Nikon D850 specifications recap


  
  
I tried to put together all known Nikon D850 specifications into one post - please comment if I have missed something and I will update the list:

  • 45.75MP full frame CMOS sensor
  • New and improved version of SnapBridge
  • No built-in GPS
  • Tiltable LCD (3.2", 2.36 million dots)
  • Fully functional touchscreen: supports touch AF, touch shutter and touch menu
  • Memory card slots: one SD and one XQD
  • AF system from the D5 (153 points, 130% frame coverage compared to the D810, all AF points @ -3EV,  middle/center crosshair sensor @-4EV)
  • New smaller AF point
  • No built-in flash
  • Back illuminated buttons
  • Joystick selector
  • Built-in Bluetooth and Wi-Fi
  • 8K time-lapse video capabilities
  • 4k UHD video in FX format (with no crop)
  • No EVF or hybrid viewfinder
  • Slo-mo full HD 120fps video
  • The SD slot will support UHS-II
  • Improved LiveView split-screen display
  • Improved silent shooting mode: fully-silent, no-sound electronic shutter in live view (6 fps silent shooting, no mechanical movement, can shoot up to 30fps @ 8MP with the electronic shutter)
  • Improved battery life
  • Lighter than the D810
  • Native ISO range: 64-25,600
  • ISO 64 extendable down to ISO 32 (Lo1 = 32, Hi 2 = 108,400)
  • 7fps without grip, 9fps with grip (MB-D18a battery grip and the EN-EL18a battery)
  • 51 images raw buffer at 14-bit RAW
  • 0.75x optical viewfinder (largest ever on a Nikon FX cameras)
  • 180k RGB meter
  • No AA filter
  • Supports for Nikon wireless transmitter WT-7
  • Built-in focus stacking: up to 300 pictures with up to 10 levels of focusing steps (still need external software)
  • Price will be CNY 23,999 or around $3,600 (source: Chinese forum)
  • Announcement date could be August 16th
  • RAW sizes: small, medium, large
  • New 1:1 mode
  • New natural light AWB

Like the new Nikon D850 Facebook page and join the growing Nikon D850 Facebook group for a more detailed coverage of the upcoming announcement.

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  • Eric

    Lighter weight and silent shooting? I’m beginning to think that with these impressive features, the D850 may be forecasting the possibility of a “hybrid” camera concept sitting somewhere between mirrorless and traditional DSLRs. The way mirrorless cameras seem to be getting bloated these days with bigger lenses and components, the size/weight differences that formed the heart of their marketing campaign has become less compelling. That the D850 is expected to be lighter than its predecessor, indicates perhaps a slight movement towards the center and a first step in stealing mirrorless’ thunder. Who knows, maybe “hybrid” is where the sweet spot is, so things are getting very interesting indeed. Nikon is not dead by a long shot.

  • I sold my D810 today… you know, “need funds” 😀

    • A. F.O.

      Can i ask you for how much and how many shutter actuations did it had? Thanks.

      • Michael Cary Arellano

        ^^^ ditto. Looking to sell my D5/D810 asap. Both have 40k actuations, hoping for $5.3k/$2k respectively. I’m concerned about D850 ship date though…

  • Dino Brusco

    Great Job, Peter!

  • Dino Brusco

    This would mean something like 5520×8280 pixel sensor..

    • paige4o4

      i wonder if that means 4k/8k will actaully be to the DCI spec (17:9).

      • I was asking that a few days ago. The only mention seems to be UHD so I’m skeptical but DCI could be there too.

    • Eric Calabros

      8284×5523

    • silmasan

      Yes, but my guess for the actual image size: 8264 x 5508

      There’s understandably a difference between “total pixels” and “effective pixels” number, but the latter tends to be a bit of a liberal rounding up if you know what I mean. Just look at the product & specs page for e.g. Nikon D810 or Sony A7R II.

  • Coffee

    So based on the specs of the D850, what would be the closest competition to this model (Sony, Canon, Fuji, Lumix, …) that is currently on the market or that has been announce.

    • Eno

      Canon 5D mark 4, future Sony A7R III….

      • Coffee

        Took a look at Canon 5D mark 4, for the same price, the D850 smokes it (photo wise, I do not care for video). As for the Sony, I cannot compare it due to the lens. Those Sony lenses are expensive and not well rated considering the issues with build / after purchase service (or lack there of). Although, Sony can make a good camera body, so I’ll give them that.

        Based on those two cameras, D850 at ~3600 usd, is actually competitive market price. Fuji does not have a FX equivalent (kinda smart if you ask me, it’s crowded already).

        Only issue I can see is if people want video and photos, for the price of the D850; they would consider the Lumix GH5 and the Fuji XT-2 combo (ignoring the issue with 2 different lens mount and if your coming from Nikon also). You won’t get the same mp as the D850, but it would be a good 2 body combo for video and photo shoot.

        Depending on how good the video and photo quality is on D850, it might be the best camera for this price for a full frame. I await the reviews for real life use (and not just the “look at this new shiny tool that Nikon released” videos, I want real use, in real world, over time, in different environment that are not artificially controlled (yes, I am pointing my finger at you Sony for the a9 promo crap)).

        • Sony lenses have some of the highest ratings on DxoMark and their prices are in line with other companies. In fact, Sony, Sigma, and Zeiss are the only three lens makers in the top 10 of Dxo’s reviewed lenses.

          Unless you have a specific need for telephoto lenses to shoot sports (which is less likely if you’re interested in high res cameras like these) the argument that Sony doesn’t have lenses is a few years too late.

          • Allen_Wentz

            Some of us do not consider Dx0 to be the way to rank lenses.

            • That’s fine, but claiming they’re categorically bad when plenty of people consider them as good and in some cases better than the competitors seems silly, no?

    • RC Jenkins

      Currently? I’d say:

      ::Sony A7R-ii
      ::Canon 5DSR
      ::Fuji GFX

  • Winstead

    I heard that it will have less dynamic range than d810, is that true? how can newer camera have less dynamic range, maybe at least the same as previous model but less? could someone please explain? ty

    • Vince Vinnyp

      No one who can properly test it will be allowed to say yet. It will probably have slightly better Dynamic range if it is effectively a scaled up D500 sensor as has been speculated. The D500 has slightly better DR than the D810 for the same sensor area, within it’s native ISO range, only losing out below 100 because the D810 has a base ISO of 64. The D850 will have ISO 64 as well. But it is unlikely to be much better or worse but for me it’s about the improvements where the D810 is weak rather than hoping for many gains where it is strong.

      • Winstead

        thank you for explaining! i thought the same. it will be awesome camera for not only sports and wild life but also portraits and studio i think, where i am focused more

      • RC Jenkins

        If the D850’s sensor is identical to the D500 but larger, it will have approx. 1 stop better DR than the D500 across the board.

        • Vince Vinnyp

          Makes sense, I assume lowering the floor to 64 ISO will skew this, i.e. more gains at low ISO traded for smaller gains at high ISO whilst keeping the area under the curve unchanged.

          • RC Jenkins

            Yes, that’s likely.

            There are certain basic physical properties at play here as well.

            For example, FX has just over twice the surface area of DX. Therefore, it captures 1 stop more light. If all else is equal, we should expect 1 stop improvement vs. the D500 curve.

            But all else is not equal…

            We know that the D850’s base ISO is 2/3 stop faster than the base ISO of the D500. This implies that the sensor was ‘tuned’ for max PDR at base ISO & suffers relatively across the board (just like the D800 vs. D810). The D810 was something like a third- or half- a stop worse than the D800 across the board. So maybe subtract that from the (D500 + 1) curve.

            In terms of PDR, my guess is:
            ::ISO 64-100: D850 > D810 by up to 1/3 stop

            ::ISO 100-400: D850 = D810 (or > by less than 1/3 stop)

            ::ISO 400+: D850 > D810 by roughly 1/2 stop. Maybe close to the D800E or D750.

            Or another way to think about it: here is a mockup relative to other cameras’ actuals

            (my D850 guess in green).

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/e503f212ca9105a535d39a0bb0aaf62e7c6c678870478ab02b67bc17bba444ce.png

            • decentrist

              you never give with that fallacy.

            • RC Jenkins

              Huh? What fallacy? It’s actually a physical fact.

              Just like how at a given focal length, F/2 is twice the total light of F/2.8 or twice the shutter speed is half the light, a sensor that is twice as large captures twice as much light. That’s the top end.

              A stop is defined as twice as much light.

              All else equal (same gain), the noise floor will be the same at the low end. So the range between the same noise floor to twice as much light = 1 stop.

            • decentrist

              haven’t you got anything better to do on a Saturday morning than to mislead people with your delusions. Exposure is per unit area. sensor size does not change this, a sensor is not like a pitcher of water…just stop the stupidity!

            • RC Jenkins

              You don’t apparently since you’re replying here.

              I never said exposure changes with sensor size.

              What I said was that:
              Total light = exposure (per area) x total area

              And this is important when it comes to dynamic range. There is a very predictable pattern:

              http://www.photonstophotos.net/Charts/PDR_Area_scatter.htm

            • decentrist

              light is not a physical partical. It is a circuit. sensor size has nothing to do with total light because it is only measure per unit area. have you got that photon guy?

            • RC Jenkins

              If light wasn’t a physical particle, digital sensors wouldn’t work.

              And sensor size has everything to do with total light.

              https://www.dpreview.com/articles/2666934640/what-is-equivalence-and-why-should-i-care/2

            • decentrist

              dpidiots…sensors measure a electro-magnetic charge. Light is a circuit. It is not a thing. Your sensor is not a bucket collecting pieces of light. And light is not sampled as a quantity. It is per unit area. Happy photon gathering!

            • RC Jenkins

              I don’t know why you’re arguing theories of EM radiation (which, btw, also exhibits particle-wave duality), when there is clear evidence that total light matters.

              Otherwise, you’re claiming that a cell phone camera at F/1.8 vs. a full-frame camera at F/1.8 produce the same image. Well yours might because you don’t know these basics.

              You’re also arguing that a flashlight produces the same exposure whether spread over a 1″-diameter circle or a 1-meter circle, which is not true. Most 5 year olds are able to sort this one out.

              The flashlight outputs a certain total amount of light. If it’s spread across a larger area, it’s less intense. If it’s spread across a smaller area, it’s more intense. Same concept.

            • decentrist

              you’re so lost…I’m not mentioning output, no one mentioned flashlights. Tell me, where do you store all your excess photons? Do you keep them in your quantum jar? Do your photons stick to the sensor, or do they hide behind the shutter?

            • RC Jenkins

              I’m not lost at all. Explain the flashlight. That’s what we’re talking about.

              This discussion is about area & intensity, not efficiency or mechanics of the photoelectric effect or theories of particle-wave duality. I’m explaining the fact that exposure over a larger area results in more total light, and you’re proposing that area has nothing to do with total light.

              So according to your theory, a single flashlight can light the entire universe with equal intensity. I find that hard to believe.

            • decentrist

              per unit area, not quantity…quantuum, as particles. stop confusing people.

            • RC Jenkins

              Again, when did I make a claim about per unit area?

              Not my fault you can’t read or make things up in your head.

            • Are you a Quantum Mechanics denier?

            • What?

    • Eno

      I’ve heard the D850 won’t cook your diner! How can newer cameras not cook your diner? Could someone please explain this nonsense? 🙂

      • saywhatuwill

        If you leave the shutter open the sensor or at least the circuits will be hot enough to cook your dinner…if you’re the size of an ant.

        • Eno

          Neee, it’s not a Sony, won’t get hot enough. 🙂

    • nwcs

      I heard that any speculation of that sort is made by people who are pulling “facts” out of their rears. Even if it is the exact same sensor as the D500 cut larger there is still a great deal of flexibility in tuning, image processing, and optimizations.

      Anyone who declares such as fact is not anyone to pay attention to in my opinion.

    • TinusVerdino

      Maybe because the Nikon D7500 has less DR than the D7200 (14 vs 14.6 on base iso)

  • sanosuke yap

    Really Nikon? It is compatible with the WT-7? What the hell! The D850 has Wi-Fi built-in , YET we are forced to use this expensive Crap shaped non ergonomic brick know as the WT-7. It should be incorporated into the battery grip MB-D18a at least. Maybe then Nikon will see their battery grip sales fly of the shelf much faster! And make it 802.11Ad standard. The competitors https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0e05c535c225222b6809839f90baec3dcde8f382f47ebb858f3a59d1e822b4c9.jpg in this industry WILL wake up

    • Thom Hogan

      Have to say I agree with you. The WT-7 is ugly, ungainly, doesn’t really serve as a vertical grip, and seems to have been designed by engineers locked in the 90’s.

    • MB

      Well Nikon had to make it substantial to justify 1000$ price tag 🙂
      Wow, I see they lowered the price to only 750$ … someone is paying attention 🙂

    • Coffee

      Well they have to sell their $750 usd gadget some how…

    • Vince Vinnyp

      Well we don’t know that this is the only way to get wi-fi transfer and I doubt it is. The WT-7 is ugly and way too expensive but it has a 200m range so not really the same as built in Wi-Fi. and probably needs to be big to have enough of an aerial.

    • Vince Vinnyp

      It’s compatible with doesn’t mean you need one to transfer files. you will almost certainly be able to by other means. The WT-7 is ugly and overpriced but it has 200m range so it probably needs to be big to make that happen. With the D5 you can use the 6A also overpriced but not too big.

      • sanosuke yap

        “its compatible with doesn’t mean you need one to transfer files. you will almost certainly be able to by other means. ”

        – You missed my point. Yes, I know you can transfer files via USB cable. But my point is IF ONE needs or wants fast Wireless transfer. One will need the WT-7.

        “It has a 200m range so it need to be big to make that happen”

        -so is the MB-D18a battery grip smaller than the WT-7? No. So why can’t they route the WIFI antenna Around the battery grip? And maybe add a little bulk to the battery grip to accommodate the wifi components inside? All smart phones are much smaller in size than any camera battery grip, YET they ALL have Wifi capabilities.

        Oh and many photographers that shoot tethered to computers do not necessarily need the 200m range, we just want it to reliably transfer large files wirelessly within a much shorter distance e.g 10m? So that crew don’t get trip over by the USB cables.

        • Vince Vinnyp

          Yes so for that you may be able to use the built in wi-fi and almost certainly the much smaller WT-6a

          • sanosuke yap

            WT-6a works? If so, maybe i will try. Yes, software side truly sucks! PRIMARY Connection only via browser…. WTF….
            The Japanese ( Nikon ) really do suck in programming. Should have gotten the Chinese to do it.

            I heard there was a company who hire a Chinese programmer to do an APP . All expenses and accommodation was paid for during his employment. Deadline was 6 months to write, test and perfect the App. If he could do it, a house of a few million USD will be given to him.
            Guess what??
            He DID IT IN 3 months!

            • It isn’t that the s/w development is poor it’s that there isn’t any. Enabling HTTP and FTP is trivial.

        • Coffee

          I think you have a very valid point. Why is the battery grip limited to only adding more power. Could they not add improved WIFI or other feature built in (include the WT-7 or GPS with a switch in the grip).

          As far as value goes, the grip is extremely poor value for the customer, but great profits for the manufacturer. So adding improved WIFI or GPS or something else than just 2 additional fps due to extra power (boost of voltage to the motor, would that not wear out the motor faster?).

          Seriously, you could increase sale of the grip if you added a few features to it, more people would want it!

          • sanosuke yap

            Yes,exactly! It’s a potential gold mine for Chinese manufacturers to clone the battery grip with wifi and / GPS unit built-in and sell it at a higher or equal price to the original MB-D18. Hell, if I am a millionaire, that’s exactly what I will do to make a new business out of it. And machine router the grip out from an aluminium block!

          • Why not include WT-7 in the grip? I suspect that the various national regulatory authorities would be a problem. Do you realise there are 4 different versions of the WT-7 for different parts of the world due to local wireless regulations?

        • Don’t be so pessimistic until we see the full specs. I think you might just get what you want.

    • DSP~

      I remember the times of my WFT on the 5D Mark 2, it was so much joy having connectivity and ergonomics. It is so pathetic of both Canon and Nikon to abandon the ergonomic networking battery grip…

      • sanosuke yap

        Yes, I’ve used that grip before too. My reaction to it was like “ahh….. a battery grip that’s actually semi useful! Why “semi” you may ask. Because it was STILL SLOWWWW in transferring files and connection wasn’t very stable. It Needs Wigig / 802.11ad standard. Short distance but high speed.

    • Can we be sure that it hasn’t got the Wi-Fi capability to function without the WT-7 just because it is compatible with it. I still think the bump on the side of the viewfinder could hide something like a U.FL socket for an external antennae.

      Doesn’t the WT-7 provide a wired connection as well so there might be some who still need it? There can be some issues for wireless approval in certain countries which might have implications.

      • sanosuke yap

        Well if the D850 can transmit data via its internal wifi (without Wt-6/7) it will be great! But it will still be under the 802.11ac or slower standard. No Wigig, no 802.11ad.( yes aD… not ac) Thus slow transfer of RAW files. Embrace the future standard in tech…. not living in the past.
        U.FL socket for external Antennae??? U think Nikon will be so generous as to add multiple wireless options for us? Hmm?? Hahaha… users can choose the WT-7 or WT-6 or attach an external antennae thru the U.FL socket? Then user can complain next if they can add a small satellite dish to it via ports so that they can transmit data directly from camera to a computer located on the other side of the world. All war journalists will switch to Nikon because of this feature alone!

        As for your point on restrictions in certain countries, then don’t buy it. Or don’t bring it there. Use just the USB port and cable that came with the camera. But at least you CAN still use the camera. Just not the WT-7.

        Not that concern about hackers hacking into my camera etc. if u are so worried, then maybe don’t use the internet at all. Cause a lot of our data is already captured by google and others. Shoot film.

        • Do you plan to use your wireless connection within a single room? I assume so as the spec gives a range of 3.3m. If not then you may find 802.11ad doesn’t give you any benefit. You would need to use the 60GHz band to get the throughput your claiming. 60GHz doesn’t go through solid walls either. At best your connection will switch to the 5GHz band and you’ll be back to the same problem. Decent software might up the data rate to 200Mb/s.

          802.11ac can achieve in excess of 800Mb/s using the 5 GHz band when using an increased bandwidth of 160 MHz. The range is specified as 35m.

          I don’t think anyone is likely to put 802.11ad on a camera but I could be wrong. The 60GHz band might be usable for studio work.

          • sanosuke yap

            Yes, I always use the camera next to the MacBook Pro. I think it’s 10 m range 33feet without obstruction. Yes I am aware it’s 60ghz . I agree 802.11ax is better but that will come into masses in 2020 or later?

            • The IEEE specification says 3.3m or 11 feet. obviously I don’t know your working environment but you might like to read this.

              802.11ad devices will inherently have significantly less power output
              than outdoor 60 GHz bridge radios. 802.11ad devices will not benefit
              from very high gain, directional antennas as are found with outdoor
              bridge equipment. 802.11ad mobile devices may only have omnidirectional
              antennas (it’s unknown at this time) and may have low power output (to
              save battery). Using only omnidirectional antennas (no beamsteering) a
              60 GHz 802.11ad transmission is not expected to have a range much
              greater than 10 feet. Human bodies (high water content) will impact
              Line-of-Sight 60 GHz transmission and beamsteering APs may partially
              mitigate these effects. Beamsteering has the ability to attempt to find
              a reflected path around obstructions (like people) in a room. If
              beamsteering is implemented then 802.11ad is expected to perform well
              even when many people are in a room (like a conference room). Because
              802.11ac operates in the 5 GHz spectrum it is less impacted by people
              in a room than equipment in the 60 GHz spectrum.

          • sanosuke yap

            With short range I do not have to worry others tapping into my data. It works to be an advantage.

            • It helps but that assumes they haven’t already hacked into your AP. I think you’ll need one as I don’t think your laptop will run 60 GHz. A tip in that case: don’t use a wired ethernet connection between laptop and AP. Due to different frames in 802.3 and 802.11 you may find that degrades your throughput. The significance of that will depend on the implementation of your data transfer software. If it uses small packets then it could be hit hard.

  • Nikos Delhanidis

    “New 1:1 mode” regarding what exactly ?

    • TinusVerdino

      crop

      • paige4o4

        they should take a page out of Fuji’s book, and add every crop ratio under the sun. no reason you can’t have any custom crop in live view.

    • saywhatuwill

      Square format.

      • Nikos Delhanidis

        Thanks. I am curious now if nikon maybe changed also in 850 the way of displaying the crops in viewfinder.

  • Peter G

    I wonder if it’ll have a USB-c port instead of the micro USB 3.

    • MB

      WT-7 compatibility suggests USB3 Standard B connector …

      • Good.

        • paige4o4

          Bad. USB-C lets you power the camera from any external battery.

          • MB

            Actually so does standard USB connector … as long as you have right cable … and can use 5V …

            • Kob12

              Standard USB (Type A) specs limit its current carrying capacity to 0.5A. I doubt that this is enough to power a capable camera. USB-C can carry much higher power.

            • MB

              In that case tablets with micro USB ports using standard USB A connector would need days to charge 🙂
              Max power, according to USB PD specification, is 5 V 2A using standard USB A connector …
              USB PD specification actually enables higher voltage, up to 20V 3A limit for standard A/B connector, so the maximum power should be around 60W!
              USB-C connector has many other advantages though, it is symmetrical meaning reversible and equal on both sides (no more A B) and it is huge advantage IMHO …

            • Kob12

              OK, I agree with you but you are getting into variations of the original specs. USB 2.0 power is 0.5A max (that is, if you hook up a device to your older PC with USB 2.0 port, you will get no more than 0.5A.)
              USB 3.0 will be able to supply 0.9A (with high speed data active), but, as you say, there are charging requirements that need more power – these call for specific charging ports that are sensed by the devices via different data line configurations. This will let you pass even 3A, but for charging only – you can not send data at the same time. There are some variations that let wall-mounted chargers to pass higher voltage that 5V – up to 20V, and also support larger currents.

              USB-C let you pass few amps of current and data at the same time.

            • MB

              I wasn’t talking about base USB specs but about standard USB3 as used on D500 and most likely on D850 …
              http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-d500/Z-NIKON-D500-PORTS.JPG
              Nor I was talking about the charging mode available on some earlier USB chargers …
              There is no difference in maximum possible current available with standard USB3 connectors and USB-C connectors (actually it is 20V 5A as defined by standard for either of them), or the ability to do data transfer at the same time, that is just misconception (you actually have to use standard USB3 type A connector for data transfer to PC in either case)…
              https://files.cablewholesale.com/mailimages/usb-30-type-a-connector-det-small.jpg
              The point of USB-C is that it is small, symmetrical and it supports USB3 … and yes it would be a better option for a camera …

          • Vince Vinnyp

            Yes but most cameras, that have it, don’t allow USB-C power. I wish they did.

  • outkasted

    Will the video in this beast be better than what has been offered from Nikon in the past…or more of the same

    • Gilboa

      That’s what I’ve been wondering too…no mention of on-sensor PDAF in the leaked sensor description. Which means Nikon are probably sticking with their traditional (and worst in the industry) CDAF instead…slow and hunting LV-AF like on the D500 and all over Nikon DSLRs. But of course we can’t be sure of that until the full reviews come out. I know this might not be relevant, but the D850 retains the EXSPEED 5 image processor of the D5/D500. I was thinking maybe if they wanted to go all out on vastly improved video capabilities they would of developed a next-gen EXSPEED 6 for this camera.

  • mikerofoto

    thanks for the listing, good work!

  • RHC

    Video on DSLR is dead. I don’t see why Nikon and Nikon users in this blog still wasting talk about this. Whom try I Sony mirrorless, with Slog2 and slog3 and 5-axys stabilization, like A7sII or A6500 won’t want to use a Nikon or Canon DSLR for vídeo anymor. Is fact. D850 must to do just ok for vídeo and care about photography. Iphone and Samsungs will do 120fps and more better than a monster like a D850. Nikon can try to use use another codec than mp4 trash, but the autofocus will still a problem. The dual pixel solution for Canons stay behind of a Nex 6, for example. Until Nikon get close to the competition they will be another steps forward. So, want to go deeper in vídeo? Buy a a6500 or a6300. Save Money, and keep you actual Nikon d810 or d750.

    • Bob Thane

      People don’t buy DSLR for video, they buy it for stills and it’s nice if it’s also able to do video without having to buy a whole new camera.

      • DSP~

        Do they though?
        All those people saying that you have to have two separate camera systems for stills and video are getting really annoying recently.
        Is a DSLR really incapable of having 4k, IBIS, log, full sensor readout, peaking and a good codec? Is there some physical limitation that I am missing?
        No? There isnt? What do you say? – There is already a full frame camera that is able to do all that?
        Now tell me why Nikon and Canon fail to implement all this stuff? Because DSLRs are not meant to have those features? Are they meant to lag behind every other competitor?
        Yep, DLSRs are not bought for video, because all the DSLRs I know shoot pathetic and shit video, all of them.

        • Antonio

          Isn’t it also “pathetic” all the effort some people spend against DSLR cameras?

          • DSP~

            It may be, yet your post is not the answer to the problem wich is:
            Sony implements huge feature sets in their cameras wich make them very appealing for every hybrid photo/video shooter and yet there is not a single reason why Nikon and Canon don’t catch up to those high standards.
            Canon and Nikon are so much behind technology wise, they seem old fashioned and can only shine with rugged bodys and decent stills quality while others try to invent, try to innovate, try to move forward.
            I am angry that I have to use two separate systems for stills and video and all the news of Sony and Panasonic dig the grave of Nikon and Canon bit by bit – imho.
            The moment, Sony gets close to Nikons DR and offers 4k60p, I will switch to mirrorless, no question.

        • Bob Thane

          DSLRs will always be primarily stills cameras because an OVF offers absolutely no advantage for video. Since video is all about running the sensor full time, mirrorless will always have some advantage.

          But as I said, it’s great that DSLRs are getting more video features, since most photographers do a little video here and there but not enough to justify buying a different system.

        • JXVo

          This DSLR (D850) and its predecessors don’t lag behind your full frame example. They are flat out superior for stills use, including their ecosystem, ergonomics, battery life and reliability because they were designed for this. The video offering was always the secondary objective. There are enough committed stills shooters around to make it successful, as its predecessors were.

      • RHC

        Exactly. Just ok video capabilities is fine.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Yup. And Nikon is expected to add mirrorless, so more video-centric Nikons are probably also in the pipeline.

    • Antonio

      Shall we thank you for coming from Sony’s world to enlighten us, “poor” Nikon users?

      • RHC

        This is not the point. Just came up on mind after read the comments about video. Just in time the nikon d850 must be the best photo option. I own a d750.

    • JXVo

      I was kinda in agreement until the iPhone/Samsung statement…..
      Nikon unashamedly aims this camera at demanding stills photographers. I am one of those like many here and I couldn’t care about video
      The inclusion of significantly upgraded video capability over previous D8x0 bodies will be welcomed by those who need it but I do think that they should have implemented their patented quad pixel OSPDAF or at least the same AF tech offered in 1 series. It would have closed the gap to competitors considerably and it has advantages for both video and live view stills shooting.

      I’m confident we will see improved video tech in the upcoming mirrorless body though; they’ll have to when you consider the features offered by the competition.

  • Veselin Gramatikov

    no live view AF / PDAF?

  • fixed

  • pippo

    the more we learn about D850’s specs, the worse Nikon’s initial announcement of the camera looks. I mean, who gives a […] about 8K-time-lapse, when you can shoot 7 or even up to 9 fps at 46MP with an even better AF then D5 (smaller AF points!). these are the specs they should have at least teased.

    • pippo

      Imagine a teaser video with someone shooting sports at low light. You hear the camera click-click-click-click-click-click-click – people would be running the video back and forth to figure out how many clicks per second there are. When the guy checks the images, you can see a light on his thumbs indicating the lit buttons. someone shooting a weeding ring at close distance apparently using that new small af-point and the stacking-thing. so many possibilities… and they come up with 8K time-lapes. i will never understand.

      • RC Jenkins

        If I was shooting sports in low light, I’d use a D5. It’s a better camera for that.

        The main differentiator is in this camera’s is still high detail & high dynamic range scenarios, not sports.

        And the roughly 97% positive responses to the teasers from hundreds of thousands of views seem to align to people being impressed. You might not care specifically about 8k timelapse, but it has many implications–especially when taking challenging images like galaxy shots.

        • Tony

          Agreed, it is curious that Nikon should highlight landscapes and commercial sports in their initial press release for the D850. I cannot see that commercial sports photographers need this much resolution (in the same way that I cannot see that landscape photographers need such high fps).Wildlife is as an area where the D850 will probably be popular (although this didn’t get a mention in the press release).

          • Allen_Wentz

            I think Nikon is shooting [:)] to position the D850 as “best all-around,” which is what the D8xx bodies have been famous for. Hence showing both HS sports and landscape imagery. If a body can do both those things it is all-around hella competent.

          • High frame rate for landscape focus stacking in rapidly changing conditions? Focus stacking isn’t just for macro …

          • Matthias Merz

            I’m a professional photographer and I shoot both sports and commercial jobs for advertisements etc. I’m really curious about the combination of high fps and high image quality. My current line-up is D5, D4 and D800. I’m planing on replacing the D4 and the D800 with the D850, because I can use it as second camera for sports and also for high IQ. Most professionals nowadays don’t shoot sports only or commercials only or wedding only etc. I’m sure that many of them will be very glad about an all-round camera like the D850 promises to be. I’d only wish for features like in-built GPS, (fast) WiFi and good video capabilities to make it the almost perfect camera. But I doubt we will ever be given the one perfect tool, simply for marketing reasons 😉

      • Maybe it was hint so that we could calculate the MPx.

    • Chris Phillips

      Could it be that the DR of it will be even better than the D810? I was always wondering why astro?Well astro needs high DR. Just sayn

      • I think it is guaranteed that the DR will better than the D810. Nikon will not screw this up.

        • If DR is the same as the D810 that would be a major achievement in my view given the larger resolution.

          • That’s a good way of looking at it, but yes – I just don’t think it will be worse than the D810.

    • Chris

      It’s said before. Nikon marketing is poor.
      But I rather have it like this than the other way round.
      Now I’m positively surprised (couldn’t care less about video).

  • Spy Black

    Nikon should include an XQD-to-SD adapter with every camera they put out with dual format memory card slots.

    • JXVo

      It would not have broken them to offer the option of 2 x SD or 2 x XQD as in D5. They already have the parts and the firmware coding to make this work

      • Allen_Wentz

        When Nikon tried offering XQD or CF choice with D5 most pros quickly found that the benefits of keeping with slower CF were an illusion. My guess is Nikon sells way more XQD than CF D5 bodies.

        D500 and D850 both have a large prosumer market, hence the XQD/SD dual-slot scenario. I will be interested to see how the slots perform in real-world operation; i.e. how badly SD compromises performance when an SD card is in the body.

        • I think this one will not be crippled. Nikon may have taken a hint from A9.

    • MB

      Does such an adapter exist?
      On the other hand if Nikon implements background XQD/SD synchronization in firmware there would be no drawbacks as far as writing speed is concerned … but dual XQD slots would be the best solution IMHO …

      • Spy Black

        I’m not aware of such an adapter existing at this time. Hopefully someone will make one, because this dual format system royally sucks, and with such an adapter, at least the the people who use the industry standard storage system can make efficient use of the camera. I know some people want 2 XQD slots, and as I’ve said, make it one or the other. Nobody benefits from having two different storage formats in any camera, anywhere.

    • Are these adapters available in the market?

      • Spy Black

        Not that I’m aware of. 😉

  • Chris Phillips

    @Peter: The other riddle to solve is who makes the Sensor. As far as I know Sony does not have a 46mp sensor. Any guess?

    • Davo

      Sony didn’t have a 20mp APS-C sensor before the D500 either.

    • Mike D

      Nor did they have a 36MP sensor before the D800.

    • JXVo

      Sony doesn’t limit itself to making only the sensors used in its own cameras. Their sensor division makes sensors for a wide range of customers and devices. I guess they will make to order including customisations if the price is right.

      • Yes, the rumors about Sony keeping the best sensors for themselves were wrong.

    • disqus_ErOzKSxw9P

      As I’ve said here multiple times, Nikon designs ALL of their sensors and simply hires other manufacturers to make it like Sony or toshiba(before Sony bought them)

    • I was told it is not made by Sony.

      • Thom Hogan

        That would be unusual and surprising.

        • NikonFanboy

          thom plz confirm? we all know you know more then anyone?

          • MB

            Thom would not be here if he really knew much more than NR … or maybe he can prove me wrong … tease tease … please please … no? 🙂
            But seriously if not Sony then who can manufacture sensors for Nikon these days? TSMC? Samsung? I doubt it …

        • Yes, I agree. I am saying what I was told. This is why I mentioned this only once on the blog and did not include it in the list of specs. I am still not sure about it. Everything else so far was correct, so I have no reason to believe that this info is wrong. Now, when you make your statement, do you know or you are just guessing based on the fact that Sony has more than 50% of the market. Because some other websites reported that the sensor is made by Sony just to make a headline.

          • Allan

            “Everything else so far was correct, so I have no reason to believe that this info is wrong.”

            Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

            Peter, one interpretation of Thom’s comment is that he agrees with you. Because the recent sensors have been manufactured by Sony (and Toshiba/Sony), it would be unusual and surprising if the D850 sensor was manufactured by someone else. Thom appears to be careful with his choice of words. Additionally, he previously has explained what and WHEN he can comfortably share his information on Nikon Rumors.

            • Allan

              And another interpretation of Thom’s comment, is that he doesn’t know who has manufactured the sensor.

              What is obvious to everyone is your (Peter’s) rumors about the D850 have been the first and most accurate ones on the internet.

            • Exactly, it is not clear, that’s why I asked. Now, if the sensor is not made by Sony, this could mean that something went down between Sony and Nikon. It will be an interesting development. Sony does make the best sensor, but I have Leica cameras who use other sensors and they are not bad either.

            • Allan

              And one day someone will make better sensors than Sony. And so it goes.

            • Thom Hogan

              I can confirm that at the moment I don’t know who “manufactured the sensor.” But see my comment below.

            • Yes, this is why I am confused when Thom says something like that – is it what he thinks it is, or what he know it is. Because there is a big difference between the two. I just cannot make a conclusion based on his statement – it can mean anything really, this is why I asked.

            • Allan

              I think Thom is in a different position than you in what information he can easily share with us.

              Sometimes he actually is quite definitive. I don’t find his occasional vagueness bothersome. I actually find it entertaining, and try reading between his lines; I sincerely believe he’s not a bullshitter. He’s telling us something. But I do understand when some people find his vagueness irritating.

              Peter, you have many wonderful contributors to your amazing website. Thom is a diamond.

            • But you have to understand that I run a rumor site and when somebody comments that they know a secret but they are not going to tell us, I just don’t understand the purpose of such comment. Why mention this all together? What does this add to our discussion.

            • Allan

              Good points. I don’t have good answers to your questions.

              I’m not 100% sure, but Thom frequently/always shares with us the contents of his “secrets” after there has been a credible leak from another source (frequently you).

              (Note: Thom has edited his comment above.)

          • Thom Hogan

            There’s sort of a twofold question here. (1) On what technology was the sensor based? and (2) Who did the fabbing?

            If the D850 does in some way derive from the D500 sensor, that would imply that #2 is a Toshiba fab (now owned by Sony). It would also imply Exmor technologies, so also Sony.

            Remember, the D500 sensor had copper internally, which to my knowledge is still only a Sony thing.

            Given the photosites being basically the same size as the D500, one would guess that this is where Nikon started.

            But things are becoming confused in the sensor game. The A9 was certainly Sony Semiconductor tech, but had Sony Imaging tech added on. The D500 was certainly some Sony Semiconductor tech, but there was engineering in it that didn’t exist prior in other Exmor designs, thus likely Nikon add-ons. Ditto with the Olympus E-M1 Mark II sensor: Sony base with Olympus tech. And the Fujifilm X-T2: Sony base with Fujifilm tech.

            This is why I don’t like the somewhat vague “made by” terminology. Who made what?

            But all that said, clearly there is new tech in the D850 sensor, if for no other reason than the full frame 4K spec. Where that came from I don’t know. But in terms of fabbing (#2), Nikon has only got two historic sources left, Renasys and Sony (Toshiba).

            We’ll know more when we see photos of the sensor itself. The way the interconnects are handled has generally been a strong hint of the fab plant.

            • Allan

              Thanks, Thom.

      • felipeignacioortega

        Maybe “ams” formerly “cmosis”?

        • MB

          Cmosis or AMS do not manufacture sensors … they design sensors and contract TSMC for manufacturing …
          There is also Forza Silicon … and god forbid Canon 🙂 … but my guess … it’s a Sony …

          • felipeignacioortega
            • MB

              Your point being?

            • felipeignacioortega

              My point is this company is the one that makes some sensors to Leica.

            • MB

              Everybody knows that, but as I said they are fabless company same as Nikon. They design sensors and then contract somebody to make them, same as Nikon, so what would be the point for Nikon to hire them?

            • felipeignacioortega

              diversification perhaps?

  • Spy Black

    Actually I agree with that, in the sense that Nikon should include two slots of ONE format, whether that format is XQD or SD. Make it one or the other. They’re not doing anyone a favor by having both.

    • John

      Absolutely, I can’t understand where Nikon believes people want 2 different memory cards.

    • BukkakeComet

      That is my only gripe (so far) is that I wanted dual XQD. I understand that the distant future of those cards is up in the air. But there are already 256gb cards.

      If there is a dual XQD variant that is the one I’ll buy.

    • Allen_Wentz

      SD compromises maximum performance, period. Dual SD would be really bad news for the body.

      Plus forcing slower SD into post-processing workflows is also bad news.

      If Nikon feels the consumer end of their buyers want SD (yecchh) then giving us at least the one XQD means we can pull the SD to optimize performance when necessary.

      I agree with Chris that Nikon should include dual XQD slots.

    • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

      Doing some people who’ve upgraded from say a D5xxx -> D7xxx and now to a D850 who has a collection of SD cards or someone who has a Sony Mirrorless as a 2nd / addtional body, Plus if you’ve got a problem with a XQD card in the field / away from home you can pop into many electrical, camera shops, etc and buy a SD card.

      Nikon should have adopted XQD sooner in the D8xx bodies and to the D7500 to increase cameras using this format and to get as much up take of this media as possible.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Cards are not some kind of consumable like razor blades. One buys a batch of the best currently available and they last forever. And (because they hold the work product) cards get platinum-level security, much stronger than the camera body itself gets.

        “A collection of SD cards” IMO is worth piss, because almost assuredly they are even slower than slow UHS-II – – which is much slower than XQD. When one buys a new $k camera it deserves the best current cards available, period. And yes one keeps spare XQD card capacity.

        We do not need XQD to be ubiquitous, just available. And when the industry moves to a newer better format (which will not be SD) XQD will always be available overnight just like Beta tape and 5″ floppy disks are still cheaply immediately available.

        • I think

          Davidvictormeldrew has a point. If you are upgrading from D800/800E/810 then you will have CF and SD cards. Not to be able to use any of them could be annoying. When I bought my D800, I thought why not dual CF? Then I realised how cheap and ubiquitous SD was so I bought loads of big SD as well. I rarely need high write speeds and I find the convenience of SD slots in laptops outweighs the lower performance.

          I certainly welcome XQD replacing CF but I’m not disappointed by SD being retained. It would be interesting to know what proportion of those who buy the D850 will need XQD and what proportion would like it for an occasional need. I will fit in the latter category,

      • Even if nikon had adopted XQD earlier, it still would have been a dead end as long as nobody else has switched to it too. Not even sony for A9. Look what happened to memory stick. And sony sold a lot of them compared to XQD devices.
        Everything else i.e. 1st paragraph +1.

        • Davidvictormeldrew Idontbeliev

          A good reply umeshrw

  • SUMAN

    I will not purchase if nikon not provide…. IN D850
    1- perfect EXPOSURE COMP. – Out put must be same what preview get & very imp… after take photo … EX. COM.. metering will not change … very frustrating…

    2. Minimum 10- 15 FPS… MINIMUM… WITHOUT BLACK OUT….I am ready to pay…. but I what shot I need = MEANS I NEED…. NO FAIL…
    3. FULLY ARTICULATED SCREEN …. MUST MOOVE FOR VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHES… WE EVERY ONE FEEL HOW DIFICULT TO PHOTOGRAPHES THE TALLER AND HIGHER SUB… IN A LIMITED TIME AND SPACE…

    ENOUGH… THESE R THE MINIMUM QUALIFICATION & REQUIREMENTS…. I DO NOT NEED TO MAKE ME NONSENSE…. AGAIN….

    • pippo

      You got your elbow on caps.

    • RC Jenkins

      This camera is designed for photography pros who know how to use it. I don’t think this camera is for you.

      But I agree that you DO NOT NEED TO MAKE YOU NONSENSE AGAIN.

      …(whatever that means?)

    • Mike D

      I’m not clear. Are you going to buy a camera or aren’t you. Any camera?

      • RC Jenkins

        @disqus_3XLjc09kq4:disqus , didn’t you hear him? Why are you making him nonsense again? 🙂

    • Vince Vinnyp
    • Bob Thane

      It Needs At Minimum 18 FpS At 72mP AND A Hybrid EVf Or Else nikon Will Lose All My Business And sony AND canon AND samSung Will Take Over The Market

      • Michiel953

        Lol!

    • ZoetMB

      IMO, people who shoot at 15fps aren’t still photographers – they’re videographers. You’d think that back in the days of 4×5″ Graflex Press cameras and 2 1/4″ Rollei’s that no one ever captured a great sports photo. Still photography (IMO) is about planning and capturing a moment. There’s nothing wrong with shooting video and picking out frames, after all, it’s the end results that count, but IMO, it’s not still photography. If we were still using film, you wouldn’t be shooting 15fps even if the cameras were capable.

      But I do agree that a fully articulated screen would have been preferable.

      • FromTheNorth

        The F3HS shot 13.5fps and with a 250 frame bulk film back the capability was there. Just not in high demand.

      • Allen_Wentz

        Lots of old photogs make that argument. I am an old photog, but I disagree. New tech capabilities make for new image capture methods and opportunities.

        The easiest examples are of moving-critter photography:

        A) One can plan the composition, prefocus on a spot and hope the child/dog/eagle/skier/etc. goes where one planned, and be pleased if it actually happens the way. Or

        B) One can plan the composition, pull the lame SD card from the body, set CH and focus choice for the subject, use the AF-on button, set eyes focus point to suit composition, and start the body capturing the eyes in focus as the critter moves into the planned composition area.

        Both methods A and B work. The difference is that B provides far more keepers, and also allows one to improvise far more readily as moving critters do unexpected things, providing hero images as well as keepers. Plus using the B method one learns that the modern Nikon AF tool allows for re-compositioning on the fly as one sees in real-time what the subject/background actually is, rather than just the “still” preplanned in one’s mind.

      • MB

        Well 8MP 30fps is actually 4k video …

      • I remember a friend shooting at an airshow display. He wanted to catch the exact moment that two Red Arrows display jets crossed. He pressed the button on his F5 as they approached each other and ran out of film before they met.

        • silmasan

          😀 Just yesterday I was thinking about the F5, 8fps on 36-exp rolls! They better had three or four of these plus assistants with fast hands!

          Digital is a blessing… or is it a curse for the one dealing with the files later? 🙂

          • Well at least my digital archive doesn’t take up much physical space. My film archive was beginning to take over. I thought about scanning it all but life is too short.

    • Eno

      Anything below 24 fps is a joke! 10-15 FPS is for “newbies”. 🙂

    • Chris

      Get some help

    • Carl 317

      Yoda???

      • Ric of The LBC

        Funny that is

    • Davo

      1. English may not be your first language. Tip: loose the caps.
      2. If English is your first language, you’re drunk go home.

  • naeem ahmadi

    what about body material and weather sealing? any information?

    • Thom Hogan

      That information is coming, but one would expect it to be the same hybrid body approach as the D810. The only full metal frame camera left is the D5.

      • naeem ahmadi

        thanks tom,,, i wonder if its only me who loves metal bodies

      • Thom, is that information coming to me or to you?

        • Thom Hogan

          Should be part of the announcement info.

  • Nguyên Toét

    it seems like a hard slap on 5D4…..3,600 usd is justifiable…if it is real, i will buy one

    • Michiel953

      < 4000

      • Nguyên Toét

        yes.

  • Exciting – but at the same time not sure worth moving from D810. Except for GAS.

  • Laud Farter

    deleted

  • This is the benefit of desperation. The D500 and now the D850 are the kind of camera that Nikon should have been making all along — the best camera they can manufacture at a price point, vs crippled to not cannibalize older models in random ways. (I’d argue that the D700 and D7000 were also of this mold). Thus, in every way that makes sense or doesn’t increase its cost the D850 equals or improves on the D5.

    This won’t save Nikon (Olympus and Pentax both don’t hold back on features in non flagship cameras and they’re not exactly thriving) but it might stop the rot.

    • Allen_Wentz

      I disagree. The D850 evolved from the world-leading D800 series as influenced by D500 successes, not “desperation.” And the D850 is not an “improvement” on D5; D5 is a very different line that will likely see its own D5s and/or D5x improvement in less than a year.

      Nikon as a firm faces financial challenges, but the development of their pro-level cameras (D5,D500,D810) has been totally solid, NOT “rot.”

    • Two totally different cameras for different kinds of photography. You’re trying to compare apples and oranges. They’re both good, but…

      Nothing rotting when it comes to Nikon’s professional gear.

      • I’m curious as to exactly which incomparable cameras I am comparing and who or what I implied was rotting.

        The D810 and D4 were just as “totally different” and yet there are plenty of examples of professional wedding, portrait, and wildlife photographs taken with both. As an enthusiast I prefer to carry one camera at a time, and I’d prefer it to be as good at every kind of photography as makes engineering sense, not deliberately handicapped by marketing decisions.

        • You are suggesting that the D850 is an improvement on the D5. Improved in what way? My argument is that you can’t compare those two cameras. The D5 has a 20mp sensor and is built for sustained abuse through the worst conditions. It has a huge buffer that allows for long stints at maximum frames per second. On the other hand, the D850 is a super-high resolution camera for making detailed photographs with maximum dynamic range. You COULD use the D850 for many of the kinds of things you use the D5 for, but it wouldn’t be ideal. It certainly isn’t the camera Van Agtmael is going to take to cover the war in Afghanistan. Likewise, you’re not likely to see a D5 in a commercial product photography studio. As for rot, you said it in your last sentence…it won’t save Nikon but it might stop the rot.

          • No I am suggesting the 850 isn’t intentionally crippled to be worse than the D5 in silly ways (e.g. Continuous shooting, autofocus) and superior where this is possible (viewfinder and full frame 4K video for example). Most Nikon cameras are “positioned” which is to say crippled so as not to excel higher end models.

  • Mahatma

    I would be very surprised if it had much more than 50MP even though the technology is there.Probably not making much sense for such an improvement business wise.

    • Mike D

      The spec says 45point75 MP. Not 45 to 75MP

      • Mahatma

        Ahh.English is not my primary language.Thanks for info.

      • ToastyFlake

        Does that mean it will be 75MP with a 45 point autofocus?

    • Coffee

      I don’t think the issue is the MP for the sensor size, but the encoding/writing the data to the card. In theory, you could have a 3,500 K mp camera with a full size sensor, so a 3.5gb picture in raw (would probably be more) would take a minimum of 12 seconds to write to a xqd card, let alone what the processing time it would take. Not sure how long your computer would take to load just the picture on your computer or to process in post.

      The other question would how much noise would be on the photo?

      • Mahatma

        They’d work around that problem surely.But another informed me that it was not 45 to 75 MP.

  • Pells

    I still can’t believe the 10 pin connector is alive in this day and age. We can have a phone without a headphone jack, but we still need the 10 pin connector. This thing needs to die ASAP. Make a universal connector that makes sense.

    • Fly Moon

      I agree. It’s really weird to see that and I have D810 and D500!

    • nwcs

      There is good and bad with legacy support. That’s part of the bad. At least it isn’t dual CompactFlash…

      • I’ve got loads of CF for my D800. Anyone want to buy them?

        • nwcs

          I gave mine to a photographer friend with an older Canon.

    • I like it. I can still use the gear I bought 20 years ago. At least they dropped the cable release before digital …

      • Pells

        I appreciate the backwards compatibility and I have a handful of things that use the PIN, but many of the accessories can be moved to a cell phone app. Remote triggers, GPS, wifi connections, etc. They should all just go through a cell phone, which I am sure you have with you.

        • No, I’m a luddite* in that respect. Having had to carry a phone since the late 1980s, I now prefer to leave it at home or at least switched off in my bag. Very liberating.

          The most important accessory for me is usually a remote release and I know it won’t let me down. Can’t forget to charge its battery. Why is it a problem to keep the 10 pin?

          * A group of British people who smashed new machinery during the industrial revolution – just in case you are not familiar with this.

          • Pells

            All things equal I have no problem with it being there, but in a cost saving environment that these camera makers are in, they should be pushing software solutions, not hardware. Especially when the user experience is improved. I can’t event get things to screw into that most of the time, and I have spent time straightening the pins on my GPS while on safari. It is an all around bad solution, and Nikon should be pushing technology forward. With all due respect to luddites, these companies shouldn’t be designing for you. I would rather see Nikon save money on the 10-pin than make us buy accessories that should be built in to the camera, or remove things like the built in flash (which I liked).

            Agree however that leaving the phone is liberating…maybe just turn the cell service off!

            • Problem is that Nikon is much better at hardware than software.

            • Removing the built in flash has meant a better viewfinder, no bulky high voltage capacitor inside the camera taking up space that could be used for better things, no power drain which stops VR working while the capacitor charges, … I could go on.

              Don’t look back. Embrace the change. Even this luddite has. Why shouldn’t Nikon design cameras for me? I’ve spent a frightening amount of money with them over the last 40+ years. I’m a damned good customer.

    • JXVo

      I have 2 accessories that use the 10 pin connector and I appreciate being able to use them across multiple camera bodies.

      10 pins gives enough capability for several types of data transfer, power in both directions and switching functions.

      Remember that D850 is part of a system and not a standalone product.

      • Pells

        What are the accessories?

        • JXVo

          MC-30…normally in bag
          MC-36…nicer to use for time lapse than the built-in system on later cameras, I like that it has its own power and lcd so I can control stuff without touching the camera after setting it up.

    • Thom Hogan

      Be careful what you wish for. Note the recent Nikon patent for connectors in the flash hot shoe. Are you really prepared to replace everything that you use in the 10-pin slot? For yet another new proprietary slot that may not really gain you any clear benefit?

  • For the totally silent shooting mode, do we know yet it that will be able to do that shooting RAW? or just Jpeg like previous Nikon’s?

  • Mike D

    You can’t have a serious mirrorless camera without on-sensor PDAF. It appears that Nikon is not even putting PDAF on the D850 for Live View use. Not sure if it’s a missed opportunity or Nikon just isn’t there yet with the sensor.

  • CR

    Would be great to see a spec matrix comparison with the D810 vs D850.

  • George

    Any idea on what the FPS will be in DX mode?

  • Politics_Nerd

    Dear Nikon,

    Why is it SO HARD to put DPAF in a (Nikon) DSLR?

    -The Universe

    • Ben Brayev

      ask yourself why no other camera maker has that except canon.. canon invented it. which means no one can use it.. nikon/fuji/sony/whatever has to invent something else or a bit better /a bit different and call it a different name.

      • Politics_Nerd

        Is it patented by Canon? Nikon needs to do this.

      • MB

        I presume he is talking about on sensor PDAF and actually every other camera maker has it, these days most cell phone has it, and even Nikon had it on series 1 …
        Canon patented dual pixel AF but that is not the only way to do it … so the question remains, what stops Nikon for doing it …

        • Politics_Nerd

          Imagine the video nerds going nuts with full-sensor 4k and reliable LV auto focus! :::is one of those nerds:::

        • Ben Brayev

          i thought he meant Dual pixel af, but you might be right. although, it doesnt matter, because the reason live view af sucks in nikon cameras is there isnt a proper on sensor pdaf.. which canon called “dpaf”..

        • Ben Brayev

          also, he said “why is it so hard to put it in nikon cameras” which suggested he meant the DPaf and not the PDaf.. because every camera has PDAF..

          • MB

            That is correct, PDAF has been around for a very long time, even since F-501 for Nikon 🙂

      • nwcs

        Nikon has a version of this patented that’s different from dual pixel. No idea if they’ll use it or not but they aren’t restricted due to Canon.

  • Milkod2001

    I wonder how fast wifi will be. Currently very happy to use D810 for studio shots but constantly tripping over orange usb3 cable when teethering. If D850 could send NEF & JPG to computer through wifi within 6 secs i’d get it only for this feature alone.

    • Got a feeling it will just have to be the jpg and download the Raw later

  • Senor Magnifico

    Nikon tries to convince us that old school will rule photographic equipment world during next season (2-3 years).
    But even fuji has changed it’s mind and works on sensor stabilization.

    • Politics_Nerd

      If Sony lenses were any cheaper than Nikon’s, you might have a point.

      • Milkod2001

        Sony 85/1.8 is a good starting point for Sony. It does need to make more affordable lenses to match Nikon 1.8G offerings though.

    • Milkod2001

      i believe Nikon will have that plus all mirrorless goodies when it will have mirrorless camera to offer itself.

    • Ric of The LBC

      Point being?

    • nwcs

      Sensor stabilization is simply an option, and hardly revolutionary at that. It’s a nice to have not a must have feature.

      • Milkod2001

        to have stabilization on any lens is not nice it is great feature actually

        • nwcs

          It’s useful within a range of use. It is usually a substitute for a lack of good stability. It doesn’t help with subject motion and it isn’t useful at all shutter speeds or situations. And it can make people overconfident in their abilities. It’s still useful but it’s less useful than good autofocus I think.

      • TinusVerdino

        And with every new camera IBIS will get better and all of your lenses will have better stabilisation. Not to mention neat tricks like pixel shift resolution or anti-aliasing or astro tracing.

        • nwcs

          And the sensors get more expensive with more potential for issues. As I said, it’s a nice to have. It’s not a must have feature. When IBIS can make my subjects sit still then I’ll call it revolutionary.

          • TinusVerdino

            Has nothing to do with sensors. It’s a mechanical array with gyroscopes and precision motors. The sensor just sits on it.It uses the same sensors as a camera without IBIS. There are not a lot of issues with IBIS. ILIS will also not freeze subject motion. That is not what it is about. It stabilizes camera shake enabling to shoot a 4 to 5 stops lower iso (in current camera’s with IBIS)

            • nwcs

              It’s all one assembly and I was saying sensor as a shorthand for the whole assembly. I keep saying it’s useful within limits. It’s not revolutionary. And I think real world stabilization is not as good as the specs.

            • Thom Hogan

              Mechanical things break, as Sony discovered with their earliest IBIS implementations. Motors have frequencies and generate heat, both of which are issues, the latter particularly important as heat at the sensor translates into noise. IBIS has geometric limitations with telephoto work, which is why all the IBIS makers are now adding IS to their long lenses.

              IBIS is an interesting tool, but like all IS solutions, it’s more conditional to me than a permanent crutch. Useful, but in a narrower range than most people think.

            • TinusVerdino

              I’ve never heard of Pentax SR breaking. it is more reliable than other mechanical components. Pentax nor A-mount use VR lenses. E-mount does, but IBIS came late to e-mount. IBIS also came later to m43. They are the only ones combining both versions achieving up to 6.5 stops in the case of oly. Lens stabilisation only offers two axis. Sure on long focal lengths it is less effective because it needs room to move around and some vignetting may occur. But in Reality only Canon and Nikon are into very long lens photography. up to 300mm they perform about equal. Not many people use glass over 500mm. It makes a lot of sense to use IBIS and only switch to lens stabilisation in special cases. Or use a combination of both for even more steady shooting (of course pay for more expensive lenses to increase performance).

            • In lens VR makes more sense on a DSLR than it does on a mirrorless camera. If you are looking through an OVF then IBIS has no benefit in helping to stabilise your framing. I find VR is a great help when shooting hand held macro for that reason. Most of my macro work doesn’t allow a tripod or anything similar. Another photographer doing similar work to me was singing the praises of the 105 VR micro when it first arrived. I thought he was exaggerating until I got mine.

            • I rarely shoot video and I don’t use very long lenses that often. I do have the 200-500. I have just used it more in the last fortnight than in all of rest of the time I’ve owned it because I had swallows nesting in an ideal location in my portico. I’m no bird photographer but I have been impressed by the handheld results the VR has given me even with a 1.4x converter. When shooting video at 700mm with a tripod, the VR has made a big difference. I don’t think I have ever shot so much video.

              I don’t doubt IBIS might be as good for video but in my view, VR is generally much better for a DSLR.

            • TinusVerdino

              Strange. Extrapolated from one experience, your own, with one lens you can make a general statement. You must be really cheap to hire for a research job.

            • I have six VR FX Nikkors and I previously owned a handful of DX ones too. I’m not for hire but your comment is valid as I didn’t explain the reason for my preference in the post. I had done that in a previous post but probably should have included it again. I’ll add it via a brief edit above. Thanks for drawing my attention to the omission.

  • animalsbybarry

    OK
    So now we have all the specs on the D850
    So now we need the specs on the new Nikon mirrorless camera

    • Allan

      Good one, Barry.

      But, maybe we need to give Peter a rest … maybe not. 🙂

  • Nick

    Am I the only one super stoked for s,m, large raw options?! Wedding photographers dream!

    • Mike D

      When is raw not raw? … when it’s a digital camera sRAW format.

      • Nick

        What’s that mean?

        • Mike D

          It means that camera sRAW and mRAW formats are not true RAW. The data is YCbCr and in past Nikon bodies sRAW is only 11 bits. Now, if Nikon really came out with some pixel binning or something that would be great. But I expect this will be the same old format. There’s plenty of sites out there that explain sRAW and mRAW.

  • Marcus

    This is not a good camera. No integration of LTE, WLAN, GPS. Every smartphone is better in this regard. Seems also as if there is no Ethernet port. A further optimized camera that is outdated in at least one year. There are only a few people who really need this high specs. No need to upgrade for most professionals. This is the best way to secure the revenue with all the technology driven Nikon fans/collectors.
    It would have been a great surprise if an analog Nikon F7 is in the pipeline or LTE, WLAN and a simple user friendly operating system. Digital cameras have become so boring. This is will not bring the turnaround in camera business.

    • Allan

      This is a great camera for its target audience.

      The camera industry will survive for professionals and enthusiasts.

      • Marcus

        I hope that Nikon will survive. I would guess Hasselblad and Phase One are the next manufacturers that will file bankruptcy.

    • Bob Thane

      The convenient camera for consumers is the smartphone, and that has LTE, GPS, and more.

      D8x0 users tend to care more about getting great shots.

      • Marcus

        There is a need for a seamless data integration without process breaks like a memory card. Top of the line cameras like the D850 are not the cash cows. The market is rather small. On the other hand there is a high demand for images that are produced and distributed very fast (e.g. retail images, news). Companies like RED offer a very good data integration. It is now possible to generate small movies (4K, 6K) and at the same time get stills (16 MP) for retail.

        • Allan

          Maybe RED should compete with Canon, Nikon, Sony, Fuji ….
          Maybe the camera companies should license some of RED’s technologies.
          Maybe RED should compete with the smartphone companies.
          Maybe running a camera company today is bloody difficult.

          • Marcus

            That’s rigth! It is a very difficult business. They are now in a similar situation as Kodak was ten years ago. Yes, RED is working on a smartphone. With 4K video Nikon is a competitor to RED. I am not working for RED. Maybe you ask them for license options.

        • mikeswitz

          You clearly are not a photographer. Stick to your smart phone. I hear you don’t like Leicas either. Not integrated like Red.

          • Marcus

            I liked my Leica but sold it anyway. My D810 is a great camera but most of the time I shoot on my Nikon F4, F3 or on medium format cameras. The colors are really good on the D810. The first time I liked them. But skin tones are far more better on analog film. Sad to see that the new E lenses are not working with the F6/F5/F4 cameras.

            • How do these F4, F3 or MF cameras integrate seamlessly in your fast workflow exactly?

            • mikeswitz

              So your a rich non-photographer. Like I said, be happy with your smart-phone so you can connect with all your fans.

        • Antonio

          Just to have a more precise idea about this comparison of yours: how much will it cost to get that RED camera ready to shoot and beat the D850 so clearly as you say?

          Taking the probable cost of the D850 into account how much do you think I can save going your way?

          • Marcus

            The price of the camera is not as important as you might think. Just take a look at Amazon fashion. There you see small movies of almost every dress and also stills. If you can produce more movies/images on a day with one system and integrated workflow you reduce the cost. There is more than a camera, it’s about lighting, software, workflow, team. Red by the way is also new to the smartphone business.
            Nikon and Canon stay in their business scheme and it seems they hope to survive in their niche. At the same time almost every day new inventions in the camera technology of smartphones are published. The quality is getting better so fast. If quality becomes acceptable there is no reason not to integrate smartphones in the workflow.

            • Antonio

              You are right about the importance of lighting, software workflow and team as well when you say the price it’s not all and to prove it we may refer how popular Panasonic m43 cameras are for video recording

              In the process the camera is just a tool and the industry offers tools that suite the more diverse needs. Therefore it’s not fair to say so linearly that “this is not a good camera” just because you consider that it is not the best solution for your particular needs and to offer as a comparison benchmark something whose price amounts to dozens of times more in oder to fulfill all the requirements you consider the D850 is missing.

            • Marcus

              That’s a good point and you are right! The application I described is very special although online retail business is an important part of the business. Never the less there is no seamless digital workflow possible with this camera. The image quality will probably be better than on any other camera and all the high sophisticated features will suit the needs of some special application. The D850 is an optimization rather than a new invention. A simple LTE module for a single board computer costs about 30 bucks and takes the space of a CF-Card. On the other hand a D5 offers Ethernet connection in camera.
              Anyway with the price point of the camera the market is very limited. The D850 will surely be a very capable DSLR with (hopefully) great image quality. I think this is the first time I will not upgrade. The D810 fits my needs well for digital imaging.

        • bobgrant

          This is also a bad camera for those who need to use it to order pet food online.

        • Bob Thane

          Generally people who are shooting these in studio are shooting tethered, and those who need wifi connections for work can afford the extra dongle.

          • Marcus

            Tethered shooting in still life is fine but with people in the studio it is always a risk. Nikon and Capture One Software are not great for tethered shooting either.

      • Marcus

        I agree with you! That’s the reason I own a D810. I tried out many different cameras and tested all sensors on image quality and color response with Xrite test charts under controlled environment. The D810 was by far the best digital camera. Most of the time I still use analog film. I like the colors, the option to let the lab do the work and save time and to stay away from the computer. The images are uploaded to a cloud service and or printed.
        But when I use the camera I often want to share a great shot with friends and family. Therefore I have to use my smartphone.

      • Matthias Merz

        What would be bad about getting great shots and having all the connectivity options? Doesn’t make the shots worse…

        • Bob Thane

          Oh, it wouldn’t be bad (except for any weight, battery life, and price effects, but that’s probably not important) – it’s just that not having those features built in won’t significantly affect sales of this class of camera at this time.

          • Matthias Merz

            Weight shouldn’t really be a problem. It might affect the price, but that shouldn’t be a lot. If it’s implemented well, and there is an easy way to switch it off, battery life wouldn’t be the matter if one doesn’t want/need it. The way it is right now I have to bring my smartphone even to remote areas, carrying weight, draining the battery of the phone and have to take care to have a recharge for that (no changeable battery there). Therefor I would have loved in-built GPS. But maybe you are right, and most people see that different, so it probably wouldn’t be a significant marketing issue indeed.

    • nwcs

      I’m glad you can declare that on behalf of everyone. 🙂 Those things you mentioned are nice but wouldn’t turn around the industry either. The answer is in software, workflow, and integration. Not in LTE, WLAN, etc.

      • Marcus

        A Camera connection to the internet lets you transfer every (or any selected) picture to a cloud service like smartphones do. A convinient way of sharing or to archive/manage your images on a tablet, smartphone. The data has to be transferred anyway. Why not during the time it is not in use (e.g. in the bag). I remember in my first days as a photographer working for a newspaper. My camera was a Nikon F4S and the guys from Reuters came and set up a Kodak DCS connected to laptop and a heavy modem. We went to the lab and developed the soccer pictures while Reuters already distributed the pictures online. D5 / 1DX Mark II offer Ethernet connection in camera!

        • Thom Hogan

          Uh, these are 46mp images you’re talking about. Even blasted through the Ethernet port (WT-7 accessory for the D850) this isn’t instantaneous, and over LTE you’re talking huge data costs.

          • Matthias Merz

            For regular press jobs you don’t need to send full size RAWs. Having the possibility of directly sending out some small JPEGs through the locations WLAN or a hotspot on the smartphone or tablet would be awesome for these occasions. And the possibility of including ITPC data in camera is already there. Even cropping and adding a short phrase in the captions could be easily done on the touchscreen if implemented right, and there would be no need of switching to a different device.
            It wouldn’t do the full worklflow for sure, but it would be a nice possibility for those extra urgent pictures.

            • Thom Hogan

              True and not true. While it’s true that my press work accepts JPEG instantly, several of the groups require raw to be transmitted on request.

              Look, I’m using IPTC in the cameras that support it. I preset a few things for each job. I still have to take the time to do captioning, as the photo editor at the other end doesn’t necessarily know the players I’m shooting or what the situation is for the shot. Every moment you’re doing workflow chores, you’re not shooting. For football, that’s not terrible, as there is some downtown between plays. For a sport like ice hockey, there’s no downtime in most college games unless they’re televised, and even then it’s minimal and not totally predictable.

          • Marcus

            LTE transfer speed is very high. How many images (or every image) and the file size (quality) depends on the needs (settings) of the user. In the last decades prices for communication services have contently declined and at the same time the transfer speed went up. Smart Devices (internet of things) is a trend in consumer electronics that offers new possibilities. Amazon, Google, Apple, Microsoft to name just the biggest players are invested.

            • Thom Hogan

              Just to be clear, I just tested my LTE. Yes, on downloads LTE can be fast (9.13MBps is what I achieved). But on uploads? Not so much (0.83Mbps is what I got). FWIW, Internet Speed Test claims that my Internet speed “is typical.”

              Again, how many 46mp images do you think you’ll be transferring upstream?

            • Marcus

              LTE speed is 50 MBit up-/download minimum at my region and maximum is 100 MBit. Of course it depends on where you are. It is often faster to use LTE then DSL. Some companies offer routers that combine DSL and LTE and switch between them when atomically to get the maximum speed.

            • Thom Hogan

              What is claimed versus what is delivered can be considerably different. And we should pick MBit or MByte to be consistent.

              Again, I’m filling 16GB cards at events. At 1MBps–faster than the upload speed I get–I’d be waiting hours for that card to upload. So your “every photo” notion just doesn’t play in my world.

              I tested my LTE systems (I have two from two different vendors) against my home Wi-Fi. My home Wi-Fi beat both handily (it’s connected to a very high-speed cable).

            • Marcus

              LTE is super fast in my area. DSL (ADSL – asynchronos) has very low upload speeds. So I use LTE and it is super fast. But I not think it is a rather good idea to transfer uncompressed RAW-Files. But JPEG are easy and fast to transfer. Both Canon an Nikon offer tools to optimize the JPEG-engine. I fine tuned it so 95 % of the images do not need to be loaded into Capture One or Photoshop. It saves me time. And as we all know time is money. To optimize disk space the raw-files are deleted.

            • El Aura

              My LTE just tested at 65 Gbit/s down and 47 Gbit/s up. My home WiFi, aka my cable, offers 100 Mbit/s down and 10 Mbit/s up (I could pay more to get 500 down and 50 up via cable). And for about two years now, I also have the option of fibre where I can get 100 Mbit/s down and up for almost the same price (with the option of up to 1 Gbit/s down and up).

    • bobgrant

      GPS? Don’t you know where you are? I’ll be upgrading. The bump in IQ will be valuable for my catalogue work.

      • Marcus

        That is very interesting. 15 years ago six megapixel were good enough for a double page. What kind of catalog are you doing? Where do you save and archive your data and how long does the transfer to the customer ( – system) take.

        • bobgrant

          Line sheets for conversions to catalogue. That means low res for the line sheets, but then they use many of the same shots for blow ups and crops. When they crop down two 80-120% the higher the resolution, the better. In some setups the clients have become accustomed to get 3-4 variants out of shot, cropping deeper and deeper. Saves them money and me time, but six MP won’t even come close. D800 was the first DSLR that could match medium format for this type of application.

    • You can’t take a GPS integrated DSLR everywhere, illegal in a number of places. But you sound clueless, so….

      • Marcus

        Thanks! But may you can explain to me why Canon already integrated GPS in the 6D years ago?

        • Do they sell the same model in all markets? I don’t think that would be possible for the reason CrashingOut has given.

        • JXVo

          Yes they have done this, and Nikon with e.g. the D5300 and AW130 that I know of but the cameras sold to regions with GPS regulations must each be separately registered and certified in those regions. It adds cost. It is also then illegal to travel with your camera bought elsewhere to one of these regulated countries. My country (South Africa) is one of these. I’m sure nobody checks but it is technically illegal to bring your US or EU purchased camera here if it has GPS built in. Same would apply to your smart phone and again, I’m pretty sure nobody will check this. I can’t see the sense in it but there it is.

          • Marcus

            That’s a good argument!
            But the manufactures could install the hardware and deactivate GPS in software for specific regions. Like WIFI where there are some hidden channels (for South Korea).

            • JXVo

              I agree. Like I said, I can’t see the sense in regulating GPS receivers but one thing is for sure….Nikon gives you two other ways to integrate realtime gps data into your pics so the need to include GPS into the camera is less than for some other features. If a designer is left short of space or is designing to a price then, for a camera, features that don’t directly affect image making would have lower priority than those that do.

    • Fly Moon

      LTE?
      Really? Even some tablets don’t have that! Be realistic when you ask/wish for features.

  • Allan

    lol

  • Oz Baz

    Looks like fantastic DSLR. My only issue with my Nikons is the AF in live view. Hopefully the sensor has phase and contrast detect AF in live view but I suspect it will not.

    • Most probably, it hasn’t. At least we haven’t seen the minor hint about that.

  • Raymond

    So, built-in wifi? Does that mean we can control the camera via a smart device? Is that already available with Nikon and I just don’t know it yet?

    • Eric Lee Overton

      I can do it on my d750, but it’s not perfect. It’s good for live view on my phone (not for making adjustments), then I use the ml-l3 to snap the shot (you can control shutter with the app, but there is a lag)

    • JXVo

      Yes there is Nikon wireless remote utility app. It works with D5300, D5500, D7200, D750 which all have built in wi-fi. I think the newer Snapbridge enabled phones need the Snapbridge app which relies on a combination of both Bluetooth and Wifi. Users have complained that they cannot separately access the Wifi on Snapbridge enabled cameras. As I understand, it uses Bluetooth (low power draw) to establish and maintain a fulltime connection and to control the wifi connection to transfer the photo data when needed. Wifi is faster than Bluetooth, especially the newer Wifi protocols but also more power hungry and I suspect this is the reason for the hybrid system.

  • Murray Miller

    Just a question about the features availability. I see we are anticipating a new/improved version of snap bridge. Will Nikon issue a firmware upgrade/patch for the other cameras who have had less success with snap bridge or is it a truly hardware issue?

  • Oz Baz

    Any news on a F7 film SLR?

    • Don’t think that will happen. How many bought the F6? Despite being passionate about film, my last SLR was the F5.

  • Iceman

    The only thing I am disapointed is the base iso 64, i expected 25 or 32

    • RC Jenkins

      How much light do you have when you shoot!?!

      • Allan

        solar photography?

        • RC Jenkins

          True, but ISO 32 is only 1 stop below 64…

          You’d be using an ND filter anyway, and ISO 32 would likely make all other ISOs suffer in performance.

      • He lives in the article circle during the summer.

    • Bob Thane

      I’m impressed that they kept ISO 64 to be honest – with it seemingly using the D500 sensor but scaled up, I thought they’d have to go back to base ISO 100.

    • sickheadache

      you know Nikon D810/50 says 64iso…but it is really 50 and will go down to 23?

  • Schrute

    Any insight on the wifi capabilities? I’d love to tether wirelessly to Lightroom without a WT-7, but I’m guessing the built-in wifi would be able to handle that.

  • Steve

    Why does NR even include a comments section. They’re mostly just a bunch of whingers trying to one up on the other guy. The one or two sensible comments are drowned out in the noise of squealing meerkats vying for attention.

    • Coffee

      We are killing time before the official release/announcement. So we like to dream about what could be, its human. Don’t like it, plenty of other sites or forums.

    • I find many of the comments helpful, maybe I just have to do a better moderation.

      • Allan

        Good luck with that.

        • When we get the regular few hundred comments per day I can handle it, but when we go over 1000 per day, I just don’t have the time to read everything.

          • sickheadache

            hand me the keys to this benz,,,I will make sure the masses stay on course. bet.

            • So you want to be a moderator? I am not even sure if I can do that in disqus.

            • sickheadache

              Yes…I would love that..how much? Does it pay…lol

            • I have to talk to Nikon’s CEO and clarify the details 🙂

    • JXVo

      It generates traffic for the site which helps to keep it going. Some of those who comment bring knowledge from a wide range of fields, not only photographic. It is interesting to see how many different ways people are using their cameras and this gives insight into the immense range of features that the much maligned Nikon designers must cram into their complex machines.

    • PaPaJ

      I am getting ready to buy my first DSLR. Reading all the comments and information in NR is teaching me a ton of information. It is all real conversation that I understand better than “book” learning. I love NR. Don’t change a thing.

    • ToastyFlake

      The comment section is optional. You don’t have to read or participate.

    • Ivanku

      The folks who have something smart to say can recognize each other by now, and we skip the filler to find comments we want to read. If you’re willing to scroll for a few seconds, there’s a lot of good thoughts here.

      • I agree, and you can now also ignore comments.

    • verytoxic

      If NR removes comments section, NR is dead. Even though there are bunch of whiners, including me, I still learn a great deal from the commenters. Article itself does not address all questions, hence the need for comments.

  • jason

    Anything about on sensor phase detect?

    • Ivanku

      We would’ve known by now. So, it’s a no go.

  • PT

    Peter (admin) how about adding ‘supports the Nikon SB 5000 radio wireless system when using the Nikon Wireless Remote Controller WR-R10 and WR Adapter WR-A10.

    • Michael Cary Arellano

      +1. Really, really hoping for this!!

    • JXVo

      Info to date is that the D850 does not have a built-in radio flash trigger so it is likely it will need the existing WR-R10 and associated gadgets to trigger remote flash units unless they also release some new gadget…..expensive gadgets…..

  • low

    Does anyone know the fastest SS with the e-shutter?

  • R. T. Firefly

    Only 46MP? 🙁

    • TwoStrayCats

      Stitch ’em together and make a gazillion MP shot. With a little effort you can have one file that eats your hard drive.

    • Antonio

      You may be sure you’ve the sympathy of some people that would like Nikon to offer also a 24 Mpx option and not “only” the 46 Mpx one… 🙂 🙂

  • Ushanas Trivedi

    Button over diopter switch continues to be mystery. I could locate similar button on D810 but it is on front side just above BKT button & below built in flash. Please check in attached image. It doesn’t seem to have any functionality. I don’t own one, so I don’t know. It can very well be the same thing going on here. It may be just so that location of this thing might have changed to https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2d9b32fff6308b76bd05bc88c4a05afe09c12975f5551aa9d50b1e09e53bfdd1.jpg back of camera.

    • “I don’t own one, so I don’t know…” Thank you for that insight. No one short of Nikon and their endorsees “owns”
      one. Be patient, I’m sure it’s there to do something other than cause you to squint.

      • Ushanas Trivedi

        I meant, I don’t own D810 & don’t know about that button on D810. Obviously, no one owns D850 till it is released & supplied. It is common sense. Isn’t it?

        • Common sense? On this forum I wonder some times…really. Thanks for clearing that up.

          • pedantic_brit

            This forum is hardly unique in that respect – MarkTwain said: “I’ve found common sense ain’t so common”. It seems he was hardly the first to have expressed this in the second century the Roman poet Juvenal wrote ” Rarus enim ferme sensus communis.” – Common sense is generally rare.

            • And, of course, there’s Thomas Paine…right? 🙂

            • pedantic_brit

              Voltaire too, I think – and no doubt many others ..

            • Voltaire, yes. I was playing with the term common sense, as in the name of the famous pamphlet Thomas Paine wrote. He seems to be a favorite topic with my British friends.

            • pedantic_brit

              Ah!
              Sorry – I was a bit slow on the uptake.

        • Duncan Dimanche

          Not really sure why he is giving you crap for that… I got that you were talking about the D810 and not the d850… sigh

    • silmasan

      That button simply ejects/pops-up the flash lid…

      • Ushanas Trivedi

        Okay. I thought flash button below BKT may be doing that like in D750. Thanks for your input

      • Gosh1

        there is no built-in flash on this D850

    • That is a lock for ring that changes FPS/MUP/Timer etc. It has always been there and will stay there as it is mechanical. Oops. Bracket button you said. That’s flash popper.

      • No, he is referring to the pop-up flash (strobe) release as silmasan has already pointed out.

  • Murat Sahan

    Its nice to see that nikon is joining the 4k video in different ways: “…can shoot up to 30fps @ 8MP with the electronic shutter…” 😀

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