Rumors: Nikon D5 firmware update to extend the 4k video recording limit to 30 minutes

Nikon-D5-camera
Nikon-4k-video-logo
The Nikon D5 can only shoot 3 minutes of 4k video while the D500 can shoot 4k for 30 minutes (see this and this post for more details). I received a tip that Nikon will release a firmware update after shipping starts in March that will increase the 4k recording limit of the D5 to 30 minutes. This info is coming from a Nikon rep at one of the recent D5 events, so take it with a grain of salt.

Update: the 30 min 4k video in the D5 will probably be achieved by recording 10 sequential files @ 3 minutes each.

This entry was posted in Nikon D5 and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • olemwold

    I too got this confirmed at a Nikon event two days ago. The Nikon rep apparently just got that information the day before the presentation.

    • good to hear that from another source

      • olemwold

        They also had in the presentation that the video bitrate will be 144mbit. Not specifying at what resolution that is tho.

        • John Mackay

          Would that be via hdmi out? I don’t think many cards can even write that fast

          • Eric Calabros

            It’s 18MB/s. XQD2 cards are near 500MB/s.

            • John Mackay

              Sony’s fastest is 350mb/s I think. Is there a faster make out there?

            • Lexar 2933x is rated for 400MB/s write.

            • John Mackay

              oo, cool, and cheaper than sony, thx!

        • thanks

        • Eric Calabros

          and 4:2:0, right?

          • olemwold

            Yes. 4:2:0 internally. And I believe it is 4:2:2 through hdmi out. If I remember correctly.

    • Did the rep say anything about D750 compatibility with new sb-5000?

      • Cristian

        Despite Nikon website does not say anything about camera compatibility, I don’t think it will have compatibility problems with D750: if mounted on the hot-shoe, it will work as a iTTL speedlight; with the d750 in commander mode the SB-5000 should work as a traditional CLS, controlled via light modulation, and with a wireless commander it will work controlled via wi-fi.

      • Cristian

        Nikon USA website tells that it is compatible with any CLS capable camera or speedlight…

      • Thom Hogan

        The SB-5000 is bi. It can work as a radio controller/slave, it can work as an IR controller/slave.

        • Stephen

          So, can I put the SB-5000 on my old D700 and have it operate as a RF wireless master? It didn’t sound like it from everything I read thus far.

          • Thom Hogan

            That bit is still unknown for sure. Likely no without a change in firmware, which wouldn’t be likely for a camera that old.

            • Stephen

              Thanks for replying.

              I’m expecting that older cameras are out of luck. It is just weird that Nikon didn’t build full RF control into the speedlight, but I suspect they did it this way to claim a reduction in size of the speedlight as well as forcing a camera body upgrade for existing users.

              Sigh, now I have to wait longer until I can afford a camera body and two SB-5000 units to use RF. And I so wanted to drop the PocketWizards…

            • Thom Hogan

              My understanding is that the way Nikon did this ties into the WR-R10 and other radio remote stuff they’ve been doing. The WR-R10 isn’t big enough to have full controls on it, so that all went into the cameras. True, that doesn’t mean they couldn’t duplicate that in the flash.

              We still just don’t know enough about the SB-5000 yet. Even the folk at Nikon I know and talk to don’t seem to know exactly what it can and can’t do yet, let alone how that works across all Nikon products. The clearest answer I’ve gotten so far is “radio requires firmware in body but the SB-5000 can work just like old IR commanders when needed.”

        • I specifically want to use the RF so I can donate my TT5 system to the round file.

          • Thom Hogan

            Be careful what you wish for ;~)

      • Sorry, I should have clarified: I am interested in finding out if the D750 can utilize the RF comm (the unique new feature – else it’s a SB910). Wouldn’t it make sense that the WR-R10 transceiver could be used?

        • Thom Hogan

          My understanding is that the WR-R10 requires firmware in the camera to enable the “controls.” So the issue will be whether Nikon retrofits the older cameras with firmware updates. That hasn’t really been Nikon’s tendency in the past.

          So, get PocketWizards or one of the cheap Chinese knockoffs (and that advice shows the “wisdom” of Nikon’s ways… ;~).

        • akkual

          Would be kinda traditional Nikon way to do product feature that many have waited but rule out most of the potential buyers outside it. As why the heck try to do more money with old camera owners as you can boost D5 sales by 5 units with that.

          • KnightPhoto

            Good point, if they want to sell a ton of SB-5000 and WR-R10 right out of the gate, if they updated D610 / D750 / D810 at least, as they are all still current models not directly competing with the new D5 / D5000.

  • neonspark

    It doesn’t really matters all that complained never planned to buy it for that purpose anyway.

    • Eric Calabros

      Yea, but if true, it gives more confidence for those planned to buy it 🙂

    • John Mackay

      I want it for videography of birds, I cant afford or carry a second set of lenses for a canon/sony system just to do video. 30 minutes means I can record and wait for something to happen. 10 Minutes would have also been fine. Its Nikon’s only 4k camera too so its not like I can get another native camera.

      • Sawyerspadre

        Does the D500 not shoot 4K? Seems like the reach might help on the birdies…

        • John Mackay

          Yes, but with a 2.25x crop factor. The lack of a 1x crop factor annoys me no end, let alone if I had to shoot with a 2.25x. I don’t think I can hold a 1800mm lens steady enough with a gimbal so I don’t really count it.

          • KnightPhoto

            Is D500 also 2.2 crop? I will say “actual pixels” video = great looking video…

            • John Mackay

              A couple of things worth noting is that one of the best things of dslr video, shallow depth of field, you wont get. Also the d500 has a pixel density about
              50% higher than a d810 (20.9 vs 15 in a dx area). Your taking a central one to one crop of just 8 of them. That is a pretty big ask on full frame glass. Fine for top Zeiss glass but I would have thought a lot of primes will struggle away from their sweet spots. I have a d810, though I freely admit I have never shot video on full frame glass with a 2.25x crop factor so its just conjecture.

      • If you’re recording 4K video clips in excess of 5 minutes, you need to read a bit about video production and editing.

        • John Mackay

          I don’t get why some people are so hostile to good basic video video features in a $6500/£5200 camera. You can probably make a film in 5min chunks but not a documentary or an in depth interview or a speech at a wedding or your kids school play.

          • See, NO ONE is making an in-depth review with a sports/PJ camera, nor producing full-length wedding videos in 4K. This is the wrong kind of gear for that. If you can afford the D5, and are buying it for those reasons, you’re doing something wrong. I find it odd that everyone is expecting every type of camera to offer every feature. Certain products are designed for certain purposes. Find yours.

            • Wade Marks

              I agree with Michael. Some people are acting like the D5 is meant to be an all purpose general consumer cam. Like the average shooter is going to pony up $6500 for a camera.

              First, consider the audience for this camera. High end professionals, many working for larger news outlets, etc. For these people and organizations, they will use the D5 just for stills. They know if they want video they need dedicated tools to do it at the level they want and need. If you work for ESPN or Reuters, they have dedicated video crews to shoot video using real video cameras.

              A dslr is a very poor choice for video. To make it work well you have to bolt on a bunch of extra equipment anyway. Pro’s know that and will seek better solutions.

              Now sure you will have some advanced hobbyists buy the D5, but most of those will care about the stills and not the video.

              I’m glad if they drop the arbitrary limit…why not, if the machine can handle it? But there’s a lot of people writing about this camera without realizing that it is meant to be a very specialized tool for a very specialized user. And as Micheal noted as well, where is this myth coming from that one camera needs to do everything? Would I expect a sports car to do the same thing as a heavy duty pickup truck?

            • Moose1414

              “First, consider the audience for this camera. High end professionals, many working for larger news outlets, etc. For these people and organizations, they will use the D5 just for stills.”

              Care to explain the bit where Nikon’s marketing department heavily promotes 4k video being one of the greatest new features of the D5? Seems to me there is a bit of a disconnect between who you think this camera is for and who Nikon think this camera is for.

            • Wade Marks

              The D5, at most, will be used for very short video clips, when no other alternatives are around…Nikon has said so much, hence they justified the 3 min limit in the first place.

              I personally think the 4K is there mostly to tick off a checkbox of features on the spec sheet, to keep people from whining about the lack thereof…and as noted, it does give some added flexibility to users with no other way to get video at the time.

              But make no mistake: this camera will be used by far mostly for stills. Even on the Nikon marketing pages, they list the other features of the camera more prominently than the 4K.

              This is not meant to be a primary tool for video shoots, esp. at the high end, where this is aimed.

            • Moose1414

              Wade I totally agree that if the D5 has a 3 minute video limit it will likely only be used to make short video clips.
              Further, I don’t at all expect people who are serious about video to buy a Nikon, especially a D5. As you say there are many better alternatives around.
              The thing I take issue with and i think is legitimate criticism is that if Nikon add video then it should work properly and without ridiculous amateurish caveats. And if they don’t want to be held accountable for their video specs and it is just an add on like you say, then they should stop promoting the hell out of their video chops in their marketing materials.
              If they don’t want to do video thats fine. If they just want to do video as a me too afterthought thats fine too. Just don’t pretend the video on your camera is something its not.

            • Already mentioned this but.. Sony’s first generation of A7 cameras couldnt record 4k internally at all. The D5 can but limited in time, some have mentioned due to over heating. With an external recorder the user gets higher quality, higher bit depth clean output. Give Nikon a break if Sony can’t manage 4k output internally first go then a make not famous for video is going to struggle.

            • I don’t see the D5 marketed for its 4K video anywhere. It’s a sports/PJ shooter. Autofocus, speed, accuracy. Those are the selling points.

            • Moose1414

              Maybe take a look at Nikon’s website.

              From the first sentence of the press release announcing D5:

              “The most powerful camera in Nikon history blazes in with a phenomenal new autofocus system, highest standards of expanded ISO sensitivity, turbocharged workflow, and exceptional durability, for superlative flexibility to shoot both stills and 4K movies”

              “D5 primary features:

              4. TAKING THE DIRECTOR’S SEAT IN ULTRA HIGH DEFINITION

              • Cinematic brilliance with 4K UHD (30p) movie capability: The D5 supports 4K movies, which offers higher resolution than HD or Full-HD movies, capable of recording 4K UHD (3840 × 2160)/30p, 25p, 24p movies to a memory card inserted in the camera. Alternatively with a simultaneous HDMI output, movies can also be displayed on an external monitor or recorded as uncompressed video to an external recorder. With the maximum standard sensitivity of ISO 102400, as well as even higher sensitivity settings up to Hi 5 (equivalent to ISO 3280000), superior picture quality is still assured even when recording movies at these high sensitivities. Rounding off the spectacular movie-making experience is the capability to generate 4K UHD time-lapse movies in-camera.”

              Curiously, fails to mention anything about a 3 minute limit

            • Wade Marks

              On that Nikon press release, notice that 4K is the last selling point feature they mention.

              D5 is not marketed as a primary video cam. Period. The 4k is an add on, a nice bonus feature. Of course they list it and advertise it; but it’s not their main selling point or even close.

            • Moose, i think you’re the type who enjoys arguing for the sake of arguing. And with that, I’m out 🙂

            • Moose1414

              Fair enough Michael, I wasn’t arguing for the sake of it i was just trying to correct the record after you stated firstly that Nikon didn’t make the D5 for people who use video and then that you hadn’t seen anywhere in their marketing any mention of 4k.. nothing to do with me wanting to argue, all i threw back at you were Nikon’s own D5 press. Peace out.

            • HF

              Nice website, by the way. I read you use the older 105/2 DC. Still using it?

            • HF

              What would you do if you were in marketing? Wouldn’t you advertise new features, too?

            • John Mackay

              Everyone knows this is an action stills camera, but it is Nikons flagship camera with a big price tag and people should rightly expect big things. I’m not asking for a pro video camera in a DSLR, I’m asking for my $6500 dslr to be able to cope with shooting a video of someone talking for 5 minutes without being upstaged by an iphone. I was saying that there are a bunch of people out there who were annoyed by the three minute limit as it means that the 4k mode cant be use for so many things and will be very glad if Nikon fix it, which Nikon seem to be promising to do before the camera has even launched so clearly they agree which is all that matters. The 3 minute limit was clearly a case of Nikon hasn’t finished developing the video yet but at least it seems to be a software problem rather than hardware. Nikon should be praised where they do good (like the new 24mm 1.8) and criticised where they fall short (D5 video limit and the 300mmf4 vr issues), not given excuses.

            • PhilK

              I’m not yet convinced it’s truly a “software problem”. The fact that Nikon can release a firmware update to “fix” it doesn’t prove much – it could be just running it into unsafe territory a lot more and either endangering the hardware or making it likely the camera will keep unexpectedly shutting-down to preserve itself.

              It’s like claiming the rev limiter on your car’s motor is unnecessary since you could technically remove it and rev the engine to 12K RPM – as long as you didn’t mind that little problem of blowing a rod out the side of the block and running off the road in flames..

            • John Mackay

              If they risk damage to the camera over recording video for longer then that would be covered under warranty so would cost themselves a lot of money. Shutting down due to overheating is a possibility, but is better than shutting down after three minutes when it doesn’t need to. Another possibility is that it is just fixed with software. The A7r2 had overheating issues on launch with 4k recording but then they fixed it with a patch.

            • PhilK

              Agreed on the warranty repair expenses but I disagree about the random shutdown thing.

              If I were paid to document an event I would far FAR rather know that my DSLR has a 3-min limit and make appropriate other arrangements to cover the video requirements, rather than just merrily assume the DSLR will do the job and then discover it shuts down with little notice at a critical, un-re-capturable moment.

              And once again on the “fixed with software” thing: I reiterate that people need to understand that there are often very much physical or electronic hardware issues that can NOT be magically fixed w/ software.

              And even if it could be “fixed” in S/W, there are fixes and there are “fixes”. If the “fix” for example reduced the readout/bitrate in order to keep the heat generation to a safe level, then the output quality would be reduced. This is precisely the kind of thing that manufacturers do all the time, often without notice. (And probably what Volkswagen is going to do to “fix” their recently-discovered fraudulent emissions control in their diesel cars. It’s highly unlikely that they will be able to come up with a “magical” new tech that will properly meet emissions standards without compromising some other aspect of the motor’s performance. Sometimes you just run into the laws of physics..)

            • John Mackay

              My thoughts on random shutdown are that I would know if it shutting down randomly is a possibility beforehand and I would therefore only offer video services without relying on it, either in HD or record in 3 minute 4k chunks anyway. I want video for wildlife in the cold north of Scotland and would rather risk the overheat than miss something unnecessarily due to a 3 minute record limit. I think I would quickly get to know my camera and if I needed to shoot in HD or could use 4k.

              If they just lowered the bitrate that would suck, but they could easily introduce a lower bit rate 4k mode if that is their only fix. It’s up to Nikon as to how honourable they want to be. That said I would rather 30 minutes at a lower bit rate than 3 at a slightly higher one, although I will accept I might be in the minority. I am fully aware that hardware limitations cant be solved by software, but this is certainly the type of thing that might be software limited. I have never thought of Nikon as great software engineers so I could easily believe there is
              some room for improvement.

              As for VW I thought that the cars could meet the emission standards whenever they wanted
              by using the ammonia additive, but they were programmed to detect tests and only use it then. Not using it outside tests was to give better performance to their customers. Emission and MPG tests could be totally separate though and I might be totally wrong. I have far more interest in fast lenses than fast cars.

            • PhilK

              First of all my general sense is Nikon is very honorable about delivering what they say they are delivering, that’s one of the reasons I’ve been using their products so long. (Whereas I’ve heard that, for example, Fuji plays games with ISO on some of their current cameras, claiming around 2/3 stop better ISO performance than they actually deliver)

              But of course when you’re a straight-shooter (no pun intended… or maybe so 😉 ) , your less scrupulous competitors may make claims about their products they cannot actually fulfill, and while stooping to their level might make some of the squeaky social-media wheels quiet for short time, your long-time customers that have come to depend on your products and the claims you make for them will not be so happy about those games. Which is not a very good longterm strategy.

              So perhaps Nikon will offer a lower-bitrate option on the D5 for people who need longer than 3min 4K video shooting. That would be an honorable decision, assuming there are actually hardware constraints.

              As for whether Nikon are great software engineers – I would agree if you were talking about personal computer apps – and Nikon generally contracts that work out anyway – but there are all sorts of definitions of software. When it comes to the software and firmware that runs inside Nikon cameras, I’d say Nikon seems pretty darn good in that regard. (No we may not have the latest trendy features all the time, but in my world, stability and predictability trumps trendy gew-gaws any day)

              As for VW, my limited understanding of the situation is that VW was fairly unusual in that they seemed to have some unusually effective way of gaining both fuel economy and performance on reasonably-priced vehicles, without having to resort to the complexity and cost of urea-injection that other companies (eg Mercedes) use to comply with emission requirements.

              Well there’s an old saying: “Good, fast or cheap. Pick 2.” As we now have predictably discovered, VW in fact did not have any “magic technology” up their sleeve at all. Just another form of “magic trick”. 😉

            • John Mackay

              In general Nikon are quite honourable I think, but I remember their first 4k camera (some coolpix thing) boasted its 4kness, but you had to dig into the specs to find it had a frame rate of about 12 fps, which is pretty unusable. And again with the D5 the three minute recording limit you have to dig deep into their website to find mention of it (just had a look on the EU and USA sites and I cannot find it mentioned. I thought I had managed to find it before. Maybe they removed it if they are planning to upgrade it?). As a side note releasing raw files would be nice to give those making pre orders an idea of the high iso performance rather than only jpegs. Nikon also seem to have also rushed a couple of things to market with issues like the vr on the 300f4, and there were some other recalls of late if I remember.

              I agree that Nikons cameras have good firmware, I have never had a problem and patch notes only seem to mention very small bugs. I also prioritise reliability over flashiness. I only meant that its not a stand out area and might have some room for improvement. Their pc software is appalling.

            • PhilK

              Well the information about the 3minute limit got out pretty fast and became a huge topic of discussion, so clearly they disseminated the info somehow. (IIRC, it may have actually originally been discussed here on NR, before the official announcement, and Nikon representatives confirmed it later on launch day.)

              I think we have to be careful claiming malice on the part of vendors implementation of certain technical standards, when the standards themselves do not specify certain characteristics that the vendor comes under fire from some people for not meeting. Kinda like getting angry at Lamborghini when they announce their new supercar has a 0-60 acceleration of 3.4 seconds, because you think that acceleration should be achievable going uphill on an 18% grade into a 30mph headwind without having to hold onto the steering wheel. 😉

              In a nutshell, an educated customer understands the attributes that are important to them (eg, minimum continuous shooting time) and verifies those things. Because we all know that in the competitive marketplace on these highly-complex products, the vendors will always try to put a positive spin on their product’s capabilities. (Hopefully without too much hyperbole)

            • John Mackay

              I watched the D5 press announcement and the videos Nikon Canada put out including one dedicated to the video, no mention of it. Matt Granger was at the announcement, did a video hands on with the camera, then had to post a second video later filmed in his hotel saying he had just fount out about the 3 minute limit. As I said I believe it was on Nikon’s website buried in the specifications which I believe is where NR readers found out about it but is now removed. If you think that Nikon just forgot to mention it except in their technical specifications or thought that no one interested in the D5s video capabilities would think it worth mentioning then that’s up to you.

              I don’t think advertising a 4k video mode while trying not to mention it is15fps (it was the Nikon 1 J5) analogous to expecting a 0-60 time to apply up hill. I did check and when I read that immediately lost all interest. I think its analogous to advertising a 0-60 time of 3.4 seconds and not mentioning that that is for downhill but only, and it would be 5 seconds on the flat mentioned only in the terms and conditions. If you advertise a video mode people expect that you can film normal scenes unless told otherwise. Likewise people expect normal (10 mins plus) recording length on a $6500 camera unless told otherwise.

              I’m not saying Nikon were fraudulent, but I wouldn’t call that marketing honourable or up
              front. It is definitely information people buying the camera would want to know in my opinion.

            • PhilK

              As we now know, the specs were not “hidden”, they are right there in the specification list.

              Perhaps the fact that my avocation as well as profession is technology makes me slightly different than the average person in this respect, but when I’m reviewing information on any state of the art $7000 electronic or electromechanical product, I always pore over the specsheet in detail, especially when there is limited initial information and no independent reviews on a product that is not shipping yet.

              So I disagree about the assertion that they are not being honorable or up front. It’s not like this limitation is going to remain a big secret once reviewers actually get it in their hands to test it, so trying to keep it a “secret” would have no useful purpose anyway.

              Like any other company that invests a lot of R&D and resources into producing an expensive product that they only have essentially one other competitor in the world to contend with, they are going to highlight their new flagship’s most appealing characteristics. Nothing new under the sun. It’s not like I expect Canon to remind everyone in their marketing literature for all their DSLRs that they historically have lousier DR in their DSLRs than Nikon does. 😉

            • PhilK

              Regarding the “3 minute” text going missing – it’s there.

              Go to the D5 product page on Nikon USA and click on “tech specs”, then do a page search for “minutes”.

            • John Mackay

              Oh yea, my bad, but I hope you see what I mean thogh, its in there, but you probably wont find it unless you are looking for it. If they mentioned it in the overview I wouldn’t have any issues with their marketing, but they don’t. USA site replied to one question about the limit, sadly they just said it can be avoided with an external recorder (which cost about £1500 for 4k) rather than answer if you can record again right away which was actually asked.

            • PhilK

              The “can you record right away” question is kind of a dumb question because since the usual reason for such recording limits (including in various prior Nikon DSLRs) is because of overheating, the whole reason for the camera shutting down is to let it cool down. Cooling down takes time. How much time is impossible to predict because there are dozens of variables that impact that.

              I also see unanswered questions there that were already answered in other questions. I assume they will get around to answering most of them in due time.

            • David Peterson

              Wrong, many many pros use DSLRs (or mirrorless) for video. And many many many serious amateurs use DSLRs for films.

            • David Peterson

              Wrong wrong wrong. Lots of wedding videographers used a Canon 1D C. So why not Nikon instead!

            • And all these videographers use still cameras, as opposed to dedicated video cameras? Furthermore, do all the couples these days demand 4K video? Do they even have the means to play it back?

              Again, you’re blowing this out of proportion. 4K functionality is solely an added benefit. No one is looking at this camera solely to produce 4K videos.

            • Eno

              Yes, if man has the money to spent on a bloody camera he has at least some bucks invested in a decent computer.
              As for the need of 4K, if you were into video business you wold have known better. And yes, the vast majority of folks who work in this field use DSLR or DSLM cameras for video productions. I know a TV channel who invested in more than 20 GH4 cameras for it’s shows. Who are you to judge wo uses what.!?

            • HF

              Thing is, you are not the only one knowing people in the photography or wedding business. The ones we know, don’t do it. Who is right then? For me, 4k is overhyped right now. And I, too, think it makes no sense. I would go A7rii/A7sii in that case (same price). I consider the A7sii a better video camera, too. People in the past didn’t have valid alternatives and needed to stick with DSLRs. Now you could use NX1, GH4, the Nikons, A7sii for 4k if you wanted to. I consider mirrorless for _video_ as a better alternative.

            • Eno

              So very true!

            • PhilK

              Well, that’s not a still camera, that’s a very overpriced video-dedicated version of a still camera. The regular 1D x doesn’t work for that.

              So what is your point, that Nikon should make a D5-v?

            • Good god this attitude is annoying!
              John wants to have the possibility to shoot video on-the-go when he’s shooting birds, so of course he wants good video capabilities in his main camera. If the D5 can offer what he wants, it doesn’t matter who is normally doing “this or that” with whatever camera. The D5 “is the wrong gear for that” until they fix the 3 minute limit, please get the point. When they do fix it, it will no longer be “the wrong gear for that”, but will be useful for many people. It’s the same attitude as when the D800 came, and people said “if you want high res photos, it’s the wrong gear for that, buy medium format instead”. Now no one is complaining anymore. Guess what, technology is getting better and many kinds of equipment now are very good at doing things they usually couldn’t do before, even if they normally were the “wrong kind of equipment for whatever”. Video in DSLR is one kind of thing. Sorry for being harsh, but I just can’t stand the “you shouldn’t use this for that, because it’s not what it’s mainly for”-attitude.

          • Wade Marks

            John wrote:

            “You can probably make a film in 5min chunks but not a documentary or an in depth interview or a speech at a wedding or your kids school play.”

            If you are making a documentary or interview or filming a speech for pro reasons you will use another and better tool: a dedicated video camera.

            As to shooting your kids school play: I don’t know many parents who will spend $6500 and buy a D5 as their camera. That’s an entirely different market. There you are talking about the amateur market at a far lower price point.

            But that’s an example of people analyzing this camera like it’s meant to be marketed to the average consumer. This is a pro tool largely sold to pro’s. Some well financed amateurs will buy it, but they are either people with too much money to throw around, or very serious still photographers.

            • I am a still photographer who has been doing increasing numbers of videos. My primary focus is on great performance in very low light situations in entertainment venues.

              I’ve been very happy with my D4’s performance in this field. I could consider a RED Scarlet W, but it’s much heavier, far more expensive, and has significantly worse low light performance. But as venues get darker and darker, I want to up my game with a D5 or similar.

              So I’ll bite – what dedicated video camera would be better for this admittedly narrow niche?

            • Eric Calabros

              A7sII. Relatively small, useable up to ISO 25600 and you can put your Nikon lenses on it.
              But grading its very flat log files is more time consuming.

          • neonspark

            his point stands. speech and weddings or kids play don’t need this camera. Watch any movie or even well known documentaries (not interviews). The camera cuts every 10 seconds because people finding it boring to stare at something for so long.

            • I record an entire performance with a moving camera and then I choose what parts of it to keep in and edit out for a final video. So I genuinely need longer recording times.

            • Exactly. It’s always easy to spot the video production noobs on these posts by their incessant declarations that professional video is done by constantly hitting the record button on and off to make cuts, when it fact it’s usually multiple cameras running the entire time and the cuts between them done in post (and there’s this little pesky thing we use called time code that gets mad when someone stops recording). But of course in the case of having one camera only, you will undoubtedly not be able to achieve the same level of coverage (unless you can defy the laws of physics and both you and your camera be in two places at once), and therefore need to keep rolling in order not to miss a shot. Photo ops don’t wait for us to be ready, why would video?

              Bottom line, 30 minutes limit is a pain, 3 minutes is just insulting. And I don’t care about niche market garbage speak, if I buy a $6500 tool that contains all the hardware capable of performing a task that $500 tools/toys can do but I can’t, I’m going to be pissed.

          • PhilK

            Because there are usually technical tradeoffs to try to shoehorn that stuff onto a state-of-the-art still camera.

        • Ever heard of a guy named Hitchcock and a film named “Rope”?

          • Wade Marks

            “Rope” was an experiment. Hitchcock filmed his other films the more conventional way. And of course, Hitchcock had access to the best video equipment. If Hitchcock were alive today and filming Rope, he would be using dedicated video equipment, like Arri, Red, etc.

        • Moose1414

          Sooo.. Nikon are really just the only company doing video right then?
          If no video camera actually needs to shoot more than 0-3 minutes what the hell have all the other guys been doing all this time, idiots.

        • CERO

          Michael, there are many areas where you cannot dictate when something will happen.
          Take the example of the bear someone in this site mentioned..
          You are not going to tell the bear to go back and run again so you can film another row of 2-3 minutes because the 3 minute limit hit in the best moment and you missed it.

          You film as much you can, then cut the parts you want. better to have something in excess than miss it and have nothing.

          And yes, if this was a “professional set up” environment where everything is controlled.. I would have agreed with you.

      • HF

        How much GB do your 30min clips have?

        • 32GB @144Mbit. Actually surprisingly manageable given that in 2001 when we were dealing with 30 minute digital video (standard def!) that weighed in at multiple GB the largest hard disks were maybe 10GB 🙂

  • Eric Calabros

    Maybe they got a hint that Canon 1DXmark2 will record 30min or a thing like that 🙂

    • neonspark

      it doesn’t matter what canon does as they have a video line more suited to videographers than the still photography bodies. people moved on to the real gear long ago.

      • Eric Calabros

        Not PJs

        • PhilK

          Just to pick one particular detail: how does that work outside in the bright sun using an LCD with no hood on it?

          And no one in their right mind would use the rinky-dink microphone built-in to the camera for any kind of serious video work, right? So one way or the other you’re going to have a bunch of crap stuck onto or plugged-into that camera to do the job, and then have to pull it all off again to take stills again.

          Seems easier to just pull a compact 4K-capable device out of your bag when it’s time to shoot video, to me.

  • This really ticks me off, ….. I want that 3 min limit, . . . 30 minutes, I am canceling my order, . . . . and I dont even shoot video!

    • Where are the folks demanding a D5 without video functionality altogether?

      • RMJ

        Shooting their Df, and waiting for Df2.

        • CERO

          Except they seem to be blasting people who would love to have the 4k video limitation decreased with their ” you’re not a pro if you take more than 3 mins videos”.

  • Zinchuk

    How would they ever consider 3 minutes adequate? Why even offer it with such a low limitation?

    • Wade Marks

      Most people’s video clips are well under 3 minutes. I agree that they shouldn’t necessarily put that limitation on there arbitrarily…

      But watch any Hollywood movie: it’s a bunch of really short clips edited together.

      • Michael Laing

        There is a chance that it could be used for interviews or for a press conference, which might mean you need to record for more than 3 minutes and if you are running and gunning you probably don’t want to carry around an external recorder or lots of extra equipment.

        I would guess that this would be the kind of situation that it might be used more than shooting movies. Though I am not sure that new organisations are set up for 4k yet, I know they weren’t a couple of years ago. Not having the storage space for 4k.

        You had people like Philip Bloom using and liking the Canon 1Dc so there may be a market for the video if the quality is good enough. Though the industry has moved on since the release of the 1Dc, especially with 4k cameras.

        • n11

          I agree that having a 3 minute time limit is a bit absurd, but I’m having difficulty trying to think of scenarios where you would need much longer record times. I’ve been an associate producer for 5 years and rarely did I do shots that last longer than 1-2 minutes. Multi-cam Interviews would go up to 6 minutes sure, but I was using a professional Sony XD cam. I don’t think too many people will be running into that issues. If they are, maybe 30 minutes isn’t enough from that perspective?

          • vFunct

            A fashion show is 10-15 minutes long.

            The photographers at the end of the runway are all using these pro cameras, or video cameras.

            • neonspark

              they are using video cameras with a much wider color space and a much better scanning method on the sensor.

            • vFunct

              Photo cameras have much better color space than any non-raw video camera, and scanning methods are of no concern when shooting runway.

          • Michael Laing

            I don’t particularly disagree with you and the reality is that I don’t think we will be seeing much 4k news any time soon (Or broadcast television). The main reason to have it is for keeping up with the Jones but someone might find some more practical use for the extra time.

            The reality is that I would probably record to an external recorder anyway, just because the quality is probably going to be better but not giving the D5 30 minutes record time, when the D500 can is like Nikon scoring an own goal. If they do upgrade the firmware, it will be interesting to see if there is any heating issues.

            • Thom Hogan

              No, you won’t see much 4K output yet. But…

              If you shoot in 4K you have post processing flexibility, including cropping.

            • Michael Laing

              Yes, the only caveat to that is if you are going to film 4k and have a D5, their isn’t much reason not to buy an external recorder and have all the advantages of that gives.

            • Thom Hogan

              Absolutely. I’ll take 4:2:2 in any ProRes compression over 4:2:0 in Nikon’s MPEG compression any day.

            • Eric Calabros

              It’s still 8 bit, because of silly HDMI limitations. With no log, you can’t play too much with curves anyway, no matter how its compressed. But you get less ruined color data, and a smoother to edit files. For many people, not enough gains, for adding the monitor bulk.

            • Thom Hogan

              Nikon might not have S-Log, but it does have Flat. But more importantly to someone headed to broadcast, it has the ability to output to a “limited range,” which protects white/black IRE levels.

            • Moose1414

              Doesn’t the GH4 and Leica SL output 10 bit 4:2:2 over HDMI? Are Nikon using a different HDMI spec or just playing is a different sandbox to their video savvy competitors?

            • Eno

              Thom, be careful, Pro res and mjpeg are very similar in nature. Yes, 4:2:2 is preferable, but if both codecs only compress color information in 4:2:0, only the bit rate wold make the difference in image quality.

            • Eno

              The difference is not that big, many have tested Nikon’s internal vs external recording and found no practical difference in image quality what so ever. If the thing was exporting in 10 bit and 4:2:2, then perhaps all the fuss about recording externally would have paid of, but as it is, it’s practically unnecessary.

            • Moose1414

              Spot on. I really think this point is lost on so many people. Nikon promoting the expense and clunkiness of external recording when is next to pointless. If it was 10 bit that is different as you say, but of course with Nikon it is not.
              They just give us the same 8 bit processed signal thats used for internal recording and then advertise that if you aren’t happy with the internal codec its simply a matter of outputting the “uncompressed” signal and you’ll get professional quality video. Just marketing spin as usual.

            • Thom Hogan

              Yeah, and I remember a Nikon Ambassador going around the country in the early 00’s saying that “JPEG is all you need to shoot” and me correcting him every time he said that.

              Sorry, but this is the old “good enough cause I don’t see it” issue in another form. If you’re a video pro you know what the difference is between 4:2:2 and 4:2:0, and between 10-bit and 8-bit, and between the MPEG compressions versus the ProRes or DNX compressions. Simply put, when you get to post and start grading your output, you run into all kinds of barriers with 8-bit 4:2:0 MPEG compressed source. The easiest to trigger is banding (the old 8-bit problem), but 4:2:0 tends to have real color issues when transcoded, too.

            • Eno

              Well Thom, I live from video production and my comments are from personal experience. Two years ago I did a test with D800 and a Atomos Ninja external recorder, and there was practically 0 difference between internal and external recording. Do a google search on the subject, you’ll find plenty examples.

            • Thom Hogan

              Sorry, but my background is actually more video than it is still photography, I just don’t publicize that nor do I point to any of my video work.

              If you record to an Atomos correctly, you will not be transcoding when you edit in most products. With the internal compression, you will be in most products. So compression of compression artifacts. Then, when you output, you’ll probably be transcoding again. And if the video is broadcast, it will get transcoded yet again, and possible multiple times.

              Maybe I live in a rarefied world of high end, but I don’t know of any other video producers that would say 4:2:0 is okay. But I’ll take you up on your assertion: when I’m at NAB in April, I’ll add “are there visible differences between to my list of questions to ask all the attendees.”

              Nikon’s video across cameras is inconsistent in the artifacts/quality it is producing in the first place, which does impact this discussion a bit, but only a bit. The D4 is very soft, the D800 has clear artifacting due to line skipping, and we’ve seen just about everything at one point or another, as Nikon is adding video capabilities to sensors, not optimizing sensors for video. Still, this is the same argument as about lenses and about JPEG and about sensor resolution. You’re arguing “good enough” because the original is compromised in some way but the compression doesn’t seem to compromise it more from a quick visual perusal. And yet, we shoot raw why? Bigger bit depth, all the data, and fewer artifacts caused by the compression. The same exact thing is true of video. You want the deepest bit depth and color capability you can get, all the data, and no compression (raw if possible, high bit-rate quality compression if not).

              The good news is that while Nikon uses a fairly low bit-rate in their compression schemes, they do use intermediary frames and other higher end techniques in the compression scheme itself. I’m not saying that Nikon’s video compression is bad, just as I wouldn’t say their JPEG implement is bad, only that it has huge implications downstream for those of us whose video is ending up in broadcast.

              Even if I shoot raw video and edit with something that doesn’t transcode that, my output will be transcoded first by the agency, second by the broadcaster, and then by the satellite/cable provider. Artifacts in the original will be visible in the final if you’re not careful to preserve every data value you can.

              I’ve been extremely consistent on this my entire career. In film I worked at optimal exposure, processing, and printing. In digital stills I work at optimal exposure, processing, and output. In video I work at optimal exposure, processing, and output. I’ll stand by what I wrote: I’ll take 4:2:2 over 4:2:0 EVERY DAY.

            • Eno

              “I’ll take 4:2:2 over 4:2:0 EVERY DAY” if it is offered internally. My point was very simple: if the external recorder dos not provide tangible image quality improvements, the money are better spent in other more useful accessories like better sound, lenses, better stabilizing systems etc.

            • Eric Calabros

              I’ve seen sample in forums that, I dunno how, 4:2:0 causes banding even in gray while 4:2:2 doesn’t show the issue. The thing is video is intentionally consumerish in DSLR, even if the body is pro. They want it to be consumed straight out of camera. Not to be reproduce! They don’t even like to call it a video friendly camera when talking to journalists, worrying somebody take it serious and ask them more!

            • PhilK

              I hope that’s how they characterize it, because it’s fairly obvious to people who understand this stuff that Nikon doesn’t really “know” or “get” videography or cinematography the way some of their competitors who have been doing it seriously for way longer than they have.

              (Sony, for example, has been producing broadcast video equipment since the *1950s*, and Panasonic’s parent started developing television technology in the *1930s*..)

            • Thom Hogan

              No, the camera companies THINK that video going to YouTube, et.al., is coming straight out of camera. But that’s not true. Transcoding is taking place, and that impacts the downstream quality.

              Start with crap, end up with crappier.
              Start with cream, end up with cream.

            • ninpou_kobanashi

              PP Stabilization is very useful!

            • true

              Gamers should have access to 4k stuff very soon. While it’s true that not many have 4k monitors (gamers either), they will most likely have one on their Head Mountable Display. Stuff like Oculus Rift / HTC (+steam) Vive should be 4k capable, meaning there’s bound to be people viewing 4k content with those devices.

              And if the hype lives and the devices revolutionize movie watching (watching a cinema like FOV @ your own home), it could be a big thing!

              Oh and these devices are rumored to be 400-1000usd , giving huge potential if they live up to their name.

        • neonspark

          you don’t need a D5 for an interview. Unless you’re interviewing a running person in the dark.

          • Michael Laing

            You probably don’t but if you are on a job where you are doing stills and video, You can combine both to one camera. Am I saying it is going to happen often probably not, would you probably have a external recorder, very probably, would you need to record in 4k, very probably not.

            I was a cameraman long before I was a photographer and give then choice when shooting video I would always go for a video camera, right tools for the right job but I have also been in situations when pretty much everything goes to shit and you just make do with what you got.

      • DrNo666

        True but when u shoot u normally let the camera roll and edit everything together at the end.

      • vFunct

        These cameras aren’t for movies. They’re journalist cameras, and press events last longer than 3 minutes.

        • Wade Marks

          If you’re working a press event as a pro, and need video, you will have and use a dedicated video camera. DSLRs are a poor platform for video work.

          Look at any press conference by, let’s say the President…you’ll see the still shooters clicking away, and you’ll see the big video rigs doing their thing. Two different tasks, two different crews of people.

          • vFunct

            Right I agree that video and photo are two separate functions, but I think that Nikon itself is moving towards targeting these press videographers. especially as more online media outlets are using the same person to perform both functions.

            I hate using dSLRs for video. Dedicated video cameras are the only way to go, but who knows what some of these smaller media outlets want to pay for.

            • PhilK

              Which is why Nikon has been putting rudimentary video features into their DSLRs since the D90 was the first DSLR in the world to have such a feature.

              The question is, where do you draw the line of expecting every one of the latest trendy video features to be incorporated into a camera which is primarily designed as a state-of-the-art still shooter.

              Maybe when the time comes that videocams are also expected to include 14fps PDAF still shooting with 4-stop VR, matrix metering, 21MP, 15 stops of DR, F-mount and 3,000,000 ISO capability…. maybe I’ll change my mind. 😛

            • Well said!

          • neversink

            And this is the way it will stay for a long time. Dedicated video eliminates a lot of headaches of shooting video with a DSLR. It’s not that DSLR’s can’t give high quality. They can. They can, but using DSLR for video is much more of a compromise in technique and ergonomic factors and complexity than using a dedicated video camera.

        • neonspark

          no, they are action cameras. Unless your press event is shot in the middle of a riot, you don’t need the D5 speed for a slow moving fat man talking.

          • Zinchuk

            You’re not going to carry five difference cameras. The D5, if that’s your body, needs to work for all things, not requiring you to carry another body for longer pieces. And I’ve rarely been to a press conference under 3 minutes.

          • vFunct

            A fashion show is basically a glorified press event, and they need these action/sport cameras. You can’t shoot them with a basic camera otherwise you lose that specific moment in a walk where the model has the best look.

      • sickheadache

        IF you watch Tony Northrup’s Video of the D5..It will explain why you are wrong. About that short clip junk..Camera need to be set up and a continuous rolling…IF i am shooting a bear at 4k..and only have three minutes..I must stop the bear and explain..sorry..can we start over..my D5 can only shoot you 3 minutes at a time. I hope we on the same page now. The 3 minute time limit is a massive fail.

        • Eric Calabros

          If you have to wait longer than 3min to get the bear does something, you are filming a dead bear I’m afraid

          • sickheadache

            ERIC..>Keep up..stop being a kcid…Bears moves just like anything else you film in 4K…Eric Fail. Thanks for playing.

          • CERO

            or.. you know.. the bear is doing bearly stuff.. not exactly dead XD

          • PhilK

            Hey ya never know… dead-bear photography could be a thing.. 😀

    • Spy Black

      Just think how much better this would have looked in 4K, and this is only 55 seconds long..
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J—aiyznGQ

  • iamlucky13

    “This info is coming from a Nikon rep at one of the recent D5 events, so take it with a grain of salt.”

    I got a chuckle from this. After all the mixed messages and ambiguous clues about product strategy, response to quality issues, acknowledgements of bug fixes, etc over the years, the post reads to me like, “This is coming from somebody who works for Nikon itself, so the source is unreliable.”

    • Thom Hogan

      Generally, I’d agree. However, with the introduction of a new camera, Nikon generally spends a fair amount of time and effort to bring reps up to speed. It’s the one time when they tend to be accurate and not making things up, mainly because its the primary time when they actually get trained by Nikon.

  • Doug Laurent

    Getting rid of this 3 minute limit is the absolute minimum Nikon has to do. The 1DX2 will not have such a limit, and a camera with that price point does look stupid with such a limit in 2016. The D5 is a pro camera that many will still use in the year 2020. A 3 minute limit on 24fps video is something you would expect from a 2005 amateur camera.

    • Wade Marks

      I do agree that the limit is silly to impose if not necessary due to technical limitations.

      But it is funny to see a comparison with the upcoming Canon equivalent…which, of course, has not even been released. And it’s also funny to see the comparison, when the Canon shooters are already fretting that the 1DX2 won’t have as advanced an AF system as the Nikon, won’t be quite as good at high ISO’s,will not offer 2 card slots of the same type, etc…the grass is always greener…

    • n11

      “a 2005 amateur camera”…. recording at 4K I’m assuming? If not, be quiet.

    • David Weinehall

      Do tell, what 2005 amateur camera I should buy that handles 4k at 24fps? I don’t really mind the 3 min limit; if the camera is from 2005 it should be pretty cheap by now…

      • Doug Laurent

        It’s not about the resolution, it’s about the time limit. Lots of much smaller and cheaper cameras do shoot decent 4K video now. None has that 3 minute limit. Hardly any camera that shot video in this millennium did have such a limit including the ones with the highest standard industry resolution that was available in those years.

        A camera that is able to shoot 200 raw pictures in a row, but can’t record more than 3 minutes video is an epic marketing fail. Nikon also heavily advertised video and 4K, but did fail to come up with 4K demo videos. This makes them look like as if they don’t really know what they’re doing, and most consumers need to give loud feedback so they finally listen.

        Huge companies don’t have mercy when it comes to prices and making the most money from consumers. So I don’t understand why they deserve mercy when it comes to judging about the details of their products. Critics make the products better and help the consumer and the brand in the longterm.

        • HF

          Despite for interviews and such, I don’t see a need for longer time limits. I would be interested in knowing all the applications making longer durations a necessity, as I don’t care about video and don’t know why this is so important. But for a simple interview, is there a D5 really necessary? Wouldn’t a GH4 with 4k be sufficient?

          • Doug Laurent

            More and more photo and video has to be done at the same events. Why should someone carry a second camera with more adapters or lenses and far less lowlight capabilities, when you already have a 10k+ worth D5 Nikon setup with you that could do the job?

            Aside from interviews there are endless amounts of situations that require more than 3 minutes, like music videos, concert videos, sports games etc. Sometimes even the 30 minutes are too short!

            If it was at least 6 minutes limit, this would mean that a much larger part of takes of music, sports, interviews, press conferences could work – which are exactly shooting situations that often need a photo camera as well.

            3 minutes on the other hand are more suitable for scenic film work – which is exactly the place where you usually DON’T need a photo camera. This is why this limit makes no sense.

            If the Nikon D5 had a preroll/prerecord function (which I’m sure it won’t have), at least that would be great. So if there’s a scenery where you might only need 5-30 second of footage, but don’t know when the interesting part happens, a file limited to 3 minutes that constantly prerecords until you activate the video recording would be great. This should be very easy to implement. I wonder in what year Nikon and Canon will start to add such an old video function.

            • HF

              Thanks for your input!

            • KnightPhoto

              Excellent points. And there would be a lot of irony if one still had to carry a GH4 around with your D5!

            • > This should be very easy to implement.

              Modulo sensor overheating and battery power and having to be in live view.

              It seems like it might not be a bad idea to simply strap a lightweight 4K video camera onto your pro DSLR and turn it on. (Perhaps some kind of hookup so it syncs with the zoom on your primary camera’s lens). Humping a pro DSLR around and leaving it in video mode seems like a waste since it will interfere with taking stills.

            • Doug Laurent

              The Nikon system with its switch between photo and video mode is in one way much better for parallel photo and video shooting than any other camera, as you can have two different optimized shutter speed settings for stills and motion.

              Two cameras on top of each other is indeed something i have done several times successfully – like 2x video (one wide angle, one close up priority) or in helicopters 1x video priority and 1x photo timelapse.

              But that doesn’t make the current D5 limit better. A much smaller A7R2/S2 usually doesn’t overheat, and a 1DC never overheats. Nikon by now could have found out to do that as well. But i guess it was more of a marketing idea anyway to artificially limit the specs. One of the confusing decisions such companies often do.

            • PhilK

              Sony for example has produced various documents discussing the different requirements for shooting video compared to still photography, and the different sensors optimized for each.

              As such, I would be quite surprised if a sensor (and its associated processing electronics) that are optimized for state-of-the-art still photography (and that is what every “single digit” Nikon DSLR is), is also ideal for video work. There are almost undoubtedly conflicting technical requirements.

              And if there is a question whether or not to optimize a Nikon flagship for stills or video, as far as I am concerned the video should unquestionably be the lower priority.

              Nikon simply does not have the background, resources or infrastructure to successfully compete for the high-end videography customer compared to companies like Sony, Panasonic or Canon, and as such I personally think they should stick to what they know. The videography market is much smaller than the photography market as well.

  • Bernard Languillier

    I would expect people to shoot serious video with a D5 to use an external recorder such an Atomos, but hey… 30 mins is for sure better than 3 mins. This was pretty much the only item on the spec sheet that got negative comments so good move if Nikon was able to fix this quickly.

    The quality of the video coming out of the D5 may actually be pretty good since it relies on direct reading without any interpolation.

  • usa

    I would be happier if the cut the time by three minutes, but that is just me. If I want a video camera, I would buy a video camera.

    • Eric Calabros

      Even a 30min limit will be combination of ten 3min clips.

    • true

      I think it’s more fun to have a dslr / mirrorless body do the video than a separate camera for that purpose. Consumer saves money, can spend on 1 system and 1 body.

  • Stephen Corby

    For the record, I said this was likely weeks ago when it was announced. It was just a software issue they were working at.

  • photomanayu

    We heard the same thing from NPS rep in canada as well.

  • usa

    Rename the D5 the D3min!

    It wouldn’t be a Nikon launch without the rumors, complaints and recriminations; but it will be the most accomplished sports photography body ever.

  • petervandever

    If the heat was the issue…. how is not going to be the issue after a software update?

    • mas921

      lower bitrate ?

  • longzoom

    The limit of 3 (or 13, or 333) min was set for the reason. There isn’t a magic stick to make it any longer, without appearance of dead pixels. Do it 3 min, at max, wait 3-5 min, do it again. I’ve great experience with dead sensors. So, I do not believe there is any firmware to cool the sensor, the one was designed like this. Or, the data must be cut to 25-30% from the original. Come on, guys, do not wait for wonders, or accept lower quality. Clear speculations, nothing more.

    • Eric Calabros

      But Nikon itself is afraid of processor heat, not sensor heat.

      • longzoom

        Sensor is impacted first, you will see it (God forbid) very soon. Any and every sensor is suffering, less or more, sooner or later. Still camera is not movie one, and can’t be. The rest is speculations. Do not try the camera of $ 6500, it doesn’t pay. Follow manual, experiment should be costly!

        • Eric Calabros

          D5 full frame image is about 105MB of data, it sends 14x105MB per second to processor (14fps with mirror up), its like traveling 12Gb/s out of sensor. It’s huge! Video is probably made in 12bit mode so its 30x35MB per second, and of course in a smaller area, so 8.5Gb/s. I don’t see why it shouldn’t handle that.

          • longzoom

            It should handle, say, for 3 min. Over this time its getting hot. Why it is designed like this, and what and why 3(333) min is a limitations of time frame, I don’t see either. But if one doesn’t want to destroy $6500 camera, do not exceed the time limit. It is today’s technology, we have to accept it, or leave it. Actually, 3 min is good enough for almost any scenery of shooting.

            • PhilK

              Agreed. People don’t take a camera like a D4s or D5, and hold their finger down on the shutter release and shoot 12fps RAW files for 30 minutes straight.

              I just hope Nikon doesn’t kowtow to the cameraforum specmonger crowd and remove a technical restriction that results in the cameras failing or going down constantly from overheating. 😐 It seems to me that the negative PR from that would be much worse than attempting to pretend that they are a videography company when videographers know very well that they are not.

            • longzoom

              Indeed!

  • I’m puzzled by the need of every camera serving every need of every photographer. Why not do a D5v and D5s. Then let the photographer choose which machine they want/need. Doesn’t Canon do that?

    • Eric Calabros

      They did, and the v failed.

  • Nikon User

    What about filming 4K with the entire frame rather than using the cropped frame? Will also be fixed?

    • Knut-Sverre Horn

      No, certainly not. The 4K video i red out pixel by pixel with no pixel binning.

    • If they released a camera with far less mpx they could easily. But to remove pixels reduces quality. Do we want the highest quality with a crop or bad quality without one? Using wider lenses isn’t too bad a deal surely?

  • Compared to this 3 min. limit on 4K recording, I am actually more excited for a firmware that will remove the function limitation of the touch screen.

  • mas921

    hmmm … am learning videography, shouldn’t a scene be like 20 sec’s max? even for multiple takes 3 min seemed ample to me…??

    • Not if you are doing an interview.

    • neversink

      Absolutely not. I worked in Hollywood throughout most of the 1980s and there are many scenes that can go beyond 20 seconds. Alfred Hitchcock was a master of long scenes. It’s all about your creativity. There are no rules….

      • mas921

        fair enough! i learned something new!

  • Knut-Sverre Horn

    Vegard Berg from Nikon Norway confirmed it on an event in Norway Thursday.

    • usa

      That makes the rumor Scandilous! 🙂

      • JG

        NO makes it SanDiskilous (you will need many)!

    • ok, this makes it 3 confirmations from 3 different countries

  • MonkeySpanner

    Can’t wait to get this firmware update on my D5. Wait….

  • I read somewhere the time limitation was more to do with overheating issues’ . The fact that Sony’s first a7 generation couldn’t record 4k internally makes me think that people are over reacting to this. an external 4k recorder will be expensive and it’s another thing to carry but a d5 is hardly small, is it really a big issue?
    Nikon are not famous for their video quality. Sorting out their bit depth and profiles -s log etc and a xrl sound recording battery grip add on will probably go further then extending 4k filming. Fact is most videographers are moving away from slrs and probably wouldn’t touch a Nikon any way, this is for photogs who do a little video now and then.

    • nwcs

      I think a lot of people speculated without any real facts since the D5 isn’t in customer hands yet.

      • Indeed, people like to speculate and moan online I find.
        Lots of complaints about the crop in 4k as well, but surely cropped high quality is better then un cropped poor quality? Just use a wider lens surely?

        Again I will state(without trying to sound that I am speculating or moaning!) that Nikon should add better codecs, improved bit rates and profiles to their video options- more video peeps would take them seriously then.

    • Mike

      I agree. Re: Sony. No one blinked or chuffed on that spec. If someone ‘needs’ a D5 type camera AND 4K, they are likely already using a 4K camera beside their D4/s. That said the D5 will be an attractive proposition as either a B camera for 4K (I know, I know) or camera A on smaller jobs. And, don’t forget Nikon’s lenses. 4K and specialist lenses like macro or T/S could open up access to different looks that a dedicated 4K camera couldn’t achieve or with much costlier solutions. The 4K in the D5 is not the be all end all, but it adds another tool to people who need it.

    • PhilK

      Regarding external recorders – I’m no expert but it seems to me that most people who are remotely serious about DSLR videography/cinematography spend thousands of $$$ on ginormous shoulder-mounted rigs with big external mikes, monitor/controllers, batteries and so on… may as well just plop an Atomos in there if it’s not already in the shopping-list.

  • Update: the 30 min 4k video in the D5 will probably be achieved by recording 10 sequential files @ 3 minutes each.

    • JG

      That makes sense as achieved in software. Hopefully no dropped frames between files. It would be nice to bridge that 3 minute limit when needed.

    • BVS

      So, exactly the same as how the D500 does it.

    • neversink

      This makes a lot of sense…. Looking forward to getting my hands on the D5 – I have no interest in the D500, although I am sure it is a great camera.

    • outkasted

      I really wonder howmany pros really used their D4/D4s for video. I mean most video DSLR cameras I ever heard about are smaller frame factor like the D7000 series,D 5300, D800/D810 etc… but I never hear about the Bigger Canon 1Dx as an example as a camera of choice to do video but i often hear the 5D series and 7D series as the camera choices. I mean I guess pros would use them in some capacity to capture a few video frames hence the 3min. 4K. It just in my opinion makes sense.

      • Patrick Baldwin

        I use 3 D4’s and a D800 to film stage shows.

      • Mike

        Before the a7s, the D4/s was the low light video champ. Super clean video at 25,000 ISO.

    • Mike

      This is how the D500 does it too. There was some head scratching at an NPS event about the different video modes. They intimated that between then and release there could conceivably be a firmware change on the D5 to allow sequential 3min 4K vids totalling 30mins.

  • Eno

    This may help Nikon’s reputation regarding video.

  • Ric of The LBC

    Ok, so I won’t switch. 🙂

  • CERO

    sequential files are not that bad. You can glue them easily with any basic film program. I just hope they do not leave any gab.
    But then, I couldnt afford the D5 unless I sold a kidney or a cornea.
    My eyes are on the D500.

    • Mike

      You will need your cornea before and after 😉

      • CERO

        they are very cheap on the blackmarket! you sure you dont want an extra kidney on the side? XD

  • neversink

    Still be better off using a dedicated video camera. Get your hands on an Arriflex….. ;-}

  • Eric Calabros

    I agree that’s not much about heat, but if sensor heat is to blame, making D500 a proof of this claim is wrong. D500 reads out the 4k frame from smaller area. The longer electrons travel, the more heat they make.

    • Lars Holst Hansen

      The reference I mention says “It’s a matter of processing and the heat which is generated during processing.”

  • Littlelio

    Due to tax related reasons, there is a limitation. However as many mentioned, 30 minutes are long enough for small productions.

    So now question is: does D3/D500 supports clean hdmi output? External recorder comes for rescue!

    • Mike

      Yes they do.

    • PhilK

      I keep hearing about these “tax related restrictions” on video shooting time.. do you have any links to more info on that? Sounds like a very weird regulation.

  • petervandever

    I believe the heat issue…. D500 is APSC. Whole new discussion.

    • Lars Holst Hansen

      We will just have to see if the 3+ min 4K will be made possible but crappy due to the “heat issue”

  • Carlo

    Then my question is: is it possible to know how many minutes has the camera recorded … Before we were looking at shutter counts.

  • ToastyFlake

    Seems like a really stupid move on nikon’s part. If a firmware release is coming later, many people who needed or wanted 4K longer than 3 minutes will have already written the D5 off. It also makes Nikon just look sloppy.

    • D700s

      What a stupid comment. Why would they have written the D5 off when it hasn’t even shipped yet. It’s getting so hard to read these blogs because you have to wade through so many stupid comments from people that have no clue what they are talking about.

      • PhilK

        Whoa, pardner. First of all it was just an opinion about a strategy and a sociology/psychology question that is hardly set in stone.

        Furthermore, if someone wants/needs some capability that they thought Nikon would produce (eg in the D5) and they would have been inclined to wait and buy it from them, but then it becomes apparent that Nikon won’t produce it, they may very well switch to a different product instead. If that different product happens to already exist and they can buy it NOW, it makes no difference when the D5 ships.

        Another example: if you were a bird photographer in 2015 looking for an APS-C DSLR that performed better than a D300s or D7200 in terms of frame rate and AF, the obvious choice would have been a EOS-7D Mark II. If you were a bird photographer that needed such capability on January 24, 2016, despite the fact that the D500 has already been announced, you can’t have it on January 24, 2016, so you still get the Canon. When the D500 does eventually hit the street, you already have your camera, so you’re no longer a D500 customer.

        Luckily only a small percentage of customers cannot wait. For the people that can, the “updated” D5 spec may encourage them to do so.

        Tho none of us yet know what this “fix” will entail. It could for example lower the bitrate or something in order to keep the sensor/processor heat down, in which case it may not be the solution some people were looking for anyway.

        • D700s

          Pitiful attempt to excuse the stupid comment above. Read his comment again.

      • ToastyFlake

        Hey stupid. It has shipped and people who wanted more than 3 minutes of 4K video have written it off. Now if Nikon comes out with a firmware update to correct that, that would be as stupid a move as not designing the thing to take more than 3 minutes of 4K in the first place. Not that I wouldn’t love to have one myself because I don’t have any desire to take a bunch of 4K video.

        • D700s

          Well you got me there. I guess I am stupid. I apologize for calling your comment stupid. At least they will release a firmware update. Maybe it’s to late and the D5 is doomed now.

      • ToastyFlake

        What an idiotic comment. If you know something doesn’t offer what you want, you’re not going to be interested in buying it. It doesn’t make a damn bit of difference whether the product has started shipping or not.

  • true

    lol, maybe they should’ve done the firmware update before releasing the info on the 4k duration of D5? Now there’s bunch of ppl confusing the short 4k duration with D500 on dpreview and some other sites, giving nikon bad rep!

  • MB

    Canon 1DX II would have killed D5 without this update … no mater how useless 30min video clip actually is …

  • Back to top