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First set of Nikon D610 specifications: same as the D600

Nikon-D610-logo
The first set of Nikon D610 specifications I received are 100% identical with the current D600 model:

  • Sensor: 24.3 MP (6016 x 4016 in L mode)
  • ISO range: 100-6400
  • AF: 39  focus point, 9 cross type, 33 point available at f/5.6
  • Viewfinder coverage: 100%
  • TTL exposure metering using 2,016-pixel RGB sensor
  • Video recording capabilities: 1920 x 1080 30p/25p/24p
  • LCD screen: 3.2", 921k dots
  • Battery: EN-EL 15, using the same MB-D14 battery grip
  • Dimension: 141 x 113 x 82 mm
  • Update #1: the D610 will not have built-in GPS or Wi-Fi capabilities
  • Update #2: the D610 will have 6fps (compared to 5.5fps in the D600)
  • Announcement on October 7th or 8th

Please note that this does not mean that there may not be some other improvements that are not mentioned in the list above - I am still trying to get some additional information. The fact that the D610 body size will be the same indicates that this may really be exactly the same camera, just with improved shutter mechanism (just like the SB-900->SB-910 update I mentioned few weeks ago).

In the meantime the price of the D600 continues to fall - Sammy's is currently selling it for $1,799:

Nikon-D600-another-price-drop
Check also the Amazon listing as I expect different retailers to start driving the price even further down after Nikon is no longer enforcing their MAP policy for the D600.

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  • D610 fan

    :)

  • robert

    meh..

  • Jake

    When is an official release expected?

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I believe in the next 30 days but I do not have an exact date. Nikon have changed the way they do announcements and I have to adjust my “research” accordingly.

      • Sebastien Girard

        Are you confident that those specs are 100% real?

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          not 100% but 90%

      • D600fan

        this rumor has the reliability of a dwarf dressed as Superman . The D610 will come out no earlier than September 2014, and however after the new D800.

  • cat

    d600 price is as low as $ 1520 in taiwan

  • Alberto

    It doesn’t seem a good idea…Maybe the AF zone is larger than in D600

    • Levi

      Yeah, the AF system is my main concern about D600 as well.

      • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

        If you set your camera to back-focus, and put it in AF-C mode, the tiny focus area really isn’t much of a problem. Very fast and reliable in low-light, high motion environments. flawless in good conditions, and best of all, it’s entirely predictable after a few hours of shooting.

        With the default focus settings, I always feel like I’m fighting with the focus on a D600 or D7000.
        Backfocus = problem solved.

        • robert

          back-focus?
          what do u mean?

          how o u do it?
          ty

          • http://kyleclements.com/ Kyle Clements

            In the menus, find “assign ae-l/af-l button” – change to “AF-ON”
            Now, The AE-F/AE-L button controls focusing.

            Disable the “shutter half-press = AF” option.

            now the shutter will meter and shoot whenever you push it down, and the back button will focus. now you’ll never get stuck losing a shot that you already have in focus because the camera wants to try to focus again.

            Keep the AF system in AF-C mode, so when you hold the button down, you have continuous AF, but as soon as you let go – it functions just like AF-S.

            This is great for metering, focusing, then re-composing at fast paced events like weddings or concerts.

            • fred

              Glad you clarified!
              Most people think of ‘back focus’ as a poorly calibrated lens issue.

              I do as you do, works very well in low light situations, less hunting.

            • http://www.naturalvolo.it/ michele perillo

              This works well also with birds with a confused background. No more misfocusing for a stupid straw in front of the subject either!

  • presidentNikon

    Stupid Nikon fails again.

    Should have put in the new 50 mp sensor. new processor, ISO 50-60k native, 4k video, 82 pt. AF, and 4″ LCD.

    I’m buying Fuji.

    • Aldo

      you forgot waterproof…

      • Allwet

        How is that a joke..? Nikon is making water-proof cameras these days in their N1 series! =P

        • Aldo

          May as well make the Swiss knife of cameras…

    • IslandNature

      I didn’t know Fuji had a 50mp sensor. Their build quality for the X100s, XPro and X-E1 is really good though, Nikon might learn something there. I really like my X100s but my go to camera is definitely the D600. If Fuji ever produces a FF camera, I’d be very tempted.

      • Markus Arike

        Hah. I used to have an X-Pro1 and now have a D800. The X-Pro1 is a nice camera, the D800 is a million times more solidly made.

        • sperdynamite

          A million times is a lot of times.

        • IslandNature

          Was comparing the X100s to the D600 – I’d hope that for the extra $2K you’d be getting a better build with the D800.

          • Markus Arike

            The D600 is an entry-level FF DSLR for which Nikon had to cut corners in order to be able to offer it at for at near $2000. But it feels quite solid.

            The X100s is well-made, but even the LCD at 460 K is a lot lower than the D600s 920K panel.

            The X-Pro1 is the top of the line X-mount camera. What’s the top-of-the-line Nikon?

            • StarF

              D4 is too expensive, but it still a exclusive camera that someone can afford :D

        • Aldo

          I used to drive a Tesla but then got a Ferrari… I like the Ferrari a lot better!

    • Andrew

      That is so yesterday’s technology! Unless they interpolate that ISO 50k to ISO 200k… including the specs you outlined, I am not touching that thing!

    • Grey Chen Junyang

      What about an MF sensor that uses FX lenses, edge to edge PDAF to -6 EV sensitivity, 20FPS burst with 150 RAW buffer plus IEEE 802.11ac open standard wifi transmitter?

      I’m buying Olympus.

  • bgbs

    It’s been a year already, they should be releasing D650 to fix the dust issue, thats worth 10 points, and add/upgrade four more features worth 10 points each, and now you got a D650 camera that everyone wants.

    • Ovidiu

      You got me thinking: Nikon has three more names left for FF: D400, 500, and 900. Therefore, I think they’re f****ng up on purpose, so they can come up with +10 increments to their existing products :) So it’s not that they’re not able too produce high quality ff cameras is just that they’re running out of names.

  • Aldo

    *sad face

  • Lee

    DARN!! Was really hoping for 51 AF points, like the D7100. Really like the D600, but this does not seem to be an improvement at all.

    • skaarj

      And spread across the entire area along with 1/8000 shutter and 1250 sync.

      • n11

        1/8000th shutter speed isn’t as important as having the AF spread across the entire viewfinder as you mentioned. That’s probably my biggest gripe with the camera.

      • instamatic

        Agreed. The AF points spread across the entire focusing area is sorely missing on Nikon DSLR, and AFAIK Canon too. I find that detrimental to my type of photography (photojournalism and portraiture). In that sense I like the D300 very much, still getting tempted to buy one, but hoping for a D400 soon. I’m less concerned about flash sync speed, however I fully understand why that is a problem as well, since I used to use off-camera speedlights before I opted to learn more subtle techniques of natural light photography.

        • Archer

          If you want to use DX and FX modes in the same camera you would have to develop a whole new AF module where in DX and FX different AF points are used. The way its currently done is cheaper and more universal with the added advantage of the same number of AF points for DX and FX. Sure total coverage with 51 points would be nice, but at what price? Although I’ve missed the coverage a few times I could work around it. I’ve yet to miss the 51 point AF from my D300s. Those extra points are just gimicks to me

          • Guest

            Wouldn’t be difficult programming logic as
            IF DXMode=True THEN
            AFPoints = (1,….,21) Else
            AFPoints = 1,…..,39

    • Markus Arike

      Unless I’m missing something, these specs are only a rumor, not etched in stone.

      • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

        I feel pretty comfortable about those specs, I just don’t know the rest.

        • KT

          What I don’t understand is if Nikon never really admitted to the oil spill problem, how could they come out a year later with an identical camera, under a different name and expect people to just buy it. Don’t they have to give an explanation for the name change or at least add a set of new features to give the impression of a revision/update?

          • koenshaku

            Exactly that is like releasing the D7000 then the D7100 having the same 39AF points. Anyone no point in bickering I am glad I saw the specs anyway. Would be nice to have something in between the massive sensor of the D800 though…

          • Thom Hogan

            Yes, they do. To justify a new model number, there has to be a change. How significant that change is will determine whether people think this is just an attempt to get past the D600 shutter debris problem or a real product iteration.

            However, we have the past to look at. The SB-900 had a well-known issue with overheating. The SB-910 really only addressed that one thing. No admission that the SB-900 was a troublesome product, just a blatant move to get to a troublefree product name, basically. The D610 is sounding an awful lot like the same thing, unfortunately. Nikon is risking something new, now: that “adding 10 to a name means they had a defective product.” At some point, people stop buying the 00 version of the products ;~). Sort of like the old “wait until version 3″ thing that Microsoft users did.

            • ric

              similar with AUTOCAD. the rule of thumb was to skip every odd number release

            • fred

              Similarly with Microsoft OS’es. Every second one flakey.

              98 ok, WinME bad, WinXP ok, Vista bad, Win7 ok, Win8????

            • Vin

              I think we can look back many years to see similar quick change reaction, either due to sudden improvement in technology or fault in mechanism. N2000-n2020, n8008-n8008s, D300-D300s, . I think this has been a similar business practice for decades. I think there will be at least some minor change.

            • Thom Hogan

              Don’t necessarily disagree. The N90 versus N90s is another example. But the D300 -> D300s was more an attempt to extend the life of a product than anything else, and why would the D600 need any life extension at the moment?

              Nikon seems to be completely oblivious to the Internet and the impact it has upon perceptions. Look at how many of the first responses here were “covering up” versus “improving the camera” in nature. I reiterate: Nikon may run the D610 into an area they will regret: that it’s no longer perceived that buying the 00 version of something is a wise move.

              Thing is, when sales were ever expanding upwards, losing one percent here and one percent there on something you did that was perceived wrong is probably okay. But sales are headed downwards now, so even if only one percent decide that there’s something amiss in Nikon’s offerings that could translate into an acceleration of declining sales.

              Put another way: you can do dumb things and make mistakes when you’re growing rapidly, but if you’re just trying to tread water, even a small wave can be dangerous. (Yeah, I know, mixed metaphor.)

            • Vin

              Interesting points you bring up, the D600 may have been rushed, there is defiantly a much quicker demand for product responses to competition. I think in this case Nikon was working on being #1 to the more affordable FF enthusiasts camera. This might have caused the errors in the shutter problem.

              We in the audience can defiantly criticize the production, weather its actually a defective part or product that could have been produced better.

              It does seem as though Nikon ‘s quality control and R&D works alone in a glass bubble. Only really responding to there rivals. It reminds me of a Coke PepsiCo rivalry. When Coke came out with “New Coke” and ultimately They had to go back to Classic Coke.

              The D600 seems like “The New Coke”

            • Thom Hogan

              I’m not so sure about “quicker responses.” While I’ve written words similar to that at times, I think the actual need by Nikon is make more predictable product drops and for those to be better thought out in terms of user needs, not just a mismash of more megapixels and some new features no one uses.

              The missing D400 is a good example. The fact that it is now completely off the usual Nikon update pattern is a big problem. As other cameras fill in the areas around it, it will need to be an even more distinguished update when it eventually appears.

              What’s missing in all of the camera companies except perhaps Fujifilm’s APS mirrorless efforts, is a strong sense of where they’re headed and why. But even Fujifilm is now muddying the waters with cameras like the X-A1 and the XC lenses. As you note, the problem is a disconnect from the users, who have no access to the glass bubble.

            • Theodoros Fotometria

              As I’ve many times mentioned to you Thom in our private (by mail) conversations, a DX D400 was never in Nikon plans… After all for many years now, 3digit even starting number means FX, while 4digit odd starting number means DX… (I believe this is common sense that will not change until Nikon will decide to change their naming policy many years later). So, FX D400 is what should be expected in the near future… OTOH, I doubt that D610 will only be a D600 with no issues at the shutter mechanism given that D600 was a much overpriced product… In fact I believe that it will be a much better specified camera (priced at D600 price), while D600 will drop in price to a much lower level and the two cameras will continue in production, until D400 (FX) will finally replace D600! Even if Nikon would have to change the shutter for a non issue one. they wouldn’t introduce a new product to do so… This is bad marketing, they are not so naive.

              P.S. Remember FM-2, FM-2(n) & FM-2 (n2)? …n & n2 never changed the naming of the camera. If they where to only replace the shutter, they would never change the name of the product.

            • Thom Hogan

              And as I’ve replied to you many times, you’re wrong. Nikon has prototyped a “D400″ and tested it, and there have been at least two different versions. Whether or not Nikon has changed their numbering scheme remains to be seen, but there’s no evidence that they have to date.

            • Theodoros Fotometria

              What do the numbers say Thom? What D300S and Canon 7d sell together and what (the more expensive) D600 & 6D sell? …what if the D600 would cost 1500? …what it would sell then? …and what a full metal body D300S replacement would cost? ….if a D9000 will ever exist Thom, it will never be a D300S replacement, it will be a camera designed with priority to video users because this is what Nikon lacks than competition and because they believe (and they are right) that video is better done with APS-c… D400 will be an FX camera down from D610… and if Nikon will drop D600 value down to the same price level (1500 or about) and keep in production along with D610, it will be some more time before the D400 comes to replace it.

            • Thom Hogan

              The numbers say that Nikon sold more D300’s in the first year than Nikon has sold D600’s in the first year.

            • Theodoros Fotometria

              What that has to do with anything? …there was no FX alternative at those days! People had to buy the D3 at more than double the price! …besides, you don’t answer to any of the above.

            • Thom Hogan

              For 11 months, then they could buy a D700. So let’s step forward and then you’ll see what “that has to do with anything”: When the D700 came out, the D300 still outsold it.

              The D600 has dipped down to as low as US$1700 in the US as it is. That didn’t tangibly increase the sales, probably because too many people think it’s a problematic release and it’s a consumer grade body, not pro. Watch carefully where Nikon prices the D610. I’ll bet it’s back at the US$2100 price point, and I doubt there’s enough difference between the two to keep the D600 in production. Thus, any price decrease on the D600 will be that thing Nikon has to do a lot of: inventory purging. They still have D90’s in stock in the US, for heaven’s sake.

              As to your other questions, I’ve answered them elsewhere when you’ve challenged me on this, but I’ll answer the main one again for the others reading this: Nikon would make more profit on a D400 priced at US$1700 than a D600 priced at US$1700. The metal body frame and sealing is a far smaller parts cost than the full frame sensor.

            • Theodoros Fotometria

              A bookmark for the last statement… Nikon will never make a pro body DX anymore, there will be an FX D400. I guess we’ll soon have the answer….

            • ANP-Al

              Thom is right – a metal body/sealed D400 fills a professional shooter need: A 300s with a 300/2,8 can be made to shoot better pix than a D3s/D4 with a 400/2.8 or 500/4 because you can easily travel with it and easily hand-hold shoot it. It is also VERY cost effective, and that is important these days. You can’t hang a big lens off a plastic body so the 7100 is out. You simply get better shots if you can move the lens quickly and crop frame gets you there.

            • Andrew

              OK, I agree that coming out with the D610 with only minor or at worst negligible improvements will be a bad move on Nikon’s part. And I agree that even if 1% but more likely 3% of their customers do not feel confident in a Version “x.0″ release, the consequent profit hit could be significant. The more time your customer has to think about purchasing your new product the more likely they may not purchase it at all and decide to wait for the next model or at worst are later induced to buy your competitor’s product. So much purchasing is based upon emotion and as a company you do not want to do anything that would cause your customers to pause in purchasing your new product!

              If Nikon is taking a risk in maintaining a more aggressive product release cycle, then it is also likely that the newer features may attract new customers to Nikon – like in the likely case of their recently released Nikon 1 AW1, an underwater camera. I would buy this camera because of its ruggedness and waterproof encasing not because I care about underwater photography, but because I can take it everywhere and not worry if I accidentally drop it in the pool or am totally soaked in rain water.

              Now we all know that Nikon released the D6, D7100, D5200, and D3200 with no quality control issues. I think the oil leak with the D600 which for most of the cameras clears out after 2,000 shots – though it is an unfortunate incident, will make Nikon a better company moving ahead. There is good reason for this thinking. The first thing is that all eyes are on Nikon’s quality control department. Their job is to help the engineering team and not undermine it. And I hope they know that quality control is an iterative process. In other words, any minor change – even if it is a last minute change that appears trivial – must result in them subjecting the camera through an entirely new battery of tests. What if the camera was thoroughly tested and at the last minute some genius engineering manager decided to change the viscosity of the oil (resulting in good fluidity but detrimental effects)?

              We know there are somethings that are not easily perceived when it comes to quality. If an item is designed to last for 7 years and it lasts for 5 years, most people may not complain especially when the warranty extends for only 90 days or 1 year at most. Five years later when it fails, they may not have realized that the equipment did not meet its manufacturing specs. Now the easiest batteries of tests to perform is to take a lot of pictures after production and determine if the quality of the pictures are up to the camera’s specifications. These cameras should be sent to a large army of professional photographers instructing them the types of things they should look for, and encourage them to also test for new scenarios. Even when the camera enters into full scale production, continue to test vigorously. The reason why the tests should continue is because certain machinery may miscalibrate themselves due to vibration in the manufacturing process, but also to make certain that parts from suppliers continue to perform according their specifications.

            • Thom Hogan

              The lubricant problem isn’t the real problem. The real problem is the shutter itself. We now have pretty clear evidence that some number of D600’s had defective shutters (statistically higher in early replacement than any other previous Nikon DSLR in life failure it appears, even the higher volume consumer ones). The lubricant and debris problems reported by people appear to be symptoms, not the actual problem. Moreover, excess lubricant should be an easy enough issue to catch and shut down. Nikon themselves should have caught it in their own early use of the camera.

            • Heinz

              I don’t understand, what defective shutters have to do with the dust problem on many D600s. I don#t know anybody who had a shutter problem, but i do know many who have dust issues.

            • Thom Hogan

              The speculation goes like this: the shutter mechanism has part of it that is peeling or shedding material as it is used. Note that the “dust problem” with the D600 is highly specific to one area of the sensor, which means that the source of that material most also be specific. Moreover, on examination, the “dust” actually isn’t dust (which would tend to be circular gray of a certain size): it’s debris of irregular size and shape.

            • paul

              I was living in Los Angeles when I ordered my refurb D600 from Adorama. It had dust issues after about a week and 2000 images. I took it to Nikon’s repair facility directly (it was 2 miles from my apartment in West Hollywood), and the representative that I spoke to told me that simply “cleaning the shutter would be a waste of time, because the issue is the shutter itself scraping against another part and shaving off particles.” Because of this, they had to replace the whole mechanism.

              All said and done, it took them about 8 days, but I haven’t had an issue since! The D600 is a FANTASTIC camera, and even more so at the ridiculous price it is now!

      • Aldo

        Where have you been? This site has almost turned into facts only… I don’t recall the last rumor…

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          I somehow missed the rumors about the last Coolpix announcement.

          • Aldo

            I forgive you… just vote up my comment and we are even…

            • Duncan Dimanche

              Aldo you are spending wayyyyyy too much time on this post….. let go of your pc/tablet or phone and go out and shoot some !!

              Cheers

            • Aldo

              You are right. This d610 watch don’t seem to pay off. I only shoot Saturdays though. I should shoot just for fun.

    • koenshaku

      Same here.. That just cements my purchase of the D800 unfortunately.. I wanted the FPS of the D600, but the with the -2EV focusing sensitivity that is a deal breaker for me. I didn’t like a couple of the bugs that were in the found in the D800 with the green hues that are more prevalent at higher ISOs yeah I know you can adjust the white balance for it. I just would have preferred grab and go auto.

      • Robert

        As far as I know (as a D800 user since May 2012) the bugs have all been sorted out. The slight green tint that you could see under some conditions in the D800 pictures were corrected in the firmware release A 1.01, B 1.02 released 2013-04-02.

        • koenshaku

          Well that is great to hear!

          • fred

            Ha-ha, as the other guy said, what did we learn today kids? Nikon release firmware updates for a reason! and if you READ what they fix (ie: D800) then your reason NOT to buy may have disappeared!

    • MyrddinWilt

      I think it rather unlikely the D600 is going to offer the D800 autofocus system.

      What might have been a rather more achievable upgrade is to add on the GPS and Wifi capabilities that are going to be considered essential in a couple of years time just like video has become.

      And no, the opinions here don’t matter, the opinions of the guy who picks up a box in Costco matter much more. Costco adds the wifi receiver in their package because they understand that there is demand.

      • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

        I was also speculating that the D610 will have GPS and/or Wi-Fi but now I think that it will be basically the same camera as the D600, just with a new shutter. Nobody can tell me what the difference will be.

        • Andrew

          If it is the same camera then that will be a bad marketing move by Nikon. The best way to get people to think beyond your recent problems is to put their minds on something new and different. Get them excited about some new feature on this camera. We all know that Nikon is capable, buy are they willing to lead the market. If they do not come out with something exciting, most people will not upgrade their cameras unless it breaks-down or unless their camera is seriously outdated.

          • Jonas From Sweden

            Make it water proof down to 15 m, shock resistant from 2 m … :)

          • DK

            Bad publicity for folks that have already bought the D600, but it will be a good move by Nikon to sell to folks that have not bought the D600 because of spot issues in some models. There is absolutely no point in manufacturing new D600 bodies.
            So overall, with this (rebranded) D600 release they can now sell the same camera whose sales were slipping before.
            Not a bad move on Nikon part, but hopefully Nikon will honor complete fix on existing bodies that have issues.

        • RMFearless

          Who care about wifi, if nikon WirelessMobileUtility app remains the same crap?

          • Cyrille Berger

            You know that you can use it with other apps ?

            • RMFearless

              Tell me please, wich app should be compatible with D600 and wu-1b?

            • Cyrille Berger

              I haver personnaly used https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dslr.dashboard on android, and there are probably equivalent on iOS. The wu-1b use PTPIP which is more or less a standard (I say more or less, because the standard is poorly documented and the spec is difficult to get)

            • RMFearless

              Wow! You change my day. I have installed the application, it’s fantastic!!! Thank you man!

            • Remedy

              Now kids, what have we learn today? Do the fking research first before You post something ridiculous on the internet. Have a nice day Sir with new fancy app that surprisingly works.

            • PoisoNikon

              Your shutter plate unit will die soon. Prepare for this, child.

            • kj007kjolso

              Didnt find it on iOS AppStore, but the have iguanalapse which I think is a better application. Its not for free though ($10-12).

          • Trp

            just get shuttersnitch

        • MyrddinWilt

          I suspect that those upgrades will have to wait for an ‘s’ model.

          They really are a no brainer and it is hard to see what else Nikon could pull out to justify the mid-life upgrade.

          And of course people here will vehemently deny that WiFi is at all desirable so that they can get the best price possible when they flog their existing body the minute the new model comes out.

    • Theodoros Fotometria

      We are still to the rumour stage where nothing is certain… However, if D610 doesn’t replace the D600 but will go alongside with it for a while at different price levels (with considerable price drop for D600), I would expect the new camera to have much better specification than D600… My guess would be that D610 will have both an advanced AF system than D600’s, to also have a 1/8000 & 1/250 sync shutter mechanism and perhaps lack the AA filter from the sensor… In addition there might be surprises in its video spec and maybe in the cards department… (XQD maybe)? …we shall see.

      • Grey Chen Junyang

        I cringed at the possibility of XQD… that’s a hell of a HD DVD vs Blu Ray format war with no clear winner yet. As an events guy clinging on the D700 for dear life, all I need is a 1 button 100% zoom button, a 2nd function button and if possible – better AF coverage.

        • Theodoros Fotometria

          There is nothing common to empty cards with the pre-recorded media war… there is plenty of space for new (and safer) technologies for storage… Survival of media was never the issue for storage… only support can be a problem, but with the new multi=card readers coming, I hardly see how can the safest and faster recording media around fail.

          • Grey Chen Junyang

            you reply is quite convoluted, i didnt quite understand it. the issue is not support but standardisation. my first DSLR,2nd DSLR and 3rd DSLRs all used CF cards (400D, 40D, D700). With the rise of SD there was a new standard, but at least they’re the same across brands. With the XQD vs CFast, changing brands wouldn’t just be changing lenses only. it’ll be changing cards again, its just a great PITA

      • tifkat

        And what do you say now Theo?

  • rwmckenna

    So glad I waited, these price drops are just what I need to switch to FX!

    • Michi Fuz

      What about lens prices? The FF lens are very expensives! It’s not just about the camera.

      • rwmckenna

        with the exception of my 35mm/f1.8, I have all FX lenses because I knew I was eventually going to go that route. I just need a nice 50mm prime and I’m set!

        • Michi Fuz

          Well, that’s all :) Good for you! Enjoy!

      • http://www.intensitystudios.com/ Antonio Carrasco

        no, FX lenses are not much more expensive and have a complete line of lenses, where as DX is mostly crappy zooms

        • Riccardo

          I agree, I bought an 50/1.4 AFD, 24/2.8 AFD and 35/2 AIS for 500€, used but in really good condition, especially the last one. They are all pretty good lenses, and for the same price i can’t get anything similar on DX.

  • Michi Fuz

    I know it is FF, but anyway I got a feeling that a D7100 is a better deal. And im just talking about cameras here.

    • robert

      FF allows you to shoot at iso 6400. with DX, you cant go pass 3200 without heavy chroma noise and artifacts in the pictures. plus the pictures look so much better on a ff sensor for some reason. different sensor mfr as well. DX looks very flat.

      http://nikonrumors.com/2013/08/12/we-are-spoiled-nikon-d70-vs-d600-iso-comparison.aspx/

      see the video and you will see it. the highlights are better and shadows are also better. if you never owned a FF camera you wont understand why. its a different league.

      • Michi Fuz

        I will look the video. My only 35 is a F3 :)
        As you gues, i don’t own a FF, that’s why i saying that. At the point i am today a D7100 seems a better deal. Image quality aside, I feel that D7100 offers me more tools to improve.
        The exception are people like rwmackenna, who already have FX lenses.

        • robert

          a few months ago I got back to doing wedding photography. I had the d300 and was just about to purchase the d7000.

          my friend who I work with had a d3 that did 680k shutter clicks. replaced already under mack warranty. he gave it to me and I was shooting with it and said, the d300 is great and was shooting but kept going to use the d3 because even on the lcd the pictures look amazing. I couldnt understand what I was doiung wrong and then when putting those pics on the screen at home clearly saw the difference. the texture of the skin is so much more natural. its a different sensor and im glad he told me to wait and buy another ff.

          I shoot between 4000 to 6400 indoors and if you expose properly the grain is so minimal and almost complete free of chroma noise. no red and green artifacts in the noise at all. it just really looks totally different.

          yes I think dx gives great bang for the buck but its the sensor that pumps out the IQ and thats the bottom line. my only concern is the response time of the AF. af sensors being close together doesnt bother me as I really like single mode and one af sensor to work.

          its how I worked with the f5’s back then and I still love it like that,

          my friend uses the d4 with continuous af mode and that thing is from another planet. really amazing.

      • Tom Hunter

        The video compares a D600 to a D70. I’m sure there is a big difference between the D70 and the D7100.

        • robert

          yes its a bit better with the d7100 but on the whole dx has not advanced much over 10 years.

          if youre just a serious enthusiast then stick with dx, if you need to shoot in low light situations, ff is where its at. there really is no comparison.

          ff leaves dx behind from 1600 onwards. 3200 looks decent but I wouldnt even use it often unless I had no choice. with ff, you can shoot 4000 and go up to 6400 if you have no choice. just get the exposure correct and use good glass.

          • Thom Hogan

            > DX has not advanced much over 10 years

            I don’t have the D70 numbers handy, but the D40 was basically the same sensor:

            D40: 24% efficiency, 8e- read noise, 26151 saturation
            D7100: 52% efficiency, 1.1e- read noise, 29236 saturation

            Those are incredibly different levels of performance.

          • Thom Hogan

            > DX has not advanced much over 10 years

            I don’t have the D70 numbers handy, but the D40 was basically the same sensor:

            D40: 24% efficiency, 8e- read noise, 26151 saturation
            D7100: 52% efficiency, 1.1e- read noise, 29236 saturation

            Those are incredibly different levels of performance.

  • IslandNature

    For those of us “stuck” with the now devalued D600 (for the record, I haven’t had any problems with mine since the Nikon shutter replacement and love the images I can make with it) the same specs are a good thing. I’m now thinking that Nikon should offer a free “re-branding” for D600 owners – you can send it in and they’ll pull the shutter and replace the D600 badge with a D610 badge at the same time.

    • FDF

      Good, they’re just renaming the camera that got a little problem that was blown way out of proportion. It doesn’t devalue my D600 at all. D610 having the same specs means that D600 was done right except for that tiny problem that didn’t even show up in my photos.

      • sperdynamite

        Done right except that you can’t change the aperture in live view, 1/4000ths of a sec max speed, and the inferior view finder vs the D700. Not a happy D600 owner personally. But the D800 is not a wedding camera, and I’m a fool for thinking the D600 would be an improvement over my D700. Looking seriously at 5D Mark IIIs…

        • thecouchguy

          Yep, same here.

          • Idahojim

            Spyder sir I think you’re right Nikon does not make a camera in your desired price range that you would or could be happy with.

            Unfortunately I’m doubtful that Canon does either. You see the 5DMKIII is more expensive than the D800, you’d of course have to replace your entire stable of lenses and accessories, the file sizes really are only moderately smaller from the 5D, IQ is not better, high ISO differences are negligible, and the pro lenses are are too close for clients to visibly discern.

            Definitely looks like a no win situation for you. You have my condolences.

            • Thom Hogan

              Note also that the 5D3 isn’t in the same price range as the camera he bought (the 6D is; but that’s another consumer camera ;~).

              The bottom line is this: he could have bought either a 5D3 or D800 for about US$1000 more. In the case of the D800 he’d have to stretch a bit more for more drive space, and in the case of the 5D3 we have to assume he’d have to stretch for new lenses. Or he could have stretched another US$3000 to get a D4. Instead, he bought a consumer camera for pro work. He now blames Nikon for a problem he caused by buying low.

              I, too, don’t think that a 5D3 is the answer to his complaint. Not that the 5D3 isn’t a good camera–it is–but rather that he’s really redirecting his anger at Nikon for a decision he made for which he should have known better. The D600 didn’t suddenly develop a Live View problem AFTER he bought it: the camera was what it was from day one, and anyone investing for a business should have known what the compromises were to get to that lower price in the first place. You make the decision to accept those compromises for the discount, or you buy the right thing in the first place.

        • umeshrw

          If only I could vote up as well as down. Up for most of the post and down for the last sentence.

          • sperdynamite

            I gotta do what I gotta do. Where is the D700 replacement? Every wedding I shoot my D600 reminds me it’s not a pro setup. At the last wedding that stupid eyecup fell off and I had to go hunting for it. I was also shooting film and my F100 was just so much a better camera, save for the older AF system. Shoulda known sure, but I have no real upgrade option. If Nikon just isn’t going to make a product that I need, I have to find someone that will. I crop everything to 4:3 to match my 645 work and I like the extra pixels, but the D800 is too far in that direction. Most of my peers shoot with the 5D3 and they all seem pretty happy about it. Plus I gotta say I’ve been envious of those 1.2 primes (keep in my wedding work gets a little dreamy).

            • umeshrw

              I would say D800 more than matches 5d3 in wedding work.As for cards and Hdd space etc, I use sd for raw (14 bit compressed) and CF for jpegs. Saves a lot of money that way and no speed problem. PC has to be fast though. If you can put 1800 for D600 then 1000 more is ok for D800. As it is 5d3 is quite more pricey. As for 5d3 , DR and noise for 800 (and 600) is better till 3200 iso. Only after that 5d3 is better.As for those 1.2 primes, yes I also feel envious.

            • sperdynamite

              It’s just a way bigger file than I need. I just look at the 5D3 and see the file I want and the glass I want… If I stick with my Nikon setup I’m just sticking with compromises in what I really want.

            • Sundra Tanakoh

              Shoot Lossless Compressed and stop being a baby about file size.

            • sperdynamite

              A baby? It’s about hard drives, which translates into $. Clearly you don’t do this for a living lol. If you want to talk about file sizes we can start looking at my 8×10 drum scans.

            • Thom Hogan

              8TB of Thunderbolt drives is now at US$800. That’s 193,705 14-bit lossless compressed images, or a half of a penny an image for state-of-the-art drives.

            • Figgy

              I just bought two 4Tb USB 3.0 externals for US $360, and real-world tested they run about as fast as current TB.

            • umeshrw

              I just checked the file sizes for 5d3 raw. They average ( for max quality and about 400 iso) at 35 mb. D800 raw 14 bit lossless compressed files average at 42 mb. So not much of difference. If you want to still save space then you can always go all the way down to approx 28 mb approx for 12 bit lossy.( And other settings in between) I can say only one thing about space constraints. We can always add disks. The DR, size, sharpness and noise levels of an 800 file is worth the minor inconvenience.It was for me more so when I checked out 5d3 in a working scenario. Plus as for me the slow controls of canons always held me back from defecting in the trying pre 800 times. But dramatics aside check out the other quality settings and file sizes of both cams before deciding for jump.

            • Michael Sloan

              A friend of mine had the 85 f1.2 from Canon. He sold it because he had too many issues with the AF hunting on him. It seems the super shallow DoF can be problematic on the 5DMkII for AF. I would thoroughly test the combo of lenses you are interested in before making that leap. Also, I personally do not like Canon ergonomics, everything is in the wrong place; sure you can always retrain yourself over time.

            • Aldo

              5d3 is a good camera… but just like you feel now with the d600… every time you shoot with the mark 3 you could be reminded that you could be shooting with something better… a d800 =]

            • sperdynamite

              The D800 is not a wedding camera. I nor my clients require 36mp images of their drunk asses filling up my RAID. Nice images sure, but completely not what I need. Also why I don’t shoot weddings with an IQ180 and a Phase One camera, or snapshots with an 8×10 view camera. Wrong tools for the job. Nikon has decided they’re not going to make the right tools for my job this generation I guess. The D4 would be nice but it’s totally overkill, and pricey.

            • Aldo

              I have shot close to one hundred weddings with the d800… Trust me it is much more than a wedding camera… you just need to learn how to use it.

            • sperdynamite

              Oh once you learn how to use it the file size gets smaller than 36mp in raw? Genius! Or maybe that happens after the one hundred wedding mark? Or maybe I just know what’s best for my work flow and my business and you don’t. Yeah, that would be it. Cute trying to be condescending though.

            • Aldo

              yes… that is correct.. otherwise you would know you can shoot at 15mp raw =]

            • sperdynamite

              In DX, no.

            • Mr. Mamiya

              Check out the D800’s manual: It can save images in an image format called ‘JPEG’ that has less than 36MP! ;)

              I shot many weddings and events with my D800: Important and official stuff = RAW, drunken party shots that you won’t retouch heavily anyway: JPEG-M, ~20 MP, totally sufficient. Perfect so far.

              If I was a full time wedding pro I would probably prefer a D4 sensor in a D800 housing and shoot away in RAW 100% of the time, but my camera is for general purpose and the full 36 MP can be really fantastic for studio, landscape and architecture. Best camera ever!

            • Aldo

              I shoot at 20mp jpegs often as well… raw when I know the image will require higher DR than average…dx when I need a bit more reach without switching lenses or want a smaller raw (the best quality of an fx lens is at the center anyway) Anyway, a poser will never truly know how versatile and amazing the d800 is.

            • umeshrw

              True that. I do everything in raw. Just that for low priority work I switch to 12 bit compressed to save space. It is just a little bit more that HQ jpeg and I still get more than enough leverage for correcting over jpegs. ( I don’t pay a lot of attention towards colour while shooting. )

            • sperdynamite

              So you start out telling me to shoot jpeg but then your last paragraph you basically agree with me…

            • Thom Hogan

              Again, I’m having problems with your economics. A D4 instead of a D600 would have been US$4000 more. 40 weddings a year over three years works out to a D4 costing you US$33 a wedding over the D600. If you’re shooting more than that, the number is less. If you’re shooting fewer weddings than that, you’re not really a full time wedding photographer, IMHO. If your margins are so thin that you can’t figure out a way to recover US$33 a wedding, then I’d say you’re not really making money at weddings, either. After all, you’d be getting higher frame rates, better focus, and maybe even better low light results depending upon how you’re outputting. Plus you’d save on those pesky disk drives you’re complaining about being so expensive.

              When I hear this kind of complaint, what I’m usually hearing is someone who’s set up a low margin business and has no confidence they can push up margin. Picking a Canon camera over a Nikon one isn’t going to solve your fundamental problem. Indeed, it would likely just be another investment in gear that would erode your small margins at this point.

            • sperdynamite

              I’m a film shooter so my digital is less important to me than my Pentax 67II/645NII which I use for a lot of the day. The digital comes out in low light or in some kind of situation where I need the advantages of what digital has to offer. I like that D4 sensor but the cost is just not worth the investment for me.

              As for the D800, if ‘up my game’ is the same as ‘needlessly update computer components’ to suit a camera with specifications that I never asked for, then sure I could make it work. But why should I do that? That’s why I got the D600 in the first place. If I update my RAID I gotta buy 4x every drive, that gets expensive, so doing that just to be able to shoot 36mp files that I don’t need…well…again, why should I do that? I’m not shooting jpeg, it’s a waste of camera.

            • Thom Hogan

              What you just told me is that you’re shooting weddings with very high cost of materials (MF film and processing, maybe scanning) most likely because you’re trying to achieve high quality, yet you suddenly get extremely cost conscious for your low light work. That doesn’t sound right to me. Moreover, your cost of materials on a single wedding may be exceeding what those extra drives you abhor would cost you. Something just doesn’t feel right about your protestation here.

            • Mr. Mamiya

              So you shoot weddings on MF film where a single shot costs between 50 Euro-Cent and 1,50 Euro, depending on the actual format, 645 or 67, s/w or color. Scanning, prints and additional time not included. I don’t know about the cost in your country.

              May I ask how many rolls of film you typically shoot per wedding?
              But basically that means that you have customers that are willing to pay a big extra for that opposed to digital.

              And now you shoot a D600 @ 24MP because you can’t justify the additional storage cost opposed to a D800 @ 36MP? And what was so wrong with your D700 for late night shots that you sold it?

              Your camera decisions don’t sound very well-conceived to me somehow. ;-)

            • Michael Sloan

              Buy a Nikon D3S then…better ISO then the D4, 12MP = smaller files, great buffer, 100% OVF, great FPS, and vertical battery grip. Buy refurb and save. But then again you’ll probably complain about the files being too small. You’ll just have to wait until Nikon launches the D4X and the D900 (with D4 sensor) simultaneously.

            • Thom Hogan

              Right. It’s not a pro camera. Never has been. It’s a consumer camera, which is why Live View is the way it is (the part needed for real time aperture changing is missing on the consumer models; it’s one of the things that make them consumer models).

              The D800 was the D700 replacement, whether you want to admit it or not. I suspect that your objection is mostly one thing: 36mp. If you’re shooting JPEGs, I don’t see how that’s an objection at all, as you can just pick a different size. If you’re shooting NEF, well, yes, you’ll need to up your game on your computer to make it state-of-the-art, but you also have more cropping flexibility, better low light performance, more acuity, the potential for larger prints, and more.

            • sperdynamite

              I got the cropping with 24mp. Better low light is debatable, from what I see it’s the same. Potential for larger prints, sure, I’ll never make them though. My big prints come from medium format film scans which generally have a lower mp count. I’m not shooting jpgs.

              And if Nikon thinks that making it impossible to change aperture in live view is appropriate for a consumer camera, well that’s probably another reason why someone would choose a Canon Rebel, because Canon doesn’t castrate them out of the box. It’s little stuff like this that has me frustrated with Nikon. The crappy 1 system, their inability to make a competitive Coolpix, and now this generation of cameras that has my peers holding on to their D3s’s and D700s… I just don’t get it.

            • Thom Hogan

              If you’re not seeing the difference in low light between the two, then something is wrong with your exposure/post processing.

              D700: 38%, 5.3e-, 58,111
              D600: 53%, 2.8e, 76,231

              That’s actually a fairly big differential in underlying ability at the sensor.

            • Groosome

              I certainly agree with the point about aperture in live view. How stupid to omit when everyone was hoping for that before the D600 came out and still today if they haven’t gone to Canon. Although as I always say only Nikon makes full frame cameras with a built in flash!

            • Marco Santa Cruz

              A professional will shoot with what he has. A camera is a tool to be manipulated to make what one needs.

            • sperdynamite

              iPhone for the win.

            • saywhatuwill

              Isn’t that what a D4 was made for? To give you peace of mind and confidence in your equipment?

            • sperdynamite

              I would say that the D4 was made for sports and some press shooters. I would also say that every Nikon should give you peace of mind and confidence in your equipment, within reason.

            • instamatic

              I agree. I also own the F100 and it’s probably my best camera – except that it’s using film so I can’t use it all the time. It is so well rounded and robust that I feel it is the least intrusive into the photographic process of any of my cameras, the D700 being closely behind that. The F100 in my opinion truly has the capability of becoming an extension of the mind of the photographer. With the D700, the autofocus gets a bit in the way for me.

        • Grey Chen Junyang

          good luck with the 5d mk3. I came from the Canon camp and I know they like to screw you over twice as much as Nikon’s little sniggles ever does. The 5d mk3 exists only because the D800 pwned it big time.

          I started with a Canon 40D and looked in envy as Nikon’s DX D300, D300s, D7000 got better and the Canon DX got worse. When I decided to get FX 5D mk1, mk2 and 6D all fail in the AF department and the 5D mk3 cost as much as a D800. Starting out as a student I got a D700 and never looked back.

          Sure the 5Dmk3 might look better for events now, it won’t be for long. And as others have said, if you’re doing this for a living… seriously what is the cost of a new PC/HDD versus new workflow and new set of lenses?

          Heck. Without changing system you can get a D3X and not live with any compromises.

          Addendum – list of Canon fails I’ve seen:
          40D was the best DX camera for years.
          50D = downgrade in ISO speed and frame rate
          60D = complete downgrade to consumer use
          7D = cost a bomb and still a downgrade in ISO whilst Nikon D7000 ISO is entering FX range

          5D mk2 = same AF as the ancient mk1. Fine camera, people work around it but hell, D700 is older and better.
          6D = shit for AF and no external mic for video
          5D mk3 = good stuff finally but should’ve been the Mk2 and compared to D800, its still a shade paler in comparison

          • sperdynamite

            This is a weird set of arguments…

    • Aldo

      Though I was crossing my fingers for some other improvements… I think this pays respect to current d600 owners.

      • Groosome

        Respect would have been a product recall. If a users camera is fine as they claim then fine, don’t send it in.

      • Ovidiu

        So if somebody has to choose between a 600 and a 610, while specs are the same but the price will surely differ, what will be answer to his/her natural question “But why should I pay more for the same camera?”. I guess: “Because it works as its predecessor was supposed to in the first place”?

        I really don’t think Nikon will come out with a camera with the same specs. It would be so wrong on so many levels :)

    • saywhatuwill

      Just get some black tape and tape over the zeros. You’d have a D6 then!

  • Mandrake

    For Nikon’s sake that sensor better not get a single spec of dust if they aren’t changing anything else.

  • J

    Shame on you, Nikon. Ridiculous.

  • Markus Lajer Photography

    … I hoped for 1080 at 60fps, shutterspeed at 1/8000 and 51 focus points…

    • thecouchguy

      this.

    • Andrew

      How many companies have 1080 at 60 fps? It is mostly 1080i (or 1080 at 30 fps).

  • Daniel

    D610 has dust filter removed like the D800E has AA filter removed vs D800

  • Sebastien Girard

    Announcing an identical body is officialize that the D600 was a beta version… I’m so disappointed.

    • Eric Calabos

      Announcing an identical body is also a nightmare for marketing guys. How they should claim new model is improved, without approving the previous model was a fail?

  • Aldo

    I guess the only good thing that will come out of this is a greater price drop of the d600

    • John M

      Yup. It should make for some really nice deals.

  • nobody

    So Nikon are going to announce a new camera with the same specs as its predecessor? Hard to believe!

    • BlueBomberTurbo

      Canon does it all the time! ;)

      • nobody

        You mean the D610 is made by Canon? I’m confused now!

        • Daniel

          Yes Nikon made body but Canon designed sensor

          • Aldo

            canon also designed the shutter :P

        • BlueBomberTurbo

          I mean reusing old parts. Like that ragged 18MP sensor they even put in the EOS M. ;)

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I will say it again: only the above listed specs will be the same, I do not have the rest of the specs and they could be different.

      • itcrashed

        But let’s be real now, there will be nothing new. Just like the SB900->SB910 “refresh”.

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          I think you are correct.

          • Thom Hogan

            +1

          • Thom Hogan

            +1

          • R!

            I think they are fixing the shutter problem(hope so),but Its a new kind of technology they need to deliver,because my Nikons always have that problem and I always need to clean them every 3 or 4 month . ( specially if I use old AIS )
            Once again my Canons and my panasonics never had this problem,even If I had to clean one of my friends 5DMRK II once ,but the Camera was used evryday during 2 years before It gets 3 or 4 dots on It!!!

            conclusion:Nikons has a shutter problem and a non effective sensorcleaner .
            Besides this they still great cameras ,but you need to know how to clean them once a while .

  • Z

    Yep, just swapped out D600 name plate for D610 … and probably same original D600 price …

    • fred

      Yes, too easy.

      No more D600 stigma.

      A cheap QUICK fix!!
      We pay full price again.
      Nikon shares go up again.
      Marketing dept get raise.
      Engineers take holiday. Shoot with ‘new’ D610.
      ‘Wet clean’ sensor cleaning product sales fall away.
      C-Net.com have ‘new’ camera body to review. Is it better, oh yes! ;)

  • http://1000wordpics.blogspot.ca/ 1000wordpics

    The very last of the D600’s are going to be a great deal for whoever picks them up. It’s not like Nikon has been waiting until the D610 to sell a defect free camera, and even if the later units still have the debris issue, a decent discount will cure most worries. If it falls further below $1799, it will be a sweet deal indeed.

  • Marco Fiorini

    I moved from Canon to Nikon because the AF of the D700 (much better than 5d 1 and 2) since I couldn’t afford the 1D IV or 1DsIII. Now Nikon do a D800 with so many mp that is impossible to do wedding with without buying new Mac/PC, hard drive, bunch of big CF, etc… and a D600 with an AF that SUCKS (maybe is good for amateur photographer) and 1/4000th of a second. And even if I’m a pro I’m not going to drop 5500 euros in the only camera NIkon made with the brain. I think I made a really bad move moving from Canon to Nikon and giving my money to those guys that are going to produce a D610 to fix problems they never really admit, missing the chance to make a better camera than that piece of overpriced toy.

    • vice

      Don’t know what you are talking about…. d600 is a great camera…. Got 2 of them, working perfectly fine…. also have d800, all editing is done on 5y/o PC….(i 5, 16Gb ram, win7…)
      I think perhaps there is something wrong with people who switch boats in the first place….. just think about it for a sec….

      • Marco Fiorini

        I’m not saying it’s no good camera, I’m saying that it’s not good for working professional.

        Try to focus something that moves FAST and not in bright light with a side AF point of the D600. Try to edit from 2000 to 4000 images per week, and store it somewhere, with the D800. Try to do a portrait at f1.4 during a summer day with 1/4000th. (I’m not saying you should, but if you have to..).
        I think perhaps there is something wrong with people who can’t get the difference between working professional and amateur photographer.

        • Riccardo

          I find D600 AF pretty good even on side points, anyway if something moves REALLY fast as you say probably you can’t get it in focus even with a D800 or D4, or you cannot be able to press the shutter in time. But I can’t imagine that, and I have no idea of what do you mean for fast. No problems in terms of af speed on my D600.

          If you have to do a portrait at f1.4 during a summer day (my question is WHY? Yeah i know it’s just an example) you must use an ND filter on your lens. Or in the worst case you can recover the one stop difference (1/8000 to 1/4000) in post without problems, D600’s sensor is really amazing.

          In any case I agree that D600 is not really a professional cam, but no complains about shutter speed and AF

          • R!

            I say this is why Pro use most of the time in their no miss allowed shott the center point only and recompose.
            (you know this lil moove that we do when we moove fast to change te composition )
            I’d say that only one AF point is needed the point is to know how to use it,or not use it,because some time you have to focus with the aperture and know your distance to be sure so AF is not the point on getting the focus right aperture is also or almost more important,try landscape with an F0.95 aperture you will understand right away

        • R!

          Marco you are right and the 9 AF points that you are use to are the easyest way to focus and choose the points that you really want to get on focuss ,people that want lots of AF points dont get that point.
          I know that 51 is better for following objects on APSC but on full frame they cover a to small part of the frame so they’re no AF that is perfect ,personally I just use the exelent Canons 9 points AF points for people and 51 D300s or DX 39 on D7000 for mooving lil object far away like birds or sports action like kind of shoot!!
          you will never have a car fast like a ferrari and allroad abble like a range rover that’s just life.

  • Jozef Povazan

    Will the sensor have wipers installed against the oil drops?:) Any news of possible other FF like D4s/x in fall time Peter?

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      Nothing solid but I still think there is still a chance for a new D4 before the Olympics.

      • Jozef Povazan

        Let’s believe :) Thanks

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          Nikon always announces something before the Olympics games.

  • Jon Ingram

    Just as expected. It will be interesting to see what kind of nominal features they add in order to pretend like it’s a higher model. The deals on the D600 will be amazing…, good for some, infuriating for others.

  • jmb2560

    If this is just bug fixes, Nikon should call 600.1 or 601… ;-)

  • Ian Lee

    LOOOOOOOOOL this must be a Joke

  • FX wisher

    Admin, I know you are trying to get more and better information on specs, but please include trying to find out if they are expanding the 39 point focus grid from DX to a full FX spread. This is the only architecture weakness of the D600 IMO.

    I have been resisting a D800 purchase as I would have to learn that style of camera controls and considering I have a D7000 now, the D610 with a proper focus point spread would be a easy learning curve….. Love my U1 & U2 modes :) If no FX spread on focus points, then I personal would upgrade to the D7100 until I see what comes after the D610.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I doubt that they will do that.

    • Emceee

      The D800 has different quick switch modes, they just aren’t on the dials like on the D7000.

    • umeshrw

      D800 button layout is much better than D7000. So good that you wont miss u1 , u2 after a while. I am lovin’ it.

  • Time_is_Monet

    Hey guys. Oil is a feature of a high f/value — just like vignetting at a low f/value. It makes your pictures more “interesting.” If Monet were alive, he’d buy a D600. I’m pretty sure Nikon isn’t increasing ISO either, because graininess is also a feature. Why have perfectly sharp, smooth photos, when you can have grainy vignetting oil-blotched photos instead? Less oil, moire ISO please.

  • J Cortes

    So NIKON is going to try to pass off the D610 as a new camera? What a bad PR move (if they don’t improve upon the D600) . They should have admitted whole heartily their mistake and announced a recall on the D600 . Then if they wanted to come out with a D610 with improved features such as higher sync speed , live view aperture adjustment , better AF point spread it would of made some sense . It seems as if Nikon may have squandered an oppurtunity .

  • outkasted

    The damage has been done and the 610 without some major improvements wont entice those who have been waiting. I believe people will wait for he next full frame maybe D700 replacement. Thus another years wait. I just sent my D300 in for refurb anyways along with 28-70/2.8 and 80-200/2.8. Just a 1month before that I had my D700 refurbed and Nikon did a superior job. Well done.

  • Chris Weller

    If these specs are all the same, it’s pretty crappy of Nikon to bring out a whole new camera to fix the sensor oil issue. At least Canon has the integrity to recall their camera’s when there is a defect. Not impressed.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

      I agree, this should have been a recall. Obviously the problem was serious enough for Nikon to consider an update.

      • Pdt496

        No business will go through the expense of a “recall” unless the cost is offset by the risk of lawsuit. That is why most all recalls are for safety reasons. The D600 has an issue and Nikon has addressed this issue through their warranty service. Why would they issue a release to acknowledge an issue that only affects certain users. I don’t deny that some D600s have oil spots but when has Nikon refused to service a camera that has the issue?

        • Thom Hogan

          I’ll repeat: the risk that Nikon is taking is that people won’t be so fast to buy new products when they come out. We’re starting to see a pattern now, and if the D610 is just a relaunch, we’re seeing a second pattern, as well. Initial QA = poor. Fix = iterate the product by 10 and re-release.

          The one thing Nikon shouldn’t be doing right now is adding any additional friction to someone buying a camera. There just aren’t as many of those folks in the market any more, they’re highly price conscious, and now Nikon is conditioning them to be QA conscious, as well.

          People have been hounding me for being so hard on Nikon in the past year or so, but what I’m seeing is a trend that does not bode well for the future. Something is seriously wrong at Nikon when they botch high-end product intros. It’s one thing when the product costs US$200-300 (e.g. Coolpix). It’s an entirely different thing when people are spending US$2000-3000 to get cameras that shouldn’t have made it out of QA, and have design flaws that shouldn’t have made it out of engineering.

          The “cost” that Nikon needs to look at is the one of its reputation. Could it be that the D600 sales are lower than expected because of their own error? Denying a problem and re-issuing the product might just be seen through by the exact customer base that they’re targeting (e.g. sophisticated).

          There are still a lot of very good things about Nikon DSLRs. But we’re seeing execution errors (D7100 buffer, D600 shutter, D800 focus, D800 frame design, etc.) that are adding frictions into the decision to buy. At exactly the time when less people are buying to start with. Nikon needs to get on the other side of this problem, and fast.

          • dclivejazz

            It’s poor business practice not to be up front with your customers. I have had the oil/dust problem, which is recurring even though Nikon replaced my shutter. As I arranged to send in the camera the first time, the customer service person could not say anything about Nikon’s latest position on the issue. It sounded like she just wasn’t supposed to talk about it.

            Meanwhile, I’ve used my D600 to improve my photography skills and am considering what to get next because I feel I need two bodies (It was a drag to give up my camera for a month for the repair). I’m apprehensive about a D800 because of the left focus issue. I don’t feel I can trust Nikon. People who say these issues are just internet blather have reduced credibility with me because of my experience with the D600. Meanwhile, Nikon’s lack of forthrightness about their QC has me questioning continuing to invest in their system, although I will probably stick with them a little longer because I have so much invested in it already.

            BTW, if this is the real Thom Hogan, I’m having trouble getting connected to your site index, even though I can still get to your individual sites.

            • Thom Hogan

              The bythom.com site is having hardware replaced at the moment. It’ll be down until the new hardware is tested and reloaded.

            • dclivejazz

              Thanks for the info. Glad to see you weighing in here. Love your sites, too.

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              Thom, you don’t really need bythom.com, just hang here :)

            • Thom Hogan

              In a few months I’ll officially be at retirement age. I don’t need to hang anywhere ;~)

          • sperdynamite

            You just illustrated a lot of the subconscious reasons I have for wanting to switch sides. I think it IS a problem when the launch of bunch of crappy coolpix’s because that’s part of the brand, and the brand should be about quality. If the coolpix problem is now infecting the higher end cameras, well what’s happening over there?

          • R!

            Totally agree!

      • FredBear

        No, it wasn’t.
        Just a few ‘people’ running round doing their best to make the issue (that only some had) seem far larger than it was.

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          Trust me, it was not few people. Nikon would have not replaced the D600 with a D610 if there were only few people complaining. There were many returns and repair requests. MANY.

          • FredBear

            Trust me. I did the math and have reviewed the thing so damn much and the results come out the same every time. – there were some problems.
            Most people *complaining* about the D600 did not have, nor never owned a D600 – they had ‘heard’ the D600 had a problem.

            Many have said the problem is a defect of the camera – if it was they’d all have the problem and this is clearly not the case. I have had one for 10 months – no oil or dust – and I trust the source of this information ;-)

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              I believe you, I do think that Nikon did fix the problem, but they never came out publicly to announce that. As a result potential customers don’t know if they are buying a defective or a fixed camera. Nikon solution to that problem is to announce the D610.

            • Pdt496

              I dont have my head in the sand about the issues. I do think that they exist but are not near what they are made out to be. I dont own a D600 not because of the issues but mostly due to the price point for what you get. If it were $1500, which it may soon be, I would get one. But for $2k, I would rather get the D800 (which gets an undeserved bad rap due to the high MP). I cannot agree with Nikon’s logic here if the rumors hold true. I think that they will include GPS and WiFi to compete better with the Canon 6D.

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              I still think there will be no GPS and Wi-Fi. I could be wrong.

            • Pdt496

              So could I. I just wish they would keep GPS external and have it communicate through the hotshoe like Canon does.

            • Andrew

              Chris, you finally said it… Canon, Canon, Canon… all the way! So how many Canon cameras do you own? And what location at Canon do you work for? Maybe you can use some of the D600 oil to lubricate your Canon camera. You set the stage by posting many times about oil, and then you start talking about Canon… It appears that someone is desperate for more sales. Way to compete, wait until your competitor comes out with a new product and look for a point of attack.

              Canon must be proud of you!

            • umeshrw

              Hey . Stop that. If there is no darkness or bad or down (you get the idea) then what do we compare light or good or up with ?

            • fred

              If they DID introduce new Wifi and internal GPS features to the D610 AND it turned out flakey then that would be another PR problem, just more egg on face.

              No doubt the D610 is a fix, just ‘get it right’ so that with the guaranteed new shutter on the D610 the folks wanting a ‘good’ D600 can buy a D610 with confidence.
              Just like the SB-910 flash let people buy with confidence again.

            • umeshrw

              There is only one thing wrong with this logic. sb 910 cost a lot more than sb900.

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              I think the D610 will be priced the same as the D600 ($2000).

            • FredBear

              Thank you. You have some sense ;-)
              Strange how there are so many that believe that Nikon sat back for a year and chuckled over those having problems with the first batch(s) of D600’s.
              If one does a search for “dust oil sensor (make)” the most hits you’ll get turn up using ‘Leica’ for (make) – 10,800,000. Seems like the more someone pays for something the greater the amount of whining if it’s not 100% perfect.
              Substituting other brands:

              Canon: 942,000
              Nikon: 652,000
              Nikon D600: 61,000
              Interestingly using ‘dust oil sensor canon -D600′ (the (-) directly in front of D600 removes any results with D600 in the return) one gets 3,190,000 hits.

            • Thom Hogan

              Dust and lubricant issues have been a problem for DSLRs since they first appeared in the 90’s. There’s no doubt you’d get lots of hits for that in a generalized search. Even to this day I get constant emails about “what is this black splotch in my shots?” Try googling “D600 dust after 1000 shots” and see how many results you get (4.37 million).

              Your statistics here are meaningless to the hypothesis. The hypothesis is “some measurably high number of D600 bodies shipped with defective shutters.” I can tell you that out of the statistics I see for people who’ve returned D600’s to Nikon for cleaning, there’s a huge number that had their shutter replaced. Trying to get a definitive handle on a percentage has been difficult. In surveys I did last year after the D600 shipped, the number was well into the double digit percentages. I need to redo those surveys, but my sense from my In Box complaints is that the number would be far lower for more recent purchases.

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              I can do a quick poll on how many people had dust/oil spot issues on their D600.

            • Thom Hogan

              Your poll would be “anyone repond,” whereas I do nth person samples to predict to population.

              Still, it might be worth asking:
              A: Do you own a D600?
              B: If so, have you experienced excessive dust/oil?
              C: If so, have you had it checked by Nikon?
              D: If so, did they replace the shutter?

            • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

              My poll/survey account had some issues and I just was able to login. Will publish the survey online soon.

            • FredBear

              My stats are as good as anybody else’s out there – at least I’ve made an attempt rather than simply submitting to internet noise.

              Apart from the Google searches (which were far more precise than yours) that I’ve outlined I also looked on B&H, Adorama and Amazon reviews. The results are the same < 5% report an issue. An if one removes the "I've had my D600 for (specified time) and have no problems. However others have reported that they have a dust/oil problem" then the result is around 97% positive reviews.
              Then we move on to the major reviewers on the internet and get around a 10% 'dust/oil' problem *as experienced* – but wait, many of those with negative reviews were the major users like Lens Rentals (who don't see the problem as a defect) – so it's not unexpected if the early cameras did have a problem.
              So yes, I think my stats might well be more accurate than those collected at a single source like your email address.
              BTW, "D600 dust after 1000 shots" results in 0 (zero) Google hits. Removing the brackets results in 4.38 Mil – but that's a ridiculously broad search criteria.
              As a comparison lets just add Canon to this search in place of D600 and we get 4.58 Mil.
              Canon dust 1000 shots gets us to 82.2 Mil.
              As demonstrated (and as I started with) the way one searches does affect the results which is why I also checked the other resources.
              Ultimately, one way or the other, I have a 10 month D600 that has no issue with dust or oil (at least at the moment) and that's my overriding stat.

            • Thom Hogan

              1. Look at the results that query produces, the actual responses. Note how many of them are exactly to the point at hand here.

              2. Given that I’ve sold as many D600 books as anyone, have a Web site that has more serious Nikon DSLR users than just about anyone, and that I regularly do surveys of both, I can actually predict to population with some degree of reliability. While it was a flood of messages in my email that originally prompted me to begin surveying D600 owners (and D800 owners for focus issues before that), I don’t base my comments on anecdotal evidence as you seem to suggest I do (single source like your email address [sic]).

              3. I also have a D600 that has no dust issues. That doesn’t actually have any statistical validity other than for your own camera (and mine). Doing a one sample test is the easiest way to make invalid judgments on population. Moreover, you’re dismissing those that had the opposite experience: their one sample test said the opposite ;~).

              So far in what you’ve written, I haven’t seen anywhere that you’ve actually controlled for the variables at test here.

            • FredBear

              I’m sorry but your argument is also irrelevant.
              You have based your analysis on information that you have received via your email as you have said.
              As you have also admitted you haven’t specifically looked at the population as a whole in the interim period – meaning that your results are statistically biased towards the initial D600 release.
              At the same time we know that the majority of early D600 deliveries went to the US – and thus these results, again, are specific to a limited original population.
              Your website is ‘US-centric’ thus the feedback you get is geographically flawed (unless you can actually produce a detailed list of your ‘viewers’ and there global distribution) – as per the precluding paragraph.

              You have also failed to take cognisance that a purchaser of a defective $2,000 camera is 10 times more likely to complain ‘publicly’ (read via the web of to your website) than those who have no such problem.
              Cognisance of the internet flora who just love to complain and take advantage of their ‘fanboyism’ is also not adequately addressed in perpetuation of the web hysteria.
              Then one also has to assume that Nikon just sat around and did nothing about something which would be seen to be a ‘major problem’ in the days after it’s launch.
              I have done as much as I can without absolute values, across a broad spectrum of sources (more than any I’ve seen). Thus I don’t see anything better out there – and no matter how many books I may write I doubt it would make a difference to Nikon R&D and QC.
              Yes, I know who you are. I also know who Obama and Kerry are. When I see something wrong I don’t back down no matter who the personages are. Sorry.

              Ultimately you have D600 with no issues, as do I. If you trust me and I you, then the problem doesn’t exist ;-)

            • Thom Hogan

              I think you discount the regular and on-going surveying I do. My email really only alerts me to things I might want to ask about via surveying.

            • FredBear

              Thom,

              I know you do on-line surveys as I do visit your website and I do fill them in – and I thank you for that – because I believe having reliable information is a necessity (to me anyway – but there will always be shysters out there who will do their best to spoil it for some obscure reason)

              However, I’m tired of the amount of misinformation on the web (aka “I know somebody” or “It is said” that there are dust/oil issues) that simply pollutes any attempt to get to reality – if that’s possible, and if some actually want to acknowledge reality.
              So, I’ve put my ‘stats’ together – limited as they may be – as something more reliable than “My gran’s, sisters’, hairdresser says her second cousin twice removed has an oil problem with her D600″.
              There appears to have been a problem, yes. But Nikon will have sorted it out – and not sat around drinking Sake – quickly. How quickly is again conjecture but will depend on the nature of the problem and how quickly they could get it sorted out.

              Possibly the truth lies somewhere between your analysis and mine. I don’t know. The ones who probably have the best handle are Nikon and they’ll probably not say anything as usual.

            • StarF

              Most people *complaining* about the D600 did not have, nor never owned a D600 – they had ‘heard’ the D600 had a problem.

              Totally agree.

            • Thom Hogan

              That’s still missing the point, even if the notion that there are more complainers than owners is true. Nikon has mishandled the D800 and D600 problems very badly. They’ve allowed the Internet to spread the shutter debris and focus troubles far and wide with no response that didn’t actually intensify the spread (in both cases where Nikon made a quiet statement through the repair entity of a subsidiary, the statement actually verified that some unspecified number of cameras had a problem, and re-amplified the spread of the message).

            • R!

              Some smart people ,like me hehe,waited for the new Nikons full frame for so long that they ended up trying Canons.
              Nikons colors quality are unbeaten for colorskins and landscape or natural colors,But!!!
              the contrast is lower than Canons(exept with flash)
              the Dynamic is higher but more flat(probably the more dynamic means the sensor catch less contrasts)
              AF is slower but more precise,the video mode is always behind ,the bufer is geting smaller each time and the DUST ISUE IS GETTING WORSE!!
              I tell you the truth I didn’t by no FX new generation yet waiting on a come back from the yellow brand, I am shooting APSC and 4/3 since 3 years and I m feeling alright (under 3200 iso) .
              The best pictures are made with film and when I can I shoot film ,I might get a Canons but their colors looks like cartoons even If sometimes I enjoy It I might wait 2 more years (no joke)
              And I ‘m shooting professionally,any DX or apsc or 4/3 even some compacts deliver better technical pictures than 20th century Camera only photographer are poorer.
              I’m not that old I’m 38 ,but when I look at Doisneaus work or Arakis or Hamiltons or Man Rays or Mc Currys or MC cullins etc… work ….I just got to say that people need to shoot more and talk less.
              me first hehe.

            • Thom Hogan

              Please share you math with us. Some of us actually do real data collection and real analysis. I’m actually very interested to see yours.

          • Andrew

            As I said, I do not agree with you on this one. I know we are all speculating, but Nikon needed to convince us that the problem was completely solved. What better way than by introducing a new camera vis-a-vis, the D610. I would feel much better walking into the store and picking up the D610 than by going to the store and wondering, “Is this D600 part of the later production batch that Nikon has fixed?”

            • fred

              I agree completely. It is about restoring consumer confidence.

              I like my Nikons but I would not even consider buying a D600 until I know that the problem is definitely fixed. = official notification by Nikon.

              I have not seen a notice from Nikon HQ that states something like “After serial No. 20065400 all shutters in D600 are the new improved version”.

              As a buyer I would then know what to look for (serial No.) and can thereafter ‘buy with confidence’.

              The cowardly way is Nikon keep quiet and release a D610.

          • R!

            yep! Iike I said before I’m not buying new stuf without advice and I was right not purchassing D600 or D800 If they dont come out with new products without deffect I’m buying 6D or 5DMRkIII and wait the next generation of Nikons.(ps: I’m always buying product one year or 2 old so I can get an oppinion on the markett and get the best in term of quality and price.
            D4 is obsolete (XQD is surpassed by new sandisk standard CF and readers areto rare plus the batterys capacity is smaller and resolution and FPS under 1DX)
            And damn I love Nikon they always beenontop before 2008 but right now they are behind exept for the MPX race that they criticize before giving us some poor 24 and 36 MPX without the technology that go with It.

            • Pdt496

              Didn’t mean to claim that the issue does not exist. I only wanted to point out that Nikon had no obligation or need to institute a “recall” of D600s. Recalls are used for safety issues not poorly manufactured products. If Nikon was refusing to address the issue under warranty, I would agree with the complaints. Also, if I had paid $2k for a camera that spent weeks in repair facilities I would be upset as well.

      • Andrew

        Not necessarily. They may have fixed the problem a long time ago but decided not to make any formal announcement. And besides, not everyone experienced the problem. It is a good marketing move to introduce a new model number even if it meant only changing the paint color slightly! This way, they will distance the D610 from the launch problems of the D600. But having said that, it would have been a better marketing move to introduce some substantially new features; and by not doing that, it will make people think that this camera is simply a fix.

        I think the marketing guys are Nikon are all engineers. The company has a 1980’s mentality with 2013 engineering skills. Nikon reminds me of IBM who came out with the IBM PC Junior in the 1980’s with a totally none functional keyboard. Why? Because they were afraid that the computer will compete with their higher priced models; so they made it impossible for people to type on the keyboard. Nikon should take on the mentality of Intel, each new product competes against their existing products. The D610 should have all the very best features of the D800 and D7100. The D800 will still distinguish itself by its megapixel count, its size, and its rugged build quality.

      • jk

        do you think they will put a Toshiba sensor as rumored in Japan and China?

    • One More Thought

      If they bring out a d610 with the exact same specs then they are implicitly admitting the D600 had a problem. That’s kind of a PR problem…maybe even a legal problem if customers of D600’s decide to start a class action lawsuit.

      For just the appearance sake, Nikon should add some improvements to the D600.

    • jk

      that is true , I just want a bit more honesty and sincerity from Nikon.
      after all , the D600 is not a cheap camera even if it is an entry level camera.

  • One More Thought

    Even with the same specs, the D610 will be a great camera if they fix the oil/dust splatter problem.

    That being said, I find it hard to believe that Nikon wouldn’t take this opportunity to make at least some minor tweaks and improvements.

    I also think it’s rather absurd that they do not put their 51 point AF into the D610. Obviously, the 51 pt. AF module doesn’t cost that much more, since they put it into the D7100, a far less expensive camera.

    They could also remove the AA filter, perhaps tweak the sensor…

    I would imagine they would want to do something, other than just announce a camera that fixes a problem they never would admit to…

  • Richard

    To all you D600 owners – would it make sense to buy a discounted D600 and deal with the shutter or is the problem bad enough to justify paying more for a marginally updated D610? Cheers. Rich

    • FredBear

      Like many others (the majority) out there.
      What dust/oil problem?
      Any teething problems were sorted out a long time ago.

      • Andrew

        I am starting to think that Chris Weller is from the Canon camp. Give him time and his obsession with oil will run out.

        • jk

          hey, many people are multi system user.

          • R!

            And we are all photographer and human on the same planet all brother ,there is no war exept for companys on getting our money !

            • Andrew

              Wrong. Your enemies do not hire you, they attack, enslave, or destroy you. But companies hire you!

              If you work for a company, then you are a part of that company. Then that means you are supporting the company’s efforts to get other people’s money if that is your view of companies.

              Companies do not take other peoples money away from them. People walk up to companies and “freely” decide to buy that company’s product at the advertised price. An ethical transaction takes place.

        • R!

          There is only one camp :the good picture camp boy!

          • Andrew

            Boy? You must be an old man!

            Men do not weep when a problem is acknowledged and easily fixed. Nikon gave an advisory, wipe your camera or take it to the service center. Or follow well published report to simply take 2,000 pictures and the problem will go away. We are not living in the days when a single picture will cost you $1. Wipe your camera and you can take good picture. Boys don’t grow up and boys defend boys!

    • Dave Ingram

      Go with the the D600 if the price drops into your range as long as you get the warranty coverage – Nikon was excellent with replacing the shutter on mine when things got too mucky. It’s been great since. Might be good to wait a bit longer to see if there’s anything extra added to the D610 – maybe they should have rolled it out as the D600E?

    • Richard

      Cheers guys

    • jk

      I ‘d say no, just go for the D610 or the D800, they are much safer and I think at least the D800 does not have the annoying fixed aperture in LV and video issue.
      The D600 is a great camera in terms of IQ and speed , but at the same time it is a very annoying camera(LV and Video mode is so badly implemented and of course the dust issue).
      I know some say their D600’s are clean , no they just do not test theirs meticulously , all D600 cameras sold have this, just some people cannot see it does not mean theirs are clean.

      • R!

        the test for dustchaser is take a picture of the sky focussed on closest setting or with a macro lens,then you will see your sensor dust and be abble to know if your sensor is clean or dirty.

        • fred

          The trick is use f/11 or f/16 or higher + shooting light plain background. Spots before your eyes, yes!

    • Cyrille Berger

      I don’t have the problem on my six months old camera (I am nearing 4000 actuations). It is unlikely the D610 will be released at a different price than the D600, so do the math, it cost around 30€/$ to get your sensor clean by a professional, that gives you the number of “free” sensor cleaning you can get. And if you change lenses, you will end up needing some cleaning anyway.

  • Doug B

    What the hell Nikon, are you totally oblivious or just totally stupid? You can’t release a D400, you have to come up with a D610 with the same specs as the camera you already have out… IDIOTIC !!!

  • http://stevewakeman.tumblr.com/ Steve Wakeman

    I really think they would do well to increase the AF point coverage. I don’t see why that would be a problem.

  • Yoshi Spendiff

    I can’t say I’m remotely surprised at this.
    As an enthusiast who was looking at the D600 my major gripes were the dust and the live-view hiccups. All they have to do is fix those 2 problems and I, and probably many others, would buy it. Those are specs that aren’t listed here.
    It may be a fairly expensive FX camera but it’s still entry level really. 51 point large coverage autofocus was just never going to happen, they’ve got a D4 for that sort of shooting in FX format.

    • stoooopid

      It may be currently the entry level for FX, but I think I saw a rumor somewhere on here saying Nikon may have a lower level FX camera in the works. Maybe something more along the lines of a D5200, or D3200 specs with an FX sensor. That could be interesting. Maybe they will recycle the 18mp FX sensor from the D4? Of course I am just speculating based on a vague memory of just a whisp of a rumor that got bull dozed by all of this D610 talk.

      • Michael Sloan

        16.2 MP sensor….

        • stoooopid

          Yes, fine, 16.2, sans 18 (been looking for a reason to use sans all day). Anyway, it is probably too fine of a sensor to put in a body below the D610. But we can always dream.

          • Michael Sloan

            Sorry I couldn’t resist…especially when you forced me to do a double take. :-) I own the D4 and thus you had me exited for a moment about the another 1.8MP I somehow overlooked. And you are right, it is currently too fine a sensor for anything below the D610, but it would make a GREAT sensor in the D700S! If they would only make this dream camera, sans video (now look, you got me doing it), I think it could easily outsell the D6xx, D800 and D4 series combined. But Nikon doesn’t seem to be interested in making cameras that would REALLY sell well, anymore. I have great video potential in the D4, but I’m a stills kind-of shooter, not interested in learning video yet; hell, I still haven’t mastered my photography yet.

            • stoooopid

              Michael – don’t say that too loud – there are people on this forum that will shout you down for saying something like D700s (they think the D800 was the successor to the D700 and will hear no talk of anything else). I agree – I think the D800 was not a proper update to the D700, something of the spirit of the D700 was missing. And I also agree that if Nikon was really interested in moving cameras they would take that sweet D4 sensor, drop it in a body similar to the D7000, or D7100, sell it for $1500 and sit back and watch the profits roll in. Why would still photographer even consider buying any other camera body in this price range if this camera existed? Would it eat into D610 sales – without a doubt. Would it move more cameras – of course. But anyone considering a fuji x-system body or going the Sony route, or m4/3 would be crazy to get one of those bodies over this body. And that is a lot more people than the D4 sales they might lose, or the D610 sales they might lose.

            • Michael Sloan

              stoooopid, Nikon admitted that the D800 was not intended to be the replacement for the D700, and that something else was coming. Unfortunately, they would neither confirm or deny the D600 as being the D700 replacement. As for putting an FX sensor in a DX body, I don’t see that happening. From the comments on this forum and others, I think Nikon has failed to create the cameras that many of its customers want. The two that obviously come to mind are the D700 replacement and the D300 replacements. A D3S sensor in the D700S would make an excellent camera and sell VERY well, if properly priced (say $2499). Nikon was probably planning on making this camera, but I suspect the tsunami really screwed up their release schedule. Likewise, a D7100 sensor in the D400 would have also sold very well, but I suspect that too was delayed or dropped altogether. Nikon still had to release flagship cameras like the D4 and D800 for events like the Olympics and Photokina to keep up brand exitement and their image. We may eventually see the D700 replacement, it will be called the D900; and likewise the D300 replacement will be called the D500. This will occur once Nikon gets back on their product release schedule cycles.

  • Rock Kenwell

    Again: D610 = D600 + Oil Sealer – AA Filter

    • Andrew

      + ?

      All the specs have not been revealed yet; here’s hoping!

      • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

        that’s correct, we know that we don’t know everything :)

    • jk

      I ‘ve heard that the D610 has a Toshiba designed CMOS , other than that all same or at least identical to the D600.
      so I think admin is always correct , thanks NR.

  • Can’t Believe It

    Despite the problems, it sounds like a chance to get a D600 at a price that makes up for its shortcomings…How low should I wait for the price to go before buying? What do we think the rock-bottom price will be? $1,600? $1500? $1,400?

    • Joseph Li

      Well a refurbished D600 for $1600 with a free lens that you can sell off for $300 is already a kickass deal for full frame, plus the oil issue is likely fixed by Nikon already. It’s hard to predict the market but I suspect the price will actually stabilize or even go back up after the bunch of refurbished D600 are totally consumed by the market, then you are stuck with pricey $2000+ D610. And if D610 isnt all that great spec wise most users will hold onto D600 so the used price wont really tumble either.

      • stoooopid

        Yup. This is what I am trying to calculate. I think when the D610 is actually announced and everyone realizes that it is actually the same camera, the D600 prices will stabilize. So maybe right now is the best time to buy, because prices have taken a hit on just the rumor part of the D610, not the delivery part, which will probably be much less exciting.

        • http://nikonrumors.com/ Nikon Rumors

          The D600 will be a good buy – you also may get the new improved shutter depending on when your camera was produced.

          • stoooopid

            and even if I don’t, a few trips to Nikon service center and they will get tired of seeing me and replace the shutter with the improved one. So either way…

          • Andrew

            +1

    • jk

      do not get it unless you want to use it for longer than a couple of years since its resale value will drop dramatically as the D610 announce in this coming Oct.

    • riotsheelds

      My benchmark is $1300. Why? Back in July, you could get a Canon 6D with 24-105L and Pixma Pro-100 printer for $2000 after rebate. After selling the lens and printer it was a $1200-1300 body. I view the 6D and D600 as basically equivalent (D600 has better specs in most regards, but 6D has better ergonomics, warranty service, and no dust/oil issues). Unless I can get a new D600 for that low, I might as well wait for the next Canon sale.

      • Can’t Believe It

        Thanks. That will be an amazing deal….

  • Joseph Li

    Wow..this is bizarre…

    Ok let’s wait to see what are the difference in specs. If they are mostly identical, then there’s really no point in paying more for a D610, as long as you put up with sending a D600 to Nikon 2 times to get the shutter/mirror fixed etc, and they will do it for free anyways. All cameras require sensor cleaning, as long as it’s not crazy bad as faulty D600s it’s actually not that bad. So at the end of the day you are paying for the convenience of not having need to send it into Nikon? well in a way that’s gonna keep the cost of D600 up, which is a good thing for me :) D600 is going to turn into a discontinued SB900, but way better in the sense that the oil issue can be fixed for free but SB 900 you just have to live with the overheating issue for the life of the flash.

    • Andrew

      I have said repeatedly, why send the D600 to be fixed every few shots (i.e. 200 to 400 shots. A professional lab has tested these cameras and the oil problem goes away after 2,000 shots. So just shoot repeatedly and in a short moment of time your issue with oil will no longer exist. Tests have shown that 5 out of 6 D600 cameras have that problem solved after 2,000 shots. Yet I hear how folks are sending their cameras to be cleaned after only 200 shots; people just need to be informed. And besides, Nikon says you can clean the shutter. But I guess if people like concierge service, more power to them! And besides, many people have bought the D600 without any oil problem.

    • jk

      if you send your D600 in for cleaning service every month , they will eventually replace the shutter , they did to mine.
      my last copy of the D600 is a bit better than my older two bought in last year.
      but as this rumor first came out I sold my last copy of this camera and got another D800 to back my D800E up.
      so if possible force Nikon to fix the shutter and then sell it.

  • Chris

    I just hope they fix the stupid oil problem of the D600…

    • Andrew

      Oh no, why should they fix it… it is one of the best features introduced to get you to clean your sensors regularly. You do that anyway, why not clean your sensor while doing your regular sensor clean. Why, this is not a point-and-shoot camera! I don’t know why they did not introduce the oil problem in the D6, D800, D7100, D5200, D3200, and Nikon 1.

      • Chris

        give you an A for the sarcasm… but nikon’s been fucking things up, I wouldn’t be surprised if oil problems appear in the D610

  • azur

    I’m in the market for a full-frame D610 if – and only if – it comes without Anti-Aliasing filter (AA filter).
    Just like e.g. the DX D7100.
    Due to the lack of AA filter the present DX D7100 has better acuity than the present FX D600.
    So if the soon to be announced FX D610 does have an AA filter I’ll pass, because in that case there are more compelling non-AA alternatives from quite a lot of other manufacturers, though so far mostly APS-C format cameras.
    The premium I have to pay for the Nikon D800E over the D800 in order to avoid the AA filter is insanely high and makes the E version irrelevant at least for me.

    • jk

      but the D800E is only 200USD more expensive than the D800 normal model, in’s it?
      that said as a D800+D800E owner , I have to agree the detail gain with the E over the normal D800 is really really small, and that only seen at f5.6(or maybe f4).
      I in fact find the D800 a bit more all around better balanced camera, especially if you are into video like me..

      • azur

        Yes, lucky you if you are in the US.
        But I’m in Europe and where I live the difference between D800 and D800E equals 820 USD.
        That’s insane in my opinion, and that’s why I hope Nikon will make the D610 without AA filter, just like the D7100. I have been shooting D800 and D800E side by side for a while and I think the difference is sufficiently noticeable so that I have decided that I don’t want a camera with an AA filter again.
        If the D600 comes with an AA filter I’ll pass and just wait for the next model generation. I strongly believe that the AA filters are about to disappear from most high-end cameras. That’s what we see from more and more manufacturers.

        • jk

          oh my god, are you serious?
          820 EURO extra for the E over the D800?

          it is not worth it, I can guarantee it because I have 2 D800E + 1 D800 and 1 D600,which I ‘ll be selling soon as soon as Nikon return it to me.

    • Sahaja

      Why do you want a D610 with no AA filter? The pixel density is lower than on the D800/D800E, and much lower than on the D7100 – and so more likely to give you problems with moire and artefacts if there is no AA filter.

      • azur

        On rare occasions I do have seen moiré with my former D800E and with my former Leica M8. And actually even with all the AA filtered digital cameras I have owned the last ten years. But it has never been a major problem.

        The only occasion where moiré is sometimes a bit bothersome is when I have a rare assignment with shooting some special kinds of artistic textiles. That can be a bit tricky. But even at those times I’m usually able to deal with moiré just by changing distance, angle and aperture.

        So, summa summarum, I simply do not want a blurring filter in front of my sensor ever again if I can possibly avoid it. I prefer acuity over blurring of moiré tendencies.

  • Nate H.

    Really bad marketing strategy.

    • Andrew

      In what way?

      • tertius_decimus

        Releasing exactly the same camera under new badge is silly. Same AF? Major fail.

      • R!

        Testing the products for us ,for sure thank you, but Nikon should have that done for us.

        • Andrew

          I understand what you are saying, but it does not address my question. He said that the D610 is a bad marketing strategy. I an curious about his thoughts concerning Nikon’s “marketing strategy”, but he does not explain. The term “marketing strategy” is a bid word in business, and many theories are written about marketing strategies. It is always good to know what the other person is thinking, but he did not provide any reason for his views.

          Anyway, thank you for your feedback. In regards to that, even though you are mockingly alluding to certain behavior and motives on Nikon’s part, I do not think Nikon would attempt to let users do product testing for them. I think someone dropped the ball, and Nikon has not learned how to communicate to the public. They appear as an insular company – having great difficulty communicating with the public. They can communicate well at times, but they just are not consistent. They need to hire a mature public relations firm in the US.

    • jk

      yeah agree, they really should have shown more respect to us(D600 owners or ex-owners).

    • stoooopid

      I think it is great strategy. I will pick up a refurb D600 at a steal as soon as all the D600 owners think it sucks because the D610 is out.

  • Photoretouchpro

    Maybe Nikon realized that the d600 doesn’t fit my hand well and will put it in the d800 shell. :S

  • nobody

    If the 39 point AF module turns out to be true, Nikon has lost my business. I will stick to my D700 a bit longer. A mediocre DX AF system in an FX camera is just silly. Sorry, Nikon, I will not buy that.

  • Alex

    This is a patch. Should be called D601

    • jk

      or D600F orS

  • Jekyll

    I own a D600 since January. In March the dealer cleaned the sensor a first time. In August a 2nd time. After getting it back 2 weeks ago I took the camera yesterday and took 200 test shots. The sensor is literally full of particles again…worse than the first 2 times it noticed.
    Now finally the dealer agrees to send it to Nikon…I guess by the time I will get it back the D610 will hit the market…
    Happy customer I am? Guess not!

    • Dave Ingram

      Why didn’t you just send it to Nikon directly? Took about a week to ship mine out and get it back with the shutter replaced. No problems since. No need to wait for the dealer to agree.

      • Jekyll

        I am sorry, but I should have mentionned that I live in Luxembourg, and obviously I cannot send my camera directly to Nikon…since they are serviced in Belgium. Yes I know that particular “living in the smallest country ever” issue is not Nikon’s fault… :o)

        • Dave Ingram

          I guess we’ve got it easy here in Canada. There happens to be a Nikon service centre in Richmond BC, less than 2 hours and a ferry ride away from where I live. Hopefully your turn around time will be quick – once they replace the shutter you should be fine.

        • Andrew

          It is reported that after 2,000 shots, 5 out of 6 of the cameras that experienced this problem are fixed. So you may want to try this out before sending your camera to be serviced. So I guess if I had this problem and 2,000 shots did not completely clear every spec of oil, then 3,000 shots would likely do it.

          • jekyll

            Dear Andrew,
            thank your for that information. As a matter of fact I believe I shot over 3000 images with my D600 since January. The 200 shots I mentioned in my initial post were made after the second sensor cleaning. I brought the camera back to my dealer today, who agreed to exchange it against a D800…with an extra payment of just 800 €. Not sure this was the right decision, but we’ll see…

        • Andrew

          It is reported that after 2,000 shots, 5 out of 6 of the cameras that experienced this problem are fixed. So you may want to try this out before sending your camera to be serviced. So I guess if I had this problem and 2,000 shots did not completely clear every spec of oil, then 3,000 shots would likely do it.

  • click

    It seems that Nikon does not sell as much D600s as expected. And Nikon thinks it has something to with the shutter problems. And after the D610 release Nikon will find out that the customers want better AF and a faster Shutter.

  • hendsch

    If they only update the shutter mechanism to distract from the dreadful «dust spot issue», does that mean, if I buy a D600 when the D610 comes out, it WILL have the «dust spot issue»???

    • Andrew

      Alert – Canon users are visiting Nikon blog. They are reporting oil problems 10 months after it was fixed!

  • Smac

    I would be surprised if Nikon could suddenly produce a new iteration of the d600 with all the desired features people have been mentioning. This would be a new model and would require all the testing and approval this entails. No company can just botch these things together (but the d600 replacement programme may be accelerated)
    In the meantime Nikon need to sell d600 product. They will have shed-loads of unsold d600 product and stores full of component parts they need to use. They are obviously off forecast sales and budget and they need to get back on track with the d600 and they need a minimum cost solution.
    That’s where the d610 comes in.

  • ls0w

    There is likely more oil and dust in the forums than most 600’s. And yes I have one, a refurb with 253 clicks when bought ‘new’ at a $600 savings. I don’t mind cleaning it every few months if needed, it takes great pictures. Happy as hell.

    • stoooopid

      Yeah, I hope to get a refurb when Nikon announces the D610. By then it should be the deal of the century, price-wise anyway.

      • jk

        well,you may have to send it in for service several times and it may cost more than what you save by going for the flawed D600 camera.
        I know a guy had to send it 5 times and needed pay a lot for shipping. so if you got a bad copy(I actually think all D600 are bad copies), just return it.

        • RC

          People should return it to the seller. Not send it in for service.

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