Nikon D5600 vs. Nikon D5500 comparison

nikon-d5600-vs-nikon-d5500
The new Nikon D5600 camera has only a few minor upgrades from the previous D5500 model:

  • SnapBridge
  • Smaller size Slightly lighter
  • Auto ISO with the touch Fn button
  • Frame advance touch interface (like the D5)
  • In-camera time lapse feature

This is a comparison between the Nikon D5600 and Nikon D5500 based on the specifications published on Nikon's website:

Nikon D5600

Nikon D5500

Type
Single-lens reflex digital camera Single-lens reflex digital camera
Lens mount
Nikon F mount (with AF contacts) Nikon F mount
Effective angle of view
Nikon DX format; focal length equivalent to approx. 1.5x that of lenses with FX format angle of view Nikon DX format; focal length equivalent to approx. 1.5x that of lenses with FX format angle of view
Image sensor
DX, CMOS, 23.5 mm x 15.6 mm DX, 23.5 mm x 15.6 mm CMOS
Total pixels
24.78 million 24.78 million
Dust-reduction system
Image sensor cleaning, Image Dust Off reference data (Capture NX-D software required) Image sensor cleaning, Image Dust Off reference data (Capture NX-D software required)
Effective pixels
24.2 million 24.2 million
Image size
(L) 6000 x 4000, (M) 4496 x 3000, (S) 2992 x 2000 (L) 6000 x 4000, (M) 4496 x 3000, (S) 2992 x 2000
Storage file formats
NEF (RAW): 12- or 14 bit, compressed, JPEG: JPEG-Baseline compliant with fine (approx. 1 : 4), normal (approx. 1 : 8), or basic (approx. 1 : 16) compression, NEF (RAW)+JPEG: Single photograph recorded in both NEF (RAW) and JPEG formats NEF (RAW): 12- or 14 bit, compressed. JPEG: JPEG-Baseline compliant with fine (approx. 1 : 4), normal (approx. 1 : 8), or basic (approx. 1 : 16) compression. NEF (RAW)+JPEG: Single photograph recorded in both NEF (RAW) and JPEG formats
Picture Control System
Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait, Landscape, Flat; selected Picture Control can be modified; storage for custom Picture Controls Standard, Neutral, Vivid, Monochrome, Portrait, Landscape, Flat; selected Picture Control can be modified; storage for custom Picture Controls
Storage media
SD, SDHC (UHS-I compliant), SDXC (UHS-I compliant) SD, SDHC (UHS-I compliant), SDXC (UHS-I compliant)
Card slot
1 Secure Digital (SD) card --
File system
DCF 2.0, Exif 2.3, PictBridge DCF 2.0, DPOF, Exif 2.3, PictBridge
Viewfinder
Eye-level pentamirror single-lens reflex viewfinder Eye-level pentamirror single-lens reflex viewfinder
Frame coverage
Approx. 95% horizontal and 95% vertical Approx. 95% horizontal and 95% vertical
Magnification
Approx. 0.82x (50 mm f/1.4 lens at infinity, –1.0 m-1) Approx. 0.82x (50 mm f/1.4 lens at infinity, –1.0 m-¹)
Eyepoint
17 mm (–1.0 m-1; from center surface of viewfinder eyepiece lens) 17 mm (–1.0 m-¹; from center surface of viewfinder eyepiece lens)
Diopter adjustment
-1.7 to +0.5 m-1 -1.7 – +0.5m-1
Focusing screen
Type B BriteView Clear Matte Mark VII screen Type B BriteView Clear Matte Mark VII screen
Reflex mirror
Quick return --
Lens aperture
Instant return, electronically controlled Instant return, electronically controlled
Shutter type
Electronically-controlled vertical-travel focal-plane shutter Electronically-controlled vertical-travel focalplane shutter
Shutter speed
1/4000 to 30 s, in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV; Bulb; Time 1/4000–30s, in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV; Bulb; Time
Flash sync speed
X = 1/200 s; synchronizes with shutter at 1/200 s or slower X=1/200s, synchronizes with shutter at 1/200 s or slower
Release mode
S (single frame), CL (continuous low speed), CH (continuous high speed), Q (quiet shutter-release), Self-timer; interval timer photography supported S (single frame), CL (continuous low speed), CH (continuous high speed), Q (quiet shutter-release), Self-timer, Interval timer shooting, delayed remote, ML-L3; quick-response remote, ML-L3
Frame advance rate
Up to 5 fps, CL: Up to 3 fps CH: Up to 5 fps (JPEG and 12-bit NEF/RAW) or 4 fps (14-bit NEF/RAW). Note: Frame rates assume continuous-servo AF, manual or shutter-priority auto exposure, a shutter speed of 1/250 s or faster, Release selected for Custom Setting a1 (AF-C priority selection), and other settings at default values. Approx.5 fps. L: Up to 3 fps. H: Up to 5 fps (JPEG and 12-bit NEF/RAW) or 4 fps (14-bit NEF/RAW). Note: Frame rates assume continuous-servo AF, manual or shutter-priority auto exposure, a shutter speed of 1/250 s or faster, Release selected for Custom Setting a1 (AF-C priority selection), and other settings at default values.
Self-timer
2 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s; 1 to 9 exposures 2 s, 5 s, 10 s, 20 s; 1-9 exposures
Exposure metering
TTL exposure metering using 2016-pixel RGB sensor TTL exposure metering using main image sensor
Metering method
Matrix metering: 3D color matrix metering II (type G, E, and D lenses); color matrix metering II (other CPU lenses). Center-weighted metering: Weight of 75% given to 8-mm circle in center of frame. Spot metering: Meters 3.5-mm circle (about 2.5% of frame) centered on selected focus point Matrix
Metering range
Matrix or center-weighted metering: 0–20 EV. Spot metering: 2–20 EV Matrix or center-weighted metering: 0–20 EV. Spot metering: 2–20 EV
Exposure meter coupling
CPU CPU
Mode
Auto modes (auto; auto, flash off); programmed auto with flexible program (P); shutter-priority auto (S); aperture-priority auto (A); manual (M); scene modes (portrait; landscape; child; sports; close up; night portrait; night landscape; party/indoor; beach/snow; sunset; dusk/dawn; pet portrait; candlelight; blossom; autumn colors; food); special effects modes (night vision; super vivid; pop; photo illustration; toy camera effect; miniature effect; selective color; silhouette; high key; low key) Auto modes (auto; auto, flash off); programmed auto with flexible program (P); shutter-priority auto (S); aperture-priority auto (A); manual (M); scene modes (portrait, landscape, child, sports, close up, night portrait, night landscape, party/indoor, beach/snow, sunset, dusk/dawn, pet portrait, candlelight, blossom, autumn colors, food); special effects modes (night vision, super vivid, pop, photo illustration, toy camera effect, miniature effect, selective color, silhouette, high key, low key)
Exposure compensation
Can be adjusted by –5 to +5EV, in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV, in P, S, A, M, SCENE, and night vision modes Can be adjusted by –5 – +5 EV, in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV, in P, S, A, M, SCENE, and night vision modes
Exposure lock
Luminosity locked at detected value with AE-L/AF-L button Luminosity locked at detected value with AE-L/AF-L button
ISO sensitivity
ISO 100 to 25600, in steps of 1/3 EV, Auto ISO sensitivity control available 100–25600, in steps of 1/3 EV. Auto ISO sensitivity control available
Active D-Lighting
Auto, Extra high, High, Normal, Low, Off Auto, Extra high, High, Normal, Low, Off
Autofocus
Nikon Multi-CAM 4800DX autofocus sensor module with TTL phase detection, 39 focus points (including 9 cross-type sensors), and AF-assist illuminator (range approx. 0.5 to 3 m/1 ft 8 in. to 9 ft 10 in.). Autofocus is available with AF-S, AF-P, and AF-I lenses. Nikon Multi-CAM 4800DX autofocus sensor module with TTL phase detection, 39 focus points (including 9 cross-type sensor), and AF-assist illuminator (range approx. 0.5–3 m/ 1 ft 8 in.–9 ft 10 in.)
Detection range
–1 to +19 EV (ISO 100, 20 °C/68 °F) –1 – +19 EV (ISO 100, 20°C/68°F)
Lens servo
Single-servo AF (AF-S), Continuous-servo AF (AF-C), Auto AF-S/AF-C selection (AF-A); predictive focus tracking activated automatically according to subject status, Manual focus (MF): Electronic rangefinder can be used Autofocus (AF): Single-servo AF (AF-S), Continuous-servo AF (AF-C), Auto AF-S/AF-C selection (AF-A); predictive focus tracking activated automatically according to subject status. Manual focus (MF): Electronic rangefinder can be used
Focus points
39, can be selected from 39 or 11 focus points 39, can be selected from 39 or 11 focus points
AF-area mode
Single-point AF, 9-, 21-, or 39- point dynamic-area AF, 3D-tracking, auto-area AF Single-point AF, 9-, 21-, or 39- point dynamic-area AF, 3D-tracking, auto-area AF
Focus lock
Focus can be locked by pressing shutter-release button halfway (single-servo AF) or by pressing AE-L/AF-L button Focus can be locked by pressing shutter-release button halfway (single-servo AF) or by pressing AE-L/AF-L button
Built-in flash
Auto, portrait, child, close up, night portrait, party/indoor, pet portrait, super vivid, pop, photo illustration, toy camera effect: Auto flash with auto pop-up P, S, A, M, food: Manual pop-up with button release Auto, portrait, child, close up, night portrait, party/indoor, pet portrait, super vivid, pop, photo illustration, toy camera effect: Auto flash with auto pop-up. P, S, A, M, food: Manual pop-up with button release
Guide Number
Approx. 12/39, 12/39 with manual flash (m/ft, ISO 100, 20 °C/68 °F) Approx. 12/39, 12/39 with manual flash (m/ft, ISO 100, 20°C/68°F)
Flash control
TTL: i-TTL flash control using 2016-pixel RGB sensor is available with built-in flash; i-TTL balanced fill-flash for digital SLR is used with matrix and center-weighted metering, standard i-TTL flash for digital SLR with spot metering TTL: i-TTL flash control using 2016-pixel RGB sensor is available with built-in flash; i-TTL balanced fill-flash for digital SLR is used with matrix and center-weighted metering, standard i-TTL flash for digital SLR with spot metering
Flash modes
Auto, auto with red-eye reduction, auto slow sync, auto slow sync with red-eye reduction, fill-flash, red-eye reduction, slow sync, slow sync with red-eye reduction, rear-curtain with slow sync, rear-curtain sync, off Auto, auto with red-eye reduction, auto slow sync, auto slow sync with red-eye reduction, fill-flash, red-eye reduction, slow sync, slow sync with red-eye reduction, rear-curtain with slow sync, rear-curtain sync, off
Flash compensation
-3 to +1 EV in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV, in P, S, A, M, and SCENE modes -3 – +1 EV in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV, in P, S, A, M, and SCENE modes
Flash-ready indicator
Lights when built-in flash or optional flash unit is fully charged; blinks after flash is fired at full output Lights when built-in flash or optional flash unit is fully charged; blinks after flash is fired at full output
Accessory shoe
ISO 518 hot-shoe with sync and data contacts and safety lock ISO 518 hot-shoe with sync and data contacts and safety lock
Nikon Creative Lighting System
Nikon CLS supported Advanced Wireless Lighting supported with SB-910, SB-900, SB-800, SB-700, or SB-500 as a master flash or SU-800 as commander; Flash Color Information Communication supported with all CLS-compatible flash units
Sync terminal
AS-15 sync terminal adapter (available separately) AS-15 sync terminal adapter (available separately)
White balance
Auto, incandescent, fluorescent (7 types), direct sunlight, flash, cloudy, shade, preset manual, all except preset manual with fine-tuning. Auto, incandescent, fluorescent (7 types), direct sunlight, flash, cloudy, shade, preset manual, all except preset manual with fine-tuning.
Bracketing types
Exposure, White balance, ADL --
Live view - lens servo
Autofocus (AF): Single-servo AF (AF-S), full-time-servo AF (AF-F); Manual focus (MF) Autofocus (AF): Single-servo AF (AF-S); full-time-servo AF (AF-F). Manual focus (MF)
Live view - AF-area mode
Face-priority AF, Wide-area AF, Normal-area AF, Subject-tracking AF Face-priority AF, Wide-area AF, Normal-area AF, Subject-tracking AF
Live view - autofocus
Contrast-detect AF anywhere in frame (camera selects focus point automatically when face-priority AF or subject-tracking AF is selected) Contrast-detect AF anywhere in frame (camera selects focus point automatically when face-priority AF or subject-tracking AF is selected)
Live View - automatic scene selection
Available in auto and auto flash off modes Available in auto and auto, flash off modes
Movie - metering
TTL exposure metering using main image sensor --
Movie - metering method
Matrix --
Movie - frame size and frame rate
1920 x 1080; 60p (progressive), 50p, 30p, 25p, 24p; 1280 x 720; 60p, 50p, actual frame rates for 60p, 50p, 30p, 25p, and 24p are 59.94, 50, 29.97, 25, and 23.976 fps respectively; options support both high and normal image quality 1920 x 1080, 60p (progressive)/50p/30p/25p/24p, high/normal. 1280 x 720, 60p/50p, high/normal. 640 x 424, 30p/25p, high/normal. Frame rates of 30p (actual frame rate 29.97 fps) and 60p (actual frame rate 59.94 fps) are available when NTSC is selected for video mode. 25p and 50p are available when PAL is selected for video mode. Actual frame rate when 24p is selected is 23.976 fps.
Movie - file format
MOV MOV
Movie - video compression
H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding H.264/MPEG-4 Advanced Video Coding
Movie - audio recording format
Linear PCM Linear PCM
Movie - audio recording device
Built-in or external stereo microphone; sensitivity adjustable Built-in or external stereo microphone; sensitivity adjustable
Movie - ISO sensitivity
ISO 100 to 25600 100–25600
Other options
Time-lapse movies --
Monitor
8.1 cm (3.2–in.) diagonal; TFT vari-angle LCD touch screen with 170 ° viewing angle, approx. 100% frame coverage, brightness adjustment, and eye-sensor controlled on/off; Approx. 1037k-dot (720 x 480 x 3 = 1,036,800 dots) 8.1cm (3.2–in.) diagonal. TFT vari-angle LCD touch screen with 170° viewing angle, approx. 100% frame coverage, brightness adjustment, and eye-sensor controlled on/off. Approx.1037k-dot, (720 x 480 x 3 = 1,036,800 dots)
Playback
Full-frame and thumbnail (4, 12, or 80 images or calendar) playback with playback zoom, playback zoom cropping, playback face zoom, movie playback, photo and/or movie slide shows, histogram display, highlights, photo information, location data display, auto image rotation, picture rating, and image comment (up to 36 characters) Full-frame and thumbnail (4, 12 or 80 images or calendar) playback with playback zoom, movie playback, photo and/or movie slide shows, histogram display, highlights, photo information, location data display, auto image rotation, picture rating, and image comment (up to 36 characters)
USB
Hi-Speed USB, with Micro-USB connector; connection to built-in USB port is recommended Hi-Speed USB; connection to built-in USB port is recommended
HDMI output
Type C HDMI connector Type C HDMI connector
Audio input
Stereo mini-pin jack (3.5 mm diameter); supports optional ME-1 stereo microphones Stereo mini-pin jack (3.5 mm diameter); supports optional ME-1 stereo microphones
Accessory terminal(s)
Wireless remote controllers: WR-1, WR-R10 (available separately). Remote cords: MC-DC2 (available separately). GPS units: GP-1/GP-1A (available separately) Wireless remote controllers: WR-1, WR-R10 (available separately). Remote cords: MC-DC2 (available separately). GPS units: GP-1/GP-1A (available separately)
Wi-Fi standards
IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11g IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11g
Wi-Fi operating frequency
2412 to 2462 MHz (channels 1 to 11) 2412–2462 MHz (channels 1–11)
Wi-Fi security
Authentication: Open system, WPA2-PSK Authentication: Open system, WPA2-PSK. Encryption: AES
Wi-Fi (Wireless LAN) range
Approximately 10 m (32 ft) without interference; range may vary with signal strength and presence or absence of obstacles Approximately 30 m/98 ft (assumes no interference; range may vary with signal strength and presence or absence of obstacles)
NFC - Operation
NFC Forum Type 3 Tag --
Bluetooth standards
Bluetooth Specification Version 4.1 --
Supported languages
Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Marathi, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese (Portugal and Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese Arabic, Bengali, Bulgarian, Chinese (Simplified and Traditional), Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Marathi, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese (Portugal and Brazil), Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Vietnamese
Battery
One EN-EL14a rechargeable Li-ion battery One EN-EL14a rechargeable Li-ion battery
AC adapter
EH-5b AC adapter; requires EP-5A power connector (available separately) EH-5b AC adapter; requires EP-5A power connector (available separately)
Tripod socket
1/4–in. (ISO 1222) 1/4–in. (ISO 1222)
Dimensions
Approx. 124 x 97 x 70 mm (4.9 x 3.9 x 2.8 in.) Approx. 124 x 97 x 70 mm (4.9 x 3.9 x 2.8 in.)
Weight
Approx. 465 g (1 lb 0.4 oz), with battery and memory card but without body cap; approx. 415 g/14.7 oz (camera body only) Approx. 470 g (1 lb 0.6 oz), with battery and memory card but without body cap; approx. 420 g/14.9 oz (camera body only)
Operating environment - temperature
Temperature: 0 °C to 40 °C (+32 °F to 104 °F) 0°C–40°C (+32°F–104°F)
Operating environment - humidity
Humidity: 85% or less (no condensation) 85% or less (no condensation)
Supplied accessories
DK-25 rubber eyecup, BF-1B body cap, EN-EL14a rechargeable Li-ion battery (with terminal cover), AN-DC3 strap, MH-24 battery charger (plug adapter supplied in countries or regions where required; shape depends on country of sale) Rubber Eyecup DK-25, Body Cap BF-1B, Rechargeable Li-ion Battery EN-EL14a (with terminal cover), Battery Charger MH-24 (plug adapter supplied in countries or regions where required; shape depends on country of sale), Strap AN-DC3, USB Cable UC-E23, Audio/video cable EG-CP16
Compatible lenses
-- Autofocus is available with AF-S and AF-I lenses. Autofocus is not available with other type G and D lenses, AF lenses (IX NIKKOR and lenses for the F3AF are not supported), and AI-P lenses. Non-CPU lenses can be used in mode M, but the camera exposure meter will not function. The electronic rangefinder can be used with lenses that have a maximum aperture of f/5.6 or faster.
Exposure bracketing
-- 3 frames, in steps of 1/3 or 1/2 EV
ADL bracketing
-- 2 shots
White balance bracketing
-- 3 shots in steps of 1
Video output
-- NTSC, PAL
Wi-Fi communications protocols
-- IEEE 802.11b: DSSS/CCK. IEEE 802.11g: OFDM
Wi-Fi (Wireless LAN) data rates
-- 54 Mbps. Maximum logical data rates according to IEEE standard. Actual rates may differ.
Wi-Fi access protocols
-- Infrastructure
Wireless setup
-- Supports WPS
UK price (US price not available)
£799 £569
This entry was posted in Nikon D5500, Nikon D5600. Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Nikon User

    How can I use my remote control that I purchased with my D5200. Are you fxxking joking?

    • Fly Moon

      Keep using it with your D5200.
      Did you expect to be able to use it with other cameras?

      • Nikon User

        I did, I used it with both D5200 and V1. Expected to use it with D5600.

        • Fly Moon

          I hear you. I got the same thing but I switched to D500. So it’s not an issue for me.

          • calavera Vera

            regarding remote control, the D500 REALLY SUCKS, you are required to buy the adaptor (sinced does not have infrared port) for you to use any compatible remote control. I tried using the snapbridge… but it is worse.. for every single photo I see on screen I had to set up again and again…. figure out to do this process at dark areas when photographing stars.

        • Spy Black

          Just get D5500. Problem solved.

        • Ron LHeureux

          You know what they say about assumptions?

        • The nikon D5600 allows you to use the remote control differently but more easily using the snapbridge technology. Thats through your phones downloadable snapbridge app.

    • Pierre Lagarde

      If it’s the ML-L3 remote controller, just buy the D5500 and it will simply work. As it’s the same camera with nearly the same features as the D5600 (or even more features), not really a problem don’t you think? The problem is more for Nikon who won’t be selling the new one. 😉

      • Nikon User

        Yes, that is the remote I use. I love the D5xxx line as a travel camera and the articulate screen. I didn’t fancy the D5500 as it wasn’t really an upgrade from D5200 as far as I am concerned, but had been expecting the D5600 would be an upgrade (I know people think it is already an upgrade, so some people there pls don’t attack me on this.) I think I will wait for the D5800 or don’t hold my breath.

        • Spy Black

          From a shooting standpoint, there’s no difference. Supposedly it has better IQ from the sensor. If you feel the need to upgrade get a D5500, it’s also nicely priced right now as well.

        • Pierre Lagarde

          Perfectly understandable. If I was to own a D5200, I’d stay with it. The difference in image quality is not noticeable at all. The only thing I can say is that you get easily used to the touchscreen, especially the focus moving feature. And also, wi-fi can be useful. Stil it’s the kind of features that you don’t mind having before using them :D.
          So, it’s clear this is not enough to spend money on a new camera. Maybe you should spend your money with a new lens. A cool new pleasant way of rediscovering the camera ;)…

          • Andrew

            Or keep saving to see what the D7300 brings, especially if it gets lots of inspiration from the D500. The D7200 was more of a stopgap from the D7100 though it incorporated needed improvements.

            But 2017 should bring us a major upgrade to the D7200 with the EXPEED 5 image processor. We should see 4K video, advanced autofocus system, bigger buffer, touch screen, and maybe a new ergonomic form factor like the D750. But Nikon might not include an articulating (flip) screen though that might be a highly desirous feature.

            Moving from the D5000 series to the D7000 series comes with a caveat as membership does have its price.

            • David Peterson

              Really hope D7300 has 4K!!

            • Andrew

              No need to hope, it will 😉 For those who are impressed with the D500 but think it is too much of a camera especially because if its bulk and price, the D7300 should hit the sweet spot. Nikon has an opportunity to really impress us with the D7300, let us just hope that they are as aggressive with it “feature wise” as with the D500.

    • Member

      Please forgive me if I don’t understand the point you’re making. But if I were spending $800 on a camera body or even $500 on one of the previous models, I wouldn’t be concerned about the investment of $15 for a original Nikon remote or $2 for a Chinese unit.
      However if you like any of the features of this new model don’t let this ml-l3 thing withhold you from buying.
      If you’re going to keep the D5200 you stil can use your remote with it, if you’re going to sell it, with remote it will be more atractive.

  • Fly Moon

    How is it a “smaller size” if it has the same dimensions?
    Approx. 124 x 97 x 70 mm (4.9 x 3.9 x 2.8 in.)

    • Thom Hogan

      I think he means slightly less weight. Size is identical.

      • MB

        I presume those 5 grams are due to ML-L3 IR sensor removal …

    • Nisani

      stop making sense, nikon is desperate

      it is smaller depending on the angle you look at it and depending on the light that hits the camera, therefore, it is worth the upgrade…

    • Yes, this is probably for the weight – I was using the info from the dpreview quote I posted:

      “It evolves the line by adding SnapBridge (Wi-Fi + Bluetooth) while shrinking the size of the camera body.”

      http://nikonrumors.com/2016/11/09/nikon-d5600-dslr-camera-announced.aspx/

      • Fly Moon

        I am not blaming you. I saw. that at DPR as well 🙂

        It should state lighter not smaller. With these dimensions, the size is exactly the same. Maybe it’s just lost in translation!

        • Well, I should have checked before posting…

        • Captain Megaton

          A camera is an irregular shape. It can be smaller (volume) and still have the same l x h x w.

          • Kiboko

            Exactly, put it in water and do a volume test. And you will see that it is smaller. 😉

  • KC
  • Alda Smite

    as first: “SnapBridge”… dude, stop it – “snapbridge here snapbridge there” – that is simple freeware that should be implemented like in 2009 and should work perfectly from day one – period…. as long as we read, write and talk about snapbridge – nikon can think it touched the gold mine and did a good job… and we want more… how about D810 with snapbridge as the only “improvment” named as D900? you what that? from what I read in camera thech “news”- that is the only thing people want

    • ITN

      Why would you think the D810’s successor would not have other improvements?

      The D500 has a lot of improvements compared to its predecessor the D300s. So will the D810’s successor.

      The D5600 is not meant as an “upgrade”, it is an entry level camera intended as first contact to ILCs. The upgrade for an existing D5x00 user is either D7200 or D500.

      • Andrew

        I agree with you for the most part, but these entry-level cameras are all most people want and need. And besides, as I noted above, the size and weight advantage of these cameras are quite useful and appealing. But then again, the features requirements for some users is why Nikon is introducing the new DL camera series.

    • Andrew

      Please help me to remember, what camera manufacturer came out with a SnapBridge type feature 7 years ago?

  • Mehr

    I want to buy my first DSLR and debating between D3400 and D5500. D3400 (including 18-55 and 70-300 lenses) will be $500 and D5500 (including 18-55 and 55-200 lenses) $800 during the holidays (D5600 is out after this comparison). I know that D5500 comes with a touch and rotating screen that make life much easier and has more focusing points. Do you think $300 more is worth it?

    • Not worth $300 IMHO. It sounds like you are just starting out. If you were a student of mine I’d recommend buying a D5200 with no lens for $450 and then a 35mm f/1.8 lens for $195. Use it for a year before you getting another lens. You’d learn a lot about photography and how to make a picture. Zoom lenses are great for experienced photographers, confusing for beginners. Too much tendency to stand in one spot and just zoom around. Use your feet. Don’t get hung up on gear and how it’s going to make you a better photographer by trying to convince yourself that you need a sharper, longer, faster lens or just 2,000 more pixels and I’d be a great photographer.

      • JXVo

        Yes for someone planning to pursue photography as an artform or for a specific purpose I’d agree with the prime lens approach but as a first DSLR for a person wanting to use the camera for a wide range of scenes and purposes a kit with one or two zooms is very convenient and there is a reason why they are popular.

        If the bug bites….35mm and 50mm f1.8 primes are inexpensive.

    • Spy Black

      I have to disagree with Pete and recommend the D5500.

      It has a superior autofocusing system, which you will come to appreciate.

      The articulating screen is also extremely useful, especially if you’re on a tripod.

      It has front and rear infrared sensors for remote triggering via inexpensive triggers.

      If you’re interested in doing any video, it has an external mic input for capturing better quality audio.

      It has a slightly higher resolution rear screen. The rear screen is also touchscreen, although I personally don’t consider that an advantage, some do.

      It has a higher-powered built-in flash.

      It has standard Wifi versus the cripple-fi in the new Nikon bodies.

      It has an ultrasonic sensor cleaner to help minimize dust build up on the sensor.

      There are many more reasons, but those are important ones. If you’re a beginner, the D5500 is a camera that will grow with you as you become more experienced, so you don’t have to go upgrading sooner.

      VERY much worth the extra $300 in my opinion.

    • Pierre Lagarde

      Same here : naked D5200 or D5300 would be a better choice for a first camera. I you want to dive in features, D3xxx would be a bit frustrating. And the rotating screen is really fun for creation of cool angles. Save money for better first lenses. I’d also go for the excellent 35mm DX, far better in IQ than the kit zoom lenses (even if they are not that bad). Indeed, you’ll have to use your feet, but it’s also much more fun. And, with this lens, you can make close up shots with nice bokehs too, what don’t allow the zooms (or so little).

      • Spy Black

        I have to suggest a kit lens myself. They’re not horrible, and will give the camera more versatility. The 18-55mm is a decent overall lens that can literally double as a macro. The 18-140mm, if he can afford it, will cover a very good optical range.

        • Pierre Lagarde

          Nowadays cameras can’t be compared with capabilities of (good) old Nikon F cameras. The versatility of an APSC with a 35mm F/1.8 DX is more important by now than 50mm was on film cameras. Comparing these two configurations can’t be taken as an argument for first buy. Anyway, I agree with you that the kit zoom is not that bad. I just find it a bit limiting in terms of using the whole advantages of modern 24Mp sensors and for me, 18mm (28mm equivalent) is just a no go. Same for you too it seems as you finally bought yourself a 24mm in your old times… 😉 If you really need a zoom with good quality, you’d better get a 16- something later on and start with a very light and clean 35mm… 18mm(28mm equivalent) is just a flat boring focal length. Just take a look at second hand market and you’ll see that it’s saturated with 18-so lenses that nobody wants to keep longer… it’s really much more harder to find a 35mm F/1.8mm DX as they are just keepers.
          18-55mm is just good enough to test if your camera is working or, marginally, to have in your bag in case your main lens break. I just wished Nikon have the good sense to create a fix 16mm DX, would be just great.

    • unadog

      I bought a NEW Nikon D5500 with 18-55 kit lens in February, on sale at a major retailer, USA camera, for $500. That should be a benchmark price for you, especially with Black Friday coming up.

      I sold my Nikon D5300 almost a year ago for about $400. It should go for $350 or less used. That is also a great camera. The sensor on all of them is great. The problem with the D3300/3400 is the slowness/ lag in use, and the frustrating AF system. The D5300/ D5500 are great cameras that you can use for years.

      In addition to the decent-ish 18-55, I **love** the Sigma 17-50 2.8 OS for $265-$300 new on eBay. It is a high quality lens that is faster than the kit lens in low light. Add the 35 1.8 and 50 1.8 for about $120-$130 each used.

      I also have the Nikon 70-200 4.0. That is a fantastic lens, but a little more expensive- about $900 used in Excellent condition. As a former pro, that is a workable kit for me now taht I don’t need to do low light events as often. I also keep a D7200 with a Sigma 150-600 C for wildlife. That is down from the much more expensive D810 with 70-200 2.8 II, etc. Definitely pro quality with all of the lenses except the 18-55.

      Good luck.

      • Max

        Did you see a noticeable improvement in iq from D5300 to 5500 and do you find the touchscreen for button useful?

        • unadog

          I’m sorry this is so late…

          I don’t think there is much difference in image quality. I do like having the touchscreen for some things, but it isn’t a “must have.”

          I think you could buy either based on the price differential. If it were close I would buy the D5500. It will also have a higher resale value. They are both really great cameras.

          I actually prefer the D5500 to my D7200, mostly because of the “Quick Menu” and the ability to control almost everything from the rear screen with the control pad and OK button. All of my other cameras allow a similar control. The Nikon D810, D750, D7200 and similar are much further behind in ergonomics. Many functions only available through dedicated buttons scattered across the body that are not customizable.

          I know this is very late and likely not useful- sorry again. Good luck!

          • Max

            No worries I’m terribly bad at replying and remembering things I posted…
            I have a D5300 and D7100 and can’t see a difference.
            I’m waiting for the D5300 to die but it seems to be a tough cookie.
            Was thinking maybe by the time it’s shutter gives in or rain or dust kills it there will be a D5600, and as that will be two generations newer it will be a nice update. But it doesn’t look that way…

  • whisky

    new lamps for old. fresh coat of paint. now just 50% more … =:-/

    • MB

      To be fare D5500 was approximately the same price as D5600 when announced …

      • whisky

        thanks. as Thom suggested, except for the snapbridge compatibility, most of the differences could have been accomplished by way of a firmware upgrade. i’d add — perhaps even the wi-fi downgrade. 🙂

  • So sad, too bad

    So will their be any improvement to the image quality?
    ie noise, DR, etc?
    Looking at the specs i cant seen any difference.
    Also, couldn’t the SnapBridge and In-camera time lapse feature features be added to the D5500 through a firmware update?

    • Spy Black

      Why would you want to degrade the D5500 with SnapBridge?…

      • So sad, too bad

        D5500 has time-lapse?
        So why are they promoting the D5600 as having time-lapse?
        Does SnapBridge degrade image quality?

        • Max

          No it degrades the functionality of the camera. You now can’t use wifi independently, like using the old Nikon wifi app. Now you are forced to use crappy snapbridge

          • So sad, too bad

            Oh wow, had no idea as ive never used SnapBridge
            Thanks for the explanation

            • Max

              It tethers your camera to your phone to transfer photos.
              As far as I know you can only use wi-fi by going through snapbridge – the old Nikon Wireless Mobility app no longer works

        • Spy Black

          Well, perhaps it’s simply promoting it. It could also possibly be a comparison to a competing Canon model that may not have it, dunno. The D5500 will record up to 9,999 frames, which 5.5 hours at 30 fps and 6.9 hours at 24 fps. I haven’t checked, but I suspect that it’s exactly the same in the D5600.

          Snapbridge degrades the user experience.

          • So sad, too bad

            Ok, thanks!
            But does the D5600 merge all your time laps frames into one file?
            Does the D5500 do this?

            • Spy Black

              I never tried it, wouldn’t know. I’ll bet not.

            • So sad, too bad

              Ok, i just read the spec from another site.
              Its a “slightly more advanced timelapse feature”
              “camera automatically converts the sequence of stills to a video file”

            • Spy Black

              That’s the last thing you want, unless you’re REALLY lazy.

  • Captain Megaton

    The CLS spec has changed. Is the D5600 fully compatible now without having to use a master flash?

  • Vincent

    Saw the spec comparison, biggest change must be the lack of SD card slot in the D5500 (LOL)
    Why are the spec listing D5500 without a slot when I definitely has one?

  • Gandalf

    what a joke update….. nikon totally lost it.

  • KC

    Yawnersville… 🙂

  • Gerard Roulssen

    Some really don’t get it, do they … it’s not a new generation of entry-level D-SLR camera, it’s just an update of an existing model to bring it up to date and in sync with Nikon’s Snapbridge capabilities …

    • KC

      We all get that, it is still yawnersville, hahahahahaha…

  • Ruth

    I bought a grey market brand new Nikon D5500 from Amazon back in September of 2015. Would you believe that the automatic focus system stopped working in October 2016. I’ve changed lenses and also done a reset. No joy. Does anyone know if this is a problem with these cameras. I don’t see them for sale anymore at Costco or Best Buy. I’ve checked with Nikon’s website to see how much it would cost to fix it: approximately $170 not including shipping. I don’t even know if I should have it fixed because I’m worried about this type of focusing system. If you leave the camera on and walk around with it, the lens will keep going in and out trying to focus on everything, even if I am not looking through the viewfinder. What do you guys think, should I get it fixed? Is it worth it? Thanks for any advice you can give me.

  • Ratamon

    Does anyone know whether it works with UHS-II memory cards ? I’ve ordered a new Lexar Professional 64 GB Class 10 UHS-II 1000x Speed (150 MB/s) SDXC Flash Memory Card and am now hesitant as the article says it is “UHS-I compliant”.

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