Tamron SP 35mm and 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD lenses for Nikon F mount announced

Tamron-SP-35mm-and-45mm-f1.8-Di-VC-USD-lenses-for-Nikon-F-mount-announced
Tamron announced the previously rumored full frame prime lenses for Nikon F mount:

  • Even when used wide open at F/1.8 aperture, provides outstanding image quality with maximum aberration compensation, thanks to optimal use of sophisticated glass materials and highly advanced optical design
  • 35mm focal length with fast F/1.8 maximum aperture and integral VC (Vibration Compensation) for full-frame DSLR cameras
  • World's first full-frame 45mm focal length with fast F/1.8 maximum aperture and integral VC (Vibration Compensation)
  • MOD (Minimum Object Distance) of 0.29m (11.4"), the best-in-class close focusing capability**
  • Optimal relative illumination means no dark corners
  • eBAND Coating deployed to thoroughly suppress ghosting and flare
  • High-speed AF with USD (Ultrasonic Silent Drive)
  • Fluorine coating on the front element repels water and fingerprints
  • Moisture-resistant construction for shooting outdoors under adverse weather conditions
  • Circular aperture for enhanced bokeh
  • Compatibility with Adobe and Silkypix software

Tamron-SP-35mm-and-45mm-f1.8-Di-VC-USD-lenses-for-Nikon-F-mount
Tamron SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD model F012 (pre-order at $599)

Tamron-SP-35mm-F_1.8-Di-VC-USD-MTF-chart Tamron-SP-35mm-F_1.8-Di-VC-USD-lens-design
Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD model F013  (pre-order at $599)

Tamron-SP-45mm-F_1.8-Di-VC-USD-lens-design Tamron-SP-45mm-F_1.8-Di-VC-USD-lens-MTF-chart

Shipping will start on September 29th. Here are the technical details from Explora:

SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD
Lens Mount Full-Frame: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony A Full-Frame: Canon EF, Nikon F, Sony A
Focal Length (35mm Equivalent on APS-C) 35mm (Nikon/Sony: 52.5mm; Canon:56mm) 45mm (Nikon/Sony: 67.5mm; Canon:72mm)
Maximum Aperture f/1.8 f/1.8
Minimum Aperture f/16 f/16
Angle of View 63° 26' 51° 21'
Minimum Focusing Distance 7.9" / 20 cm 11.4" / 29 cm
Maximum Magnification Ratio 1:2.5 1:3.4
Autofocus Yes Yes
Image Stabilization Canon and Nikon Mounts Only Canon and Nikon Mounts Only
Lens Construction 10 elements / 9 groups 10 elements / 8 groups
Diaphragm Blades 9, circular 9, circular
Filter Thread 67mm 67mm
Dimensions (D x L) Canon: 3.2 x 3.2" / 80.4 x 81.3mm
Nikon: 3.2 x 3.1" / 80.4 x 78.7mm
Canon: 3.2 x 3.6" / 80.4 x 91.4mm
Nikon: 3.2 x 3.5" / 80.4 x 89.0mm
Weight Canon: 16.9 oz / 479 g
Nikon: 15.9 oz / 451 g
Canon: 19 oz / 539 g
Nikon: 18.3 oz / 519 g

Tamron SP 35mm and 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD highlights:

Tamron-SP-35mm-and-45mm-f1.8-Di-VC-USD-lenses-for-Nikon-F-mount-2
To develop these two standard fixed focal lenses, goals were established to provide exquisite characteristics certain to set them distinctively apart from ordinary, conventional models. This required a new approach. All of the key performance criteria were redefined to achieve the ultimate in optical performance. VC (Vibration Compensation) was incorporated as an integral part of the opto-electronics design to expand shooting freedom. Priority was set to allow dramatically closer focusing capability to remove what would otherwise be a barrier to the subject. Yet with all this innovation, the overall mechanical package had to be kept within practical size limits with an elegantly sophisticated external design as a human interface. Having optimized every prerequisite, remarkably versatile lenses have been developed that boast amazing performance from F/1.8 wide open aperture. These lenses can be enjoyed by users of APS-C cameras as well as full-frame.

F/1.8 fast-aperture, fixed focal lenses aimed at ultimate performance

Optimal use of the latest glass materials, coupled with Tamron's world renowned optical design technology, thoroughly compensated for aberrations of all types to achieve higher resolving power, while fine textures of materials and details are reproduced with subtle tonal gradations. The F/1.8 aperture delivers more light to the viewfinder—making it brighter for easier focusing – and more light to the sensor, allowing use even in very dim lighting conditions. In addition, the bokeh (background blur) effect obtained using the F/1.8 fast aperture delivers impressively smooth and soft transition from the main subject to the background.

Dynamic close-focusing capability, unprecedented among standard lenses

Both models deliver astonishingly short MOD (Minimum Object Distance) not available from other 35mm or 45mm standard lenses. Photographers can get closer to the subject with ease, unleashing new photo opportunities with an expanded scope of freedom. Superb image capture is ensured throughout the entire range from the closest to normal shooting distances, thanks to Tamron's proprietary Floating System built into both lenses.

VC (Vibration Compensation) system, a feature crucial for high-pixel-density cameras

Beneficial under all lighting conditions and especially useful in low light levels, the VC function provides noticeable advantages for handheld shooting by minimizing the adverse effects of camera shake. Cameras with high pixel densities, in particular, are sensitive to minute vibrations which cause unsharpness and degradation of image quality. VC works to ensure the maximum imaging performance even in dim lighting to allow photographers to enjoy the fast F/1.8 maximum aperture to the fullest extent.

User-friendly product design with close attention to all details

Opening a new chapter in the SP legend, product design, opto-mechanical construction and engineering processes are totally integrated. Every single detail and operating function has been thoroughly reexamined, explored and matured to a form that has a friendly, human touch.

Product design with maximum emphasis on the human interface in order to achieve the ultimate in functional beauty

While the lens is constructed with the absolutely most modern technologies inside, the exterior is articulated to offer the best possible comfort and confidence under a product design philosophy of "Human Touch." Organically composed lines and patterns on the barrel produce subtle changes in its appearance by reflecting ambient light on the surface. Metal-based barrel materials provide a pleasant feeling of comfort, high quality and durability, fitting firmly in the hands of the photographer. Design of the front face of the lens is also taken into consideration so that it is not intimidating.

Brand ring and SP emblem

A brand ring that's tinted "Luminous Gold" adorns the lens just above the lens mount. On one side of the lens barrel there is an SP emblem in the same luxurious color.

Design of distance and aperture scales

The window over the distance scale has been enlarged by 20% to maximize visibility and legibility. Font style of the characters and numbers has been newly developed to enhance the legibility as a critical element of the overall product design.

Switches with optimized geometric shape and tactile feedback

The geometric shape and sliding torque of the AF/MF change-over and VC On/Off switches have been configured and engineered to deliver the utmost comfort with secured operational feedback.

Lens hood and caps

To complete the lens product design, accessories such as the lens hood and caps for front and rear have been totally redesigned as well. Attaching and removing the lens hood has been fine-tuned by optimizing the connection interface to render both secure seating and durability.

Tamron SP 35mm f/1.8 Di VC USD sample photos:

f/2, 1/60 sec

f/2, 1/60 sec

f/5.6, 1/250 sec

f/5.6, 1/250 sec

f/1.8, 1/15 sec

f/1.8, 1/15 sec

F/2.2, 1/500 sec

f/2.2, 1/500 sec

f/2.8, 1/800 sec

f/2.8, 1/800 sec

Tamron SP 45mm f/1.8 Di VC USD sample photos:

f/1.8, 1/320 sec

f/1.8, 1/320 sec

f/11, 1/30sec

f/11, 1/30sec

f/4, 1/250 sec

f/4, 1/250 sec

f/1.8, 1/400 sec

f/1.8, 1/400 sec

f/1.8, 1/320 sec

f/1.8, 1/320 sec

This entry was posted in Nikon Lenses and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Nikon1isAwesome!

    Same price as Nikon, but with VC. I’ll be buying a 35mm FX lens soon, but will probably go with the very good Nikon f/1.8 or the Sigma Art @ $300 more.

    • Doug Henry

      I assume your talking about the FF 35/1.8. If you haven’t used it yet, I would spend the $30 to rent it over the weekend and see how it works for you. I rented it for a vacation and shot on D600. I loved the size, weight, focus grip, and sharpness. Only thing I really started noticing was how bad the CA was. I have seen bad CA like that on older lenses (especially wide open), but I thought it was exceedingly bad for a newer lens. Its wasn’t that there was more of it necessarily, but it seemed “thicker” than I have seen. YMMV.

      • Doug Henry

        and….nikon 1 is awesome!

      • Aldo

        Yeah CA is pretty bad on the nikkor 35mm as well as the 85mm 1.8g. I think it has to do with the lenses being sharper than the older ones.

        • jtan163

          I have the Nikkor 35mm ƒ/1.4 and the CA is really bad compared to my Tamron 24-70 and 70-200 ƒ/2.8 VC *zooms*.

          I’m somewhat regretting not getting the FX ƒ/1.8 when I bought and if I were buying today I’d look real hard at the Sigma and now the Tamron.
          The Sigma because it got such an awesome rep as has the Sigma 50, and the Tamron’s because my experience with their ƒ2.8 zooms has been so good.
          I know the Tamron eBAND coating is awesome for flare/ghosting from what I’ve seen on the 15-30, and this is a big issue for my shooting.
          So far it seems better than the Nikkor Nano Crystal.
          My Sigma DX 18-35 ƒ/1.8 Art’s coating is not as good and it has ghost and flare like crazy at night with artificial sources in the scene and the colour rendition is not true. I like the colour rendition but it is just not accurate.
          So right now if I were buying a 35mm prime for an FX Nikon I’d wait for some reviews of the Tamron then look real hard at the Tamron and maybe the Sigma.
          Currently the Nikkor ƒ/1.4 would be my last FX 35mm choice.

          • Aldo

            I got an incredible deal on the 35mm 1.8 nikon (ff) otherwise I would have joined the sigma art boat… Have you had your 1.4 checked out though? Others claim it to be an stellar lens.

            • jtan163

              No I have not had my copy checked.
              It’s a great lens in other respects. As I say I shoot it all the same.
              The CA is not unworkable and it comes out straight away in LR when I use the Adobe lens profile – this fact and the fact I’ve seen the CA referenced in a number of reviews makes me think it is not unusual.
              Just not what I had expected from a fairly expensive high end prime.
              I was considering the Nikkor ƒ/1.8, but a friend of mine was selling his ƒ/1.4 so we did a little deal.
              But that was then.

            • Aldo

              There are also others who swear by the color reproduction the 1.4s offer… they claim the new 1.8s are dry and boring. Something to consider… If I was in your shoes I’ll probably just keep it.

            • jtan163

              Definitely on both counts – I like the colour rendition on the Nikkor as well as the sharpness AND 35mm is my favrourite fixed FL – so I intend to keep it.
              But I would look very hard at the Tamron if I was buying now. Things really have changed for the time being.

              I actually only own two FX NikkorsI like the cachet of owning Nikkors – I only own a couple and I don’t usually buy higher end brand name anywhere else in my life unless I can see measurable reasons, but with photography gear I indulge myself in a little bit.

              But I think the quality and therefore the value proposition of the higher end Tamrons and Sigmas has changed enough to make Nikkors expensive from a pure price performance perspective. (e.g. I’ve shot the Nikkor 24-70 and 70-200 and I don’t think they are better performers than the Tammies, despite their higher cost and while I agree their build is a little better, it’s not in my mind orders of magnitude better like it might have been a few years ago).

              Now the Nikkor 200-500 ƒ/5.6?
              That is a different thing. From what I’ve read and the RAW files I’ve downloaded I think Nikon is recognising and responding to the 3rd party manufacturer’s improved quality and I think this may the the first of a series of enthusiast/semi-pro lenses that Nikon is going to use to redress the balance and address the gaps it has in it’s enthusiast line – for an affordable price.

              I’m really enthused about that lens – so much so that I am tempted to get it before I get an ultra-wide.
              This is a case of the gear nerd getting the better of my creative side which will use an ultra wide far more often that a long tele – but I’m really intrigued by the technical aspects of the 200-500 ƒ/5.6 and what it may signal for Nikon’s position in the market.

              Great time to be a photographer – and a geardo!!!
              🙂

            • Aldo

              Oh yeah… good times =] .

              I shot for two years with the 24-70 nikkor and I can tell you the image quality is fantastic… I don’t consider the tamron version ‘optically’ better… but they are certainly advantages that the tamron has, central sharpness.. and VR. VR is what really sets it apart. I found myself doing 2-3 burst shots on the nikkor when I ‘really’ wanted a tack sharp picture. This lens is VERY prone to motion blurriness… If you pair it with a high density pixel sensor like the d800 or the 24mp dx cameras… you will pull your hairs trying to get a tack sharp photo handheld (below 250 shutter). But in the studio or a controlled environment… the nikkor reigns supreme.

              VR is really taking over conventional photography. Tamron thinks so otherwise they wouldn’t be putting VR on a 35mm lens. I think one must really consider VR when in future lens purchases.

              As for the new 200-500mm. It seems to be a winner all around. I don’t have much use for such focal length otherwise it would be in my bag already. There are really no complains on it. I think you would have a lot of fun with it should you decide to buy. I once bought a sigma superwide 15 or 16mm (I forget ) rectalinear and to be honest I couldn’t find creativity with it. I found myself going back to the 24mm focal length when I needed a super wide shot and I was more comfortable shooting that range. Having said that if I was to spoil myself between a superwide and the 200-500mm.. I would choose the tele.

      • Exm3racer

        Haven’t used it yet but I agree with you on the CA from observing samples and the various online reviews. You can easily see it on the 85/1.8 and the 50/1.8 which I have used. Seems to be a common attribute on the Nikkor 1.8 series. The Tamron looks very promising in many regards.

      • Carleton Foxx

        At which apertures? Any ones in particular?

        • Doug Henry

          I didn’t do anything scientific, just did some shooting around savannah during the day (plenty of daylight). I have pics at f4 with pretty bad CA in the bokeh. Found one pic shot in to trees (with daylight behind) at f6.3 that looks really good and well controlled. Difficult to say if its strictly tied to aperture, but I would say I notice CA most on my f2-f4 shots (I only have one pic at 1.8 and that was indoors).

  • ShakyLens

    Pre-order placed for the 35mm! I really like the idea of having stabilization on a normal prime, since it’s a lens I use so much.

    • KnightPhoto

      Agreed, I am very interested in fast primes that also include VR, like to get the 35mm.

      • Aldo

        VR is nice. It’s gonna make people choose between the nikkor and this one.

        • Eric Calabros

          or just wait to see Nikon’s mirrorless system will have sensor vr or not. for wide lenses, sensor based system works better

          • preston

            I wouldn’t hold my breath for a Nikon mirrorless system that takes less than 3 generations to get right, so buy the Tamron this year and then choose whether or not to switch out for a potential Nikon VR option in 5 years.

            • I certainly wouldn’t expect Nikon to get sensor shift stabilization right at the first attempt (unless they simply license Olympus’s). Panasonic has been trying to catch up for some time.

            • Eric Calabros

              One who cant wait for Nikon, why not switch to Sony already? 🙂

  • Albert

    The MTF charts are incredible. They kill the Canon and Nikon equivalents, and are comparable to the Sigma ART. With VC, less vignetting, and the same price as the name brands…. wow.

    • ShakyLens

      I have the Sigma 35mm Art and will be eager to see how this new Tamron 35mm compares.

      • HF

        See the link I posted below. But in my opinion, his Sigma is not fine-tuned correctly.

        • Chris

          Some sigmas are hard to be tuned accurately. Seen a few that can’t be saved.

          • HF

            Some Nikkors, too, like the 135/2 dc.

            • Chris

              Oh i hate that.

            • Carleton Foxx

              What do you mean? Mine seems fine…

            • HF

              I was considering one myself and checked many forums. Many reported strong problems with AF-fine tune. Another issue is the DC ring. Marianne Oehlund has a thread at dpreview investigating this. The centering position is off for some and causes softness wide open.

            • Carleton Foxx

              Interesting. I don’t doubt they had problems. But I used FOCAL to fine tune mine, it seems pretty sharp and I bought it from LensRentals so I wouldn’t have to worry about it not working correctly.

              But what you need to know about this lens is that it’s only really good for one thing which is taking pictures of faces—mainly human but it does pretty well for animals as well. It has gnarly CA and it focuses loudly and slowly, but when you get a picture up on the screen or print it out, people look gorgeous. No matter their flaws, they look better.

              It’s also supposed to be good for shooting indoor sports in gyms, but I haven’t tried it for that.

        • Rudy Maharajh

          They shot both autofocus as well as manual; manual would have corrected for poor fine tuning.

    • HF

      Well the MTF curves (not directly comparable off brand) of the 35/1.8G ED are not that much different. One has to decide whether VC and almost 500g are worth it (fine tuning is another problem if you use several Tamron lenses as only one will be saved).

      • Albert

        I should add that the Nikon mount is 451g, and is lighter than the Canon mount. True, the Nikkor is 305g, so what you really need to decide is whether better IQ, VC, and ultra-close focusing are worth 150g.

    • Aldo

      Idk about “kill”… but they seem like excellent lenses. MTF charts aren’t comparable across brands.

    • fjfjjj

      Methods of MTF calculation aren’t uniformly adopted or disclosed, so you can’t compare charts between brands. They also tell us nothing about vignetting. The only thing being killed by these charts is critical thinking.

  • fjfjjj

    I’m so happy that these ‘off brand’ lens makers are picking up their game. Tamron’s 15-30 is a stunner. These images seem poor, and MTF charts are a game of deception, but I’m eagerly awaiting more examples.

  • HF

    Sagittal and meridional lines are farther apart in the Tamron. But as these are not measured curves it is not directly possible to compare them across brands.

    • nwcs

      Both are also computer models and real life use of any lens will show more manufacturing variance.

    • ShakyLens

      Seems like the Tamron might be sharper into the corners with more astigmatism and field curvature as the tradeoff. Will be interesting to see how it pans out in real life shooting.

  • HF

    With Nikon lenses, yes. But with non-Nikon brands only one gets saved. For example, I fine tuned the 24-70 from Tamron. Every other Tamron lens (70-200/2.8 and 90mm macro) are not shown and get the same 24-70 value.

    • vriesk

      On my D750, I have fine-tuned Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro, Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art, Tamron 90mm f/2.8 macro (non-VC one) and Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8.

      All work fine. I even have a separate entry for Nikon 50mm f/1.4G and the camera tells it apart from the Sigma without issues.

      • HF

        Of course, all Nikon lenses can be stored. But search the web and you find many many sites dealing with this issue that third-party manufacturers reverse engineer the control and sometimes are ID’ed as Nikon lenses and only one is recognized (for example www_fredmiranda_com/forum/topic/1332775). I use D610, D750 and D810 (before D7100) and all have this issue. I need to change the fine-tune value for each third-party lens (not Sigma as they are us-dock-tuned).

        • vriesk

          Possibly, but let me repeat: I have two Sigmas and two Tamrons and D750 doesn’t have any issues telling them apart.

          • HF

            I have no reason to disbelieve you. It is interesting. Maybe you are lucky and the lens IDs are treated as different lenses by the camera as there is no competing Nikon lens you tried to register. I just called a friend and he, too, has the issue that only one lens is recognised, the other gets the same values. But two Sigmas are correctly recognised. The difference is, he doesn’t have the 50/1.4registered, but I have. I delete the Nikon lens registration tomorrow and check. I remember a document I saw once in the DPreview forum quoting Nikon on this issue, but can’t find it.

            • vriesk

              Just checked, the Sigma 15mm f/2.8 fisheye is also recognized correctly (not that fine tuning this one makes any sense).

            • HF

              Cool. Wish I had the same success.

            • vriesk

              It might be because all my lenses come from different “generations”.

              Sigma 15 f/2.8 macro is a pretty ancient, screw driven thing, 150mm f/1.8 (OS version) macro is modern, but not new and 50mm f/1.4 Art is from the newest batch of Sigma products.

              Same with Tamron: the non-VC SP 90mm f/2.8 macro is old, while the 15-30mm f/2.8 VC is really new.

            • HF

              Sounds like a possible explanation.

            • Jim Huang

              That sounds so interesting! I’ve checked my D7100 and it doesn’t have the same problem.
              It has correctly identify the difference between 17-50 f2.8 (non VC) and 24-70 VC (shown as VR)

            • Jim Huang

              That sounds so interesting! I’ve checked my D7100 and it doesn’t have the same problem.
              It has correctly identify the difference between 17-50 f2.8 (non VC) and 24-70 VC (shown as VR)

            • HF

              Maybe Thom Hogan has information on this.

            • tobi

              You are partly right .. the issues is with the lense ID. The main culprit is the 24-70 and 70-200 tamron. There are other ID clashes but most people do not own lenses that have clashing IDs … http://www.rottmerhusen.com/objektives/lensid/thirdparty.html

            • Rick Johnson

              Yep, on my D750, Tamron’s 24-70 and 70-200 use the same AF tune values, unfortunately. A real pain since one needs correction, and one does not. :-/

    • jtan163

      I think that problem is only with some Tamrons.
      The 24-7o and 70-200 have it.
      I’d love to have it confirmed or denied with the 15-30. I expect they’ll have fixed it and will probably buy anyway, but I’d still like to see it confirmed.

  • nwcs

    The 35mm will sell well to DX users and a lot of FX users. And it’s good to see some differences from the other 35mm choices out there. Nice to see Tamron pursuing the market. A little competition might start some price reductions. The 45mm lens is actually closer to a FX normal (defined as diagonal of sensor) than the 50.

    Will be interested in some real world tests against other 35mm options.

    • preston

      I think you have it backwards. This lens will sell really well with FX users and hardly at all with DX users. DX users already have an excellent Nikon version for 1/3 the price. But FX users have a Nikon and a Tamron option at the exact same price point, but the Tamron gives you (potentially) better image quality and VR. The weight difference is practically negligible on an FX camera.

      • nwcs

        I think it’ll sell well to DX users because it’s a much better lens with VC than the current DX 35 1.8.

        • preston

          The DX 35 1.8 is actually fully usable at max aperture (unlike the FX version) so I think the huge cost difference will drive most people to the Nikon.

          • nwcs

            Certainly price can be a factor. I guess we’ll see how it goes. But I imagine a more sophisticated DX user would want a better resolving lens for 35mm than one designed years ago.

  • yvrgwac

    They are around 30% lighter than the Sigma ARTs, so could be better choices for photogs who travel a lot. Personally though, I have ARTs when I work locally, and travel with the old Nikon D lenses.

  • ss

    Am I the only one who has never needed to fine tune their lenses? I have the 20, 85, and 58mm nikkors and all of them are spot on focus, and i have the sigma 35mm 1.4 and that has always been spot on too. Am I just lucky?

    • HF

      Probably. I had to fine tune all my lenses. I do it for all my friends, too. Never encountered a lens/body combination which didn’t need it. But that’s just me.

  • whisky

    no pancakes … but they look like they’d make a nice lunch.

  • sperdynamite

    I think it’s great to have another lens in the 45mm range. A wholly under rated slight wide! Perfect for documentary. Also, they completely stole Sigma’s exterior design.

    • Captain Megaton

      Someone else noticed. 😀

  • Aldo

    The 35mm is a popular focal length. The new 45mm seems interesting. I think over all it’s a good release for tamron…. they will be bringing in some money with these lenses. I think the 35mm nikkor is sharper, but the bokeh seems better on the tamron.

    • Captain Megaton

      35mm is crowded, especially around the $500 mark. Hard to say which I’d go with today, like you I have reservations about the 35/1.8G. I’d probably spring for the 35/1.4 ART (used) over the Tamron… but for now I’m sticking with my old Zeiss 35/2 ZF.

      The 45mm is unique, the question is one of value over the 50/1.8G, which is cheap, light, and very good. As well as VC and close focus, the Tamron brings a more desirable focal length (my opinion), as well as reduced vignetting/improved contrast wide open. It’s also three times heavier. There are also plenty of 50/1.4 to consider in the price/weight class.

      • Spy Black

        Yeah, but they’re the only game in town with a stabilized 35mm. That’s gonna be big with video guys.

        • Eric Calabros

          Video guys appriciate VR in primes, but at the end of the day they prefer 5 axis sensor shake redction system. Optical VR is just about x and y movements. Add to that optical vr issues at 1/50s shutter speed

        • Eric Calabros

          Video guys appriciate VR in primes, but at the end of the day they prefer 5 axis sensor shake redction system. Optical VR is just about x and y movements. Add to that optical vr issues at 1/50s shutter speed

          • Spy Black

            That doesn’t change the point.

          • Spy Black

            That doesn’t change the point.

          • Spy Black

            That doesn’t change the point.

          • Carleton Foxx

            I’m a video guy and I’ll take whatever VR I can get.

    • preston

      The nikkor is only good from f/2.8 on though. Just like most nikkor primes, it is really soft wide open. If the Tamron is more like the Sigma Art series and actually usable wide open then that would be fantastic!

  • JJ168

    Man, the look of these lenses do make the nikkor looks like a kit lens.

    • Aldo

      well except for the ‘N’ (which has gotten bigger in newer lenses) most nikkors look all the same.

    • verytoxic

      Nikkors look 80’s design wise. Even older manual Nikkors look aesthetically better than the current ones. I have not idea why Nikon is not recognizing that photography is about the looks. The tools need to look good. The tools need to be desirable. Nikon, its 2015 you know, time to get your act together and design some good looking glass, internally and externally.

      • TheInconvenientRuth

        I sometimes cry myself to sleep at night because Nikon stopped using the 80’s hammertone finish on thier lenses. I’m an old fashioned girl, I like my gear to look mean and intimidating. I even had a repair guy take the top plate of my F4s so I could repaint it in hammertone. It didn’t end well…

        • verytoxic

          What I meant by 80’s is age where people wore banana pants and had hair dues that nobody would ever repeat again. It was a horrible age for aesthetics industry wide.

          • fjfjjj

            I think your hair’s due.

      • Mike Gordon

        Hahaha! Who what the outside of a lens looks like? It is a tool if it does the job.

        I will laugh thinking about this next time I am at Home Depot in the tool section. OOO.. ahh… look at the exterior of that 16oz hammer, I am in love…

        • verytoxic

          How about you tell Apple, “you know what guys, an iPhone is only a communications tool, who cares about your aesthetics” Or maybe you can laugh at Zeiss for producing gorgeous looking “tools”. Photography is creativity, and I expect creative tools to be more than just a hammer to drive nails into the coffin. I expect photographic tools to be cutting edge.

          • Mike Gordon

            Cutting edge and looking beautiful are two different things. The looks of a lens may be the most absurd topic have heard in 2015.

            • verytoxic

              U and I must have been born in different times and perhaps even different universes. An ugly took is still an ugly tool. There is no excuse that in 2015 such ugly tools are produced.

            • verytoxic

              U and I must have been born in different times and perhaps even different universes. An ugly took is still an ugly tool. There is no excuse that in 2015 such ugly tools are produced.

  • Ric Hammond

    A brand ring that’s tinted “Luminous Gold” adorns the lens just above the lens mount. On one side of the lens barrel there is an SP emblem in the same luxurious color

    Now we’re talking!!!!!!

  • Ric Hammond

    Design of the front face of the lens is also taken into consideration so that it is not intimidating.

    I was frightened for a minute

  • scott800

    Cannot wait to see how the VC performs on these lenses for video shooting

  • Captain Megaton

    The sample photos are impressive. Really nice.

    Looks like Tamron is following Sigma’s ART series, both in style and positioning.

    • Mike Gordon

      And the awful bokeh…

      • Captain Megaton

        I like it. It has a look, and yeah I can see the similarities with the Sigmas here. What would you call it: synthetic? greasy? Maybe not everyone’s cup of tea I guess but I’ve seen awful and this is not awful.

        • Mike Gordon

          The 45 looks like shards of glass in the backgrounds with the bushes.

          • Captain Megaton

            There is a bit of jaggedness at the middle distance backgrounds, true … smoothes once the objects gets a bit more defocused though (see fourth example from the 45, above). Pretty typical for fast primes with aspherical elements.

    • $98/HOUR JOBS BY GOOGLE

      $98_per_hour special report!!!!……….After earning an average of 19952 Dollars monthly,I’m finally getting 98 Dollars an hour,just working 4-5 hours daily online….It’s time to take some action and you can join it too.It is simple,dedicated and easy way to get rich.Three weeks from now you will wishyou have started today – I promise!….HERE I STARTED-TAKE A LOOK AT…..ig…….

      ================= www.Jobs367.com ☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣

  • verytoxic

    These are gorgeous looking lenses. Aesthetically alone, these lenses should cost $2K a piece.

    • Mike Gordon

      Surprised you do not have all the Sigma Art lenses already.

      Extra $1000+ for looks, WoW just wOw!

  • pyktures

    has focus scale… without hyperfocal marks… that’s basically just for aesthetics not useful at all lol.

  • AYWY

    Tamron seem to be positioning these just shy of Sigma’s f/1.4 primes to attract people looking for a “premium prime” with a better balance of price, weight and performance. Close focus performance is a draw too.

    Would have been interested in the 45mm but the current 50mm G is 3 times lighter… difficult to pass that off. And that extra 5mm would have been nice for some more differentiation to a 35. (Although some have mentioned that SIgma’s 50s are really closer to a 45) As intrigued as I am, not picking it up. Maybe if I ever need that focal length for anything commercial…

    Would be nice if Tamron stepped up to fill the 135mm gap that Canikon have been ignoring. It seems like both companies have decided that people who need that focal length should be picking their 70-200 f/2.8 or f/4 to be more practical instead. Or their 200mm f/2 if extreme bokeh is needed…

  • nhaler

    Something still irks me about shelling out $600 for a 35mm f1.8 lens, when a 50 1.4 is about $480.

    • Michiel953

      I see your point.

    • Captain Megaton

      Photons cost more the further you get from 50 mm. 😀

  • Hardcore_Fanboy

    600 $ for third party (read – a value drop) 1.8-ts ?? VC in this flocal range – should someone do a lot of 1″ to 0.5 sec exposures?

  • ElDiablo

    Is it me or they look a lot like the Sigma Art series???

    • Michiel953

      Everyone knows that Tamron designed and makes the Art series.

      • doge

        We do? Where’s your sources on that?

        • Michiel953

          Don’t you read Chinese business journals?

          • Paco Ignacio

            Any reliable source?

      • fjfjjj

        Everyone knows they didn’t. Don’t you read Korean business journals?

        • Michiel953

          On a daily basis (albeit, North-Korean only); must have missed that particular snippet of news.

  • milkod2001

    Does Tamron has fine lens tune dock similar to the one from SIgma?

  • Michiel953

    Perfect primes for a D750.

  • Shutterbug

    German photographers Krolop & Gerst, who already tested both lenses, state, that they in fact are superior to Sigmas 35mm Art lense. They have samples taken with Canons 5Dsr over at http://blog.krolop-gerst.com/technik/tamron-35mm-45mm-f1-8-di-vc-usd-sp/

  • Deryk

    Are both these all metal bodies?

  • Neopulse

    People are commenting more about the 35mm, but I can’t help, but find the focal length of 45mm more intriguing. The 15-30mm Tamron surprised me also. I think they are going the ART style route with these lenses.

  • I’ve seen a lot of nasty corner bokeh from a lot of wider-than-50mm fast primes, and I gotta say this is looking really promising. I’ll definitely be trading in my hefty, pricey Sigma 35 Art for this if it is approximately the same sharpness.

    If it actually comes through on the claims of low / negligible coma, vignetting, and field curvature, this will be my absolute dream lens, and I’ll eagerly await Tamron adding a hopefully equally awesome 24 and 85 to the lineup…

  • $98/HOUR JOBS BY GOOGLE

    $98_per_hour special report!!!!……….After earning an average of 19952 Dollars monthly,I’m finally getting 98 Dollars an hour,just working 4-5 hours daily online….It’s time to take some action and you can join it too.It is simple,dedicated and easy way to get rich.Three weeks from now you will wishyou have started today – I promise!….HERE I STARTED-TAKE A LOOK AT…..ig……..

    ================= www.Jobs367.com ☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣☣

  • Back to top