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Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX shipping in the US on March 12th?

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353_2183_af-s-dx-nikkor-35mm-f-18g_frontTake a look at this Nikon 35mm f/1.8G AF-S DX ebay listing  (seller: 100% positive feedback, 303 sales) - if they are right, the lens should be available on March 12th in the US.

UK release date should be March 13th according to this site.

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  • North75

    How come all of you who claim that size matters so much, aren’t shooting medium or even large format?

  • Anonymous

    Does it really matter? Is it necessary to back-lash into people who have bought into DX? DX is a format, it’s not the plague. Maybe it will disappear in the future, and maybe it won’t. Maybe medium format will one day exist in digital, and maybe a few years after that, it will be at the D3x price today. At the end of the day, who freakin’ cares! Buy what’s important to you and what will fulfill your needs. If the guy down the street buys DX body and glass, is it really necessary to berate him? Maybe he/she just wants a step up from point and shoot, maybe their picking the hobby up. To say that everyone should buy FX and DX is bye-bye is just so naive and ignorant and it further proves that 50% of the poster’s on this site have more of an appreciation for chasing technology then they do for photography. In spending 20 years in the business using all types of equipment and formats, I’ve got a new flash – the stuff always improves with time. I’m sure if you rated the top-of-the line gear I used when I started, the stuff today would surely “test” better. But ya know what, it still works and it still takes great pictures. Photography equipment, it’s an expense… it depreciates with time… if you want an “investment”, go buy Nikon stock.

    In the meantime, use your experience, level of enthusiasm, budget, and creativity guide your decisions. I learned on film, learned digital through DX, and own FX today. And guess what, the “gear” I use depends on the project or idea I’m pursuing. Light, environment, print size, and subject all come into play.

    • JC

      “To say that everyone should buy FX and DX is bye-bye is just so naive and ignorant and it further proves that 50% of the poster’s on this site have more of an appreciation for chasing technology then they do for photography.”

      Here is it! This is everything that I want to say in one sentence!

  • Bebe

    >How come all of you who claim that size matters so much, aren’t shooting medium or even large format?

    I do. And it is even better FX.

    • North75

      Right.. I’m sure its great.

      I also wonder how many obsolete digital bodies have been thrown away by people who are worried about throwing away $200 on a lens that might be obsolete at some unknown time in the future.

      I’m guessing that I’m going to get my money’s worth.

  • Artisan

    All the comments from the under pressure DX owners are hilarious. The comments from both sides re DX dying are also funny. The FX people are correct – HOWEVER, DX is NOT GOING TO DIE! – it is merely going to be that FX EVOLVES and becomes the sensor in the lower end bodies too.

  • Lance

    The only thing that physically differenciates the DX bodies from the FX bodies is the size of the viewfinder optics. Everything else is the same… same distance from the mount to the sensor, and same mount diameter.

    The future of the DX format is bright, but not in SLR format: in EVIL format (Electronic Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens, DX-E). This releases the DX format camera from the Engineering legacy with which it is burdened by being compatible with traditional mount 35mm lenses. It also makes the DX-E format cameras lighter and more compact, more cost effective to produce, and should help the lenses perform better with the ever increasing resolutions customers seem to crave by reducing the distance between the sensor and the lens.

    These are already available from other companies, and I see everyone following this trend. Existing DX lenses will work with new DX-E cameras using an adapter that compensates for the difference between the mount and the focal plane (and also the smaller diameter DX-E mount).

    Part of me wants to believe that a higher end DX body will continue to be available (a decendant of the D300) for those who work mainly in telephoto, but the realist tells me that this niche will be forcefully filled by the electronic DX crop mode of the FX bodies, by which time will have ridiculous resolution abilities far beyond the “needs” of most photographers, and also the resolving power of most lenses.

    Having said all that, DX SLRs will be around for a while yet while the Electronic Viewfinder technology matures.

    One thing I haven’t seen mentioned yet (though I didn’t read EVERY POST here) is the DISSADVANTAGE of the FX bodies… sure, they offer better high ISO performance due to larger photosites, but they NEED that ability to make up for having less DOF. You need to stop an FX body down MORE to get the equivalent DOF of a DX body with the same FOV. Yes, we do want a thin DOF in certain situations, but DOF can get so narrow with FX bodies that stopping down is sometimes inevitable.

    With fast primes my DX D90 can get the DOF shallow enough for most situations, shallow enough that careful manual focusing is required. Buying an FX body is something I will do in the future, and by that time I sure hope high ISO performance is at staggering levels, because at f1.4 an FX camera offers little DOF to work with.

    • Poppy

      That is false. I am a professional and most of my work is macro – by choice – and my D700 has no limitations in this area as a result of being FX. I sometimes want minimum DOF in my shots and sometimes I want the deepest possible and the FX sensor makes no difference to that. Its totally not true and make a living at this.

      What is striking between DX and FX is how much better for composing the bigger and brighter viewfinder of the D700 is.

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