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Weekly Nikon news flash #164

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  • merco

    I bet on the 18mm 1.8

    20 sounds boring

    • jivee

      18mm sounds great for DX (27mm eq) too.

    • Michael

      As a DX shooter I’ve been wanting a fast, wide lens -the 35 1.8G sometimes just doesn’t cut it. I will buy these in a heartbeat!

  • Komalkumar

    20mm and 18mm?

    • AM

      It’s just a patent. Most likely, Nikon will release only one of them.

    • Richard M

      There used to be a f/2.8 18mm alongside the 20mm. It was quite a bit more expensive.

  • Brian

    Let the bitching begin.

    • Mock Kenwell

      Lol.

  • http://flickr.com/inthemist InTheMist

    What is so special about these Odin TTL triggers?

    I’m still using CLS, but looking at radio triggers. To be honest, I’m confused about all the various models and brands. As an EE myself, some of them seem really overpriced for what they do.

    • Sjfo

      TTL basically. High speed sync for shooting wide open portraits outside or something.

    • D R

      Overpriced for what they do indeed. But that’s the price we pay for convenience. The big thing with these TTL Odin triggers is that you can dial in settings for your off camera strobes right at the camera, instead of having to venture over to each remote strobe and change them. It’s definitely a time saver to not have to walk over to each strobe and manually set dial in changes. Also, because they are radios, line of sight is not a limitation.

      I personally went with Pixel Kings TTL triggers because Odins are not out yet, 4 RX and 2 TX TTL radio triggers cost approximately $420. They have performed admirably well for me, without a single misfire or random fire. The flash grouping function is handy too.

      I feel bad for folks who spend all that cash on Pocket Wizards. When it comes down to it, a radios and strobes are simple devices, they are by no means complex. Pocket Wizards are extremely overpriced for what they offer. PW’s are the gold standard, but I’ve seen them misfire in many workshops and events. The cheap Chinese radios always seem to work pretty darn well.

      Lets hope Phottix doesn’t fall into the same trap PW has, thinking they can charge exorbitant prices for radio triggers.

  • WoutK89

    But do bigger files also mean better files? Me too can say, my photo is 30MB in size, but does that mean it looks better than the same file in 10MB? I mean, will it add significant better quality, or only quantity?

    • http://haroldellis4444@gmail.com Harold Ellis

      it adds worse compression or none, some void bits, but stock companies rate photos by megabytes so it might be perfect for them :-)

      • http://simeonpilgrim.com/blog/ Simeon Pilgrim

        Given the D5100 was using a lossy compression, so therefore is avoid losing data. So if your want to get the best out of you D5100 it may be useful. But then again, if you need to “get the best” out of your equipment, you mostly purchased a higher end model, that have loss-less compression.

  • Al

    The 28 1.8 seamed tempting, but I’ll be waiting for the 18 now!
    But why sell both an 18 and a 20???
    That’s like selling a 24-70 2.8 and a 26-70 2.8…

    • Anna Seed

      For example 20mm is just about the perfect wide angle for architecture and a walk about wide angle for buildings. 18mm is a bit too extreme but good for DX and landscape though 16mm might be more useful.

      • IMHO

        20mm is a bit wide for walk around IMHO 28 or 35 is better.

        • silmasan

          I’d vote for 20/1.8 + 40/1.4 (i know) combination but these days I’d definitely would appreciate a mirrorless solution for walk around (please don’t dude-get-a-Leica me).

          • dude!

            Dude get an X-Pro 1.

            • silmasan

              fair enough :|

  • Nikon Shooter

    “Nikon cancels “comfort women” photo exhibit in Japan without explanation.”

    What a sad and pathetic bunch those people really are. After all the rape and murder they’ve committed during those years they still find new ways to deny their responsibility and to cover up the truth. Japanese are sick and disgusting. I’ve been there and I’ve seen it myself. How can a nation that was birthed by a generation of war criminals not be?

    Nikon has just told us where they stand. They chose to side with the axis of evil and get their hands dirty- with the blood and tears of the hundreds of thousands of Chinese, Korean and various SE Asian women who were taken from their homes at a gunpoint (some as young as 10 years old) by the Japanese soldiers and were sent to brothels all over the occupied territories to be raped, beaten, and abused in many horrendous ways. Most of them died from the abuse, venereal diseases and the infections from unsuccessful forced abortions. A lot of them committed suicide.

    Imagine if it was your 12-year-old daughter, or your wife, who was taken from your home and turned into a sexual slave who had to serve 30-40 men a day and around the clock to never be seen again. Imagine if years later there was an artist who was getting ready for an exhibition where he was going to show the truth about what your loved ones had to endure and how they died, perhaps speaking on their behalf and even giving them an opportunity to tell the story of the horrors they saw and to point their finger at the monsters who did it.

    Now no one will see it because Nikon chose to protect the rapists and the murderers responsible for destroying the lives of so many innocent girls and innocent women who were someone’s mothers, sisters and daughters, and who were never to return home. What a horrible way to live and to die… and now we won’t even know their story.

    Today I’m ashamed to be a Nikon shooter.

    • Jeff

      Agree

    • Disappointed

      Have to agree, that is shameful, seems like they were worried about something:

      http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_international/534624.html

      “Camera maker Nikon supports the photographic arts in ways including providing exhibition space for photographers through five Nikon Salons, in Tokyo’s Shinjuku and Ginza districts, Osaka and other places. “Even if there was some kind of pressure, it makes me wonder if Nikon is capable of leading the world of photography if it disregards freedom of expression to such an absurd extent,” said Ahn. He pledged to continue preparing for the opening of the exhibition until Nikon Salon gave a specific, written explanation of the reason for its cancellation.

      In a phone call with the Hankyoreh, a Nikon public relations manager said, “It is true that we received several protests regarding the holding of the comfort women exhibition, but the decision to cancel it was taken in consideration of all circumstances.” It has emerged that, starting on May 21, many postings were uploaded to the right-wing blog 2channel criticizing Ahn’s exhibition and calling for a boycott of Nikon cameras. It appears likely that such movements influenced Nikon’s decision.”

      So now you know how to get Nikon doing what you want…

    • Calibrator

      > Today I’m ashamed to be a Nikon shooter.

      You are absolutely right but it’s very likely that the competition would have done the same.

      Not justifying anything here, just saying.

    • Darkness

      I am ashamed to shoot the same as you. Judgemental, ill informed and just jumping on any chance to bash the brand you claim to be proud of.
      Now go online and get involved in this sudden big issue instead of coming here.
      Nikon just cancelled an exhibition, in one place, now move along…

      • kfjm85

        Sadly, it’s a natural response from a large majority of Korean/Chinese, and I’m guessing this person is somehow related. I’m sure he/she will be able to tell us all about “Dokdo” and the “East Sea” in great detail as well. Sensationalist writing at its best.

        • Nikon Shooter

          Actually I’m of Slavic descent and it doesn’t take a Korean/Chinese to get upset over the crimes against humanity and their cover-up. What you just said is comparable to saying “only a Jew would feel bad about the Holocaust.” I think anyone who isn’t a sociopath feels bad about it on some level.

          You people should get your priorities straight and call foul no matter how big of Nikon fanboys you are. Brand-loyalty is not patriotism and no one will ever thank you for it.

          • GeofFx

            I hope Admin will delete these racist posts and ban you from this website.

            You’re of Slavic descent, where there is more human trafficking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trafficking-in-persons-map-2010.png) than Japan and and have the nerve to say “Japanese are sick and disgusting”? Admin, ban this guy already.

            • please

              please, he can’t be against the horrible treatment of people because he’s slavic?
              He is right, and you are wrong…..
              So people from places where bad things happen cant be against other bad things that have happened in other places?
              So Chinese people cant be against freedom of speech violations in Italy?
              Give me a break. It’s time you realize that there are good people from everywhere and bad people from everywhere too. Just because you are from a certain place does not mean you condone or stand up for the bad things that happen there or that the Govt does.
              Do Americans want accidental drone strikes on Mosques in the Mid East? No.
              Do people of Slavic descent have any say in the human trafficking taking place in their country? No.
              End of story.
              We should all be up in arms about things that happen anywhere in the world that are bad, regardless of our personal ethnicity.

            • GeofFx

              Of course he can “be against” bad things happening. I wasn’t objecting to that. I was objecting to the fact that he made racist comments. He wasn’t just against bad things happening. He is/was against an entire race.

              Does anyone else find it ironic that someone who calls himself “Nikon Shooter” is talking about how shameful Nikon is and putting down brand loyalty?

            • Mock Kenwell

              Gimme a break. This discussion actually has some intelligent points. Let it ride.

              I’m never a fan of broad categorizations of a people. The idiot simple observation here is how much worse this Nikon exec’s decision has made the matter. Colossally poor judgment. Had the show run, the issue would have come and gone, Nikon would have looked like a progressive, sensitive, thoughtful company that values the role photography plays in society. Now, regardless of the real reasons for the cancellation, Nikon looks like a small, petty, old corporation that’s not even smart enough to NOT SCHEDULE THE SHOW in the first place. This is just PR Self-Destruction 101.

          • kfjm85

            Somehow I don’t consider “fanboyism” to play any part in my opinion of this matter. My reaction comes from your blatant slandering of the Japanese as a whole, of which does not reflect at all upon those I know. Did the Japanese government of the time commit war crimes? Yes. Will Korea/China hate on Japan regardless of how Japan tries to make amends? Sadly, I’m a believer of that was well. The Jewish have moved on, and I would assume they don’t label every German of the current generation a Nazi pig. Try bringing up Japan, even in it’s modern form, in any context to a large group of Koreans/Chinese and you’ll see that they’re largely still focused on the past and will be more than happy to label any Japanese far worse than your use of “sick and disgusting.” There’s a time and a place for these political issues, as there is a time and a place for most things. Nikon Rumors isn’t the proper outlet for slandering the Japanese.

            • silmasan

              Your post is _almost_ balanced. I agree with your notion on not slandering the Japanese as a people (or any other nationality for that matter), for that is not productive at all.

              However I think it’s good to not ‘block’ a certain time and a certain place for a certain discussion, so as to let important issues “breach” wherever it will. So that anyone who has an opinion, however out of place it is, could vent it out and be counter-reacted accordingly–or even better, could raise some awareness with a balanced point of view that’s actually productive.

              My personal opinion? Just because a bad memory won’t make you feel good doesn’t mean you better bury it and mark it as “past”. Yes, there are more positive solutions that could be taken by the parties involved–and bringing this issue to public attention would be a logical bridge to those solutions, through raising awareness of the earth’s citizens as a collective. It might be slower than ‘direct’ actions but it leads us–as a collective–there.

              Why don’t we start seeing an “alternative reality” where Korea/China (according to the above example) don’t hate Japan anymore? Maybe the children there don’t even share the hate that some of their parents had?

              If you want to see the proof of war, see it in the remnants–and a good lesson it would be. If you want to see the proof of future peace, see it in the children.

              P.S. I live in one of the countries where such phenomenon as “comfort women” did exist (Indonesia), but I’m speaking here as an Earthling. :)

            • kfjm85

              silmasan>
              “My personal opinion? Just because a bad memory won’t make you feel good doesn’t mean you better bury it and mark it as “past”. Yes, there are more positive solutions that could be taken by the parties involved–and bringing this issue to public attention would be a logical bridge to those solutions, through raising awareness of the earth’s citizens as a collective. It might be slower than ‘direct’ actions but it leads us–as a collective–there.”
              I wholeheartedly agree. The past is not something to be buried, especially when it involves acts of aggression upon another party. At the same time, when amends are made and agreed upon by both parties, it would also not be in good faith to turn around and simply say that it didn’t happen. I haven’t looked too far into the details between China and Japan, but such appears to be the case for Japan/Korea relations. The financial payments from Japan after the war with which the Korean government acknowledged ended up being misappropriated, leaving the people with little to nothing. It goes without saying that the Korean government of the time didn’t inform its people of this detail. Japan has made their apology, the Korean government was supposed to have accepted it, and yet even today the hate continues. Try listening to the supporters from Korea/China when they’re against the Japanese during any sporting competition. It isn’t pretty.

              “Why don’t we start seeing an “alternative reality” where Korea/China (according to the above example) don’t hate Japan anymore? Maybe the children there don’t even share the hate that some of their parents had?”
              Having lived in Korea before, I can clearly tell you this isn’t the case. The children are taught starting at a very early age of the Japanese and in a very negative light. Despite having little to no contact with any Japanese themselves, they shoulder the anger and hate with which their parents pass on to them. I still remember what some Chinese student said to me after meeting some Japanese people for the first time at a foreign student gathering in the US. “They’re not the monsters I believed they were up until now.” 

              “If you want to see the proof of war, see it in the remnants–and a good lesson it would be. If you want to see the proof of future peace, see it in the children.”
              I wish I could be optimistic. Hopefully one day Koreans and Chinese will get over the past and see modern Japan for what it is, the way the US (for the most part) has despite also having been a victim to Japanese aggression in the past.

              “P.S. I live in one of the countries where such phenomenon as “comfort women” did exist (Indonesia), but I’m speaking here as an Earthling.”
              Earthling to earthling, I think rational dialogue is the way to go about this business, and I thank you for that!

            • javaone

              The comment by Nikon Shooter :”Japanese are sick and disgusting.” is clearly inappropriate and he should apologize.

              If all of Japan had really moved past this period in its history it would have no problem with the photo exhibit. The fact that factions Japan fight any such display indicate that they have not move past it. Why pick on the victims for not moving past it?
              To pick on the victims for not moving past it but give Nikon a pass is a bit one sided.

              Do we see any cancellation of slavery exhibits in the Americas or Holocaust exhibits in Germany?

            • RM!

              Of course it isn’t appropriate to level an accusation against all the people of a nation but that often happens. We have to recognise that there are groups of people in countries all over the world who deny or defend the bad things done by their countrymen. I don’t exclude my own country (UK) or our cousins across the Atlantic.

              In Germany there are holocaust deniers (even though that is illegal in Germany). There are those in Israel who deny what their Government did to the Palestinians. In Japan, there are those who refuse to accept that atrocities were committed by their soldiers. On the other hand, all the Germans I know are deeply ashamed of the Nazis. There are Israelis who have protested against the mistreatment of Palestinians.

              There are of course, Japanese who support Ahn Sehong’s exhibition. “The Japan Visual Journalist Association is preparing a statement slamming Nikon for violating freedom of expression”, Japan Times.

              The Association says, “This is basically Nikon’s self-censorship. Is it all right for a large corporation like Nikon to permit such a wimpy reaction?” That is the point. I am very disappointed with Nikon. I certainly would like to register my protest but unlike the right wing lobby that caused this I won’t boycott them. Write to Nikon. Tell them that as a Nikon user, you are unhappy with this violation of freedom of expression.

    • malez

      I would, gladly change my system to Canon, or any other brands that would hold such event.

    • http://www.homeroie.blogspot.com homer

      I am ashamed to be a Nikon shooter too!!

  • BartyL

    It’s a pity Nikon have withdrawn support for Ahn Se-hong’s exhibition about the so-called “comfort women”. Japanese forces systematically raped these women throughout the countries they occupied. It wasn’t just Korean women, but Vietnamese, Thai, Malaysian, British and Australian women (the last two groups captured after the fall of Singapore) and others. And they didn’t confine their ‘attentions’ to women either.

    If Nikon didn’t want to get involved in the politics surrounding this issue they should not have offered support for the exhibition in the first place. By offering it and then withdrawing it they have made a political statement that does not reflect well on their corporate culture. To cave in to the demands of the right-wing scum who want to pretend that these things didn’t happen is a gutless act on Nikon’s part.

    • Richard M

      Well said.

    • Muscovy

      There’s a lot of attention being paid to how Nikon cancelled the event, without a lot of information as to why. Nobody is considering the possibility that there may have been content that was simply beyond what a corporation (as opposed to a gallery) would be willing to associate with their name.

      I wasn’t even aware of this event until now– it’s gained a lot more visibility by being canceled than it would have had we’re it quietly shown. This wouldn’t be the first time that an advocate of a cause tried to push a sponsor past it’s comfort zone knowing they had them between a rock and hard place.

      It’s unfortunate that they had to cancel, because it does raise questions and make the company look bad, but they only cancelled because they seriously considered sponsoring the event in the first place– personally I think that shows a greater degree of understanding than some of the above posters are crediting the Japanese with.

      Just because Nikon makes creative tools doesn’t mean that they as a corporation can associate themselves with every use of those tools. We don’t expect Apple or Adobe to sponsor an exhibition of Iraqi civilian casualties. Some one should, but probably not a consumer products company if for no other reason than the fact that the likes of Fox news would punish them mercilessly.

      Frankly I find the willingness, earlier in the thread, to tar an entire nation with the sins of war two generations old to be as bad or worse than the refusal of a small number (and it is a small number) of Japanese to come to grips with what their grandparents were capable of. I’ve spent a lot of time in Japan, and have become close to many Japanese. The war is a complex issue for them, as any war is. Some are open in expressing their thoughts, some are closed out of shame, some out of denial, and some out of respect for their ancestors. Many, if not most, modulate what they say depending on who’s listening and tend to be more closed in talking to outsiders.

      • BartyL

        Nikon must take responsibility for the speculation surrounding their decision to withdraw support for the event because they have not provided a clear reason for doing so.

        It’s possible that the photographer has ‘pushed them past their comfort zone’ but it seems unlikely that the photographic content is the source of their discomfort. All I have to go on is the linked report of the matter, from that it seems that the photographs were of elderly women. Given that the photographs had been entered in a Nikon Salon competition in December, had won that competition, and been on display since late January I think the politest thing you can say is that Nikon were a bit tardy in thinking their way through the issues.

        It’s not incumbent on a company to associate themselves with the use of their product, but they had already, unambiguously, done so in this case. Then backed away from that association. Why?

        I’m not sure what the link between Apple, Adobe and Iraqi civilian casualties is, but if they sponsored such an exhibition then withdrew support for it they would be expected to answer exactly the same questions, and be open to exactly the same sort of speculation if they failed to make clear their reasons for the withdrawal of that sponsorship. (Happily, Faux News is not aired in Australia, but from the little that I know of them my response to any pressure from them would be a big “Fuck you”.)

        I agree that some of the generalised statements about ‘The Japanese’ are racist and add nothing of value to this debate. Although Australia was bombed on numerous occasions and Australian soldiers and nurses were among those who suffered the horrors of the work and rape camps I feel no bitterness toward the Japanese as a people. It took until the 1970s for general attitudes to begin to soften, but I think most Australians (aside from the usual racist idiots, and perhaps some of those who suffered and still survive) have ‘gotten over it’. Japan should not be stained by its past mistakes forever, nor have to ceaselessly apologise for those atrocities. But they must acknowledge those atrocities, and must deny influence to those who want to deny the plain historical facts, however horrible those facts.

        The issue here is whether or not Nikon have bowed to pressure from historical revisionists who wish to pretend that atrocities were not committed. Nikon need to make a clear statement about their withdrawal of support for this exhibition, and make clear that they do not associate themselves with revisionist arseholes.

        • Scott

          I don’t believe in collective guilt, but I do believe in accurate history. It’s not useful to blame all Japanese today for the atrocities the comfort women lived through. It’s not useful for all white Americans today to be blamed for what some white Americans did to black Americans 140+ years ago. And yet, we must never forget these horrors happened. We must realize the privileged lives many of us enjoy now may be the result of grievous, systemic crimes committed by others in the past. And that such atrocities can happen again if we are not vigilant.

          Art exhibitions are one of the many ways we learn our histories–even when they aren’t pretty. It’s not so we feel guilt over acts committed before our birth, but so we can protect ourselves and others from being similarly dehumanized in the future.

          Shame on Nikon for bowing to pressure from those who would rather forget. Because forgetting leads to repeating.

  • CB

    Those full res shots of the 6mm on a d800 are pretty cool. I’ve been trying out a few things with my 8mm 2.8 + D800 and it’s interesting to compare the two. The 6mm and 8mm look about the same in the center, but the 6mm holds on to sharpness and contrast a bit longer as you approach the edge.

    I wan that lens.

  • George Terry

    So, what say ye of a time estimate for the release of a 20 f/1.8 or 18 f/1.8? I am about to splurge on a 14-24 and now am wondering if I should wait.

  • Dweeb

    Just bring out some decent 2.8 new WAs, no more 2 thousand buck profit driven oddities.

    • GeofFx

      I totally agree! When will an affordable AF lens with good optics, at least 24mm wide be available? I’d love to own a 20mm f1.8 lens, but I’m pretty sure it will be way out of my price range.

      I can see a huge market for a 24 or 20mm f2.8. I have the current 24mm 2.8 and it is, by far, the least sharp lens I own… time for an update Nikon.

      • oIJFA

        Personally, I would NOT buy a 20 or 24 2.8 lens. For me the 24-70 or 14-24 are sharp enough.

        However if someone didn’t have these lenses I guess I can see the point. But when I buy a prime I want it to be faster than f/2.8.

        • GeofFx

          Yup, I can understand that. The 24-70 isn’t exactly an affordable option though. So, like you mentioned, for someone who doesn’t have a wide angle lens, there aren’t a lot of options that are sharp and affordable, even if someone doesn’t need/want a “fast” lens.

        • Richard M

          I agree. The older 17-35 is great too and certainly better than the very old AFD 20mm . I sold my 20mm. The best modern zooms are sharper than the old primes. The only primes I have kept are either faster than 2.8 or are micro-Nikkors.

  • http://StevenGeorges.com Steven Georges

    I am disappointed Nikon caved in when they know it is the wrong thing to do, and will wind up causing more problems for them in the long run.

    I do see one way out for Nikon. Make an agreement with Canon to jointly hold the exhibition. It would show the world that the two biggest camera companies are willing to stand up for freedom of expression.

    Come on Nikon and Canon, the cat is already out of the bag. Do the right thing or it will look like you are trying to coverup the past.

    It would also make Japan look very, very bad!

    • silmasan

      Agreed heartily, Steven. Especially since I personally have big expectations on any company that holds great potential to enhance TRANSPARENCY and OPENNESS on this planet (cameras? optics? definitely related!). Otherwise we the young ones will eventually seek pastures anew ( anyone*).

      • silmasan

        whoops, bad editing — supposed to be:

        >> (open source camera project anyone).

        • TBO

          I’ve said it before, but I will sell all my gear and switch to the first commercial open source camera which provides a similar user experience to the big 5 companies’ cameras… it’s really too bad that Nikon is so opposed to openness. There are so many things that annoy me with a given camera, that would be trivial to fix if the source were available (this speaking as a computer / embedded developer) Even such things as button remapping to get a workable ISO button would go a long way towards usability. More in-depth programming such as ETTR metering would be possible and very helpful (expose such that the brightest area of the photo is in zone 7 or something, to allow you to adjust the image in PP without losing highlight detail).

          Open source is the way of the future for cameras (and has been the way of the past 10 years for computers); the first company who realizes this will go a long way.

  • Mock Kenwell

    ADMIN, any updates on production schedules for the D800? Or details on how many bodies the big 3 (B&H, Adorama & Amazon) have released thus far? Feels like the initial reports of 30k bodies a month are either exaggerated or the demand is insane. I ordered mine immediately and still don’t have a clue when I’ll get it.

    • Carmine Monoxide

      Mock, I’ve been following the Amazon situation as I’m waiting on a 3/14 D800 order there. For a long time there seemed to be nothing happening and then a week ago a bunch of forum reports came in that indicate orders up to 3/12 have shipped. Seems like a huge shipment must have recently been received. No activity in the last week.

    • http://nikonrumors.com/ [NR] admin

      this was 30k for worldwide shipment

  • http://ronscubadiver.wordpress.com Ron Scubadiver

    I would like to know the real story behind the “Comfort Women” cancellation.

    • Jerry

      I think most likely the cancellation was due to the pressure from Japan Gov. They always tried to deny what they did during WWII.

      • http://ronscubadiver.wordpress.com Ron Scubadiver

        If that was the case, I would not be so quick to pounce on Nikon as others have around here. Still, I don’t know the story.

      • kfjm85

        Unlikely the case. Despite some cases in the past that have arisen regarding textbooks or whatnot, the Japanese government is has not “always tried to deny” their involvement in World War II. The extreme right do not represent all that is the Japanese government.

        • http://ronscubadiver.wordpress.com Ron Scubadiver

          The article linked to in the OP conjectures that right wing groups are take the position that the comfort women did not exist and their protest led to the cancellation of the exhibit. Apparently, Nikon gave no reason. Based on the little that I know, it is unlikely the government of Japan was involved here, or that right wing groups deny the war ever took place.

  • slr

    Somehow I knew this Comfort Women to be hot topic for this Nikon update

    I remember in High School when a teacher asked the class to write whether or not the USA should have dropped the bomb…the teacher replied to each student individually in an envelope. The teacher strongly disagreed with me…

    So much for teaching morality. Even a six years old know the different between right and wrong. How else to stop a military Juggernaut that has no respect for Humanity.

    Japan will go to any length to dominate the world–it even planned to seize Australia next and how they surrendered painlessly is quite merciful. Their victims had to watch their loved ones cried in total agony and lost everything.

    • Travis

      Are you nuts? Japan was already defeated before usa drop the bombs. Navy destroyed and all teritories apart from main islands were lost. Soviets went to the war with japan the day when bombs were dropped. It was just a matter of time before they would capitulate. There was no military reason to bomb japan. Even 3 years old outside usa knows it.

      • neversink

        Wrong!!!!!

        Japan had three separate and secret scientific on-going projects to develop a nuclear weapon during World War II. They would not have hesitated to drop the weapons on the US or other nations if they had developed it. In fact, that was their goal.

        Japan was not ready to accept defeat, even after the first dropping the atomic bombs on one of their cities. They were prepared to fight to the end and the allied leadership knew this (mostly American in the Pacific.) The Japanese were prepared to lose 1,000 for every one allied soldier they killed. It was the Japanese soldiers’ question of honor and loyalty to the Japanese Emperor if they surrendered, rather than run charging into the guns of enemy fire.

        I am, too, ashamed to shooting a Nikon and will cover up my logo with black tape.

        Nikon – do the right thing.

        Everyone here should write to Nikon expressing outrage over the cancellation, and obvious censorship, of such an important exhibit.

        Japan — You kidnapped and raped and tortured innocent women. Come face to face with the truth. Stop trying to hide the atrocities the world already realizes you have committed. The truth will set you free. You can’t change history.

        If I could return my new cameras (D800 and D4,) I would, but it is too too late. I am truly sickened that Nikon bowed under pressure from historical revisionists!!!!’

        Admin: You should, in memory of all the women who were forced into prostitution by the Japanese, put a banner dedicating this site to the memory of the Comfort Women who were mutilated by the Japanese. You should have a banner declaring this at the top of all your pages until Nikon decides to show the exhibition on the Comfort Women.

        I may switch to Leica, a German camera company that is known for aiding the Jewish people during Hitler’s reign of Nazi terror. Unfortunately, Leica does not offer the same type of line-up of glass that I use with Nikon.

      • Nikon Shooter

        @Travis

        Indeed you are wrong. Japan was not going to capitulate under any circumstances and the fact that it took a second atomic bomb to get them to do so- proves it. The way they were set in their heads (some still are) meant fighting until there were no people left to fight.

        We are talking here about people to whom it was an honor to catch a one-way kamikaze flight or to get chained to a booby-trapped machine gun and who committed mass suicides when only other option was to surrender.

        Good luck getting someone like this to capitulate without a couple of A-bombs. As terrible as it sounds, US actually saved Japan from total annihilation by blowing them up. Otherwise millions more would have died while the survivors and their offspring would be speaking Russian today.

    • Muscovy

      Japan “will” go to any length? I find your use of the present tense offensive here.

      I do wish the Admin would do some housekeeping– some of the hate speech here is just over the top. We can talk about the past as fact, but these unsupported, broad stroke assertions about the present day Japanese can’t be defended.

      • neversink

        Musocvy — Does poor grammar really upset you more than Nikon’s bending to right-wing history-revisionists who want to hide Japan’s acts of rape and torture and mutilation against innocent women during Wrld War II????

        • Muscovy

          I don’t give a damn about grammar, and see no reason to assume there was a problem with it. Unless you’re posting under multiple names you can’t tell any better than I can whether it’s bad grammar or cultural ignorance. Given the rest of the garbage I’m seeing in this thread, I’m pretty comfortable betting on the latter.

          Tense is important here– it distinguishes between historical discussion and slander. The Japanese were brutal through WWII. The Japanese are a leading example of peace and civility among post war nations. Both true statements due to the magic of grammar.

          • neversink

            Muscovy — temper, temper, temper….

            Japan is only a nation of peace because it was forced to be…. They agree to unconditional demands from the allies of disarmament and peace. Then the US gave them tons of money to rebuild their infrastructure and industry.

            Japan is not so civil when it comes to brutally killing whales for so-called scientific research.

            Have you been to Japan? It is still very hard for anyone who is not Japanese, despite the very friendly outward behavior of the Japanese. Visit, have fun, eat our (radioactive) sushi, go to our clubs and visit our shrines, but please don’t fall in love with a native Japanese or live among us for very long. If you must stay, go and live in a neighborhood for foreigners.

            To me, Japan is not a shining example of peace or civility. Have you been on a Japanese subway car where the men grope women? Have you experienced racism when walking down the street in Japan? Yes, racism exists in the Japanese society. Certainly there are many examples of racism and an exclusionary society. There are signs in some establishments throughout Japan that say “Japanese only admitted.” There is really no recourse. Sometimes the signs apologize and ask for your understanding.

            Japan has refused to honor its 1996 international treaty obligations and pass laws against racial discrimination.

            Japan has an abysmal record when it comes to women’s rights and is ranked near the bottom of many nations (number 101 in 2010) according to the World Economic Forum. Japan. There is little tolerance for others in many parts of Japanese cultures. Not just non-Asians are victims of Japanese discrimination and xenophobia, but so are other generations on other Asians who have lived in Japan for generations including Buraku people, the Ainu, the people of Okinawa, people from former Japanese colonies such as the Koreans, Chinese, and their descendants, other foreigners, and migrant workers who have come from all over Asia.

            The good news is that some Japanese groups are trying to fight this discrimination and are calling for a tolerant society. But it will be a big fight. To say that “The Japanese are a leading example of peace and civility among post war nations” is just “garbage” as you like to phrase it.

            Japan has a long long way to go before is is considered a shining example of “peace and civility.” That is just ignorance. Wake up muscovy, and smell the coffee.

            • kfjm85

              Japan is not so civil when it comes to brutally killing whales for so-called scientific research.
              Another hot topic, but also one that’s not as black and white as many would like to make it to be.

              Have you been to Japan? It is still very hard for anyone who is not Japanese, despite the very friendly outward behavior of the Japanese. Visit, have fun, eat our (radioactive) sushi, go to our clubs and visit our shrines, but please don’t fall in love with a native Japanese or live among us for very long. If you must stay, go and live in a neighborhood for foreigners.
              Yes, I have been to Japan. It’s really not very hard to live in Japan at all, and it really depends on your outlook. If you try living abroad while thinking you own the place and that people should accommodate your every request in a language that’s not theirs, I can imagine the frustration. Imagine arrogant foreigners doing the same in a Western country; most Westerners wouldn’t think twice to change their usual friendly demeanor. Look at the situation between Mexico and the States. As for your statement of “(radioactive) sushi,” it’s clear what your stance is towards Japan. Do you also believe in the “ghost towns” stories of Tokyo?

              To me, Japan is not a shining example of peace or civility. Have you been on a Japanese subway car where the men grope women? Have you experienced racism when walking down the street in Japan? Yes, racism exists in the Japanese society. Certainly there are many examples of racism and an exclusionary society. There are signs in some establishments throughout Japan that say “Japanese only admitted.” There is really no recourse. Sometimes the signs apologize and ask for your understanding.
              Yes, I’ve ridden the Japanese trains/subways before. Groping happens, and it’s treated as a crime. Have you seen on a news where any black man committed a crime? I’d imagine making a blanket statement about black people and crimes due to isolated incidents wouldn’t earn you much love or understanding among your peers. Experienced racism when walking down the streets? Nope. Neither have my friends. I think you’ve mistaken Japan for Korea. As for Japan, I’ve always been welcomed with open arms despite the differences in our background. Believe it or not, racism exists in many countries, including in the States where everyone would like to believe in true equality. And yes, I’ve indeed heard of those “Japanese only admitted” signs. Heard of. Seen? Experienced? No. I’ve never been turned away from any establishments due to being a foreigner.

              Japan has an abysmal record when it comes to women’s rights and is ranked near the bottom of many nations (number 101 in 2010) according to the World Economic Forum. Japan. There is little tolerance for others in many parts of Japanese cultures. Not just non-Asians are victims of Japanese discrimination and xenophobia, but so are other generations on other Asians who have lived in Japan for generations including Buraku people, the Ainu, the people of Okinawa, people from former Japanese colonies such as the Koreans, Chinese, and their descendants, other foreigners, and migrant workers who have come from all over Asia.
              Do you mind my asking of how much time you’ve spent in Japan yourself? It sounds like you are painting a very negative picture basic on little personal experience but rather through simply picking and choosing your statistics. Japan is indeed not a melting pot of cultures and people. The vast majority of the population is Japanese. Such is Asia, and you’ll also find similar behaviors in Japan’s neighbors. Would you also be able to tell me of racism in Korea, China, or are you somehow only focused on negativity towards Japan?

              The good news is that some Japanese groups are trying to fight this discrimination and are calling for a tolerant society. But it will be a big fight. To say that “The Japanese are a leading example of peace and civility among post war nations” is just “garbage” as you like to phrase it. Japan has a long long way to go before is is considered a shining example of “peace and civility.” That is just ignorance. Wake up muscovy, and smell the coffee.
              It’s not quite at all as ignorant as you try to make it out to be. Spend a little time in Japan with an open mind and I’m sure you’ll come to agree with Muscovy.

            • neversink

              Yes, I have been to Japan….

              Yes, we are talking about Japan, not the US, not Korea, not China. These countries all have issues, but Japanese atrocities against women is the issue and the censorship by Nikon of this exhibition on Comfort Women they were willing to show, but suddenly cancelled without explanation. Nikon could have taken the ethical road, and not caved in to outside pressure.

              In the US, we are open about discussing our issues and problems. We have anti-discriminatory laws, unlike Japan. I have seen the signs that say “Japanese only” all over the place, and their are websites with photos depicting these signs in city after city. Germany has dealt intelligently and honestly and openly about their war crimes and history and anti-Semitism. Japan has tried to rewrite history.

              Nikon does not need to be silent concerning this. As much as I use my Nikon gear for my profession, I am not afraid of criticizing them when appropriate. These women were victims of rape, torture, kidnapping, mutilation, forced prostitution and other horrors in the hands of the Japanese. The Comfort Women weren’t only Korean, they were Chinese, and from other parts of Asia. There were some Australian women who were also kidnapped.

              The Japanese government is trying to rewrite history and not discuss their horrible past. Nikon could have taken the ethical role. But they decided not to.

              But honestly, Japan needs to confront their history and their continuing xenophobia. They need to accept the horrors they committed and never forget.

              The Japanese government requested that a memorial to Korean Comfort Women in Fort Lee, New Jersey be dismantled. Fort Lee officials refused, and it has spurred a small movement to erect more monuments like this in honor of Comfort Women throughout communities in the United States.

              If Nikon showed this exhibit, It might force the issue and help make the government enact anti-discriminatory laws which are lacking in Japan; and might force the Japanese government to improve their on -going atrocious record of gender discrimination even today.

              That is the power of photography that Nikon is , supposedly, so dedicated to.

  • Tony
  • Rudi

    NEW FIRMWARE for D4 (also for D800/E). One of issues solved is the lockup.

    https://nikoneurope-de.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/52813

  • burgerman

    Dear Customer,

    Thank you for your recent purchase of a Nikon D800 professional DSLR.

    To comply with Nikon’s requirements for professional sales. could we kindly request that you provide your cameras SERIAL NUMBER to Jessops via return email.

    In addition, we would also like to take this opportunity to make you aware of the Nikon “I AM A PICTURE PERFECT DEAL – NIKON FX LENS PROMOTION 2012″ offering you up to £180 Cash back.

    The Cashback is only available to Nikon D4, D800 or D800E customers:

    The Offers

    NIKKOR 14-24mm f/2.8 £100 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 24-70mm f/2.8 £80 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G £50 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 16-35mm f/4G £75 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4G £75 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G £60 CASHBACK

    NIKKOR 50mm f/1.4G £35 CASHBACK

    The promotion will run from the 1st May 2012 to the 30th September 2012 (inclusive), and all claims must be received by 31st October 2012 in order to qualify. Redemptions will be fulfilled by Visa Prepaid Card.

    For more information on the promotion or to download a claim form, visit: http://www.nikon.co.uk/cashback. The website will be operational by the end of today.

    Once again could we thank you for your purchase and support in supplying your serial number details.

    Kind regards

    xxxxxx@xxxxx
    Jesops…

    • burgerman

      Should be Jessops of course… I screwed that up while removing the email address.

    • burgerman

      Firmware already installed, thanks! Although no lockups in 2000+ shots anyway.

  • jorg

    wish the started the cashback in germany too + firmware for D800 please!
    after ca 5000 shots mine started to freeze 4 times one day. but only this one day. strange….

    • jorg

      update: also D800 firmware now available.

  • tony

    I got my Nikon D4 this week from Jessops and had the free card and reader in box.

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