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The latest B&H shipment of Nikon D810 cameras does not have the thermal issue (white dots)

Nikon D810 camera service advisory for thermal issue white dots

The black dot in the tripod socket means that inspection and necessary adjustments have already been made.

After it has been out of stock for a while, B&H just received a new shipment of Nikon D810 DSLRs and they confirmed to me that all cameras in their warehouse already have the fix for the thermal issue (white dots) during long exposures.

I am curious if those "new" cameras will have a different firmware update. If somebody has purchased one, please share the firmware version in the comments section. Thanks!

Update: it seems that the new D810 shipment has firmware update C 1.01 (before the thermal issue fix, the firmware was C 1.00).

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  • Stefan Georgiev

    Too fast to be true.
    I suspect this is only B&H move to prevent (decrease) the number of the returned cameras.

    • ZoetMB

      What are you saying – that B&H opened all the boxes and painted the white dot black? Because if that’s what you think, you can take off your aluminum foil hat now.

    • Ms.KrystalMeth

      [URL=http://media.photobucket.com/user/3877Conundrum87/media/redani.gif.html][IMG]http://i790.photobucket.com/albums/yy189/3877Conundrum87/redani.gif[/IMG][/URL]

    • http://loewald.com/ Tonio Loewald

      No, it just means they probably knew about the issue before it became public, and had a fix in the works. It’s quite common for computer hardware and software companies to have patches out for a product almost immediately after it ships, and cameras these days are more computer than anything else.

    • neversink

      That’s an outrageous and irresponsible comment. To accuse B&H of purposely deceivng customers is wrong and unethical of you. Where is your proof and what is your motive of such accusations. Shame on you. I’m sure they wouldn’t do this as it would taint their reputation.
      I was at B&H yesterday morning. (I am back in the states for a month before I return to Africa.) The salesman I have been going to for years told me that B&H had no D810s in stock and that they were backordered. They must have arrived at the warehouse without his knowledge sometime in the day.
      I did play with a beat up demo D810 (which had some AF issues because it had probably been knocked around in the store and dropped) and took some test shots with the following lenses – 85 f/1.4, 200 f/2, 50 f/1.4 and 300 f/2.8. I also had my D800 with me for comparison testing on the same lenses. I shot fine jpeg only on the D810 – Stupid me – I should have shot RAW also. That would probably tell me more.
      Haven’t yet imported them into Lightroom, but just looking at them on the two camera’s LEDs is quite striking. The images of the D810, at least on the 85 and 50, appear more contrasty and sharper with slightly richer colors…. I will go back and retest on RAW…
      I could see very little or no difference between the two cameras on the images taken with the 200 and 300 lenses. They have incredible glass. i was surprised to see differences with the 85, which is also an incredibly sharp lens, but a slow focuser. (Even my version is slow.)
      I was also shooting at relatively high ISOs for a large part of the test (1,600 to 3,000) due to the light in the store.
      The 200 is heavier and tougher to wield than my 500mm f/4 but the 300 is perfect in the hand. Not a lightweight lens, but well balanced. Supposedly, the 200 is sharper, but I couldn’t tell the difference. The 300 f/2.8 will be my newest lens.
      No copies of the new 600 Fluorite/fluorine lens or the replacement of the TC1.4 teleconverter in stock or on the demo shelves. Might be a year before we see these.
      At first glance I am very impressed by the D810 and will probably sell my D800 in Africa. (i’ll get a better price there.)

    • Andrew

      When cameras are returned/exchanged for firmware updates, it is time to go back to the $5,000 days when only professionals will buy these devices. A firmware update is not a repair, it is a function of modern software wizardry. When a company like Nikon produces 40,000 units of these cameras per month, the need for more firmware updates will increase as users find more ways to test and use their cameras.

      • Toecutter

        Fortunately,even Nikon know better than you

        • Andrew

          For a man of few words, you really have not said anything! Fixing a software problem is not the same as fixing a hardware problem, that is my point, thought I did not explicitly state it. I download firmware fixes for my Windows PC from time to time, returning a camera and getting a new one as if it is defective for a firmware issue makes no sense. Such behavior increases the cost of these cameras for all of us as manufacturers have to factor such costs in their product pricing. For me, a repair is when you have to make hardware adjustments.

    • Wade Marks

      This “white dots” issue is rapidly becoming a non-issue, as it should be.

      We have a problem that manifests itself in only a rare use case: 1.2X crop mode, long exposure, LENR off.

      Now keep in mind that it would be very rare to use the 1.2X crop mode in a long exposure. People usually use 1.2X crops for getting closer to action and wildlife, both of which require fast shutter speeds. And those using long exposure are usually landscape photogs, on a tripod of course, and want wider angle fields of view, not a crop mode.

      We also have a very quick response from Nikon, with an easy software fix.

      So problem goes away quickly…people are more than thrilled with their D810′s.

      • JTK3

        Exactly. It’s a fairly minor glitch that exists under a limited range of settings and is hard to see without some serious post processing and close scrutiny. My D810 arrived at Nikon LA on the 20th; it was in repair status on the 21st and is currently listed as “billing”, which means repair complete and shipping back to me. Granted, I’m NPS and got moved to the front of the line, but I think Nikon is doing right by D810 owners in this deal.

  • Ezra Perez Pages

    I got mine from B&H and it still needs to be sent.

    • saywhatuwill

      When did you buy it? Today? That’s what the request was. If you purchased it within the last day or 29 I’d return the camera to B&H and have a new one sent to you.

      • Ezra Perez Pages

        No this was preordered before release and it arrived early this month. So I thought that this unit was part of their “latest shipment”. I can’t return the camera since I live in Dubai. However, I called Nikon Dubai today and they said they can take the camera and it will just be a “few days”.

        So much negativity over this story. It’s such an amazing piece of camera and I truly think, Nikon have built a near perfect camera.

        • saywhatuwill

          Yeah, I know what you mean that it’s an amazing camera. Mine was affected too, but I just sent it to get fixed. I don’t expect it back for a couple weeks.

          • br0xibear

            “everyone and their mother chimes in and says the same thing and the problem snowballs from there.”
            But that’s also one of the good things. If it wasn’t for people across various forums/blogs posting about sensor dirt on their D600 bodies it might have been a bigger shambles than it was ?
            But I understand what you’re saying about finding issues that may just be on a particular body rather than the every body produced.

          • julianliues

            did you return yours? I just got a RMA number for mine.

            • saywhatuwill

              I didn’t return mine since I was beyond the return time. Also I had over 1400 shots taken with the camera so it wouldn’t be fair for another person to get my used camera. I just sent my camera to the Nikon facility. I wish the Nikon repair place was still in San Francisco like it was in the 1980s. It was so convenient to just walk in and hand them my stuff. I even got to know the technicians pretty well.

            • julianliues

              Hi, I need to return my camera because it also has a problem of taking much less photo than it claimed, like 300 as supposed to 1200 shots, I already tested it. I need to return soon or else I will miss the return window. But I lost couple of small piece, like the USB and HDMI cable clip and the battery terminal cover. Do you still have these? And can I buy them from you? I can buy you another set of cable clip later when they are available online. I would greatly appreciate your help! -Julian

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      They just got the new shipment with “fixed” cameras today.

      • Ezra Perez Pages

        I just took my camera to the service center and it was just a 10-15 minute wait/fix. Black dot and Firmware update .005

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      They just got the new shipment with “fixed” cameras today.

  • KT

    Unfortunately, the process of fixing the long exposure white dots issue interferes with the proper calibration of some AF points. As a result, we regret to inform you that some cameras might experience an erratic behaviour while searching for focus on fast moving subjects. This should not be of concern for studio or still life photography. For everyone else, stay tuned, we are working a solution.

    • saywhatuwill

      You are aware that people on photography sites don’t have a sense of humor and will take your comments seriously and thus will spread your comment as fact. Thanks for single handedly bringing down the D810 and Nikon Corporation. All its employees are indebted to you when they don’t get their paychecks.

    • koenshaku

      Troll kid

  • John Lam

    should be fixed by firmware or have to send back to nikon?

    • JTK3

      Nikon has clearly stated the cameras that are affected need to go to a Service Center, which suggests there’s something other than/in addition to firmware being done. Someone else on the initial thread said they were told the Service Center process is “15 or 20 minutes”.

      • John Lam

        ok

      • Patrick McKay

        Yep. I was told it’ll be about a half hour process.

    • TheShepherd

      Their service announcement states ‘service centers’ and a description of what they will be doing. (updating firmware and revising pixel compensation software – the latter historically accomplished through remapping the sensor, and doesn’t take very long.)
      In that context it would be surprising if it can eventually be addressed through downloadable firmware not requiring a trip to Nikon.. If user correctable at some point it would also suggest that every sensor suffers from the same exact hot pixels, which would also suggest Nikon could/should simply undue whatever they did in playing with the gain to prevent the problem to begin with.

      • John Lam

        ok thanks

      • Florian

        Do you happen to have a link explaining “revising pixel compensation software”? :)

        • TheShepherd

          Not directly as in a link to anything discussing the process in-depth – though if you get a hold of a technician that feels like being informative I am sure they can give you a brief description of the process.
          Here is how it was explained to me when I sent in a D300s for remapping.

          Most Nikon bodies have ‘pixel compensation software’ already in the camera which applies a pixel map/mask if needed to ‘compensate’ for sensor/pixel anomalies. This basic compensation is applied to all images regardless of camera settings as it is typically used to address dead/lazy pixels discovered during assembly – and if needed, as a method of addressing issues that arise/grow through use and age. On many cameras this generic map can sometimes be triggered to update itself through enabling the mirrorup/cleaning option in the menu, in which the camera reads electrical falloff values across the sensor (mapping those holding charge the longest as potential misbehaving pixels) however not all camera bodies have that menu feature (ie:lower-end bodies).
          *There are numerous forums across the internet describing the mirror lockup for cleaning procedure for addressing typical ‘hot’ pixels.*

          Additionally some of the higher-end bodies have the ability to store/apply individual masks based on shooting settings, such as under higher ISO settings, longer shutter speeds, etc.
          This is the portion of the compensation software needing to be ‘revised’ in the D810 because the number and location of the pixels will vary/increase/decrease depending on the sensitivity setting, shutter speed, sensor matrix readout (crop modes) etc..
          Without getting too deep into it all, the technician will create a separate map for different settings (sensitivity, shutter, exposure compensation – whatever Nikon has tested being affected by the issue) so a specific map, specific to each camera/sensor, will be applied at those specific settings.

          That is pretty close to how it was explained to me (been a few years) and I am sure some details and procedures were ‘dumbed down’ by the technician for the conversational context in which we were discussing the procedure (or possibly just the way some engineer explained it to him, heh) however I do know that if your camera needs to be remapped more than what the mirrorup/cleaning thing can address it does require a trip to a service center.

          I would guess the firmware update portion is an attempt to do a bit more gain tweaking to reduce the affected ranges without significantly impacting base performance. Likely downloadable at some point.

  • RGG2012

    My NPS Priority is shipping today after I sent in my first D810 for this issue last week. I will post the firmware once it comes in Monday!

    • saywhatuwill

      That’s pretty fast. Since I’m a mere mortal, mine is on the slow boat to Los Angeles (400 miles away) and probably won’t get there until tomorrow. From there it’s anyone’s guess when I’ll get it back.

    • JTK3

      Mine arrived at LA today (sent yesterday) and is NPS Priority as well…..

  • koenshaku

    Well.. bumps are always to be expected with launch products. The same can be even said when going to see a movie on the first day some people will get uncomfortable seats. This is partly why it is good to wait a bit, but everyone loves bragging rights ^_^

    • saywhatuwill

      I bought first because I figured Nikon would have gotten the bugs out of it since they didn’t want a firestorm of problems again. Also, I didn’t want to chance getting someone else’s seconds.

    • JTK3

      I expected Nikon would have burned the midnight oil on the D810 after the 800 and 600 issues, and it looks like a minor glitch they caught about 5900 cameras into the production run. I put about 3400 actuations on the shutter before sending it in with no problems of the sort reported, although I didn’t shoot within those parameters. But what I did shoot was flat out impressive and even with down time for the fix I’ll be back shooting the D810 before most folks get theirs…….

  • Mark

    New firmware is: C 1.01

  • Florian

    a) Is there any DIFFERENCE between a repaired camera and a camera which was a “good” serial number right from the beginning? Does anybody know?

    b) Does the new B&H batches have “good” serial numbers or black dot marks in the tripod thread?

    Thx for any info :)

    • Mark

      a) No. The only difference, whether it’s done at the factory or after you send it in, is an noninvasive firmware update that requires no disassembly.

      b) Doesn’t matter – just check the FW version.

      Also, Nikon told me the following when I asked why user’s can’t do the update: “We are currently monitoring customer feedback, but at this time the cameras need to be sent to our facilities for the update”. That suggests that if enough people complain, they may let us do it ourselves, but we would need more information.

      • Florian

        Hmm, thanks for your reply… but I’m a bit skeptical/confused: If there was the theoretical possibility of fixing the problem by a simple firmware update done by the user/customer himself – wouldn’t it be in Nikon’s interest to try everything to do it this way??

        - Much less company image loss compared to the repair/sending in scenario unfolding now.
        - Much cheaper.
        - Much easier for everyone.

        If it COULD be done by simple firmware upgrade but actuall is done via sending in cameras…. well, I simply don’t get it.

        I somehow suspect just flashing some new firmware is not the whole story?

        • Mark

          I completely agree with you, I am just relaying what was said to me. It’s entirely possible it was a standard “customer service” response to make me feel like my voice was being heard. The other possibility is that it’s more complicated than a normal firmware update, and the customer service nightmare dealing with improperly installed firmware might be even more of an undertaking than just doing it themselves.

          It takes 10-20 minutes though, and we know for a fact it requires no opening up of the camera. Nikon allows people to sit in the waiting room while they do it. The way it was worded to me made it sound like they hook it up to a computer device via one of the external ports, and it’s done there.

        • gpelpel

          Could be that they might have other smaller issues to fix as well and don’t want to release 2 firmware updates in a short period. What they are doing now is taking take of the few who really use the camera in the extreme conditions the white spots appear.
          Nikon should then release a general firmware update when they fill they have there bugs squared out.
          Again it’s my assumption, not something written in stone.

        • Florian

          My local Nikon Service Center told me the fix can be done without opening the camera by a simple firmware update.

          I phoned up Nikon directly just to confirm whether the fixed camera would be IDENTICAL to a body of the new batch. I mean, whether the only difference would be WHEN the firmware update was played in: BEFORE or AFTER selling the body.

          -> The answer was not definate, but implying there IS a difference. Now I’m confused….

          • Andrew

            I don’t think it is confusing. Firmware updates are pretty standard stuff. But the Nikon staff may have been trained not to answer any question that may confuse the situation. Even if you purchase your camera six months from now, it is completely acceptable for newer camera builds to have some slight functional difference. A parts supplier may make a slight adjustment that may need a corresponding software update from Nikon.

            • Florian

              Sorry, I don’t see a strong connection between my and your posting ;)

              I said it is confusing to me that two sources say different things:
              a) Nikon Service Center: After firmware update the camere is IDENTICAL to cameras sold later (having been fixed already before selling)
              b) Direct contact to Nikon: camera having been fixed afterwards is NOT IDENTICAL…

            • JTK3

              Read your response – you yourself said the answer from a Nikon rep ” was not definate but impying there is a difference”. The Service Center told you the camera post fix is identical to the later production models – I’d go with the Service Center, they’re the ones doing the actual work here. A worker bee manning the phones may not be privvy to every detail.

  • Ian Lindo

    For all the naysayers out there, I’d honestly like to see them manage creating and publishing a product this complex to thousands of people and not make a SINGLE mistake.

    For all that was fixed, and all that could’ve gone wrong, a little itty bitty firmware hiccup is really nothing to get entirely bent out of shape over. But people will anyways, because complaining is fun!

    • br0xibear

      Hi Ian,

      I understand what you’re saying but I’m not sure it’s that simple.
      Had this “mistake” been Nikon’s only recent problem then yes, fair enough…but it comes on the back of other issues like the D800 AF, D600 sensor dirt. That has damaged the Nikon brand for a certain section of owners/customers. For this “little itty bitty firmware hiccup” to happen again puts another doubt in those peoples minds about Nikon.
      When the D810 was announced I read several posts saying they were going to wait before buying incase there were any problems with the first batch of D810s. People thought they were being silly, Nikon wouldn’t alow something like that to happen again…but here we are.
      I bet even more potential D750 buyers will be waiting a month or two instead of being on the pre order list this time round.

      • dredlew

        It is NOT a mistake and Nikon is not being silly or incapable or whatever you want to call it.

        It’s a production issue, plain and simple. – Given the nature of how mass production works, this is to be expected. It’s physically and economically impossible to create a mass-produced product as complex as this without any issues. Even as issues are being adjusted and fixed as production goes on, it’ll never get to a point where every single output is issue-free.

        Now keeping that in mind, a working professional who’s livelihood depends on such a product would:

        a) never buy a first release
        b) unless he/she has a backup

        If one is such a working professional and has violated point a) or b), stop complaining right now and take it as a lesson to follow point a) and/or b) in the future.

        Having said that, it is one (acceptable) thing to have production issues, it’s another thing how you deal with them on the customer service side. It’s the latter where Nikon needs to get better…

        • br0xibear

          Hi dredlew,

          You didn’t read what I wrote, or you didn’t read it properly…at no point did I say Nikon were ”
          being silly or incapable” as you put it.
          When any company has a high profile screw up, like Nikon did with the D600, then you’d expect that company to be even more careful that nothing remotely like that happens for their next big product.
          Nikon, like many companies, has a reputation and level of quality associated with it, when they fall below those levels it harms the brand. When they fall again and again the harm can turn into real damage.

          • Andrew

            You are actually wrong on this count. Comparing a firmware update with past issues makes no sense. You most likely would not have encountered this glitch. This appears to be the type of issue that is common with all manufacturing processes.

            Nikon is pushing the state of the art and they need to take the risk to produce exceptional photographic equipment. Firmware updates is a common thing with advanced computing and electronics devices. In fact, practically every computer software comes with known issues.

            This does not harm their image among most professional photographers. You should know by now that if you do not want to experience issues with a new camera, then wait a few months.

            • br0xibear

              Hi Andrew,

              No, I don’t agree with what you’re saying.
              Had this been a firmware update like any other, ie you go to the Nikon site, download the latest firmware and install, then yes fair enough…but this is Nikon asking owners to send their bodies in.
              Nikon themselves say it’s more than a firmware update… “They will keep your camera, and modify some of the image sensor adjustment values and update your camera’s firmware to resolve this issue”.
              You’re right about waiting when a new product is released. Had the previous issues been spread out then it probably wouldn’t have mattered too much, but because it was one after the other I think it is damaging, maybe not for most professionals as you say, but to the brand in general…and going by Nikon’s recent financial report and cutbacks it’s something they can’t afford.

            • Spy Black

              As I said in another post, Nikon is damned if they do and damned if they don’t. Nikon is actually taking the right steps this time around. They are acknowledging the problem and immediately addressing it.

              This, of course, is what they should have done in the first place with the D600, but they are doing it now with the D810 issue, and I will bet any other issues that arise in future camera releases.

              New products will have the potential for problems. Not all, but it happens. When a manufacturer immediately acknowledges and addresses it, then you have to cut them some slack and give them credit for it. We need to let bygones be bygones. The D600 happened. I know, I own one (and no, I haven’t sent it back yet). It’s time to move on.

            • Andrew

              I hear your argument and it is well thought out. But the scope of the adjustment does not seem to reflect the issue reported. It is quite likely that Nikon is making additional adjustments in line with their ongoing practice of enhancing critical components as they develop new algorithms. And besides, who is to say that they are not keeping aspects of the firmware proprietary by keeping it locked up in their service centers.

              The fact that Nikon keeps pushing the state-of-the-art is reason enough for their brand to stay strong. Nikon is still the #1 photographic brand. The company has experience two major natural disasters while continuing their aggressive effort in introducing newer camera models at a faster rate than anytime in their history. The complexity of their operation and technology is an absolutely daunting engineering task. What is surprising is that we are now depending on expert labs to determine whether our cameras are absolutely flawless by discovering problems that 99% of users would never encounter.

          • Nobody Cares

            Assuming this fixes the issue, it’s a pretty minor issue. It’s not like the d600, which was never really fixed nor the D800, which took 7 or 8 months to fix and was barely acknowledged and allegedly the fix on existing bodies was not a great fix.

          • dredlew

            I read very well what you wrote and I responded appropriately. “…whatever you want to call it” is a figure of speech and can be addressed to anyone, and it was meant to be addressed to anyone complaining (for the wrong reasons).

            However, it seems that you did not understand my post properly. The “high profile screw up” you mention has nothing to do with the quality that Nikon produces. But it has everything to do with how they communicate with, and service the customers. And THAT’s their issue… which, I pointed out.

      • Ian Lindo

        Thing is, as others have pointed it out, their true mistake with the D600 was not having poor QC, but failing to acknowledge it.

        Remember that these companies are still run by human beings, who are bound to make mistakes. The best they can possibly do, is pardon themselves and service their products accordingly. I think it’s much more reasonable to expect a company to make mistakes and fix them, then to NEVER make any mistakes at all.

    • JTK3

      Well said!

  • gpelpel

    I got a return label yesterday but decided to wait before sending the camera to Nikon. I suspect they will get quite a bunch in the first week and the load will lessen in a few weeks. It should become faster to get the camera back then.

    Before making my decision I run the test suggested by Nasim Mansurov at Photography Life who first reported the issue.

    It is a very minute bug. I shot 1s, 10s, and 30s exposures at 100 ISO with some very dark areas in the frame. The white dots only appears in the dark areas after extreme treatment in PS or Lightroom; shadows opening to the max, clarity bumped to 50, and sharpness bumped to the max. The 1s exposure is not affected, the white dots are barely visible at 10s, and visible at 30s. If visible you need to be at 100% magnification to notice them and there are about 1 affected pixel for an area of roughly 200 pixels by 200 pixels.
    So mostly large print makers are affected.

    Now, if you turn Long Exposure Noise Reduction (NR) on, the problem is completely gone.

    • saywhatuwill

      I shot photos taken at 1 minute and didn’t see the problem. However, I did use the long exposure NR. I sent the camera to Nikon anyway.

      If you look at past videos on Nikonrumors you’ll see a video taken at the Nikon service facility. The stack of boxes was pretty darn high and there were numerous boxes. I don’t think waiting a week or two is going to make a difference in wait time.

    • Kartken

      Photography Life was not the first reporting this issue.
      One of them reported in July while Nasim reported on August 11
      http://www.trichardsen.com/blog/nikon-d810-and-why-i-am-returning-it

      • gpelpel

        Thanks for the correction.
        Didn’t read that blog but sounds interesting.

  • Ms.KrystalMeth

    Nikon needs to do what they have always done in the past..ship this bs over to China! I thought they always sent their defective worthless shit over to Red China. lol

    • umeshrw

      And then they will screw nikon’s happiness over it, just like in case of D600!

  • Craig

    I returned my D810 to a Big Box store I only had it 10 days. Then Called B&H and Verified that their stock was not part of the ‘service advisory’ before I saw this post. I bought a new one from B&H and saved on Taxes. No D810 for a few days. I got a D5200 for back up.

  • Ms.KrystalMeth

    I think Nikon should give everyone for their massive troubles a new kitten or puppy. Oh Nikon…please don’t send North Korea a kitten or puppy..they will just end up eating it. Thanks.

  • Patrick McKay

    I’ve got one of the affected D810′s. Just got off the phone with Nikon Canada, Richmond, BC, and they told me that if I can wait about half an hour at their facility, then they’ll have the inspection/firmware update completed, and ready to return. Not bad.

  • Toby

    I’ve got one with no painted black dot, but does not appear affected (30 second exposure @f/16 with lenscap on shows no dots… Is there a better way to test?

    • http://www.gradyphoto.com/ Pete Grady

      Not sure…maybe DxO will design a test and publish comparisons so a lot of us can feel bad about owning cameras that don’t do well when asked to do things none of us will actually ever need to do.

    • gpelpel

      Open the shadows to the max, bump clarity to 50 and sharpness to the max. View at 100% at least, you should see white dots repeated on a regular pattern, 1 dot every about 200 pixels on the horizontal and on the vertical.
      So it’s not apparent on most situation but could be on large prints where the shadow detail has been recovered to the extreme.

      It’s only visible if Long Exposure NR was turned off.

      • Toby

        Nikon now has an advisory posted, and you can check serial numbers to see if you are affected. I am, and I guess I will be sending it in… Darn.

  • Neopulse

    I actually thought the white dots at one point is was specs of dust or whatnot that were getting heated up by the sensor during long exposures that made it visible since it has such high pixel count per area and at low ISOs. Glad to know it’s an actual issue that has been addressed by Nikon.

  • Mrpong

    This defect or problem is a joke among sony A7r users. Nikon uses Sony’s sensor but Sony A7r has never been reported for this kind of problem. It seems to be true that Sony is superior in terms of firmware to control the output of their own sensor.

    • http://www.gradyphoto.com/ Pete Grady

      Perhaps, but not superior in much else. Laugh all you want but I don’t see too many Sonys at the Olympics or the White House press corps.

    • Fark

      Sensors are a platform customized for each client. For example, Nikon uses different micro lenses from Sony on the same sensor. Moreover, the analogue to digital converter is different, plus everything after that.

      Moreover, given how many manual steps is required to make this issue visible, it’s minor even if you do long exposures.

  • Kurt Story

    So I have a D810 with a ser nr. that Nikon says is affected by this issue. I think I’ve been able to duplicate this problem at ISO 64 shooting from 24s to 60s+. But this “noise” is really subtle–they are single pixels, sometimes with a slight halo, but never bright white. They are easily removed by running the image through Photoshop’s “dust + scratches” filter set to 1 pixel with negligible loss to IQ. If that’s all this is, I’ll wait for a firmware fix or just fix them in post-processing.

  • John Lam

    I contacted Nikon netherlands, they confirm me its just a firmware update, nothing else.
    I wait for the user firmware.

  • Ahmad Al-Joboori

    From my experience with Canon, and the same applies to Nikon, The rule of thumb is never buy the first or second production batches.

    • Eno

      I think this applies to the other manufacturers as well.

      • Ahmad Al-Joboori

        2nd rule, never buy from other manufacturers :)

        • Eno

          LOL. I don’t agree with this second rule…

    • Nobody Cares

      This applies to pretty much everything. Don’t buy a video game on release, unless you want to deal with lots of bugs.

  • Raymond

    my d810 bring me good pictures, more than those white dots, we need LENR anyway, just keep shooting and enjoy, i will fix the issue until i visit nikon facility next time,
    http://www.nikon.com.hk/en_HK/service-and-support/nikon-service-advisory.tag/en_Asia/service_advisory_notices/d810_service_advisory.dcr

  • Indrajit Dutta

    If anyone has bought D810 off the new stock that B&H received today, please could you confirm if your serial number still shows as ‘not affected’ (when entered in Nikon’s D810 service advisory webpage) or does it still show as ‘affected’ but has the ‘black-dot’?

    + If it is the former then the assumption would be that the new ones hitting the shelves are coming out of the production line without this issue/defect

    + If it is the later then we can assume that these were originally affected but fixed (possibly @ Nikon warehouses) before putting up on the retail shelves.

    • Craig

      I ordered mine from them yesterday. after returning one with affected serial. i’ll keep you posted.

      • Indrajit Dutta

        Thanks Criag

        • Guest

          New one has ‘Dot’ from B & H. havent turned it on to check firmware but one can assume it is the updated one. difference in serials was about 8000
          old serial was 3000###.

          • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

            Thanks, I will post this online if you don’t mind.

            • Indrajit Dutta

              So looks like Nikon is locally putting the fix before releasing the units to the retailers. Assuming the production line itself is not fixed yet.

          • Indrajit Dutta

            Thanks Craig. I got mine in India yesterday :
            1) Black Dot
            2) Firmware C1.01
            3) Shows as ‘not affected’ on the advisory webpage

        • Craig

          here the new one from B&H , tiny black dot in it. I havent turned it on but I would assume the firmware is updated. Differnce in serials was about 8000 old one was 3000###

          ( photo doesnt seem to post )

          • Indrajit Dutta

            Thanks Craig. I got mine in India yesterday :
            1) Black Dot
            2) Firmware C1.01
            3) Shows as ‘not affected’ on the advisory webpage

  • http://MDougherty.com/ Mike D

    I did a quick check on the B&H site and I couldn’t find a DSLR body that wasn’t “in stock”. Hmmm. Either production planning has really improved or demand is off.

    • neversink

      They were probably all back ordered or they haven’t yet updated their site. I wonder how long the waiting list is for the D810 at B&H and elsewhere???

      • Craig

        got one no problem yesterday (wed)
        and should arrive tomorrow.

        • neversink

          Enjoy….

  • neversink

    is anyone else feeling that perhaps this issue is more than firmware? Otherwise, why not just put out new firmware online so everyone can download?? From my tests yesterday at B&H on their demo model, and comparing with my D800, this is a very sharp camera.

    • Andrew

      The only thing I can imagine is that if there is a power loss for whatever reason while updating, it may brick your camera. Or more likely it may have some pretty proprietary software that Nikon does not want to release to the masses.

    • br0xibear

      Maybe…or maybe that’s the price you pay for 36MP in a FX size sensor?
      The advisory notice states “even after cameras are serviced to resolve this issue, bright spots may be more noticeable in exposures longer than 30s than they were in images captured by previous cameras with the same exposure time”

  • Mark Lerner

    I ordered my D810 on Monday from B and H and I just received it today. It has a “dot” that looks like pen or marker in the tripod socket. The firmware versions are “C” 1.01 and “L” 2.005. my serial number is 3010035. The box had been opened and camera unwrapped and rewrapped, I’m assuming for the fix.

    • ninpou_kobanashi

      OMG, they magic marker’s your body! Call the police! (^_^).
      BTW, a SN is showing.

      • Neopulse

        It’s a good thing it’s showing, gives an idea his model line that got the update. Also chances are it’s already registered.

        • ninpou_kobanashi

          I personally would redact the last 2 digits. But that’s probably just me (^_^).

  • Glambike

    See what I mean about buying hugely expensive prestige items (can we say bling?) to wear around your neck before your neighbor does? There is often more than a top price to pay. Wait people. All I have to say is WAIT.

  • Aaron Feinbrerg

    This has been an issue with the D800 from the start….drives me insane.

    • Neopulse

      My old D800 didn’t seem to have the issue although did quite a few long exposures (in RAW format) with a Hoya NDX400 filter on my 50mm f1/4G (at f/8-11 as I vaguely remember) when I was in Colonia,Uruguay for a couple of weekends last year. And processed it at the time in LR4. So maybe it didn’t affect every model.
      But can’t say I dedicate myself to doing landscapes, just for fun did a few and didn’t notice any bright white dots.

    • mikeswitz

      If this issue “drives me insane”, I hope you never owned a D600! And if you did I hope you never owned a gun. ;=p.

  • mrterrabyte

    Oddly, I had a ‘Pixel Defect Compensation’ performed on my fairly flawless D200 way back in 2009 (by my approved Nikon repair Centre here in Melbourne, Aus. They never explained exactly what it was, but my D200 never really had any image quality issues I was aware of either before, nor seemed to suffer after the ‘correction’ was done.

    • http://www.pbase.com/reimar Reimar Gaertner

      I just got mine done at Nikon Canada Mississauga, and I also now have firmware C 1.01 and L 2.005
      I wish I had jotted down my lens fine tune values, since these (and all other settings) were wiped out. I’ll have to do them all over again -arrgh!

      • Craig

        does yours have the ‘dot’? mine does. ( off topic) how does one fine tune a lens?

        • http://www.pbase.com/reimar Reimar Gaertner

          Yeah, somebody poked a sharpy in there. I guess they don’t want to do what they did more than once.

          I fine tune using the dot method. Set up a tripod and your largest aperture and a high contrast target perpendicular to the camera. Set an AF point (AF-S S is best for this), go to live view (the same focus area will be selected) and press the AF-ON button (half press is disabled for this routine – and the rest of the time for me). You don’t take any pictures for this method.
          Turn LV off, and half-press the shutter button and look at the focus indicator. Adjust the fine tune value and determine when the dot stays on from the left arrow side and then the right arrow side. Your fine tune value is the middle of this range. I use center point for this, but you can double check outer points too. Also check at different distances. If a zoom lens, at different focal lengths. In the end, take a compromise value that’s good for most situations. Good Luck.

  • RGG2012

    Firmware on the replaced D810 is C1.01 L2.005

  • Cyberagent

    Ordered a D810 from B&H on Wednesday 08/20/2014 and received today 08/22/2014. Serial number is 3005xxx. There is NOT a black dot on the tripod hole, it’s just silver. However, the firmware versions are C 1.01 L 2.005. Maybe they forgot to mark this one? Either way it saves me a drive out to Melville LI.

    • SkyMeow

      I took my D810 to Nikon Service center for this update. It got back with firmware version C 1.01, L 2.005. But they didn’t mark a black dot on the tripod hole.

  • Patrick McKay

    Just back from visiting Nikon, in Richmond, BC, and like they told me on the phone, it was a quick servicing for the D810: like 15 minutes, done! But when I got home, I noticed that they didn’t give me a black dot :~( lol. Fast & friendly service though.
    It seems kind of odd that Nikon didn’t simply release a general firmware download/update, to address this right across the board. Maybe, because of how they blew it with the D600 issue, they wanted to spin this to regain customer loyalty/support. Either way, it’s a moot point to me. I hope this is an indication of a change, though, with Nikon’s managing of product support.
    BTW, I’m extremely happy with the upgrade I made from my D800E, which was already a stellar camera. The new screen alone, is SO MUCH better for live view focusing.
    Now, I’m waiting, along with many others to see what the specs will be for the new D750,…

  • julianliues

    Anybody here can do me a favor? My D810 has some problems besieds thermal issue and I need to return my camera. I need to return within several days or else I will miss the return window. The problem is I lost couple of small piece, like the USB and HDMI cable clip and the battery terminal cover. I never thought I need to return my camera since I tested it good the first day. Anybody here still have these pieces and like to sell them to me? I can buy you another set of cable clips later when they are available online. I would greatly appreciate your help! Email : kelvinliues@gmail.com -Julian

  • Pablo Larenas

    when will the new firmware for download to everybody ?

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I am not sure if they will make it available for everybody.

  • Ol’ Pickle Pony

    I filled out the form to see if my camera is affected but never printed the shipping label.

    How long do you think Nikon is OK with us waiting before sending in? I don’t want to send it in for a while.

    • Ol’ Pickle Pony

      I spoke with Nikon USA. They said we can send it in whenever.

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