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Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter – a hands-on review

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

My X-Pro1 sure looks pretty impressive all decked out with Nikon's 80-400mm zoom mounted on it via the Metabones Speed Booster adapter.

In today's guest post Tom Grill will review the Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter ($429). More information can be found on Tom's blog (click on images for larger view or follow the links for the full resolution samples).

We are so accustomed to thinking of Nikon as a camera company that it is easy to forget the company began in 1917 primarily as an optical firm and continued that way for quite awhile. Nikon lenses for all uses, both scientific and photographic, were legendary, and remain so even today. It is with good reason film makers like putting Nikon lenses on their cine cameras, and Nikon lenses are carried into outer space. The quality of Nikon lenses was noticed by photo-journalists covering the Korean War,. These photographers began adapting the Nikon lenses to fit their 35mm cameras.  Even Canon used Nikon optics on its first cameras. With the advent of mirrorless cameras making it easy to adapt DSLR optics, adapters are rapidly becoming available for mounting Nikon Optics on most of these cameras. Primarily, these adapters are straight through with no optical elements. They simply form a bridge between the lens and camera. More sophisticated models can also pass data from the lens to the camera. Because the newer Nikon G lenses do not have external diaphragms some lens adapters now come with aperture control built into them.

Then along came the Metabones Speed Booster.

There are any number of adapters on the market for mounting a DSLR lens to a mirrorless camera, but the limitation has always been that in doing so the practical focal length of the lens is altered. On an APS-C size sensor, like that in the Fuji X cameras, the lens focal length is multiplied by a factor of 1.5x, meaning that a 50mm full frame lens converts to a 75mm focal length on the smaller X sensor.

The Speed Booster is an intriguingly novel product that allowed the mounted lens to maintain its actual focal length when mounted on a camera with a sensor that is smaller than full frame. Even better, as a byproduct of the conversion,  the maximum lens aperture of the lens increases by one full stop so that the maximum aperture of a f/2.8 lens, for instance, would become f/2 when using the adapter. Sounds like a photographer's holy grail -- one that definitely peaked my interest enough to give it a try.

To accomplish this miracle of conversion, the adapter must introduce an optical element within the lens to camera path, and therein lies a cause for concern. Any time an optical element -- no matter how well it is designed and manufactured -- is inserted between a lens and the camera some degradation of the image will usually take place. It might be slight, but it will be present. The best scenario would be when a camera manufacturer designs a specific device for one of its own lenses, as would be the case of Nikon designing a tele-converter to take into consideration the specific design of its own lenses and cameras. But even here, the rule follows that the insertion of any external optical elements into the path of lens-to-camera will compromise the optical quality of the original lens design to some degree. In the case of the Metabones Speed Booster the question becomes: Can it perform its miracle of conversion with a minimum amount of interference to the original design of the lens so the end product remains within acceptable limits. Let's have a look.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

The Speed Booster does have aperture control for the Nikon G lenses, such as the 50mm f/1.4G lens mounted on it above.

When I first began this hands on testing series I was mounting the Speed Booster on common focal length Nikon lenses, but it quickly became apparent that this was not very practical. After all, why use a Nikon lens interpreted through an auxiliary optical device, when a similar focal length Fuji lens of exceptional optical quality already existed. And so I realized that the Speed Booster would be most practical if it could convert lens types that were not available to the Fuji X-series APS-sized sensor. Throughout these tests I used the Metabones converter on all types of Nikon lenses, but paid particular attention to those focal lengths and lens types that were not otherwise available in a Fuji X-mount, such as the Nikon 80-400mm zoom, the Defocus Nikkors, tilt-shift models, and, yes, even the Nikon 16mm fisheye.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

The Speed Booster shown here mounted on a Defocus Nikkor 105mm lens with a Nikon 16mm fisheye nearby.

The device is called the "Speed Booster" because a byproduct of its reducing the image size to fit onto the smaller APS-C sensor of the Fuji X cameras is that the amount of light is also increased proportionately so that the maximum aperture of the lens is increased by one full stop. For instance, a lens with an f/2 maximum aperture, would become the equivalent of an f/1.4 lens when mounted on the Speed Booster. That is a nice plus.

The Speed Booster does not transfer any of the Nikon lens data to the Fuji camera. Consequently, auto-focus on a Fuji X camera is not possible. The latest Fuji firmware update did improve the manual focusing system on the X-Pro1, and I found it to be quite helpful in acquiring a sharp focus.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

The Metabones Speed Booster is 1 1/4" deep, and weighs in at a hefty 7.4oz (210g). The aperture on Nikon G lenses is controlled by turning the numbered ring shown in the two photos above.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

The adapter has its own tripod foot that is adaptable to Arca Swiss tripod mount.

You be the judge.  I performed many tests with a wide variety of some of the best Nikon lenses, and included plenty of downloadable high res versions of my test images below. Take a look at them and judge the technical results of the Speed Booster for yourself.

I did stick to the better quality Nikon lenses for my test, figuring that if the Speed Booster wouldn't work well with these, it certainly wouldn't perform well with consumer lenses. In general I found that performance with primes was better than with zooms, and better with long zooms than short zooms. This is to be expected. Short zoom lenses are very complex optical systems. Introducing another lens element into the light path is asking for trouble.

The two sample images below were taken using prime lenses, the Nikon 50mm f/1.4G lens for the top photo and 35mm f/2 lens for the bottom image. Both show good resolution when used with the Speed Booster.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download a high res version of this file.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download a high res version of this file.

One lens I tested was the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom. This is one of Nikon's better zooms. The results are shown in the two photos below. Here you can see that at the longer focal length the results are acceptable, but when pulled back to 24mm the results were very poor, showing extensive vignetting and fringing.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download a high res version of this 70mm file.

The image above and below were both taken with the Speed Booster and Nikon 24-70mm zoom. For the photo above the lens was racked out to 70mm. For the bottom photo the lens was set to 24mm. Note that at the shorter focal length there is considerable vignetting and also some corner fringing.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download a high res version of this 24mm file.

I did a brick wall test with the 24-70mm zoom set to a mid range. You can download the test images below and judge for yourself. The center of the images was sharp at all apertures, but I continued the tests down to f/11 and still had considerable corner softness and color fringing.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

This resolution test was done with the Nikon 24-70mm zoom on the Speed Booster. You can download the various aperture test images below.

Use the links below to download the high res samples of aperture tests of the brick wall test. You will notice that even stopped down to f/11 there is still considerable softness and fringing in the corners.

The portrait test below was done with the Nikon 70-200mm f/4 lens mounted on the X-Pro1. It is shot against a very strong late day setting sun producing low contrast and considerable flare -- a tough situation for any lens. The resulting image is acceptable but lacking in contrast. When I shot the same portrait later with the lens mounted straight onto a Nikon camera, the resolution and contrast were much sharper.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download the high res version of this file.

For the series of tests below, the Speed Booster was mounted on Nikon's new 80-400mm zoom set to different focal lengths and distances. In general, all of them are just a tad softer than I would expect from this lens when it is used alone. Because this was a test, I didn't do anything to improve the sharpness. I do think all of these images would actually produce quite acceptable results with some very minor post-processing work. Fringing in any of the images was easy to deal with when bringing the RAW image in with Adobe Bridge, and resolution could have been improved with the addition of increased clarity, also in Adobe Bridge.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download the high res version of this file.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download the high res version of this file.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download the high res version of this file.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

Click here to download the high res version of this file.

Conclusion:

The Metabones Speed Booster is a new concept of lens adaptability in the digital age, and one that is exciting for those of us who would like to extend the range of systems like the Fuji X cameras to take advantage of some of the better, and rarer optics already found on full frame cameras. The system is not perfect. On the Fuji it is manual focus only. Thankfully, Fuji improved its focus peaking and extended it with the latest firmware update. At least manual focusing is now easier and more accurate.

As already mentioned, optical quality will be degraded somewhat simply by inserting another optical element in the image path. Nonetheless, the center sharpness with almost all lenses I tested remained very high. It is only in the corners that things began to fall apart, as the image softened, vignetting increased, and color fringing crept in -- all of which was more apparent with zoom lenses than with primes, and most of which was easily corrected in post-processing.

This is an expensive item.  A Fuji version costs $429. I suppose the price can be justified if you factor in the savings gained by adding a whole new arsenal of other lenses to the Fuji system. The Metabones Speed Booster means that over night my Fuji X-Pro1 becomes a more practical professional system with the addition of lenses such as my tilt-shift Nikkor. Of course why I would want to use such a lens on the X-Pro1 instead of on a Nikon full frame is whole other issue. I am not sure where a product like this will lead us. It is certainly intriguing, and begins to open new possibilities as the new mirrorless camera systems become more popular.

Metabones Speed Booster Nikon G lens to Fuji X-mount camera adapter review

This photo was taken using a Nikon 24-120mm zoom mounted on the X-Pro1. Note the corner fringing in the high res sample. Click here to download a high res version of this file.

If you have an interesting idea for a guest postyou can contact me here.

This entry was posted in Nikon Lenses, [NR] Reviews and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • HotDuckZ
  • HotDuckZ
  • John

    I have designed an F mount adapter so that I can use Nikon lenses when performing an endoscopy. Sure, it’s a little tough jamming the 200mm f/4 Micro down someone’s throat, but the image quality is unsurpassed.

    • Kynikos

      Wont it focus hunt at f/4? Don’t you really want to be using the 200mm f/2 stopped down to about 2.8? Put that on a DX body like the D400 released last month, and you get even more reach.

    • Kynikos

      Wont it focus hunt at f/4? Don’t you really want to be using the 200mm f/2 stopped down to about 2.8? Put that on a DX body like the D400 released last month, and you get even more reach.

    • lololalallll

      Colonoscopies must be lots of fun. :D

    • MonroeAlan

      Or up their anuses either! Although I do know a few people that I think this would be possible with.

    • 103David

      Probably going to be a good idea to leave that petal-shaped lens hood off for this application, too. I’d guess the ring-light might be somewhat uncomfortable also.

  • fjfjjj

    Nice article – bravo!

    By the way, it’s “piqued my interest” – not “peaked my interest.”

    • Aldo

      tomato, tomahto

      • Quietly_Possible

        tomayto, tomahto … surely?

    • Fred Flintstone

      But does the adapter support focus piquing? ;-)

      • fjfjjj

        Can someone take a peek a let us know?

  • Spy Black

    I think if you really wanted to show the difference this makes on the optics, the author should have taken identical images with a full-frame Nikon body at or near the resolution of the Metabones/Nikkor combo. Of course you can look at this stuff and decide if this is a nice toy to have around if you have a Fuji, but a direct comparison would leave nothing to the imagination.

    Of course, if you can afford to put an 80-400 or 24-70 on a Fuji with a Metabones adapter, you can afford to throw ‘em on a D800. ;-)

    More interesting I think would be for Metabones to make a Nikon-to-Nikon DX-to-FX adapter with full electrical throughput, then throw something like a an f/1.2 Nikkor on something like a D7100.

    • Eric Calabos

      Sorry, its practically impossible. unless Nikon makes a mirrorless DX and then we’ll have 35mm f/1

      • KnightPhoto

        Yes, once Nikon release the mirrorless D400 with shorter flange distance, we can use the upcoming Nikonbones adapter to uplift all of our Nikkors to make them an additional stop faster while supporting AF and VR.

        • Can’t Believe It

          Yes! The 50 f/1.4 will be awesome! As will the f/2 DC lenses and the 200mm f/2. This is going to be the best Christmas EVER!!!!

      • Spy Black

        Right, I didn’t think about the mirror housing. However yes if Nikon makes a mirrorless than this could be an option.

    • g.h.

      How would you adapt F-mount to F-mount? If you add an adapter you increase flange to sensor distance to fit additional elements and degrade image/light in the process. The alternative is to take the mirror out of your DX and put the required elements inside the camera. The speed booster works because the mirrorless camera has a short flange distance you can add the elements to refocus the image without altering the lens’ designed flange to sensor distance.

      • RMJ

        The same (invert) way as teleconverter ?

        • kassim

          Teleconverter increases the distance, speedbooster shortens it. But yes, it’s like a reverse TC.

          • RMJ

            Exactly my point.

            There is no reason why there couldn’t be, for example, FX to DX speedbooster. Flange distance doesn’t matter since the “adapter” (in this case also the speedbooster) has optics that can correct the changed flange distance.

            Exactly the same is done with teleconverter. (I think so. I’m not on the mood to start calculate what exactly happens there)

            Canon to Nikon adapters exists also even though Nikon has longer flange distance. The fix is done by the optics.

            • Spy Black

              I’m not sure about that. I forgot about the mirror chamber. The adapter may need to get closer to the film plane in order for it to work. I guess we would need to propose this question to Metabones to see what they have to say.

    • John H

      I disagree. For ONCE in a forum I think we ought to be seeing actual results from the lens / body combo and making a judgment about the quality without cross-comparisons ad nauseum. It’s a GIVEN that nikon glass on a D800 will render better than mixing three components from different manufacturers. I don’t need to see another comparison to know that. I am only interested in what’s possible, not what I know to pre-exist.

  • decisivemoment

    There are always going to be opportunities like this for entrepreneurially minded shops to adapt Nikon lenses to other mounts. Nobody has a longer distance from the lens mount to the film/sensor plane than Nikon — and so Nikon F-mount lenses are in the unique position of being adaptable to virtually any other mount. I’m curious, though, why there haven’t been third-party attempts at maintaining electronic connections. I realize Nikon’s continued addiction to the aperture pin, even 15 years after their mount gained the electronic connections to avoid it, causes trouble — but still . . . no one? Now that there are at least a few Nikkor lenses that are genuinely electronic for everything, there is surely an opportunity.

  • Kynikos

    Great piece. Thanks for taking the time to write it. This kind of useful detail and well selected shots must have taken many hours. Articles like this are one of the good things about the Internet.

  • Kynikos

    Great piece. Thanks for taking the time to write it. This kind of useful detail and well selected shots must have taken many hours. Articles like this are one of the good things about the Internet.

  • John

    Do you think you could you use this on a full frame camera, with the effect of increased aperture size but obviously without affecting focal length?

    Or does this only fit APS-C format cameras?
    (Or possibly it may fit full frame cameras but with no effect on aperture size.)

    “Even better, as a byproduct of the conversion, the maximum lens aperture of the lens increases by one full stop so that the maximum aperture of a f/2.8 lens, for instance, would become f/2 when using the adapter.”

    Thanks for any thoughts.

    John

    • timarts

      I believe this won’t work on FF cameras, the concept however might be possible with medium format lenses on 35mm full frame cameras

      • John

        Thanks timarts.

        I have a full frame camera and have often wished my 28-300 had a wider aperture.

    • Eric Duminil

      No. If you affect neither the focal length nor the sensor size, you sure won’t change the aperture.

      • John

        Thanks Eric, good point.

        I would like a product that could do that though for my D800 with its 28-300 lens. 3.5-5.6 max aperture is a little limiting sometimes.

        John

        • Fred

          Well, you could use the converter and mount the 28-300mm, slow zoom, as a DX lens, getting the same angle of view, increased f-stop, increased blur, on only the central portion of the D800 sensor. About a 15Mpixel camera. The D800 is the best resolving 35mm DSLR on the market today. This is non-sense.

          • John

            Thanks Fred,

            What I really want is my 28-300 with an f2.8 aperture all the way through the range.

            But judging by the sizes of the 24-70 f2.8 and the 70-200 f2.8, a 28-300 f2.8 would be enormous, so quite an unlikely consumer product I think :)

    • kassim

      Actually, it is possible on FF if these conditions are met:
      1. Camera flange distance is shorter than the lens’(basically mirrorless FF).
      2. The image circle is larger than the sensor, otherwise you’ll get a round picture with black corners. T&S lenses have a much larger image circle than ordinary lenses.
      3. Metabones makes one that covers FF. Exit hole of the current DX version might be too small to cover FF sensor.

      Please note that this is just a speculation, based on my understanding on how it works.

      • John

        Thanks Kassim, I’ll contact Metabones and ask.

        John

      • John

        Just checked here

        http://www.metabones.com/sony/questions

        and it says

        “Will there be Speed Boosters™ for DSLR camera bodies?

        No. The mirror gets in the way but there is no room for the optics.”

        So I guess this answers my question.

        Would be very cool if there was a way to increase aperture size on the 28-300 lens from 3.5-5.6 max. I would love it if it could have fixed 2.8 all the way through the range like the 70-200.

  • Alex

    Imagine a cheap Nikon FX mirrorless based on DX sensor with this converter integrated to the body … that would be awesome!

  • MonroeAlan

    This device is similar to ones used to shorten telescope focal lengths and increase effective apertures. But I quote from the article — “The Speed Booster is an intriguingly novel product that allowed the mounted lens to maintain its actual focal length when mounted on a camera with a sensor that is smaller than full frame ” is not possible. The only way to increase aperture effectively (making the image brighter by 1 stop) is to shorten the focal length. I believe that’s just a law of optical physics. We are too easily baffled by the nonsense of smaller sensors “increasing reach” when all they are doing is cropping the image. This is a similarly flawed argument.

    • Jo

      You need to read up on your optical physics then, because you are 100% wrong.

      • MonroeAlan

        Jo –
        N=f/D
        where N = f/stop
        f = focal length
        D = diameter
        Since I don’t think this rig changes the diameter, if the f/stop gets larger, the focal can’t remain the same. Maybe not physics, but basic math.

        • Can’t Believe It

          You are all correct, just in different ways.

          The problem here stems from the use of the term “actual focal length.”

          What the maker is trying to say is that because of the optics, on a DX camera you get the equivalent focal length in 35mm terms. In other words, when you put a 24mm lens on your DX camera it will have the same angle of view that it would on a full frame camera. That’s what TaoTeJared means when he says it’s like a .67 teleconverter and MonroeAlan means when he says that the focal length gets shorter. You’re all saying the same thing.

          Now stop looking behind the curtain and enjoy the magic show.

    • TaoTeJared

      In practice the speed booster is just a 0.67x teleconverter. The aperture opening does not change (you are correct in that) but the optics actually concentrate more light to the sensor thus changing the “brightness” of the scene. It is just like taking a magnifying glass outside to burn ants – but not focused to that point ;)

  • jk

    the tripod collar does not look good and I don’t know if it’s fully detachable ?
    this SB thing is quite amazing for anyone with NEX or Fuji. I have lots of usable not-so-huge Nikon primes that can be re-used with Sony or Fuji or with both mounts.

    I think the 85mmf1.8G , 50mmf1.4G , 28mm f1.8G are all small and light and may balance on a NEX7 or a X-E1 quite well.
    I think the f1.4G series primes and DC lenses are just a bit too big and do not balance on my Sony or Fuji very well.

    thanks for the review.

    • Conguero

      I have the 85/1.8G and the X-E1. I can tell you that this lens is HUGE compared to the compact X-E1 and I would never use it, or any other G lens, on it. The old Nikon Ais lenses with aperture and DECENT manual focus rings would be a much better fit.

      I personally use my X-E1 exclusively with Leica M mount lenses from Zeiss, Voigtlander and Leica. These are very high-quality, compact lenses that make fun to use with the X-E1. My leica 90mm f2.5 for example is merely 6.6cm long and weighs less than 400gr but gives me on the X-E1 a focal length of 135mm and exceptional IQ.

      Also I’ve already sold most of my Nikon gear already, I still keep around the D600 (I’d loose lots of money if I sell it because I was one of the first buyers. A big mistake!), the 60/2.8, the 85/1.8 and the 105/2.8 mainly for macro and sometimes for portrait work. But mainly I use the X-E1 now.

  • toby reynolds

    Not sure if I’m missing the point here…WHy would you want to do this? Isn’t one of the attractions to mirror-less is a lighter/smaller package? But in doing this it pretty much becomes the same size as a DSLR with inferior image quality and no autofocus..?

    • kassim

      Yes, but if you already have a mirrorless + a bunch of full frame lenses, this is an interesting option.

    • Can’t Believe It

      It’s all about your artistic vision and it can help your images stand out from those of your competitors. Fuji cameras seem to have a very different look from Nikons so this adapter gives you the best of both worlds. The crisp quality of the Fuji sensor plus the creative wonderland that you get from the Nikkors like the tilt-shifts, the exotic telephotos, the DCs, and the million other cool lenses that Nikon has built through the years. And you don’t have to worry about the mirror crashing into the back of your $100,000 6mm 2.8 fisheye.

    • Jorge

      Agreed!
      I wouidn’t soil my Fuji X-E1 by putting Nikon Lenses on it! It defeats the entire purpose of not hauling around my D800, D700, and my 28′s. I love carrying my X-E1, with the 18-55, and the 35 F1.4 Both are absolutely amazing. What I can’t wait for is the 10-24 F4, Once I’ve read the reviews, and I like it I have a feeling my Nikon crap will hit eBay.

    • Starfires

      For one thing, with many of the primes you wouldn’t have all that large a package. Plus if you already have lenses, especially if you will keep both systems going for a bit, it saves buying them again, so you have that convenience. I agree though that losing autofocus is a big minus, especially since you can mount any system’s lenses on this, so you might find more interesting ones to experiment with than Nikon’s (D)SLR collection. But if you already have the lenses…

  • Can’t Believe It

    BRILLIANT! Thanks for putting in the all the effort.

  • Sundra Tanakoh

    All my Nikkor lenses work just fine on all my Nikon cameras, no need to buy a Fuji X to try them out.

    • John H

      That wasn’t the point behind the product. Some people have nikon glass and bodies as well as the Fuji X bodies. This is just a way for someone to use the nikon glass on the mirrorless platform. If you don’t have a fuji x camera or intend to buy one then nothing about this article is of relevance to you.

    • Renato S.

      wow, so thoughtful.

      one of the biggest points of having a metabones speedbooster – besides the 1-stop in light – is that it’s also a focal length reducer so APS-C sensor can get almost the same field of view as if it was a FF camera. but I guess I’m losing my time explaining this.

  • Martijn

    i think this combination is even more interesting combined with the newly released Blackmagic pocket camera. A great quality videocamera, where now you could use your Nikon lenses on.

  • assaad

    Is there a Nikon-FX-to-Nikon-DX Metabones adapter?

    • John

      http://www.metabones.com/sony/

      says

      “Will there be Speed Boosters™ for DSLR camera bodies?
      No. The mirror gets in the way but there is no room for the optics.”

  • JD

    Doesn’t anyone know the difference between aperture (f-stop) and transmittance (t-stop)? Even Nikon wouldn’t seem to know the difference if their marketing documents are to be believed.
    A teleconverter (which is what this is, just a rather unusual type) which is properly made will at best have the same f-stop as the attached lens, and normally has a positive value t-stop. For some reason too many photographers seem to think that a teleconverter such as a 1.4x reduces max aperture, when this is simply not the case most of the time. The t-stop which is a measurement of light is however impacted. t-stop doesn’t affect Depth of Field, while the f-stop does. Unless someone has seen something I haven’t, the Nikon teleconverters are changing the T-stop not the f-stop in spite of the fact that your camera is programmed to tell you that they do.
    The max aperture is the max aperture, there is no changing it. That doesn’t change the fact that an effectively negative t-stop is very interesting!

    • Guest

      I would like to see a source or better technical explanation of what you are saying here. Because what it sounds like is, if you are right, I should be able to get the DoF of a 270mm f/2 lens by using a 2x TC on a 135mm f/2, with a t/stop of f/4. I don’t know if that is true as I have not tried it. If so, that’s kind of a neat, and maybe an actual reason to use a TC, rather than a longer focal length, if you are looking for short DoF. But honestly, I don’t think that’s right.

      I do know though that yes, t/stop does not affect the absolute DoF, the question is the change in effective speed with added optical elements.

  • Starfires

    Thank you for this review, it is an interesting option for someone with a lot of F glass though wanting to get more into the mirrorless systems. It does sound like a better match with primes than zooms. I can’t help but think what a great combination this would be with a Nikon mirrorless DX that supported autofocus, though perhaps I could live without that.

  • http://www.postlinearity.com gregorylent

    so i can use my nikon f lenses on a bmcc .. cool

  • solidgoldstan .

    Gives nikon shooters a chance to see what their lenses can really do.

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