Nikon AF modules reference table

nikon-d500-advanced-multi-cam-20k-af-module

Nikon D500 advanced MultiCam 20k AF module

Slow news day. Here is a reference table of the AF modules used in Nikon DSLR cameras courtesy of radojuva.com:

AF module total AF points cross points f/5.6-f/8.0 f/8.0 EV range used in cameras
Advanced AM200

1

1

0

0

-1 to +19 E2, E2S, E2N, E2NS, E3, E3S, Fujifilm Fujix DS-505, DS-515, DS-505A, DS-515A, DS-560, DS-565, Fujifilm FinePix S1 Pro
Multi-CAM 530

3

1

0

0

-1 to +19 D40, D40x, D60
Multi-CAM 1300

5

1

0

0

-1 to +19 D1, D1h, D1x
Multi-CAM 900

5

1

0

0

-1 to +19 D100, D70, D70s, D50, Fujifilm FinePix S2 Pro, Fujifilm FinePix S3 Pro, Fujifilm FinePix S3 Pro UVIR, Kodak Professional DCS Pro 14n, Kodak Professional DCS Pro SLR/n
Multi-CAM 1000

11

1

0

0

-1 to +19 D200, D80, D90, D3000, D5000,D3100, D5100, D3200, D3300, Fujifilm FinePix S5 Pro, Fujifilm FinePix IS Pro
Multi-CAM 2000

11

9

0

0

-1 to +19 D2h, D2hs, D2x, D2xs
Multi-CAM 4800DX

39

9

0

0

-1 to +19 D7000, D5200, D5300, D5500
Multi-CAM 4800FX

39

9

33

7

-1 to +19 D600, D610, Df
Multi-CAM 3500DX

51

15

0

0

-1 to +19 D300, D300s
Multi-CAM 3500FX

51

15

0

0

-1 to +19 D700, D3, D3s, D3x
Advanced Multi-CAM 3500DX

51

15

1

1

-2 to +19 D7100
Advanced Multi-CAM 3500FX

51

15

15

11

-2 to +19 D4, D4s, D800, D800E, D810, D810a
Advanced Multi-CAM 3500FX II

51

15

15

11

-3 to +19 D750
Advanced Multi-CAM 3500DX II

51

15

1

1

-3 to +19 D7200
Multi-CAM 20K

153 (55)

99 (35)

37

15 (9)

-4 to +19 D500, D5
This entry was posted in Other Nikon stuff and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Eric Calabros

    and I have to ask why slow news just few days before CES? Did they rent that big booth to just relaunch the DLs?

    • Hope not!

    • yes, and the D5600 for the US market see my other comment in previous post

      • Eric Calabros

        Not so bad compared to last year, they have incredible lenses to “show”, but the problem is that none of them is new. CES is about exhibition of new things. If I was the boss, I would say “announce something”, even if it ain’t ready.

        • Sawyerspadre

          They did that with DL last year, right?

          • silmasan

            the boss: “Announce something else!”

          • Eric Calabros

            DL was almost ready, but a last-minute-found hardwae failure prevented it to enter the market. It doesn’t happen in every release. Besides, everybody is doing that these days. You can’t get any GH5 in January, but they gonna reveal it at CES.

        • KT

          Didn’t they already announce both the D5 and D500 at last CES. There’s no way they will match that for another decade. Besides Nikon was never really a big player at CES, last year was a one off

          • Thom Hogan

            I haven’t the faintest idea why Nikon is at CES. Especially since they stopped going to NAB, too (not currently scheduled for 2017, either).

            But this connects with the strange notion that Nikon started regarding itself as a consumer electronics company in the 00’s. Even though they made some true consumer products (Coolpix, now KeyMission), I wouldn’t put them in that category at all. They’re a niche player in consumer electronics, at best, and there are better strategies than wasting millions exhibiting at a trade show.

            That said, there’s a hidden reason behind their presence: retailers. CES was probably where Nikon started the hookups with places like Target and Best Buy.

            • So no new camera announcement should be excepted at CES?

            • Thom Hogan

              Depends a bit on what you regard as “new.”

            • New DSLR maybe from FX lineup…?

  • Colin Stuart

    Too bad Nikon’s Film cameras weren’t included too.

    • FWIW, I believe the F6 used the MultiCAM 2000. Not a lot of points or spread, but worked solid on my D2x.

      • Colin Stuart

        Indeed, F6 used MultiCAM 2000, F5/F100 used MultiCAM 1300, F80/N80 used MultiCAM 900. No idea what the F4 used?? or their older or cheaper AF film slrs.

  • DonD

    This and $5 will get you an overpriced coffee.

  • This gets cut off on the right side for me. Happens on both my desktop and mobile.

    • Spy Black

      If you hit the link you can see it all.

  • Bob Thane

    Pretty bizarre that the D610 has more AF points at f5.6-f8 than the D4s, D810, and D750.

    • Max

      What does it mean when that column says 0?

      • Bob Thane

        That’s if the camera can’t acquire focus past f5.6. Officially, anyway. In my experience most of those cameras actually can focus with lenses like a 600mm f6.3, provided the lighting’s decent.

  • Max

    So a D7200 and D750 can acquire focus in lower light than a D4s

    • Peter

      Not necessarily. AF-Performance is a combination of processing power and AF-Module.

    • Pro-gear

      Don’t worry about it too much 🙂 I don’t think anybody who owns a D4S will downgrade to a D750 or D7200.

  • Pro-gear

    Nice reference table although the most essential information is missing.

    Those who like to get carried away and lose self-control by the autofocus sensitivity range as for example -3 EV to + 19 EV might particularly find this table exciting.

    However, for professional users the autofocus point area is more important.
    How well the autofocus points are spread out over the entire viewfinder frame is far more relevant.

    For example the D4S, D810 have a much more spread out and effective autofocus point area compared to the D750.

    It’s about one autofocus point wider on both the D4S and the D810 on both sides, that is horizontally and vertically.
    The difference is even bigger in portrait mode (vertically).
    As far as I’m aware even the D3S and the D700 have clearly a better spread out autofocus point area compared to the D750.
    My opinion is that this information should have been included as well.
    The article do mention that the D500 has the best autofocus point coverage of all the cameras but that’s the only comment.

    • Aldo

      “for professional users the autofocus point area is more important.
      How well the autofocus points are spread out over the entire viewfinder frame is far more relevant.”

      -not sure you speak for all professionals there

      “For example the D4S, D810 have a much more spread out and effective autofocus point area compared to the D750.”

      -much more??? 2017 will be the year of fake news

      • Pro-gear

        lol…well at least I speak for all those professionals who actually uses the pro bodies that do have a better spread out autofocus area than the D750.

        So many professionals who uses the pro bodies, D3S, D700, D4, D810, D4S and the D5. All these bodies have a better and more effective AF area. These photographers would never downgrade to a D750.

        And yes, the D4S, D810 have a much more spread out and effective autofocus point area compared to the D750. It’s about one autofocus point wider on both sides, that is horizontally and vertically.
        One autofocus point wider can mean a lot during a shoot. The difference is even bigger in portrait mode (vertically).
        Nikon have confirmed that the D4S and the D810 have a wider and more effective AF area.
        The year 2017 will still be the year for D750 fanboys who never even owned a real pro body from Nikon in their life 🙂

        • Thom Hogan

          Something tells me you haven’t used a D750.

          • Pro-gear

            We only use pro bodies in our studios. The D750 has a much narrower AF area and also only max 1/4000 and a number of other issues such as a crappy and weak buffer that only last for the embarrassing 2.2 seconds and then turns the D750 into a constipating turtle. Anyway the real successor to the D700 should be here in 2017…according to rumors. Maybe Thom Hogan have also heard something about the successor to the D700 😀

            • Thom Hogan

              I’m still sensing bias. Not at all sure how 1/8000 shutter speeds play into your studio, let alone a worst case 15-shot buffer (the D700 you seem to adore had a 20-shot worst case buffer). I’m also wondering where way off-center AF fits into studio work, as well.

              You also may note that I’m the source of many of those rumors you refer to ;~).

            • Pro-gear

              If you don’t understand what to do with 1/8000 you should create another profile with another name ;-D
              The Thom Hogan I met in 2012 knew better than that ;-D

            • Aldo

              Are you a monk?

            • John Albino

              Maybe you’re a young person who never shot film or at least only goes back no more than 20 years or so, or it’s because I’m an old guy who started shooting back in the days when the top shutter speed of a “real pro camera” (eg, Nikon F) was “only” 1/1000 (and in the case of “real pro” 6×6 TLRs such as Rolleiflex “only” 1/500). but I sense a real disconnect from reality when someone claims a camera with “only a 1/4000” top shutter speed denotes said camera as “non-professional”…

            • Pro-gear

              Respect to you…but still 1/8000 is very useful…

            • Thom Hogan

              Sure, 1/8000 is useful. But in the studio? Is that the same studio where we have MF cameras with leaf shutters that don’t even hit 1/1000?

              What many of us are having trouble with is connecting the two pieces of your logic. That the things you claim are terrible on the D750 make the camera unusable in the studio.

        • Aldo

          Do you always ‘laugh out load’ and put a happy face every time someone makes a valid point? “so many professionals yadda yadda” This is ‘a tad’ vague.

          You are wrong about what ‘professional’ is and what constitutes a camera body that can be used professionally. For example, at Disneyland photographers use d3200, d3300 bodies ‘professionally’ to take photos of people to then sell them. This is still a viable business for them and more money is made there that what a lot of your type of ‘professionals’ ever make.

          You also seem to lack understanding of what Nikon is doing with their top of the line cameras since the release of the d800/d4… up to releasing intermediate bodies like the d600-d750, including the latest d500. Since you are one of those who is obsessed with the word ‘pro’ and have already implied and admitted that the d810 is a ‘pro’ body, I will stick with the d800/d4 release to explain.

          Basically Nikon effectively split camera capabilities to better suit certain type of photographers… they even took it a step further with the d800e… which doesn’t has the AA filter canceled out. The d800e was originally intended for landscapers and those who were willing to treat moire themselves for a little more sharpness. The d800e turned rather successful to a broader crowd than expected and we now see more cameras without the filter (eg d810, d5300 and up, d3300 and up etc). The d800/d800e combo was basically your top of the line (notice how I don’t call it ‘professional’) body intended to give you max resolution where the d4 was designed around the concept of high framerate and low noise at high ISOs.

          Many idiots refused to see what nikon was doing and even still today they only see (in their eyes) the D4 type bodies as the only ‘true’ professional bodies. With the release of the long awaited d300 replacement the d500… Nikon proved once again that is effectively catering to photographers who benefit from shooting DX…. eventhough DX is often thought of NOT being ‘professional’.

          So with current top of the line bodies: D5, D500, D810(soon to be replaced) Nikon has given you 3 bodies that can be a specialized tool depending what type of photography is applied. They all have strengths and weaknesses… but none is a ‘do it all’ … although the D5 comes close it still lacks resolution and will be further set apart by the d810 replacement.

          So where do lowly, garbage… not true professional bodies like the d750 come into play? Well they are INTERMEDIATE bodies. Here is the definition:

          intermediate1
          [in-ter-mee-dee-it]

          adjective
          1.
          being, situated, or acting between two points, stages, things, persons, etc.:

          The d600 was intended to be placed bellow the d800… but still had desirable features the d800 doesn’t have. The main one was obviously the sensor. 24mp hit the sweet spot for many people who longed for the ‘true’ d700 replacement and thought 36mp was overkill for their needs, or simply didn’t want to deal with the file sizes. Unfortunately the d600 had a major weakness (no it’s not the oil spots). The d600 AF performed poorly in low light . It was arguably adapted from DX cameras and didn’t quite worked well. It was also noted that the focus points were too tightly packed in the middle. Then you got the oil spot fiasco and the d610 came out which was the same thing and brought nothing new to the table.

          Then here comes the d750. It was intended to be placed between the d610 and the d810… yet it has a little bit more framerate than the d810, focuses in darker environments than the d810… and it is (for some, myself included) a closer d700 replacement. I’ve owned a d800, d810, d700, d610 and currently owned own a d750 and d500. I can say with confidence that the d750 works best for me… and for me alone. I can’t speak for everyone, but the d750 has proven itself in my work environment. Because I get paid for taking pictures, I am a professional. And my d750 is a professional camera. I can be making more money that other professionals who shoot with a D5… but I can also be making less money than someone who shoots with a d3300. It is just how it works.

          Every camera has its intended market and can be used professionally. Every photographer has a certain skill, technique, experience, talent that makes his/her photos better than others. It is a very competitive field. And though there are ‘rules’ as to what makes good photos… nowdays photography is also about taste… just like food. I’m sure there are better photographers than myself who don’t even make a dime out of photography… and vice versa. When you get into artistic photography and high end work… the gear matters less and less… and it is often those who praise and talk about professional gear, who don’t have a good understanding of what being a talented photographer really is about.

          ps… I’m posting a direct comparison of the d810/d750 spread… it is rather a small difference. I would consider the d500 to have a real advantage here over any camera… but between the d810/d750 the difference is more negligible.

          • Pro-gear
            • Aldo

              Ask your boss to let you take a camera home… you may learn something…

            • Pro-gear

              Yes I will ask him….one guy in our studio got fired because of using a shitty D750 with a shit buffer and only 1/4000s. Also the faulty shutter was a huge problem on that crappy D750 😀 LOL. I hope that every D750 fanboy can finally upgrade to a real pro body in the year 2017 😀 !!!!

            • Aldo

              You need 1/8000 and a huge buffer for studio? What recycle time do you work with? If you took the camera home you can finally take the camera out of f8 and you will finally learn something… It’s very clear you dont have much experience.

        • Aldo
    • Thom Hogan

      > For example the D4S, D810 have a much more spread out and effective autofocus point area compared to the D750.

      Not exactly true. “Spread” produces gaps in focus coverage and makes some of the dynamic choices a little more “squirrelly” than a tighter grouping does. This is noticeable, for example, on a D5 with a 300mm versus a D500 with a 200mm, for instance. The D500 tends to have gap-itis as you move off center, the D5 doesn’t. But, of course, the D5 coverage doesn’t extend to the edges of the frame.

      Simply put, there is no winning combination. Each aspect of the focus system connotes a personality to the focus system that is nuanced and subtle.

      • Pro-gear

        A narrower and cramped focusing system can at least not be better than a wider focusing system according to Nikon’s own technical advisers I have spoken too. This should apply in most cases and especially when you do a lot of composing. The D5 should be about 5% faster in terms of AF speed compared to the D500 according to Nikon. The algorithms are different on the D5. Very simply put….the pro bodies are generally better than the enthusiast bodies.

        • Thom Hogan

          Not at all true and provable with Nikon’s own cameras.

          The D2 autofocus sensors “covered” a very wide area, but they had very distinct holes in their coverage, and many of us noticed those. The D750 goes the other direction, with less overall area “covered” but more densely so. It doesn’t have the gap problems that the D2 series did (or the D500 has).

          You’re making a bit of mistake here: autofocus sensors do not blanket the entire area they outline. Indeed, they cover very little of it. Nikon has made a whole host of different sensors. The number in the CAM name actually tells you something about the total measurement area within the overall area that is being looked at. The CAM4800 sensors have fewer but overall larger actual autofocus sensing areas than the CAM3500, but they’re also allocated to look at a smaller overall space.

          I’m not sure which “Nikon technical advisors” you’ve talked to, but if you’re characterizing their statements correctly, those statements are misleading, at best.

          • Pro-gear

            I didn’t mention the D2 at all in this discussion. I’m sure the technology has developed leaps and bounds since those days….
            To make it very simple for you:
            Anybody who thinks that the D750 focuses better than a D5, D4S, D4 or D500 or even a D810 is mental and should stop his / her Internet activity at least for a few months to be able to get back to the real world 😀

  • manattan

    The table is misleading for the D5 and D500 as some of those points are only active at f4 or wider aperture. You really need another column to explain that as you already have in brackets the number of user selectable points (which also is not explained btw in the table legend).

    • Regular users choose products via numbers. E. g. …
      – more GByte RAM on VGA cards (who cares about the memory bandwidth and GPU speed?)
      – number of airbags (who cares about how thick and strong the metal of the body?)
      – AF points (who cares about the area they cover?)
      – lumens of brightness in projectors (who cares about color accuracy?)
      … etc.
      The whole world stinks of the misleading of marketing. If you need practical information you have to look under the hood yourself.

      • Agree. It’s why Trump became president.

  • cdstum

    According to this table the D7100 is better at acquiring focus than the D700… but in real life situations I found my D7100 focus would often hunt in overcast conditions whereas the D700 didn’t.

  • Bob Bolden

    useless table.

  • fanboy fagz

    Multi-CAM 20K -thats a damn jump in performance from the 3500

    • Thom Hogan

      Yes, it is. Plus it’s coupled with more dedicated CPU.

  • Aldo

    So how is this relevant to needing to shoot at 1/8k sec and needing a big buffer? So now you are talking speedlights? Do you even understand what Im talking about.. Im gonna assume you are just trolling.

  • Bob Bolden

    yes, your comment is as useless as this table. Just read what others try to explain – the table DOES NOT INCLUDE AF points sensitivity, coverage, etc. The table does not include information about the typical issues that some AF moduls have, like the one that installed in D7000.
    Means the guy spent hours to create something, that useless to use. Just let me know the example why and where this table will be usefull :))))))))))))

    • jarmatic

      I was talking about my comment, clearly. You missed me pointing at your comment, maybe? Sorry you’re so darn sensitive, bro. Also, your smily face has a lot of chins.

  • José Felipe Fraile González

    . Multi CAM 1300 has 3 cross points.: center, left and right and all 5 are double sensors

  • Back to top