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The Nikon D800/D800E replacement will be called D810

Nikon-D800s-coming-soon
I can now confirm the name of the D800/D800E replacement: the new camera will be called D810. The official announcement will be on June 26th. For now there is no change in the rumored specifications.

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  • http://hienhnguyen-photographer.com/ Hien

    The naming of this replacement as the D810 is inconsistent with how they named the D4s. To me, it reveals the somewhat “second-tier status” of the D800/E to Nikon as compared to the flagship D4/s. It is baffling because this camera has been arguably the best all-around full frame camera on the market the past 2 1/2 years, certainly if image quality is the foremost consideration. I switched from using 2 D4′s to 4 D800E’s. For the purpose of what I shoot, nothing is comparable for image quality. To me, it should be the D4x. Having shot with Nikon bodies with built in vertical grips for a decade, the ergonomics of the D4 body is so much better than the D800/E, even with an added vertical grip.

  • Marcel Speta

    as a D3s and D700 owner i am seriously considering to jump into this and bring third brother to other machines :-) I am very curious about ISO, 6fps is already somehow acceptable and higher resolution is welcome for some kind of jobs. Also higher DR than D3s/D700 would be great. So i am fine with this upgrade. Hope they fixed those AF issues. Only the price seems spoiling the feeling.

  • nbm

    Nikon should just hire the Magic Lantern guys to implement the video firmware in the D810. I realize Nikon would lose face but when you are hopelessly behind just recruit talent that actually knows what they are doing. Heck, if you want to save face just open up a back door for ML to create hacks for you. It would only help Nikon increase D810 sales and they have no pro camcorder market to protect.

    • Me

      The issue with the Magic Lantern hacks is that the Canon OS was capable of running code outside of the CPU. The Expeed 3 processor cannot ‘see’ outside of itself. It was bullet-proof code.

      The new Expeed 4 processor has a different memory architecture. You’ll have to wait two years or so for enough Expeed 4s to be in the public’s hands for enough of them to make it into hardware hacker’s hands.

  • bgbs

    Its all about the price. if Nikon plans to charge more for D810 at the time of release than the D800 at the time of release, then we have a problem. In facet we’ll have the same exact problem as with the DF. It will be a criticized camera because at the higher price point it will fail to deliver and impress. If Nikon keeps the price of the Thailand made model a little bit lower than its predecessor, then we have a winner.

  • http://www.mark-fiddian.com MarkLF

    Don’t understand all this moaning about Nikon unless you were unlucky with a D600. I bought a very early D800 and an early D800. The very early one had the focusing issue and Nikon fixed it. The other though relatively early was fine. The camera is fantastic. The range of tones and detail are beautiful. Sure I would like it to be quicker and snappier in focussing and I would like better low light quality but you can’t have everything immediately. I was wrong about the D800e and should have bought one so now the step up from D800 to D810 is an easy decision. One D800 already sold and waiting though no great hurry. Better focussing and another stop for low light, brilliant, and the rest is a bonus. Most people do not need so many frames per sec. Sill, specially at this resolution. It’s all positive unless you are a Canon shooter here for fun or just like to moan.

    • Andy

      Most of the people on photography discussion pages are moaning and groaning about gear that:

      a) They do not own and
      b) Will never own

      It’s basically reverse snobbery. Ignore them.

  • Jérôme Verony

    Anyone with me in wanting a version without integrated flash? I never use the thing and I’m not a fan of it accidentally popping up while handling the camera.

    • http://www.mark-fiddian.com MarkLF

      Occasionally it’s got me out of trouble when being dialled well down as a little fill.

      • brian

        I’d like to see it gone as well. Never ever use it, and more importantly, Nikon keeps on designing the thing so that it limits the 24mm tilt shift.

        • Carleton Foxx

          Don’t curse it. Dremel it.

    • koenshaku

      Plus the integrated flash can act as a commander for slave strobes.

    • bgbs

      The onboard flash is basically the smallest flash trigger you can find on the market today, Everything else is bulky, awkwardly shaped, and adds extra unnecessary weight.

    • Jack

      Would pay 100$ for not having that silly onboard flash.

    • Michiel953

      Gaffer tape

    • Andy

      Well, it’s cheaper than the SU-800 and works well enough as a controller for two groups of strobes. I suspect a lot of people want to get rid of the pop-up flash so that they can say that they have a definitively pro camera.

      Were they to axe it, people would complain that they’re being forced to buy an SU-800.

      • Carleton Foxx

        It’s not the popup flash that differentiates Nikon pro cameras from the amateur cams. It’s the round vs. rectangular eyepieces.

        • http://www.jonathandlopez.com Jonathan D. Lopez

          Having a popup flash is helpful when the SU-800 doesn’t work. I have had a few setups where it simply wasn’t going to work, and I was glad that it was there. Wish I could rotate the SU-800!

          I only wish the built in had 3 groups and the SU had 5 or so groups (but that would require a whole new set of speedlights).

    • Carleton Foxx

      The ability to control speedlights from the camera via the pop-up flash is the reason I bought my first Nikon. Especially when used with the SG-31R IR Panel it is like magic for most subjects. And if it doesn’t work in the automatic modes, the manual mode is always there.
      All the alternatives are either expensive or don’t work reliably. Of course I would prefer the Canon radio system, but that’s not an option for us, is it. And as for the flash popping up unexpectedly, yes, gaffer tape is the solution.

  • John

    I wonder what’s up with Nikon and also Canon. Minor updates in camera’s, predictable and boring stuff all over the place. The real innovation is at Fuji and Sigma at the moment. And Ricoh also. I know Nikon and Canon have a huge product base to defend, but some innovation and out of the box thinking would be welcome.

    • 24×36

      When you already have the best, there’s little need to be “unpredictable.” Leave that to the also-rans.

      • Peter

        That sounds like Nikon and Canon thinking: arrogant.

  • Barista

    This may sound silly, but will the D800 come down in price after the release of the D810?

    • photoroto

      It could even go up, depending on the reception of the D810, and whether or not there are any technical issues. And when Nikon says it will or will not discontinue manufacture of the D800. Nikon only specifies a minimum price (in the US) but dealers are free to jack that up if they want. I notice that a lot of dealers are pushing hard to blow out their factory refurb D800′s.

  • why nikon

    I really hate how nikon is playing this game. Why could they make D800 with good AF, like Canon did with their 5d3 ? We’re really getting laughed at by all canon owners who know that it’s not about sensor, it’s about the snappy instant AF, which also happens to be better for BIF than this D800 AF.

    • why nikon

      why didn’t they make*

    • SkyMeow

      But canon doesn’t have D800.

  • OneLuv

    …soooo, should I take back the D800 I just bought last week in hopes that the price will drop on Thursday?

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