting (not to mention NX- Dud) and Canon gave me the crop sensor body I was looking for. I have sold over half of my Nikon glass which included a 400 2.8 VR.I plan to keep my D800 and 14-24 and maybe 200 F2. After using the new 7D I will eventually own the 1DX once I sell more glass. If only Nikon had put the 7100 sensor in the D800 body. This announcement validated my decision. Really sad.

  • Horsee

    Maybe skipping number 4 is cultural. 4 is unlucky number in Japan (also S-Korea and China). They’ve sikpped this number in a lot of stuff. 4 sounds familiar to word “death”.

    • lorenzo

      makes sense. Then let’s say people are still waiting for a D500.

    • Captain Megaton

      D4 being the notable exception.

      • ZoetMB

        And the D40 and D40x as well as the 35mm bodies F401s (N4004s in some markets), F4e, F401s, F401 QD (N4004s), F4s, F4, S4 (rangefinder) and the Cooplix P340, S4400, S9400, S6400, S4200, S4300, L24, S4150, S4000, S640, L14, L4, P4, S4, 4600, 4800, 8400, 4100, 4200, 5400, 4300, 4500, not to mention the Nikon 1 J4.

        So can we now dispose of this myth that Nikon doesn’t use the #4 because of cultural concerns in Asian countries?

      • Horsee

        Yeah, my thought was the same after posting this. I don’t know. They have a different CEO now who believe this? 😀

  • I can’t wait for a touch screen Nikon camera. It will help me shoot sports and moving subjects much more quickly and accurately.

    • Skak

      and if we’re lucky it also a smart phone so you can order a pizza too.

      • I like pepperoni and Pineapple. I hope it’s a menu selection.

    • Andrew

      These low cost Nikon cameras are all starting to have exciting features and the fun factor you expect in top brand electronics devices. They have now hit the high mark of exceptional image quality (IQ) especially with the inclusion of quality kit lens with the D3300 and D5300 consumer series cameras. So our expectations are now much higher. It will be amazing to see some higher end video features in this camera.

      I once paid about $1,000 for a Sony camcorder. It is nice to see that our SLR cameras with their larger image sensors can give us even better quality videos. So yes, I agree with you that the Touch Screen is a nice addition to the D5xxx camera series. It makes recommending this camera to family and friends much easier 😉

  • Guest

    Wonder if this camera is going to have the new 18-55mm lens that was rumored not too long ago that is meant to keep up with the image quality of the new sensors.

  • Captain Megaton

    Nikon are really cranking the D5000 series models lately.

  • Funduro

    No D5400 ! Oh no I can’t handle the out of sequence name ! Oh wait, there’s the evidence the D400 is coming soon, can’t have D5400 and D400 coming out together.

    • ZoetMB

      Actually, if there ever really is a D400, I bet they will skip 400 and call it the D500. Which would make sense if these two cameras represent the same generation of technology, but in different packages (bodies) with similar features but different specs.

  • ValenzTa

    Will it be a tilting screen? Any more specifi
    cations? How many Mp’s??

  • McDonnie

    Great…..D900 too pls

  • rt-photography

    I will only let them release the camera if they also release a mew 18-xxx lens

    • Kynikos

      I doubt you’ll have much to worry about.
      Same old evolving consumer camera, same old evolving craptastic kit lens.

  • halo9

    With the whole number skipping thing going on seems like nikon is obsessed with 5’s. Maybe we might see this throughout the next year and a half with the finale being the D5. So we had D750, now D5500, maybe D7500 or D500 after that or both. They will drop in the D3500. A D850 and D5 will cement the lineup. The D650 is a slippery sucker so might slip off the radar : )

  • Fly Moon

    I have no idea why some people against this update/upgrade? Shouldn’t you be happy if you can get a D5300 cheaper now? Personally, I like this trend! I hope Nikon will release D850 next year with new features from D750! Why not? Who said the cycle should be 3-5 years? Or is it how those people classify “Pro” cameras? Maybe that was in the 1980-2010. But hey, if you could;t fit WiFi or GPS last and you can do it now, why wait for another 1-2 years? Similar to what Apple does with the iPhone! Current iPhone prices drop when there is a new iPhone and they still great iPhones!

  • ZoetMB

    If Nikon is really releasing this in January, they’re either incompetent or insane. If you have a new camera ready, why wouldn’t you make sure it was ready a few weeks earlier so it can be sold for the holiday season? I seem to remember them doing this before, but I can’t remember which model.

    • whisky

      mamma always said… flush out the old before loading up with the new.

      • ZoetMB

        While Nikon has probably become somewhat desperate in trying to get rid of the stock of the old models, because they’re so heavily discounted, there’s far more margin on a new model, which generally sells for full price when first released. So it make more sense to have an old model unsold than a new model.

        And anyone who buys a 5200 or 5300 today is not going to buy a 5500 in the next year.

        • whisky

          it’s not always so black & white. i’ve seen economies of scale reduce parts cost and improve manufacturing efficiencies to the point where they’ve increased margins near the end of a manufacturing cycle. also Nikon is a world wide distributor and some regions would benefit from the higher volumes of a stock blow-out than introducing a new model which makes older cameras appear even more antiquated and even less valuable.

          i guess i just disagree with the characterization “incompetent” or “insane” as i’m confident Nikon knows exactly what they’re doing — flushing out the old cr*p before piling up with the new. whether they announce the next camera i want before or after the holiday season is, to me, irrelevant as i’ll buy it whenever i determine i need it. JMO. happy holidays. 🙂

          • ZoetMB

            Well, let’s agree to disagree. Flushing out the old models is fine, but when you produce something for the mass market, you don’t release it just after Xmas. And if Nikon really knew what they were doing, they wouldn’t have released both the D5200 and the D5300 in the same year, unless they had depleted stock on the D5200 and thought that as long as they were going back to manufacturing, they might as well do a slight upgrade (“continuous improvement”).

            But that clearly wasn’t the case because you can still buy a D5200 today, two years after release and 14 months after the D5300 was released. In fact, at BH, you can still buy an import D90 as well as a U.S. or import D300s.

            “Buying it whenever you need it” is true as you get higher up the line and the equipment is used more by pros or wealthy enthusiasts. But it’s far less true in the mass market where the majority of annual sales takes place between Thanksgiving and Xmas.

            Nikon may still produce some great cameras, but I think it’s been clear for some time that they suck at marketing, customer service, inventory control, software applications and understanding the workflow of their customers, as Thom Hogan likes to point out all the time.

            • whisky

              well, i think you’d be hard pressed to find folk whom disagree that Nikon has, in the past, acted with a significant degree of “irrational exuberance”.

              however i’d like to give Nikon a chance to clean house under their new management structure, and prefer to emphasize looking forward rather than behind. Nikon has bigger issues on it’s plate than to simply cater to impulse buyers at christmas time.

              sure, customer service, marketing, and inventory control has set them up for confrontation with their existing user base, but i believe the swell of new patents being published suggests they’re once again dipping into the Nikon brain trust to promote their capabilities over their rivals. if that means a short term clearance of old inventory while they prep the next generation — i won’t ding them for it.

              same glass of water, but i’m rooting it’s half-full. while it may feel cathartic to label Nikon incompetent or insane, i’ve chosen to read the tea leaves a little differently. only time will tell.

    • whisky

      mamma always said… flush out the old before loading up with the new.

  • MonkeySpanner

    A touchscreen would be fine on Nikon DSLRs if live-view didn’t suck so much. And mostly it sucks because AF is so slow.

  • David Peterson

    Yay, at last, a touch screen! Mirrorless cameras have only already had them for zillion of years…

    But still, nice to see Nikon is getting with the times 🙂

  • Jim Huang

    I really don’t understand the logic of how Nikon named their cameras. This one must be so intense it skips D5400 completely.

  • Kyle

    The current round of pricing on Nikon DX refurbs are simply great if you’re looking to save some $$$ and you’re looking for a value play this season.

    D3300 is $449
    D5300 is $599
    D7100 is $699
    The FX D610 is $1369

    I’m now tempted to get a D5300 for video because of the tilt screen (and photo backup) and a D7100 for photos.

    • Captain Megaton

      At those prices the D7100 looks like the smart pick, unless you want to jump to FX.

  • Carleton Foxx

    I agree. Thank heavens Nikon engineers came to their senses and introduced this useful feature. Now, if they can only give us peaking and zebras, life will be grand. The problem that they’re solving, for you folks who hate touch screens, is that takes multiple button pushes to get Nikons to autofocus outside the very constrained limits of the AF area sensors. With this feature, it’s one touch to get the camera to focus (one hopes). And no, focus-and-recompose is not accurate enough anymore. There’s too much shift. As for light into the viewfinder affecting exposure when working in live view….. That’s what gaff tape is for. If you don’t own at least one roll, you can’t call yourself a real photographer. +1 for every additional color you own.

    • Captain Megaton

      you can’t call yourself a real *video*grapher

      ftfy

      (that’s cool and all, no disrespect … but photographers don’t tape over their viewfinders.)

      • What camera was it that had an internal blind that you could deploy with a lever and it would cover the viewfinder?

        • EnglishPaul

          The F5. I’ve just bought one! 😉

        • Antonio

          In the digital era:
          D1, D1x, D2, D2x, D2h, D3, D3X, D3s, D4, D4s, D700, D800, D800e, D810

      • Carleton Foxx

        I respect no boundaries and gaff tape everything regardless of whether I’m shooting stills or video. It’s also very handy when you want to keep your zoom at one focal length.

  • Carleton Foxx

    I agree. Thank heavens Nikon engineers came to their senses and introduced this useful feature. Now, if they can only give us peaking and zebras, life will be grand. The problem that they’re solving, for you folks who hate touch screens, is that takes multiple button pushes to get Nikons to autofocus outside the very constrained limits of the AF area sensors. With this feature, it’s one touch to get the camera to focus (one hopes). And no, focus-and-recompose is not accurate enough anymore. There’s too much shift. As for light into the viewfinder affecting exposure when working in live view….. That’s what gaff tape is for. If you don’t own at least one roll, you can’t call yourself a real photographer. +1 for every additional color you own.

  • FPS

    No more D9300 news until April 1st.

  • I think number 4 is a big no-no in Japan. Means death or something.

  • Kamen Minkov

    Not yet announced and you’re already not sure why they aren’t going to use the D5400 model name? Come on.

  • Tore Hansen

    The number “4” is similar to death in one or several Asian countries, Panasonic and Olympus has also skipped this number on several models.

  • daniel

    yea, good luck focus str8 on the eye with touch screen, lol

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